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krista4

In this thread I rank my favorite Beatles songs: 204-1.

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14 minutes ago, krista4 said:

85.  This Boy (single, 1963)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

Glorious harmonies on the verses broken up with that sizzling John vocal on the middle eight.  NufcedTM.

Mr. krista:  "That’s good.  Not my favorite.  It’s a’ight. The probably had to have a slow number for the dances."

Suggested cover:  No one can do those harmonies the way the Beatles did, but I'll post Sean Lennon, Rufus Wainwright, and Robert Schwartzman just because it's nice seeing Sean do that solo (though Rufus could have done it better).

It’s time for one of my favorite Beatle TV clips - their appearenace on the Morecombe and Wise show from February 1963 (also featured in the Anthology series/album).  This Boy led off the set which is why I’m posting it here.

i love everything about this appearance- the British humor, the self-deprecation, the random, flustered Gerry & the Pacemakers deference, John’s dirty joke at the end.  Overwhelming evidence that these four lads from Liverpool were so much more than just a rock & roll group.

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13 minutes ago, Ted Lange as your Bartender said:

It’s time for one of my favorite Beatle TV clips - their appearenace on the Morecombe and Wise show from February 1963 (also featured in the Anthology series/album).  This Boy led off the set which is why I’m posting it here.

i love everything about this appearance- the British humor, the self-deprecation, the random, flustered Gerry & the Pacemakers deference, John’s dirty joke at the end.  Overwhelming evidence that these four lads from Liverpool were so much more than just a rock & roll group.

I haven't watched yet, but is this the one you've been saving, that you mentioned on Super Bowl Sunday?  You alluded to a song you thought would be up soon, and I'd expected it had something to do with "Come Together," since there'd been some chatter about that earlier in the thread, but then that one came and went.

Edited by krista4

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1 minute ago, krista4 said:

I haven't watched yet, but is this the one you've been saving, that you mentioned on Super Bowl Sunday?  You alluded to a song you thought would be up soon, and I'd expected it had something to do with "Come Together," since there'd been some chatter about that earlier in the thread, but then that one came and went.

This is the one.  Wasn’t sure if This Boy would crack the top half or not but if it did, I figured it would be back half of the top 100.

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6 minutes ago, Ted Lange as your Bartender said:

This is the one.  Wasn’t sure if This Boy would crack the top half or not but if it did, I figured it would be back half of the top 100.

Excellent prediction.  It was actually lower than #85 for a time because it's not my preferred style of music, but those harmonies are irresistible.  

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19 minutes ago, Ted Lange as your Bartender said:

It’s time for one of my favorite Beatle TV clips - their appearenace on the Morecombe and Wise show from February 1963 (also featured in the Anthology series/album).  This Boy led off the set which is why I’m posting it here.

i love everything about this appearance- the British humor, the self-deprecation, the random, flustered Gerry & the Pacemakers deference, John’s dirty joke at the end.  Overwhelming evidence that these four lads from Liverpool were so much more than just a rock & roll group.

56 years old in 5 days. Love watching all the old stuff

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4 hours ago, krista4 said:

86.  Penny Lane (single, 1967)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

:scared: 

From the beginning, I knew that this would be one of two absolutely beloved songs that I don't dig as much as other people do (little did I know The Fool on the Hill was a third), and that it would rank on my list much lower than it would be on any list of "best" Beatles songs.  Of course I love the song, or it wouldn't be this high, but it clearly doesn't connect with me the way it does for most other people.  The best explanation I have is that, as I think I mentioned earlier in the thread, I mostly don't get nostalgia as a concept.  And if I look at this in comparison to the "nostalgia" of the other a-side of the same single, "Strawberry Fields Forever," I prefer the slight angst of the latter to the idyllic descriptions of this one.  It's sweet and lovely, but I must like the edgier parts of life.

There's a lot I love about this song, though.  It is perfectly polished and clean, and it lilts in a way that puts a smile on my face.  Love that piccolo trumpet.  If some of John's lyrics can read like poetry, I think this song shows that Paul can do the same; I especially love the opening line:  Penny Lane there is a barber showing photographs, of every head he's had the pleasure to know.  That's lovely imagery.  And I'm very taken with the rises and falls and especially the way the refrains rise back into the verses.  I even enjoy the modulation near the end, which is a device I'm not usually keen on.  There's nothing I would change about this song; as it is it's a perfect love letter to where they grew up.  Most days, though, there are just ~85 songs I'd rather listen to. 

