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krista4

In this thread I rank my favorite Beatles songs: 204-1.

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1 hour ago, krista4 said:

I wrote this one up earlier for a lower placement but moved it up.  Going to post now just to get it over with.  Deal.

I've seen this on several top 20 lists, but I guess all these songs hit at least one list now.  It is also @mike9289's favorite Beatles song.  Please forgive me!

63.  Get Back (Let It Be, 1969)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

This time it's a for-real "JoJo" song!  John called this "a better version of 'Lady Madonna'," and I agree.  Adding Billy Preston elevates any song about 16 levels, and this is no exception - his electric piano shines throughout the song and gives it an excellent groove, and Preston was actually featured on the label of this single ("The Beatles with Billy Preston"), being the only non-Beatle ever so credited.  This also features a great guitar solo by...John!  I've a special fondness in my heart for this song being the opener and closer of the London rooftop show, and the guys seemed to have a fabulous time with it.  Well, maybe not George, who never looked like he was enjoying that performance.  

This is a fun groove but doesn't get me rocking the way it does for some people; I almost feel like I don't quite understand the song.  This might be a function of its history, as it was meant to be a satirical look at the UK's racial unrest at the time.  But eventually some of the lyrics were dropped as being too open to possible misinterpretation, such as an entire section on Pakistani people that included the line, "Don't dig no Pakistani taking all the people's jobs."  Paul was likely right to drop all that, as evidenced by the fact that when those versions were discovered, the group was accused of racism when, of course, they were instead trying to make an anti-racist statement.  But in losing the political statements, the song might have lost some of the edge or grittiness that I wish I heard in it.  The grittiness is there in each of the covers I've linked below.  Still an awesome song that's painful to rank in the 60s.

Mr. krista:  "It’s the Billy Preston and Ringo show.  And Paul McCartney – the bass is really good.  I like Ringo’s galloping bumpadudump.  My least favorite part is Paul’s vocals, and the lyrics are dumb."

Suggested cover:  Actually I like each of these better than the Beatles version.  Al Green   Billy Preston, naturally  Holy hell you can try to tell me there's a sexier woman than Tina Turner in her prime but I won't believe you

almost had our first composite rankings match here.

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Hey Getzlaf, that song that you mentioned was only on one top 25 list, but was #1 on that list, have I covered it yet?

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1 minute ago, krista4 said:

Hey Getzlaf, that song that you mentioned was only on one top 25 list, but was #1 on that list, have I covered it yet?

yes

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2 hours ago, krista4 said:

I know there's this canon of "best" that many people follow, but I'm surprised this was only on one list.  It's a fascinating song.  Then again, I put it at #64 so I can't exactly say much.  With all the varied tastes in here I would have expected it to be on more.

And by the way, Binky, the fact I dropped this so much meant that your #17 keeps moving up instead.  :) 

I think we will have a few songs that we will be surprised that only made one or two lists.

My first composite listing post will be the songs listed zero times.

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2 minutes ago, Getzlaf15 said:
4 minutes ago, krista4 said:

Hey Getzlaf, that song that you mentioned was only on one top 25 list, but was #1 on that list, have I covered it yet?

yes

...annnnnnd it was??????

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Quick comment on “Get Back”, which I love but isn’t one of my favorites: if anyone has seen the Cirque De Soleil Beatles show in Las Vegas, the “Get Back” sequence is the best part. 

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Underrated song.... White album... 

Put me fine for "I'm so Tired". It's a a worthy #1. Really is. Listen to it. It needs to be in the conversation or #### off. 

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2 hours ago, krista4 said:

Understandable  I hope the sometimes naughty language didn't scare bananadad away.

Ha, I learned all my best swears from him. He's just busy planning a trip to Malaysia and learning the trumpet and doesn't really trust the internet. I'll get him in here eventually.

I'm pretty busy myself so I don't have much to add at the moment but the write-ups are fantastic and I've read every one. 

That and I regret picking the Abbey Road Medley as your #1 because it seems like you would regard picking an 8-songs-in-one as cheating. 

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Besides having a #1 ranked song appear on only one list, we had a #2, #3, #5 and three #6's only appear once on a list.  Krista has yet to rank two of those, so things could change. 

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1 hour ago, Sebowski said:

Underrated song.... White album... 

