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krista4

In this thread I rank my favorite Beatles songs: 204-1.

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1 hour ago, timschochet said:

I like Ob La Di. The lyrics are pretty stupid to be sure, but it’s got a catchy melody, and I really like the backup singing beginning in the second chorus. Just a fun pop tune. 

Dudes like your husband hate sappy Paul. I like sappy Paul. And your husband annoys me with his “I’m too cool for this song” attitude. I’ll bet in the 90s Mr Krista sported a ponytail and a turtleneck sweater. I can just see him. He used to read Herman Hesse didn’t he? 

Want to do something about it Oliver? Tell me where you live and the next time I’m in that city for a charity event we can get together and discuss it personally. 

Why limit this to the 90s?  🤔

It was the Sgt. Pepper's ranking that inspired that guy's rant, wasn't it?  Good memories.

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4 minutes ago, krista4 said:

 

Though in a similar style,

my first thought when you posted both.

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4 hours ago, Uruk-Hai said:
5 hours ago, Leroy Hoard said:

Bigger fan of most of the MMT stuff than most here. Special credit to the George Martin production.

I think it has better songs, top to bottom, than Pepper

After hours of befuddlement over this statement, I realized that you might be talking about the Capital LP released in the US (and ten years later in the UK), not the double-EP released in the UK?  If you're talking LP, I could see an argument for this.  I'm listing/ranking these on the basis of the UK releases, so I've put those additional 5-6 songs in the "singles" section, by the way.

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5 hours ago, krista4 said:

After hours of befuddlement over this statement, I realized that you might be talking about the Capital LP released in the US (and ten years later in the UK), not the double-EP released in the UK?  If you're talking LP, I could see an argument for this.  I'm listing/ranking these on the basis of the UK releases, so I've put those additional 5-6 songs in the "singles" section, by the way.

Yeah, I meant the modified album. If you go to buy the CD an Amazon or somewhere like that, you'll get the full album. It's been like that for at least 20 years, I guess, so in my mind it's kind of become canon now.

ETA: Those singles on MMT aren't also on Past Masters. Just seems like buying the altered MMT, the original British versions of the other albums, and the two Past Masters is the way to put the neatest bow on the portfolio.

Edited by Uruk-Hai
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14 hours ago, krista4 said:

Rubber Soul finally gets a cut.

159.  What Goes On (Rubber Soul, 1965)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

When I said this was going to be a Ringo-friendly thread, I was referring to his drumming (which I'll discuss in detail at another time), but i do love Ringo's singing voice as well and think it serves this song well with its straightforward self-assuredness.  This was originally a John-penned composition, in their Quarrymen days, which was later updated and expanded with contributions from Paul and Ringo to make it Ringo's first songwriting credit and a rare (or maybe the only?) John/Paul/Ringo-shared credit.  Ringo was once quoted as saying something along the lines that his contribution was "about five words of it, and I haven't done a thing since!"  God I love Ringo.

This song has such a fine rockabilly feel that for years I thought it was a cover.  Ringo is, as always, a metronome, but I think Paul's bass and George's C&W-swingy guitar work shine on this one.

Mr. krista:  "Yeah, this is good."

Suggested cover:  Sufjan Stevens  Well, this is interesting at least.  Wait through the first 40 seconds; it picks up.

I might be willing to fight you due to this being so low 

Might.

I'm waiting for the coffee pot to beep so I'm not firing on all cylinders at the moment.

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12 hours ago, krista4 said:

157.  Your Mother Should Know (Magical Mystery Tour, 1967)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

It's another dance-hall/swingy Paul song, this one with a straightforward message:  don't be such a d*ck to your parents because they might not be as dumb as you think.  This song was in contention to be the number chosen for the Our World charity concert, but lost out to "All You Need is Love," which I think was the right move.  Paul attributes the retro feel of the song to his hanging out with his aunt and uncle at the time; I attribute it to his being Paul.  The bright harmonies and interplay of the piano and harmonium are the highlights for me on this one.