I'm sure others here could do a better job of detailing what's great about the song.  So instead of saying, "top 10 for me!!!111" let us know what you love about it, too.  :) 

Mr. krista:  "You could take all the songs from the last four records and make a nifty musical, and I won’t give a #### about any of them."  [NOTE:  I don't remember what he was talking about here.]

Suggested cover:  Elvis Costello

 

Just catching up. 

Penny Lane lends itself perfectly to those growing old wishing for a more idyllic world, or reminiscing.  Could not have given two ####s about this tune when I was 14.  It cracks my top 50, but no quibbles here.

Edited by Mister CIA
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1 hour ago, Ted Lange as your Bartender said:

It’s time for one of my favorite Beatle TV clips - their appearenace on the Morecombe and Wise show from February 1963 (also featured in the Anthology series/album).  This Boy led off the set which is why I’m posting it here.

i love everything about this appearance- the British humor, the self-deprecation, the random, flustered Gerry & the Pacemakers deference, John’s dirty joke at the end.  Overwhelming evidence that these four lads from Liverpool were so much more than just a rock & roll group.

Wow - GREAT pull ...I have never seen this.  Love it.  

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84.  Love You To (Revolver, 1966)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

My favorite of the George classical Indian songs, at least today - as mentioned previously, you could make an argument for any of the three.  I do wish this song were longer, because too soon after it seems to get going it builds and builds into...an unexpected conclusion.  This starts off with such a powerful sitar part, telling you right away that it's not going to be simple pop music and that you are listening to something different than you'd ever heard before.  Love the boldness of that and of having such a long instrumental intro.  That long intro leading into the loud tablas and strumming guitar at ~0:35 is mesmerizing and energizing.  Can only imagine being a teenybopper in 1966 putting the new Beatles record on and wondering WTF was this all about.  But somehow in this one George also manages to keep a pop vibe, integrating the sitar and the droning Eastern influence with a structure that (after the intro) is familiar in pop music, a lovely melody and vocal, and lyrics that could fit as well in a pop love song.  All of this gives the song such a deep, lush texture.  

Mr. krista:  "This is a rare example where I wish the song were longer.  That time signature where the melody seems one note off, and it needs time to develop. Then when I was starting to understand it, it sped up and fades out in a pop format.  The point of that music is almost like hypnosis, the transcendental quality of music, it needs time to develop.  It’s a neat experiment and really bold and courageous.  But making it into a pop song doesn’t work."

Suggested covers: In the category of "at least they tried," The Trypes  Bongwater

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@Getzlaf15, I wasn't sure from your post...when are you planning to start your "FBG consensus" countdown?

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Just catching up for the day and see Love You To listed already.  Love the song.  It may be one of the coolest mood songs by the Beatles.  But, I get it being ranked at 84.  It's missing some real song melody and structure of most Beatles songs.  

But, Penny freaking Lane at 86!   That is just crazy talk.  It is almost a perfect song.  Not sure what is going on here but is isn't anything good.  

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7 minutes ago, krista4 said:

@Getzlaf15, I wasn't sure from your post...when are you planning to start your "FBG consensus" countdown?

still thinking your #25.  Might start earlier if 100% of your remaining songs have been selected at least once on the Composite.

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7 minutes ago, Getzlaf15 said:

still thinking your #25.  Might start earlier if 100% of your remaining songs have been selected at least once on the Composite.

Thanks to @rockaction, pretty sure we are down to three songs that are not on the composite that you have yet to rank.  He knocked off five by himself the other day.

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1 minute ago, Getzlaf15 said:

Thanks to @rockaction, pretty sure we are down to three songs that are not on the composite that you have yet to rank.  He knocked off five by himself the other day.

How does it work? We only have three left that she hasn't ranked?  

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Just now, rockaction said:

How does it work? We only have three left that she hasn't ranked?  

She has 83 songs left to rank.   I only have 80 songs on the composite she hasn't ranked.   Two songs she ranked today are not on the composite rankings. We were at five this morning.  

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So is what I'm doing good or bad?  :lmao: 

I still don't understand. The composite is the concatenated aggregate of everyone's top 25? In other words, every song? And how do they get knocked off?  

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8 minutes ago, rockaction said:

So is what I'm doing good or bad?  :lmao:  yes

I still don't understand. The composite is the concatenated aggregate of everyone's top 25?   YES  and ..... do you really talk like that to people in real life?  LOL 

 In other words, every song?  NO, 133 right now. 