Put me fine for "I'm so Tired". It's a a worthy #1. Really is. Listen to it. It needs to be in the conversation or #### off. 

Got it.  Interesting as I suspect that’s one that people are surprised I haven’t posted yet.

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5 hours ago, krista4 said:
7 hours ago, Sebowski said:

Underrated song.... White album... 

Put me fine for "I'm so Tired". It's a a worthy #1. Really is. Listen to it. It needs to be in the conversation or #### off. 

Got it.  Interesting as I suspect that’s one that people are surprised I haven’t posted yet.

I didn't make a Top 25, but if I had, "I'm so Tired" would be in it. It wouldn't be in my top 10.

Edited by simey
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55 minutes ago, zamboni said:

:wub:  Check this out, zam. Someone gave me that for my birthday a couple weeks ago. I read the directions, and it doesn't sound like you have to know anything about the BB to play it. I was surprised to see Robert Reed on the box since he refused to sign a contract with Paramount soon before he died, that would have allowed them to license his image. The game box has their faces move at different angles when you turn the box, and the pic of Mike shown at the angle in the pic may not be Robert Reed, but when he looks right at you it looks like RR. Here is a chip  in the game that looks pretty much like mike, and there is a card in the game that looks like him too. 

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7 hours ago, Sebowski said:

Underrated song.... White album... 

Put me fine for "I'm so Tired". It's a a worthy #1. Really is. Listen to it. It needs to be in the conversation or #### off. 

Suggested cover

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On 2/8/2019 at 10:44 PM, shuke said:

Are you sure this is true?  I'm pretty sure the cassette I had in the 80's had this ending.

Doubtful unless you are talking about the version on the 1980s American Rarities LP.  While it does have the trumpet ending this is not a genuine mix since it was the stereo version with the trumpet notes mixed into it.  Even the Anthology version is a combination of mixes deliberately made to make a distinct new version.

To my knowledge the original 1967 mono single radio promo is the only true version that has the alternate trumpet ending.   That said, it wouldn't shock me if there was an obscure release somewhere in the world that did have it.  There are several books that track all of the alternative mixes, covers, printings. etc. and the variations are mind-boggling.   

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On 2/8/2019 at 4:21 PM, krista4 said:

@zamboni said I should post what would piss the most people off.  Unfortunately the next one I had listed is in the top 10 of both zamboni and @Mister CIA, so I guess I'm doing my job.  Sorry.  :lol:  

81.  If I Needed Someone (Rubber Soul, 1965)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

Having sat in on a recording session of The Byrds in August 1965, George was inspired to write this song by Roger McGuinn's 12-string riffs on "The Bells Of Rhymney."  McGuinn had in turn been inspired by...The Beatles, including George's 12-string Rickenbacker work on A Hard Day's Night:  "I first saw The Beatles on television in 1963, in New York. It was the clip with all the screaming girls. I loved the music! I got it right away and started playing folk songs with a Beatle beat down in Greenwich Village."  

This song has such an amazing groove, starting with that dreamy opening riff.  George's guitar work throughout is just brilliant, and those harmonies, sung off-the-beat or syncopated as most of the melody is, are not just gorgeous but due to the off-beat timing seem to drive the song along, increasing the tension and leading in and out of the bridge.  I love the bridge's upbeat tempo and tambourines, giving it just enough of a different texture to feel satisfying but not interfere with the song's smooth groove as a whole.  I often feel like George's songs, more than any other Beatle's, should be longer.  There's so much complexity and texture in sometimes seemingly straightforward packages that I'd like to have heard them given even more time to develop.

This is one where it's worth mentioning how wonderful the lyrics are, too.  As you might have figured out by now, I'm not much of a traditional romantic, so the "I love you"s don't do it for me in love songs.  The genius in these lyrics is how hypothetical, conditional, and non-comital they are - check out the "if" and "I guess" and "maybe"s here, but then with the bold declaration of being "too much in love":

If I needed someone to love
You're the one that I'd be thinking of
If I needed someone

If I had some more time to spend
Then I guess I'd be with you my friend
If I needed someone
Had you come some other day
Then it might not have been like this
But you see now I'm too much in love

Carve your number on my wall
And maybe you will get a call from me
If I needed someone

Mr. krista:  "It’s such a good jam.  His songs are so dreamy.  It produces such interesting sonic experiments.  Like that jangly 12-string, it starts turning up across the world in other songs.  Such an expressive guitar player."