The best way to listen to this one is while watching the scene in the movie in which it appears.  :lol:  Only Ringo has any idea how to dance, though Paul is passable; maybe that's not a surprise from the rhythm section.  Note John almost falls right off around 0:16, but surprisingly he does seem to be having (stiffly danced) fun.  I have no idea what George is doing.  I never stop laughing when I watch this.

Not-fun fact:  this song's session was the last that Brian Epstein attended before dying of an overdose a few days later.  

Mr. krista:  "This seems longer than its run time.  Doesn’t it seem like Paul McCartney was just writing a vaudeville musical about a down-on-his-luck gambler who goes back to his hometown to reconcile his past and he meets his old girlfriend and his mom and a bunch of other crap happens?  I think he would have been happy doing that, writing musicals."

Suggested cover:  Actual Wolf  Chosen primarily because I like the band name.

Love this song. Your husband is an anonymous internet message board non-posting treasure.

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9 hours ago, krista4 said:

Funny you should mention that.

156.  Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da (White Album, 1968)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

A #1 hit in several countries, this was also voted the worst song of all time in a 2004 online poll in the UK.

Inspired by a phrase used by his Nigerian friend Jimmy Scott (full name:  Jimmy Anonmuogharan Scott Emuakpor), while in India Paul wrote this story about a fictitious couple named Desmond and Molly.  The Beatles recorded it joyfully and merrily during the White Album sessions, all agreeing it was one of their best efforts, and it became a smash hit single.

Wait, that's not quite right.  Actually the other Beatles hated it, hated all the time spent on recording and re-recording it, and this was one of the songs that inspired John to start complaining about Paul's "granny ####."   John famously and furiously acted out during one of the re-recordings, started smashing the piano keys as hard as he could and at twice the speed of prior recording, shouting "This is how the ####### song should go!"  I guess he was right, as this was the intro take that was used in the final product.  Paul's profane tirade against George Martin during later vocal re-recordings then drove away Geoff Emerick, who could no longer stand the atmosphere and vowed never to record with them again (though he did later return for Abbey Road).

Despite the fact that the atmosphere was tense (put charitably) at this point, the song somehow sounds joyous, with the other Beatles hootin' and hollerin' in the background, shouting out clever little retorts.  I think this is the ultimate love-it-or-hate-it song in the Beatles catalogue, and since I vacillate between the two, it falls in the middle of my rankings.  Sometimes I just can't bear that faux-ska sound or the inanity of the lyrics, and sometimes I get caught up in the harmless fun of it and want to dance around.  What can I say; I'm a woman.

If this is "love it or hate it," let's mark Mr. krista firmly in the latter column:  "I hate this ####### song.  I hate the stupid laughter; I hate the background noise. That’s what happens when white people try to play reggae.  It’s awful.  I’m surprised he didn’t put on a fake Jamaican accent like George Harrison did in "Gone Troppo."  All of the Beatles should feel deep shame about this song.  Every time it comes on the radio, they should feel like they just got caught masturbating.  Because they did."

Suggested covers:  Arthur Conley, with Duane Allman on guitar  The Marmalade has a #1 hit with this cover.  Desmond Dekker was the inspiration for naming the character "Desmond."  For a couple more where the videos are pure gold: Andy Williams and Don Ho ; Bing Crosby

I was going to yell at you....until I read Mr. Krista.... he isn't wrong..... I feel like his comments could be a Philosophy of American Music 101 debate topic for half a semester. 

Edited by Yankee23Fan
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7 hours ago, krista4 said:

I didn't intend to have all of Paul's "granny ####" bunched up like this, but I guess it makes sense that it would shake out that way.

155.  When I'm Sixty-Four (Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, 1967)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

Paul wrote this on his dad's piano when he was 14-16 (depending upon which interview you believe), so even though it was included on Sgt Pepper's, I don't think of it as being entirely of those canonical sessions.  Sure, some lyrics were added and the musicality of it was enhanced by what they were doing at the time, but at its core this is still a simple vaudevillian-style song from Paul's early years.  I've never considered it a serious work, which I think makes me enjoy more than if I did, and Paul himself says that he originally wrote it tongue-in-cheek without a sense of how/when it would ever be used, with hopes that maybe it would make it into a cabaret show some day.  This is simply a fun little song, and if you don't sing along when you hear it, there might be something wrong with you, or you are Mr. krista, or both.