And how do they get knocked off?  When Krista ranks a song that is not one of the 133.  

 

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7 minutes ago, Getzlaf15 said:

 

:thanks:           :lmao: about "concatenated.aggregate"

I still have no clue what's going on and I see a song I picked I'll think "cool." I'll just stick to the countdown. Thanks, man.  

Edited by rockaction
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83.  Getting Better (Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, 1967)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

I'm a fan of these songs where John and Paul contribute distinctive parts that you can identify as being theirs alone.  I'm a fan of the stabby guitars (reminiscent of "She's a Woman" and "Taxman"), the bass that comes in just a little early on every beat, and those slightly off-key harmonies. The best part of this, though, is how the edgy John parts cut through the hopeful Paul parts to showcase the differences in their personalities.  It feels like a true "Beatles" song instead of a Paul or John song.

The Paul part of the song is characteristically optimistic and - Martha the sheepdog alert! - came to him when he was out walking his dog and recalled Jimmy Nicol, their short-term fill-in drummer while Ringo was ill during their 1964 tour.  Any time someone asked Jimmy how it was going, he responded, "Getting better."  As a counterpoint to Paul's optimism, John chimed into the songwriting with the cynical "can't get no worse," and of course the lines about an angry young man who used to beat his women are about John as well.  I can at least admire how willing John was to admit to this, regret it, and vow that he had changed, but that he still had work to do.  In an interview not long before his murder, he described this song:  "It is a diary form of writing. All that 'I used to be cruel to my woman, I beat her and kept her apart from the things that she loved' was me. I used to be cruel to my woman, and physically – any woman. I was a hitter. I couldn't express myself and I hit. I fought men and I hit women. That is why I am always on about peace, you see. It is the most violent people who go for love and peace. Everything's the opposite. But I sincerely believe in love and peace. I am a violent man who has learned not to be violent and regrets his violence. I will have to be a lot older before I can face in public how I treated women as a youngster."    

Nearly tragic story associated with one of the sessions for this song:  John showed up to the session tripping on LSD, and during recording of some backing vocals indicated he wasn't feeling well.  George Martin, perhaps purposefully naive to the drug use going on at the time, thought John might have eaten something bad and took him up to the roof for some air.  A while later, Martin returned to the control room alone, having left John on the roof to look at the stars.  A few seconds later, the rest of the group realized what was going on and made a mad dash to the roof to rescue John, who was tripping on a narrow parapet 30 feet above the street below.  Whew.

Mr. krista:  "I’m not sure I like it, but I do like that it’s a seemingly bouncy, cheerful song that comes from a bunch of instruments playing one note.  It’s all staccato – plank, plank, plank-plank.  You could beat that melody out on a tin can.  How did they figure out it was going to make that kind of song? I like that song a lot more now."

Suggested cover:  Gomez

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Now I have absolutely no idea what you guys are talking about, too.  :lmao:  Is "concatenated" a real word?  I'm just happy Getz is even dorkier than I am.

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1 hour ago, Getzlaf15 said:

still thinking your #25.  Might start earlier if 100% of your remaining songs have been selected at least once on the Composite.

This sounds good.  I was a little worried you were starting soon, which I didn't think would work very well.

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47 minutes ago, Getzlaf15 said:

She has 83 songs left to rank.   I only have 80 songs on the composite she hasn't ranked.   Two songs she ranked today are not on the composite rankings. We were at five this morning.  

Three...hmmm..."Yer Blues"?  "Lovely Rita"?

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2 minutes ago, krista4 said:

Now I have absolutely no idea what you guys are talking about, too.  :lmao:  Is "concatenated" a real word?  I'm just happy Getz is even dorkier than I am.

I had to ask my wife what it meant.

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8 minutes ago, krista4 said:
52 minutes ago, Getzlaf15 said:

She has 83 songs left to rank.   I only have 80 songs on the composite she hasn't ranked.   Two songs she ranked today are not on the composite rankings. We were at five this morning.  

Three...hmmm..."Yer Blues"?  "Lovely Rita"?

"Mother Nature's Son"?  That song about a monkey except not really about a monkey?

I want, nay demand, to know!

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1 minute ago, krista4 said:

"Mother Nature's Son"?  That song about a monkey except not really about a monkey?