Suggested cover:  James Taylor  (I'm not posting the cover by The Hollies, which reached #20 on the charts, because George himself didn't care for it.)

Great, great song.  One of George's best and it would have cracked the top 40 foe me, maybe a little higher. 

I have no idea why George did not care for the Hollies version which I think is pretty darn good.  You would have thought that George would have been a little more flattered since I think it was the first time anyone had ever covered a Harrison song (could be wrong about that I think that is right).   The thing that separates the Beatles and Hollies versions in my opinion are the harmonies of John, Paul and George.  As great as the Hollies vocals were, no one could touch the Beatles back then, including the Beach Boys.

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On 2/9/2019 at 3:17 PM, krista4 said:

OK, I have my next 11 songs (re-)set and am not making any more changes.  It's a snow day here so I might be posting all eleven.

74.  Eight Days a Week (Beatles for Sale, 1964)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

The title to this song has been varyingly attributed by Paul to being either a Ringo-ism (as in "hard day's night") or coming from a chauffeur driving Paul out to John's place who, when asked how he was, said he was working hard, eight days a week.  The song was first intended to be a potential title song for the movie that eventually became Help!, but it was relegated to this album instead once John came up with the title song, "Help!"  My favorite part of the song is also the portion that was groundbreaking at the time:  that fade-in.  It was one of the first times (or possibly the very first time) a fade-in had been used in a pop song, and I love the way it builds the excitement around the song.  Oooooo, what's happening here?  What's going to happen next?  The way the song kicks in the vocal so dynamically after the fade-in is exhilarating, and the harmonies on the bridge and the unison singing elsewhere are infectiously happy.  Love the chiming guitars at the end!  I might usually lean toward downer songs and rock songs, but I can also love a perfectly charming pop song like this.

Mr. krista:  "Eight days a week is another great phrase.  I like all of it.  I like that it fades in.  Nothing sounds like that.  That’s neat up and down."

Suggested cover:  The Dandy Warhols

The Anthology version has some interesting takes where they were trying out how to do the intro.   I think they chose wisely

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4 minutes ago, Godsbrother said:

The thing that separates the Beatles and Hollies versions in my opinion are the harmonies of John, Paul and George.  As great as the Hollies vocals were, no one could touch the Beatles back then, including the Beach Boys.

Blasphemy. The Hollies and The Beach Boys were easily as good as the Beatles, IMHO.  

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9 minutes ago, rockaction said:

Blasphemy. The Hollies and The Beach Boys were easily as good as the Beatles, IMHO.  

They are great no doubt but for my money the Beatles 3-parts were the best.  Just my :2cents: of course

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1 minute ago, Godsbrother said:

They are great no doubt but for my money the Beatles 3-parts were the best.  Just my :2cents: of course

Yeah, I said that with a laugh. I love them all. For my money they're all Mount Rushmore of harmony and there's no need to pick nits on my end. I was being cheeky. 

I'm also a Beach Boys honk, just like a Patriots/Brady/Belichick honk would be.  

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2 minutes ago, rockaction said:

Yeah, I said that with a laugh. I love them all. For my money they're all Mount Rushmore of harmony and there's no need to pick nits on my end. I was being cheeky. 

I'm also a Beach Boys honk, just like a Patriots/Brady/Belichick honk would be.  

Stay out of the shark pool, they have decided to have a civil war over Brady and Belichick.

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1 minute ago, Leroy Hoard said:

Stay out of the shark pool, they have decided to have a civil war over Brady and Belichick.

I saw that. I can't believe it's still going. I was thinking it was like the political subforum over there and was going to say something about the comparison but thought better of it.  

Edited by rockaction
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21 hours ago, krista4 said:

These are the two remaining that I thought wouldn't be in anyone's top 25:  (1) Mother Nature's Son, and (2) Monkey monkey monkey firebell song.  Someone had those?  That's great!

That also means that every pick I make from 66->25 is going to piss someone off.  :lol: 

Both in my top 25.  By the way, I would not recommend going three days in a row not reading this thread.  It's like Ringo leaving and coming back and finding out that not only did he miss "Back in the USSR" and "Dear Prudence" but also the entire Abbey Road album, and now he's randomly looking around going "What the hell happened around here?" in a daze.  