Originally slotted to be the b-side to "Strawberry Fields Forever" before that was changed to a blockbuster double-a-side record with "Penny Lane," what shine most on this in my opinion are the flowing clarinets, the backing vocals, the final "hoo!", and the shift to a minor key for the bridge followed by the introduction back into major before the verse through the use of a cheerful chime.  Though I find most of the lyrics slight, I find this clever:

Send me a postcard, drop me a line
Stating point of view
Indicate precisely what you mean to say
Yours sincerely, wasting away

Fun facts:  Paul switches to a Scottish accent for the line "Grandchildren on your knee...".  He also had the recording sped up significantly in production to, according to Geoff Emerick and George Martin, simulate a more youthful voice or, according to Paul, make the song more "rooty-tooty."

Mr. krista:  "The Kinks had a lot of songs like that, that were English music hall variety.  But the Kinks were funny because they were really sardonic.  They were in love with England but still cynical.  So Village Green Preservation Society was just as complex musically.  Paul is kind of lacking that cynicism that might have made that song good.  It’s just in the style it’s in because that’s how it was written, not because it has anything to say about a monarchy or an empire or anything.  Music like that is why I tended to like the Kinks more than the Beatles.* That part where he rolls his r’s makes me want to throw him through a wall."

*Divorce pending.

Suggested covers:  Keith MoonThe Del McCoury Band

Yeah, can't give you any positives here. This a personal favorite and would be astronomically higher on my list.

And give your husband my card for the divorce. 

Edited by Yankee23Fan
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There are so many great songs I know 64 wouldn't rank as high as I think, but it'd be up there.  Love that song.

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8 hours ago, krista4 said:

I didn't intend to have all of Paul's "granny ####" bunched up like this, but I guess it makes sense that it would shake out that way.

155.  When I'm Sixty-Four (Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, 1967)

Suggested covers:  Keith MoonThe Del McCoury Band

 

154.  Maxwell's Silver Hammer (Abbey Road, 1969)

Suggested cover:  Though it's from The Film That Shall Not Be Named, I'm such a fan of his that I can't resist:  Steve Martin

Del McCoury Band sighting! I like their cover better than the original. The Del McCoury Band plays the Merlefest often, and they are so much fun live. Del is getting up there in age (79), but he and his band (which includes two of his sons) are still going strong. I love Steve Martin (he actually played at the Merlefest last year with The Steep Canyon Rangers). He's a great banjo player.

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11 hours ago, Uruk-Hai said:

Sweet baby jeebus on both of these. I just don't even..............

Interesting- the song actually makes more sense as a Bing Crosby/Andy Williams thing than a Beatles song. Just a weird song in their catalogue.

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Love the melodies of 64 and Silver Hammer.   The songs may have goofy flaws but they get in your head on repeat.  Amazing that Paul and John could generate so many songs like that.   I will hear those songs in my head all day.    And, that's not a bad thing.   

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2 minutes ago, DocHolliday said:

Love the melodies of 64 and Silver Hammer.   The songs may have goofy flaws but they get in your head on repeat.  Amazing that Paul and John could generate so many songs like that.   I will hear those songs in my head all day.    And, that's not a bad thing.   

Fool on the hill has been stuck in my head for a few days now.  

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3 hours ago, Oliver Humanzee said:

*Divorce pending.

(That really is him in yellow shirt.)

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Speaking of the Merlefest, every Saturday of the festival on the Hillside stage, they have the Hillside Album Hour. The Waybacks and guests cover a classic rock album in its entirety. It is always a secret what album they are going to do. They also weave in clips of songs from artists that died over the past year into some of the songs. Two years ago, they did Sgt. Peppers, which marked  the 50th anniversary of the album, and it was also the 30th anniversary of the festival. Here is a link to the first two songs they played. Whoever filmed it had the camera all over the place at the beginning, but it shows the band at 3:30 in, and then all over the place again, but finally focuses on the band around 5:00 mark.That is Joan Osborne on lead vocals. It was hot as hell that day. We were sitting under some trees about midway up the hill.