I want, nay demand, to know!

:lmao::lmao::lmao::P  You'll have to wait.

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11 minutes ago, krista4 said:

Now I have absolutely no idea what you guys are talking about, too.  :lmao:  Is "concatenated" a real word?  I'm just happy Getz is even dorkier than I am.

Italicized: Neither do I

Bolded: Yes, it means to string together a series of things. Here's M-W

 :a group of things linked together or occurring together in a way that produces a particular result or effect

I used ta read the dictionary at my temp job studying for the GREs. I also used to rap, and that's how I would remember. 

So we cold caffeinate 

and then we concatenate

and then we roll half an eighth and then we chill...

and now I'll exit stage. left. 

eta* Be here all week. It really is Sober February, huh. 

Edited by rockaction
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11 minutes ago, rockaction said:

Italicized: Neither do I

Bolded: Yes, it means to string together a series of things. Here's M-W

 :a group of things linked together or occurring together in a way that produces a particular result or effect

I used ta read the dictionary at my temp job studying for the GREs. I also used to rap, and that's how I would remember. 

So we cold caffeinate 

and then we concatenate

and then we roll half an eighth and then we chill...

and now I'll exit stage. left. 

eta* Be here all week. It really is Sober February, huh. 

Don't go anywhere.  It might not be Friday night drunk italicized lyrics, but:

I guess everybody has their own thing
That they yell into a well

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List #28 is in and recorded.

133 songs on the composite list.

Only 13 of the songs on the composite have been listed 14 or more times (50%).

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8 minutes ago, krista4 said:

Don't go anywhere.  It might not be Friday night drunk italicized lyrics, but:

I guess everybody has their own thing
That they yell into a well

I just looked that up. How lovely a sentiment!  

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5 minutes ago, rockaction said:

I just looked that up. How lovely a sentiment!  

Love that song.  Such a perfect encapsulation of the creative process.  It made me think of both you and wikkid, actually.

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Penny Lane and Getting Better are cheerful happy songs. The Velvet Underground would never have sung them. But Lou Reed would have easily sang “She said, I know what it’s like to be dead”, wouldn’t he? 

I think I see where you’re headed with this list...

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9 minutes ago, timschochet said:

Penny Lane and Getting Better are cheerful happy songs. The Velvet Underground would never have sung them. But Lou Reed would have easily sang “She said, I know what it’s like to be dead”, wouldn’t he? 

I think I see where you’re headed with this list...

:lmao:  You got me.  

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5 hours ago, krista4 said:

I’ve barely had time to mourn my breakups with Tanner and Norwood...

I get the cats every other weekend and 3 of the houses.

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12 minutes ago, OrtonToOlsen said:

I get the cats every other weekend and 3 of the houses.

As long as I get the naan oven and your timschochet alias, it's a deal.  

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14 hours ago, krista4 said:

86.  Penny Lane (single, 1967)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

:scared: 

From the beginning, I knew that this would be one of two absolutely beloved songs that I don't dig as much as other people do (little did I know The Fool on the Hill was a third), and that it would rank on my list much lower than it would be on any list of "best" Beatles songs.  Of course I love the song, or it wouldn't be this high, but it clearly doesn't connect with me the way it does for most other people.  The best explanation I have is that, as I think I mentioned earlier in the thread, I mostly don't get nostalgia as a concept.  And if I look at this in comparison to the "nostalgia" of the other a-side of the same single, "Strawberry Fields Forever," I prefer the slight angst of the latter to the idyllic descriptions of this one.  It's sweet and lovely, but I must like the edgier parts of life.

There's a lot I love about this song, though.  It is perfectly polished and clean, and it lilts in a way that puts a smile on my face.  Love that piccolo trumpet.  If some of John's lyrics can read like poetry, I think this song shows that Paul can do the same; I especially love the opening line:  Penny Lane there is a barber showing photographs, of every head he's had the pleasure to know.  That's lovely imagery.  And I'm very taken with the rises and falls and especially the way the refrains rise back into the verses.  I even enjoy the modulation near the end, which is a device I'm not usually keen on.  There's nothing I would change about this song; as it is it's a perfect love letter to where they grew up.  Most days, though, there are just ~85 songs I'd rather listen to. 

I'm sure others here could do a better job of detailing what's great about the song.  So instead of saying, "top 10 for me!!!111" let us know what you love about it, too.  :) 

Mr. krista:  "You could take all the songs from the last four records and make a nifty musical, and I won’t give a #### about any of them."  [NOTE:  I don't remember what he was talking about here.]