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2 minutes ago, Shaft41 said:

Both in my top 25.  By the way, I would not recommend going three days in a row not reading this thread.  It's like Ringo leaving and coming back and finding out that not only did he miss "Back in the USSR" and "Dear Prudence" but also the entire Abbey Road album, and now he's randomly looking around going "What the hell happened around here?" in a daze.  

:lol: 

I’m skimming through right now and going to have a busy workday, so people will probably have a chance to catch up.

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10 hours ago, Sebowski said:

Underrated song.... White album... 

Put me fine for "I'm so Tired". It's a a worthy #1. Really is. Listen to it. It needs to be in the conversation or #### off. 

I don't remember posting this... :oldunsure:Needless to say it isn't as eloquent as I'd have liked. 

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19 hours ago, krista4 said:

65.  I Want To Tell You (Revolver, 1966)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

The second of three George Revolver songs that will be on this list - go George!  I figure the dissonance in this song might not be for everyone, but...wait for it...I love it!  The off-key vocals and especially those harshly discordant piano parts.  The song starts with a fade-in of George's guitar on some staggered triplets and weird syncopation, and you know immediately this isn't going to sound like anything else the Beatles have put out.  After the guitar fades in, it continues this riff two more times, first adding some piano jabs and snare, then a hissing tambourine, and finally Paul's bass, before finally launching into the vocal.  It's all rather disorienting, as are the unusual 11-meter verses that lead to the awkward but pleasing sound of the last line of each verse.  And of course, each time you think you're getting the groove, that some of the dissonance has been resolved, then BAM! come those jarring discordant piano parts. After a couple of verses of this, you find yourself in the lovely bridge, which sounds a bit more usual with George on a sweet vocal, and even the piano at the end is melodic in leading you back into the verse.  Oh no!  Another verse means...more off-key piano blasts!  A repeat of the bridge, and then you come to the fade-out ending that I love as much as the fade-in, with the Indian-inflected three-part harmonies and George repeating the guitar riff and Paul meandering around on piano and John doing something with a tambourine.  The dark journey of this song was a worthwhile adventure.

George wrote this song to describe "the avalanche of thoughts that are so hard to write down or say or transmit."  Perhaps more than any other Beatles song, this one seems to me to convey its feeling through the music in a way that makes the lyrics superfluous.  I do think the lyrics are fantastic at expressing what George said in that quote (I'll copy the lyrics below this), but even if you stripped the lyrics away, I would fully understand the import of what the music itself is telling me.  All that dissonance, all those parts bouncing off one another - George trying to align his thoughts all comes out in the music.  The piano parts in the verses feel like a huge avalanche exploding down on your head.  Even the voices are allowed to go slightly off-key at times, to show an inability to express exactly what one wants to.  This arrangement of this song to underscore the meaning behind it is simply brilliant.  Like most George songs, I only wish it were longer.

I want to tell you
My head is filled with things to say
When you're here
All those words they seem to slip away

When I get near you
The games begin to drag me down
It's all right
I'll make you maybe next time around

But if I seem to act unkind
It's only me, it's not my mind
That is confusing things
I want to tell you
I feel hung up and I don't know why
I don't mind
I could wait forever, I've got time

Sometimes I wish I knew you well
Then I could speak my mind and tell
Maybe you'd understand

I want to tell you
I feel hung up and I don't know why
I don't mind
I could wait forever, I've got time
I've got time
I've got time

 

Mr. krista:  "Yeah, that piano is like the Exorcist theme.  Very dissonant.  Also some Eastern influences.  I really like it.  Just a great song.  This hasn’t happened to you.  Probably.  I don’t know if you’ve ever been the only high person in the room. [Narrator:  No.]  Sometimes when you’re high, you have a thought or idea that seems to have importance outside of what it actually is and to other not-high people, the difficulty in communicating that it impossible.  It can be really frustrating or exhilarating, but that’s what that song sounds like.  'You can wait.'  I like that time when you’re not burdened with practicality.  You just feel the rush of coming up with an idea."

Suggested cover:  Melvins

One of the few things in my life that I am probably a bigger fan of than the Beatles is Seinfeld.  I will still usually watch an episode or two most nights, even though I've seen them all dozens of times.  The other night, "The Barber" came on, and I watched it and found myself thinking that I've probably only seen it maybe 5 times, and there were parts I didn't remember about it.  But I thoroughly enjoyed it.  I just needed to reacquaint myself with it.  