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6 minutes ago, krista4 said:

*Divorce pending.

(That really is him in yellow shirt.)

Is his head touching the ceiling?

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45 minutes ago, Dinsy Ejotuz said:

There are so many great songs I know 64 wouldn't rank as high as I think, but it'd be up there.  Love that song.

It’s one I moved up quite a bit during Friday’s re-arranging, so it could have been worse.  :) 

@Yankee23Fan, I find it musically interesting, but overall too corny for me to love it the way you do.  

Edited by krista4

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1 minute ago, simey said:

Is his head touching the ceiling?

He’s eight feet tall!

Edited by krista4
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2 hours ago, Yankee23Fan said:

I might be willing to fight you due to this being so low 

Might.

I'm waiting for the coffee pot to beep so I'm not firing on all cylinders at the moment.

I knew some people would think more highly of 64 and Ob-La-Di than I do, but this one (What Goes On) is a surprise.  As a huge Ringo fan, I’m kind of pleased that you object.

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When I’m 64: way overrated, in general, so I think this ranking is about where I would put it. It’s funny, though, that a Beatles song in the bottom half of their catalog would be a defining hit for just about any other band. I think it’s a good habit to step back now and then (which this count-up facilitates perfectly) to see the forest for the trees and remind ourselves  just how brilliant the Beatles were. Akin to seeing a subpar Phish show which, upon comparison to any other live band, holds up with the best of them even if it seemed subpar. Hijack somewhat intended as any Beatles devotee would do well to study the work of Phish, specifically their frequent homage to the Fab Four.

Edited by pecorino
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4 hours ago, Oliver Humanzee said:

It’s an inside photo, so you took the sweater off. So what? Where’s your hardback copy of Infinite Jest? Did you put it down for the moment, or had  you already memorized it? 

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17 hours ago, krista4 said:

Rubber Soul finally gets a cut.

159.  What Goes On (Rubber Soul, 1965)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

When I said this was going to be a Ringo-friendly thread, I was referring to his drumming (which I'll discuss in detail at another time), but i do love Ringo's singing voice as well and think it serves this song well with its straightforward self-assuredness.  This was originally a John-penned composition, in their Quarrymen days, which was later updated and expanded with contributions from Paul and Ringo to make it Ringo's first songwriting credit and a rare (or maybe the only?) John/Paul/Ringo-shared credit.  Ringo was once quoted as saying something along the lines that his contribution was "about five words of it, and I haven't done a thing since!"  God I love Ringo.

This song has such a fine rockabilly feel that for years I thought it was a cover.  Ringo is, as always, a metronome, but I think Paul's bass and George's C&W-swingy guitar work shine on this one.

Mr. krista:  "Yeah, this is good."

Suggested cover:  Sufjan Stevens  Well, this is interesting at least.  Wait through the first 40 seconds; it picks up.

George's guitar is the only thing that saves this song for me.  Nothing else is interesting about it.   And not because of Ringo - the song just doesn't offer me much.

That said, I try to appreciate Ringo songs more in my old age as partly an attempt to keep him engaged in the group.  Kinda like when the mid-90s Bulls used to pass Luc Longley the ball 3-4 times a game in the post.  Even though his offensive game wasn't highly efficient, a couple of looks per game kept him involved in defense, rebounding and setting screens.

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10 hours ago, krista4 said:

Mr. krista:  "I think the lyrics are good.  I like songs about guys who kill people with hammers. But I don’t much like this song."

Obviously we are going to need a Mr. Krista ranks songs about guys who kill people with hammers thread.  :popcorn:

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11 hours ago, Binky The Doormat said:

I think tim just flopped his #### out on mr. krista's prep table.  

the cat'll get it

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56 minutes ago, pecorino said:

When I’m 64: way overrated, in general, so I think this ranking is about where I would put it. It’s funny, though, that a Beatles song in the bottom half of their catalog would be a defining hit for just about any other band. I think it’s a good habit to step back now and then (which this count-up facilitates perfectly) to see the forest for the trees and remind ourselves  just how brilliant the Beatles were. Akin to seeing a subpar Phish show which, upon comparison to any other live band, holds up with the best of them even if it seemed subpar. Hijack somewhat intended as any Beatles devotee would do well to study the work of Phish, specifically their frequent homage to the Fab Four.