Suggested cover:  Elvis Costello

 

 I was 8 years old when this song came out and it instantly became my favorite song and I bugged my mom to take me to the record store to buy it.  The funny thing is the original US mono single played on the radio at that time had a trumpet ending which was mixed out for the stereo version and all subsequent releases .   To this day every time I hear the song my brain adds the trumpet notes at the end.

Here it is if you're interested but I warn you that once you hear it you'll be waiting for it anytime you hear Penny Lane

 

 

Edited by Godsbrother
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30 minutes ago, Godsbrother said:

 I was 8 years old when this song came out and it instantly became my favorite song and I bugged my mom to take me to the record store to buy it.  The funny thing is the original US mono single played on the radio at that time had a trumpet ending which was mixed out for the stereo version and all subsequent releases .   To this day every time I hear the song my brain adds the trumpet notes at the end.

Here it is if you're interested but I warn you that once you hear it you'll be waiting for it anytime you hear Penny Lane

 

 

That’s interesting. I’ve never heard that. 

Edited by Nigel Tufnel

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9 hours ago, krista4 said:

83.  Getting Better (Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, 1967)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

I'm a fan of these songs where John and Paul contribute distinctive parts that you can identify as being theirs alone.  I'm a fan of the stabby guitars (reminiscent of "She's a Woman" and "Taxman"), the bass that comes in just a little early on every beat, and those slightly off-key harmonies. The best part of this, though, is how the edgy John parts cut through the hopeful Paul parts to showcase the differences in their personalities.  It feels like a true "Beatles" song instead of a Paul or John song.

The Paul part of the song is characteristically optimistic and - Martha the sheepdog alert! - came to him when he was out walking his dog and recalled Jimmy Nicol, their short-term fill-in drummer while Ringo was ill during their 1964 tour.  Any time someone asked Jimmy how it was going, he responded, "Getting better."  As a counterpoint to Paul's optimism, John chimed into the songwriting with the cynical "can't get no worse," and of course the lines about an angry young man who used to beat his women are about John as well.  I can at least admire how willing John was to admit to this, regret it, and vow that he had changed, but that he still had work to do.  In an interview not long before his murder, he described this song:  "It is a diary form of writing. All that 'I used to be cruel to my woman, I beat her and kept her apart from the things that she loved' was me. I used to be cruel to my woman, and physically – any woman. I was a hitter. I couldn't express myself and I hit. I fought men and I hit women. That is why I am always on about peace, you see. It is the most violent people who go for love and peace. Everything's the opposite. But I sincerely believe in love and peace. I am a violent man who has learned not to be violent and regrets his violence. I will have to be a lot older before I can face in public how I treated women as a youngster."    

Nearly tragic story associated with one of the sessions for this song:  John showed up to the session tripping on LSD, and during recording of some backing vocals indicated he wasn't feeling well.  George Martin, perhaps purposefully naive to the drug use going on at the time, thought John might have eaten something bad and took him up to the roof for some air.  A while later, Martin returned to the control room alone, having left John on the roof to look at the stars.  A few seconds later, the rest of the group realized what was going on and made a mad dash to the roof to rescue John, who was tripping on a narrow parapet 30 feet above the street below.  Whew.

Mr. krista:  "I’m not sure I like it, but I do like that it’s a seemingly bouncy, cheerful song that comes from a bunch of instruments playing one note.  It’s all staccato – plank, plank, plank-plank.  You could beat that melody out on a tin can.  How did they figure out it was going to make that kind of song? I like that song a lot more now."

Suggested cover:  Gomez

This is a good song, and Krista's ranking is pretty much where I would have it.  I love all of the songs that have Paul's cheerfulness counterbalanced by John's cynicism.  My favorite example of that is "We Can Work it Out," which is in my top 25.

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58 minutes ago, Godsbrother said:

 I was 8 years old when this song came out and it instantly became my favorite song and I bugged my mom to take me to the record store to buy it.  The funny thing is the original US mono single played on the radio at that time had a trumpet ending which was mixed out for the stereo version and all subsequent releases .   To this day every time I hear the song my brain adds the trumpet notes at the end.

Here it is if you're interested but I warn you that once you hear it you'll be waiting for it anytime you hear Penny Lane

 

 

My older sister had that single, I do remember that trumpet at the end.