"I Want to Tell You" is "The Barber" of this list so far.  Hadn't heard it in a long time.  I rarely hear it on the Beatles Channel.  But I thoroughly enjoyed it.  

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2 minutes ago, Sebowski said:

I don't remember posting this... :oldunsure:Needless to say it isn't as eloquent as I'd have liked. 

I will fight you. I will fight all of you!  

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I still have to put 12 more songs outside the top 50.  This isn't fair!!  :cry: 

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40 minutes ago, krista4 said:

I still have to put 12 more songs outside the top 50.  This isn't fair!!  :cry: 

There is no crying in Beatles rankings.

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3 minutes ago, Getzlaf15 said:

There is no crying in Beatles rankings.

Have you READ this thread?

 

😉

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***OFFICIALLY MOVED TO NUMBER 47!***

47.  We Can Work It Out (single, 1965)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

This whole thing was a bad idea.  Whose idea was this?  I don't mean the song; I mean ranking the songs.  Killing me.  

Anyway, love this song.  Always a big fan of songs where Paul and John each contributed significantly, and in this one George also made a major impact.  It's no surprise that Paul wrote the optimistic verses as he tried to work through his relationship with Jane Asher, a relationship that will also be at the heart of, and treated more negatively in, "You Won't See Me" and "I'm Looking Through You."  John contributed the more downbeat bridge, but it was George's idea to put the bridge in waltz time.  Nifty thought that raises the song to a whole new level.   As usual in these collaborative songs, the verses show their optimism in sunny major chords, while the bridge falls into a minor key to emphasize the pessimism.  Both Paul and John are in excellent voice on this song, but I think Paul's the standout with that pure vocal sound and those high harmonies; it's one of my favorite Beatles performances from him.  This was the first song in which the Beatles used the harmonium that would later show up more frequently, and I love the use of the volume pedal on it by whoever was playing it.  

This was a double-a-side single along with "Day Tripper," still to come, the first double-a-sided single released in the UK.  In the US, the popularity was tracked separately, with this song hitting #1 but "Day Tripper" only reaching #5.  Probably not at the level of Penny Lane/Strawberry Fields for "best double-a-single ever," but should be in the conversation. 

Mr. krista:  "Pretty good single.  The lyrics are funny to me.  It’s about working it out, but it’s all about hectoring the other people into agreeing with your point of view.  And time will tell you that I’m right.  Those are really bad arguing tactics, Sir Paul.  I still think it’s a really good song; it just makes me laugh.  It’s a song about cooperation, but it’s so not."

Suggested cover:  Here we have it, my favorite cover of any Beatles song:  Stevie Wonder

Edited by krista4
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38 minutes ago, Uruk-Hai said:

Have you READ this thread?

 

😉

:lmao: 

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2 minutes ago, krista4 said:

62.  We Can Work It Out (single, 1965)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

This whole thing was a bad idea.  Whose idea was this?  I don't mean the song; I mean ranking the songs.  Killing me.  

Anyway, love this song.  Always a big fan of songs where Paul and John each contributed significantly, and in this one George also made a major impact.  It's no surprise that Paul wrote the optimistic verses as he tried to work through his relationship with Jane Asher, a relationship that will also be at the heart of, and treated more negatively in, "You Won't See Me" and "I'm Looking Through You."  John contributed the more downbeat bridge, but it was George's idea to put the bridge in waltz time.  Nifty thought that raises the song to a whole new level.   As usual in these collaborative songs, the verses show their optimism in sunny major chords, while the bridge falls into a minor key to emphasize the pessimism.  Both Paul and John are in excellent voice on this song, but I think Paul's the standout with that pure vocal sound and those high harmonies; it's one of my favorite Beatles performances from him.  This was the first song in which the Beatles used the harmonium that would later show up more frequently, and I love the use of the volume pedal on it by whoever was playing it.  

This was a double-a-side single along with "Day Tripper," still to come, the first double-a-sided single released in the UK.  In the US, the popularity was tracked separately, with this song hitting #1 but "Day Tripper" only reaching #5.  Probably not at the level of Penny Lane/Strawberry Fields for "best double-a-single ever," but should be in the conversation. 