This is an excellent point to remind us of what we're working with here.  That's why putting together this list is so freaking difficult.

I've followed Phish approximately zero - any recommendations on where to start?

I worked on some my Badfinger catch-up yesterday.  As you guys said, what an incredibly sad story.

40 minutes ago, Alex P Keaton said:

George's guitar is the only thing that saves this song for me.  Nothing else is interesting about it.   And not because of Ringo - the song just doesn't offer me much.

That said, I try to appreciate Ringo songs more in my old age as partly an attempt to keep him engaged in the group.  Kinda like when the mid-90s Bulls used to pass Luc Longley the ball 3-4 times a game in the post.  Even though his offensive game wasn't highly efficient, a couple of looks per game kept him involved in defense, rebounding and setting screens.

I would have posted long odds that Luc Longley would get a mention in this thread.  Well done.  

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I've loved the Beatles for a long time but my knowledge of their entire catalogue is definitely not up to the level demonstrated in this thread.  This thread is making me renew this love. Mrs Punk and I are having a blast following along with the songs and your amazing write ups ... as well as playing our Beatles albums (which I obviously need to buy more of) all weekend long.  This is an incredible undertaking.  All I can say is thank you, thank you, thank you!!

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16 minutes ago, krista4 said:

I've followed Phish approximately zero - any recommendations on where to start?

Here?

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We are just done having our morning coffee and listening to Rubber Soul ... the last 50 countdown will be epic!

 

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With the recent batch, i got no big probs. Ob-La-Di, What Goes On coulda been lower, Maxwell's Silver Hammer (without which, there might never be a Jeremy) mighta been higher.

With When I'm 64, it's time to make a point about the album it's on. Sgt Pepper turned a page on music for largely three reasons. Engineering/production is the obvious first, the other two more subtle. #s 2&3 involve the fact that SPLHCB is not a rock album, it is a pop album. It's about us - we're the Lonely Hearts Club. We leave the concert of Sgt Pepper's band at the gazebo on the town square and go back to our lives - ol' peeps, meter maids, little girls with stars in their eyes, angry young men with their heads in the sand, sad young women packing to leave, circus coming to town next week, folks with inner & outer structural problems, washing down their rage & dashèd dreams with a spot o' tea.

I mean, we're just a few years at this point from Dylan's introduction of personal polemics into an art form as old as time and here the Beatles gathered up all the runaways, wanderers, explorers & nomads and built 'em a village. It's a wonderful thing and it makes the songs in SPLHCB hard to rate because, strip away the production values, many aren't all that much but, together, they are the Ur of how we express ourselves.

Edited by wikkidpissah
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First observation, The Beatles have 154 songs better than When I'm 64?  I didn't even know that had that many songs.

Second observation, this thread makes me feel stupid. 

Third observation, Mr. K seems like a pretty interesting dude (no homer).

 

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152.  P.S. I Love You (Please Please Me, 1963)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

The b-side to their debut "Love Me Do" single and later included on Please Please Me, this sweet but slight song was written in their Hamburg days and was particularly popular with the ladies when played live back in the day; I picture a lot of fainting.  I love the interplay of the three voices on this, including the way John and George pop in for a word in each bar...treasure...words...'gether, and I love the "ohhhh"s at the end and the ascending "you you you"s.  The song meanders a bit, but it's still lovely.

Notably, this was one of the recordings that caused tension between Ringo and George Martin for a while, as it was recorded during the session in which Martin brought Andy White in to sit for the recordings.  After Martin determined that Pete Best wasn't cutting it, the lads hired Ringo to replace him, and he sat in on a session in early September 1962.  Martin wasn't impressed and brought in White for the next session a week later, at which this song was recorded.  White played the woodblocks on this one, and Ringo was relegated to the maracas.  Martin realized in this session that White wasn't any better than Ringo, so thereafter Ringo was the drummer (except when he briefly quit during the White Album), but it took Ringo a while to forgive Martin for that.