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15 hours ago, krista4 said:

86.  Penny Lane (single, 1967)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

:scared: 

From the beginning, I knew that this would be one of two absolutely beloved songs that I don't dig as much as other people do (little did I know The Fool on the Hill was a third), and that it would rank on my list much lower than it would be on any list of "best" Beatles songs.  Of course I love the song, or it wouldn't be this high, but it clearly doesn't connect with me the way it does for most other people.  The best explanation I have is that, as I think I mentioned earlier in the thread, I mostly don't get nostalgia as a concept.  And if I look at this in comparison to the "nostalgia" of the other a-side of the same single, "Strawberry Fields Forever," I prefer the slight angst of the latter to the idyllic descriptions of this one.  It's sweet and lovely, but I must like the edgier parts of life.

There's a lot I love about this song, though.  It is perfectly polished and clean, and it lilts in a way that puts a smile on my face.  Love that piccolo trumpet.  If some of John's lyrics can read like poetry, I think this song shows that Paul can do the same; I especially love the opening line:  Penny Lane there is a barber showing photographs, of every head he's had the pleasure to know.  That's lovely imagery.  And I'm very taken with the rises and falls and especially the way the refrains rise back into the verses.  I even enjoy the modulation near the end, which is a device I'm not usually keen on.  There's nothing I would change about this song; as it is it's a perfect love letter to where they grew up.  Most days, though, there are just ~85 songs I'd rather listen to. 

I'm sure others here could do a better job of detailing what's great about the song.  So instead of saying, "top 10 for me!!!111" let us know what you love about it, too.  :) 

Mr. krista:  "You could take all the songs from the last four records and make a nifty musical, and I won’t give a #### about any of them."  [NOTE:  I don't remember what he was talking about here.]

Suggested cover:  Elvis Costello

 

I love both "Penny Lane" and "Strawberry Fields" because they are so obviously meaningful to the composers.  I also like "Strawberry Fields" better (it's in my top 5) but think you underrated "Penny Lane" substantially.  It's in my top 25 and I am glad it's stuck in my head right now. Very Strange!

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12 hours ago, krista4 said:

84.  Love You To (Revolver, 1966)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

 

Love this song. Actually came up on shuffle yesterday when I was in the dentist chair. Fun fact: sitar music works wonders in drowning out the sound of a dentist's drill.

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15 hours ago, krista4 said:

85.  This Boy (single, 1963)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

Glorious harmonies on the verses broken up with that sizzling John vocal on the middle eight.  NufcedTM.

Mr. krista:  "That’s good.  Not my favorite.  It’s a’ight. The probably had to have a slow number for the dances."

Suggested cover:  No one can do those harmonies the way the Beatles did, but I'll post Sean Lennon, Rufus Wainwright, and Robert Schwartzman just because it's nice seeing Sean do that solo (though Rufus could have done it better).

They were playing their Ed Sullivan appearances on the Beatles Channel this morning on my drive into work, and when this song came on, I was trying to remember if it had been listed on the countdown yet.  Then I get in and check the thread this morning and see that it's higher than #######' Penny Lane.  

I feel the last 20 songs or so have enlightened me moreso into Krista's taste, and, therefore, allowed me to realize my top 10 predictions are probably all wrong.  Or are they concatenated?  Who the hell knows.  

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3 hours ago, Godsbrother said:

 I was 8 years old when this song came out and it instantly became my favorite song and I bugged my mom to take me to the record store to buy it.  The funny thing is the original US mono single played on the radio at that time had a trumpet ending which was mixed out for the stereo version and all subsequent releases .   To this day every time I hear the song my brain adds the trumpet notes at the end.

Here it is if you're interested but I warn you that once you hear it you'll be waiting for it anytime you hear Penny Lane

 

 

Very cool.  Thanks for that.

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Crap.  I've typed up two songs and then changed my mind.  I should just go with the order I already had them in instead of constantly rethinking it.  Bleh.  I'll regroup.

Edited by krista4

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9 minutes ago, krista4 said:

Crap.  I've typed up two songs and then changed my mind.  I should just go with the order I already had them in instead of constantly rethinking it.  Bleh.  I have two hours of work calls right now, and then I'll regroup.

Go with the order that will piss the most people off.

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4 minutes ago, zamboni said:

Go with the order that will piss the most people off.

If that were the driving force, I don't think it matters what order they're in.

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