Mr. krista:  "Pretty good single.  The lyrics are funny to me.  It’s about working it out, but it’s all about hectoring the other people into agreeing with your point of view.  And time will tell you that I’m right.  Those are really bad arguing tactics, Sir Paul.  I still think it’s a really good song; it just makes me laugh.  It’s a song about cooperation, but it’s so not."

Suggested cover:  Here we have it, my favorite cover of any Beatles song:  Stevie Wonder

This one is in my top 25.  I posted earlier about how I really like the ones where sunny Paul is brought back to earth by cynic John. This is the very best example of that.  Brilliant.

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8 minutes ago, krista4 said:

62.  We Can Work It Out (single, 1965)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

This whole thing was a bad idea.  Whose idea was this?  I don't mean the song; I mean ranking the songs.  Killing me.  

Anyway, love this song.  Always a big fan of songs where Paul and John each contributed significantly, and in this one George also made a major impact.  It's no surprise that Paul wrote the optimistic verses as he tried to work through his relationship with Jane Asher, a relationship that will also be at the heart of, and treated more negatively in, "You Won't See Me" and "I'm Looking Through You."  John contributed the more downbeat bridge, but it was George's idea to put the bridge in waltz time.  Nifty thought that raises the song to a whole new level.   As usual in these collaborative songs, the verses show their optimism in sunny major chords, while the bridge falls into a minor key to emphasize the pessimism.  Both Paul and John are in excellent voice on this song, but I think Paul's the standout with that pure vocal sound and those high harmonies; it's one of my favorite Beatles performances from him.  This was the first song in which the Beatles used the harmonium that would later show up more frequently, and I love the use of the volume pedal on it by whoever was playing it.  

This was a double-a-side single along with "Day Tripper," still to come, the first double-a-sided single released in the UK.  In the US, the popularity was tracked separately, with this song hitting #1 but "Day Tripper" only reaching #5.  Probably not at the level of Penny Lane/Strawberry Fields for "best double-a-single ever," but should be in the conversation. 

Mr. krista:  "Pretty good single.  The lyrics are funny to me.  It’s about working it out, but it’s all about hectoring the other people into agreeing with your point of view.  And time will tell you that I’m right.  Those are really bad arguing tactics, Sir Paul.  I still think it’s a really good song; it just makes me laugh.  It’s a song about cooperation, but it’s so not."

Suggested cover:  Here we have it, my favorite cover of any Beatles song:  Stevie Wonder

I agree, I've always loved the Paul vocal on this one.  It just seems so clear and pure.  The point about the time change to 3/4 is a good one; it's amazing for 4 guys who couldn't read music, how they were so intuitive with time changes within songs, sometimes going back and forth multiple times.  

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I threw my "top 25" together without a ton of thought, TBH, and since then there have been about a dozen times that K4 has posted (or someone has mentioned) a song, and I've thought "holy hell, that's a great song - that could have been in my top 25!" But then I go look and really can't find one that I'd easily discard. 

Showing (once again) what an incredible catalog these guys have.

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29 minutes ago, worrierking said:

This one is in my top 25.  I posted earlier about how I really like the ones where sunny Paul is brought back to earth by cynic John. This is the very best example of that.  Brilliant.

I find it brilliant and completely get why it would be in someone's top 25.  It's around now that I realize what a ridiculous exercise this is, but it's made for a fun thread anyway.  :) 

Edited by krista4
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34 minutes ago, krista4 said:

62.  We Can Work It Out (single, 1965)

 John contributed the more downbeat bridge, but it was George's idea to put the bridge in waltz time.  

Genius move by George. I love waltz time, and loved when the Beatles did just that. I don't want to spoil the party (see what I did there?) but there's another song in waltz time by the Beatles that I absolutely adore and made my top twenty-five, easily.  

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27 minutes ago, krista4 said:

62.  We Can Work It Out (single, 1965)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

This whole thing was a bad idea.  Whose idea was this?  I don't mean the song; I mean ranking the songs.  Killing me.  