Mr. krista:  "Nice cha-cha beat.  Are those bongos?"

Suggested cover:  I listened to a bunch of covers of this song and liked exactly none of them.  Couldn't even find one with a cheesy video to redeem it.

Edited by krista4
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34 minutes ago, Atomic Punk said:

I've loved the Beatles for a long time but my knowledge of their entire catalogue is definitely not up to the level demonstrated in this thread.  This thread is making me renew this love. Mrs Punk and I are having a blast following along with the songs and your amazing write ups ... as well as playing our Beatles albums (which I obviously need to buy more of) all weekend long.  This is an incredible undertaking.  All I can say is thank you, thank you, thank you!!

X 1000. I listened to four more albums yesterday. 

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30 minutes ago, Atomic Punk said:

We are just done having our morning coffee and listening to Rubber Soul ... the last 50 countdown will be epic!

 

:thumbup:  Somewhere along the way - maybe when we get to that later point - I hope people will post their own top 10 lists (or top 20 or top 50 or top 204).

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I'd need months of education/research before even contemplating doing so ...that's what makes your endeavor all the more incredible!

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5 minutes ago, krista4 said:

:thumbup:  Somewhere along the way - maybe when we get to that later point - I hope people will post their own top 10 lists (or top 20 or top 50 or top 204).

I think if I did 204, I would wind up hating them.   It's incredible what you are doing here and amazed the divorce is not final.  

No one could possibly do a better job than what you are doing. 

Edited by Getzlaf15
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151.  Please Mister Postman (With the Beatles, 1963)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

Time for a reminder of how many covers were on these early albums:  counting this one, we still have ten more covers to address.  Of these, three are real standouts to me and will come up quite a bit later.  While the Beatles do an outstanding job on this one, and it might be sacrilegious to say, it's a song - whether the original by The Marvelettes coming out of Motown or this cover - that I don't enjoy as much as most people seem to.  I seem to go on and on about John's vocal performances, but put this one again in the category of "outstanding," and the "deliver zee let-tah, zee sooner zee bet-tah" bit charms me.  They're playing with great enthusiasm, and the song is full of such energy that it feels like it could explode at any moment - in either a good way or in a way that would cause it to fall apart.  Despite that verge-of-explosion-feel, it's remains tight AF, for which I give Ringo much of the credit as he keep it together.  I like this version better than the original; the problem is I don't love the original that much, though.  This kind of performance on a cover of a song I liked might earn it a top 50 spot.

Mr. krista:  [Singing, badly, through the whole song.]   "I love this song.  The Marvelettes version is better, but this is passable because John Lennon seems to love doing it.  I love this song."

Edited by krista4
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3 minutes ago, krista4 said:

152.  Please Mister Postman (With the Beatles, 1963)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

Time for a reminder of how many covers were on these early albums:  counting this one, we still have ten more covers to address.  Of these, three are real standouts to me and will come up quite a bit later.  While the Beatles do an outstanding job on this one, and it might be sacrilegious to say, it's a song - whether the original by The Marvelettes coming out of Motown or this cover - that I don't enjoy as much as most people seem to.  I seem to go on and on about John's vocal performances, but put this one again in the category of "outstanding," and the "deliver zee let-tah, zee sooner zee bet-tah" bit charms me.  They're playing with great enthusiasm, and the song is full of such energy that it feels like it could explode at any moment - in either a good way or in a way that would cause it to fall apart.  Despite that verge-of-explosion-feel, it's remains tight AF, for which I give Ringo much of the credit as he keep it together.  I like this version better than the original; the problem is I don't love the original that much, though.  This kind of performance on a cover of a song I liked might earn it a top 50 spot.

Mr. krista:  [Singing, badly, through the whole song.]   "I love this song.  The Marvelettes version is better, but this is passable because John Lennon seems to love doing it.  I love this song."

Good cover of a song that wasn't ever my favorite.   Probably would go in my bottom 30 - but I'm too lazy to do what you've done.....so who knows?

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4 hours ago, Yankee23Fan said:

I was going to yell at you....until I read Mr. Krista.... he isn't wrong..... I feel like his comments could be a Philosophy of American Music 101 debate topic for half a semester. 

 

4 hours ago, Yankee23Fan said:

Yeah, can't give you any positives here. This a personal favorite and would be astronomically higher on my list.

And give your husband my card for the divorce. 

Y23F is my proxy on these two, same same.

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3 hours ago, timschochet said:

It’s an inside photo, so you took the sweater off. So what? Where’s your hardback copy of Infinite Jest? Did you put it down for the moment, or had  you already memorized it? 

That you knew Infinite Jest came out in '96 makes me crack up so hard. 

This is the post of the thread.  :lmao:

RIP, DFW. Another simpatico Beatle at heart.  

eta* Other than the originator of the thread, who deserves all the credit.  

Edited by rockaction
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8 minutes ago, rockaction said:

That you knew Infinite Jest came out in '96 makes me crack up so hard. 

This is the post of the thread.  :lmao:

RIP, DFW. Another simpatico Beatle at heart.  

eta* Other than the originator, who deserves all the credit.  

I didn’t know Infinite Jest existed until 1997 or so.  Didn’t memorize it until 1998 or so.

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5 minutes ago, krista4 said:

I came across this video last night when looking for covers, and I felt it deserved its own post.

Kate Smith, Cher, and Tina Turner doing a medley of Beatles covers, with occasional cameos from Tim Conway

I loved 70s variety shows. This is from the first season of CHER (after she & Sonny broke up - they of course previously had their own variety show that was wildly popular.)

Kate Smith!! At that point she had been killin’ it for fifty years, and wow did she nail it. Amazing to see someone who could adapt to any style. Great find @krista4

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19 minutes ago, Getzlaf15 said:

Kate just looks so odd with those two.

Nana with her naughty granddaughters stealing the show 😂

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3 hours ago, krista4 said:

152.  Please Mister Postman (With the Beatles, 1963)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

Time for a reminder of how many covers were on these early albums:  counting this one, we still have ten more covers to address.  Of these, three are real standouts to me and will come up quite a bit later.  While the Beatles do an outstanding job on this one, and it might be sacrilegious to say, it's a song - whether the original by The Marvelettes coming out of Motown or this cover - that I don't enjoy as much as most people seem to.  I seem to go on and on about John's vocal performances, but put this one again in the category of "outstanding," and the "deliver zee let-tah, zee sooner zee bet-tah" bit charms me.  They're playing with great enthusiasm, and the song is full of such energy that it feels like it could explode at any moment - in either a good way or in a way that would cause it to fall apart.  Despite that verge-of-explosion-feel, it's remains tight AF, for which I give Ringo much of the credit as he keep it together.  I like this version better than the original; the problem is I don't love the original that much, though.  This kind of performance on a cover of a song I liked might earn it a top 50 spot.

Mr. krista:  [Singing, badly, through the whole song.]   "I love this song.  The Marvelettes version is better, but this is passable because John Lennon seems to love doing it.  I love this song."

I think this is one of their better covers.  

ETA:  Also, I am a big fan of "When I'm 64" and "Maxwell's Silver Hammer".  I think they are definitely "break" type songs within an album though - they fit within a larger set of songs.  

Edited by Binky The Doormat
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7 minutes ago, Binky The Doormat said:

I think this is one of their better covers.  

ETA:  Also, I am a big fan of "When I'm 64" and "Maxwell's Silver Hammer".  I think they are definitely "break" type songs within an album though - they fit within a larger set of songs.  

Definitely agree regarding 64 in terms of a good "break" in the album.  Maxwell is weird in that it's just a song or two apart from "Octopus's Garden."  I'd have put those two on different sides, or different albums.

 

I think I'll now post a song for each field goal scored today.  I'm two behind.

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