Anyway, love this song.  Always a big fan of songs where Paul and John each contributed significantly, and in this one George also made a major impact.  It's no surprise that Paul wrote the optimistic verses as he tried to work through his relationship with Jane Asher, a relationship that will also be at the heart of, and treated more negatively in, "You Won't See Me" and "I'm Looking Through You."  John contributed the more downbeat bridge, but it was George's idea to put the bridge in waltz time.  Nifty thought that raises the song to a whole new level.   As usual in these collaborative songs, the verses show their optimism in sunny major chords, while the bridge falls into a minor key to emphasize the pessimism.  Both Paul and John are in excellent voice on this song, but I think Paul's the standout with that pure vocal sound and those high harmonies; it's one of my favorite Beatles performances from him.  This was the first song in which the Beatles used the harmonium that would later show up more frequently, and I love the use of the volume pedal on it by whoever was playing it.  

This was a double-a-side single along with "Day Tripper," still to come, the first double-a-sided single released in the UK.  In the US, the popularity was tracked separately, with this song hitting #1 but "Day Tripper" only reaching #5.  Probably not at the level of Penny Lane/Strawberry Fields for "best double-a-single ever," but should be in the conversation. 

Mr. krista:  "Pretty good single.  The lyrics are funny to me.  It’s about working it out, but it’s all about hectoring the other people into agreeing with your point of view.  And time will tell you that I’m right.  Those are really bad arguing tactics, Sir Paul.  I still think it’s a really good song; it just makes me laugh.  It’s a song about cooperation, but it’s so not."

Suggested cover:  Here we have it, my favorite cover of any Beatles song:  Stevie Wonder

My upper-list is getting Napalmed now, but I suspect many are. 6, 8, 9, and 11 (Penny Lane, in case anyone was wondering) gone in three days.

Back to the record. I had it at #6 because of the collaboration krista talked about. To me, everything about this record works. It ####### ZOOMS, man.

Also agree that Stevie's cover is 1A - those "Heys!" are sublime. However, this isn't the cover I mentioned lo-those-many-pages-ago. 1B's still coming, @Godsbrother. Yes it is, preciousssssss.

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13 minutes ago, rockaction said:

Genius move by George. I love waltz time, and loved when the Beatles did just that. I don't want to spoil the party (see what I did there?) but there's another song in waltz time by the Beatles that I absolutely adore and made my top twenty-five, easily.  

One that I haven't named yet?

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Just now, krista4 said:

One that I haven't named yet?

Yep. At least, I'm pretty sure. I'd probably have noticed. I think I've read every page of the thread.  

eta* And I'm listening to Panda Bear right now but want to turn on that song and listen to the Beatles. Curse this thread. Love this thread.  

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49 minutes ago, krista4 said:

62.  We Can Work It Out (single, 1965)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

This whole thing was a bad idea.  Whose idea was this?  I don't mean the song; I mean ranking the songs.  Killing me.  

Anyway, love this song.  Always a big fan of songs where Paul and John each contributed significantly, and in this one George also made a major impact.  It's no surprise that Paul wrote the optimistic verses as he tried to work through his relationship with Jane Asher, a relationship that will also be at the heart of, and treated more negatively in, "You Won't See Me" and "I'm Looking Through You."  John contributed the more downbeat bridge, but it was George's idea to put the bridge in waltz time.  Nifty thought that raises the song to a whole new level.   As usual in these collaborative songs, the verses show their optimism in sunny major chords, while the bridge falls into a minor key to emphasize the pessimism.  Both Paul and John are in excellent voice on this song, but I think Paul's the standout with that pure vocal sound and those high harmonies; it's one of my favorite Beatles performances from him.  This was the first song in which the Beatles used the harmonium that would later show up more frequently, and I love the use of the volume pedal on it by whoever was playing it.  

This was a double-a-side single along with "Day Tripper," still to come, the first double-a-sided single released in the UK.  In the US, the popularity was tracked separately, with this song hitting #1 but "Day Tripper" only reaching #5.  Probably not at the level of Penny Lane/Strawberry Fields for "best double-a-single ever," but should be in the conversation. 

Mr. krista:  "Pretty good single.  The lyrics are funny to me.  It’s about working it out, but it’s all about hectoring the other people into agreeing with your point of view.  And time will tell you that I’m right.  Those are really bad arguing tactics, Sir Paul.  I still think it’s a really good song; it just makes me laugh.  It’s a song about cooperation, but it’s so not."

Suggested cover:  Here we have it, my favorite cover of any Beatles song:  Stevie Wonder

My favorite Mersey bridge, i think

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This is the Hell Zone for sure.  65 down 10.     This was my #15.

It was only on a Top 25 list 13 times out of 33 now.

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1 hour ago, krista4 said:

62.  We Can Work It Out (single, 1965)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

This whole thing was a bad idea.  Whose idea was this?  I don't mean the song; I mean ranking the songs.  Killing me.  

Anyway, love this song.  Always a big fan of songs where Paul and John each contributed significantly, and in this one George also made a major impact.  It's no surprise that Paul wrote the optimistic verses as he tried to work through his relationship with Jane Asher, a relationship that will also be at the heart of, and treated more negatively in, "You Won't See Me" and "I'm Looking Through You."  John contributed the more downbeat bridge, but it was George's idea to put the bridge in waltz time.  Nifty thought that raises the song to a whole new level.   As usual in these collaborative songs, the verses show their optimism in sunny major chords, while the bridge falls into a minor key to emphasize the pessimism.  Both Paul and John are in excellent voice on this song, but I think Paul's the standout with that pure vocal sound and those high harmonies; it's one of my favorite Beatles performances from him.  This was the first song in which the Beatles used the harmonium that would later show up more frequently, and I love the use of the volume pedal on it by whoever was playing it.  

This was a double-a-side single along with "Day Tripper," still to come, the first double-a-sided single released in the UK.  In the US, the popularity was tracked separately, with this song hitting #1 but "Day Tripper" only reaching #5.  Probably not at the level of Penny Lane/Strawberry Fields for "best double-a-single ever," but should be in the conversation. 

Mr. krista:  "Pretty good single.  The lyrics are funny to me.  It’s about working it out, but it’s all about hectoring the other people into agreeing with your point of view.  And time will tell you that I’m right.  Those are really bad arguing tactics, Sir Paul.  I still think it’s a really good song; it just makes me laugh.  It’s a song about cooperation, but it’s so not."

Suggested cover:  Here we have it, my favorite cover of any Beatles song:  Stevie Wonder

Top ten song for me.  Love it.

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1 hour ago, krista4 said:

62.  We Can Work It Out (single, 1965)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

This whole thing was a bad idea.  Whose idea was this?  I don't mean the song; I mean ranking the songs.  Killing me.  

Anyway, love this song.  Always a big fan of songs where Paul and John each contributed significantly, and in this one George also made a major impact.  It's no surprise that Paul wrote the optimistic verses as he tried to work through his relationship with Jane Asher, a relationship that will also be at the heart of, and treated more negatively in, "You Won't See Me" and "I'm Looking Through You."  John contributed the more downbeat bridge, but it was George's idea to put the bridge in waltz time.  Nifty thought that raises the song to a whole new level.   As usual in these collaborative songs, the verses show their optimism in sunny major chords, while the bridge falls into a minor key to emphasize the pessimism.  Both Paul and John are in excellent voice on this song, but I think Paul's the standout with that pure vocal sound and those high harmonies; it's one of my favorite Beatles performances from him.  This was the first song in which the Beatles used the harmonium that would later show up more frequently, and I love the use of the volume pedal on it by whoever was playing it.  

This was a double-a-side single along with "Day Tripper," still to come, the first double-a-sided single released in the UK.  In the US, the popularity was tracked separately, with this song hitting #1 but "Day Tripper" only reaching #5.  Probably not at the level of Penny Lane/Strawberry Fields for "best double-a-single ever," but should be in the conversation. 

Mr. krista:  "Pretty good single.  The lyrics are funny to me.  It’s about working it out, but it’s all about hectoring the other people into agreeing with your point of view.  And time will tell you that I’m right.  Those are really bad arguing tactics, Sir Paul.  I still think it’s a really good song; it just makes me laugh.  It’s a song about cooperation, but it’s so not."

Suggested cover:  Here we have it, my favorite cover of any Beatles song:  Stevie Wonder

Mr. Krista has it right. The lyrics always cracked me up. Happy Paul says we can make this work, all you have to do is agree with me.

Later on Paul reprises this theme in "With A Little Luck"- also very catchy.

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Man, I still have the 45 I bought at the Woolworth's of Day Tripper/We Can Work It Out somewhere in the attic with a few other tidbits of my childhood.  

Weird it didn't make my top 70.  I think I unfairly treated some of their early stuff - still assigning a "more juvenile Beatles" take to a lot of it.  

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