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krista4

In this thread I rank my favorite Beatles songs: 204-1.

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13 minutes ago, krista4 said:

25.  Helter Skelter (White Album, 1968)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

@wikkidpissah, do you want to comment on this one, since (1) it's in your top three, and (2) you're a better writer than the rest of us combined?  If not (and probably also if so), I'll come back in and do a write-up later.

Mr. krista:  "Everything about it is great.  Everybody calls it proto-heavy-hetal, but there were heavy bands already playing (Blue Cheer, etc.), but there are whole bands that wouldn’t exist without that.  Hüsker Dü owes a huge debt to how terrifyingly noisy that was.  There are thousands of noisy, heavy bands that can just point their origin story to that song.  I think Paul McCartney tried to out-Who the Who, and it turns out they were better than that.  And they were ####ed up as a band, so it’s a chaotic recording.  It’s just a ####### mint jam from a mint band."

Suggested cover:  This seems like a bad idea.

It's hard to comprehend the musical genius of certain groups even for those of use that play and write (no matter the level).  When you look at this and know that part of the entire reason for the song is Paul getting annoyed that people said he could only write ballads so he figured, watch this..... I mean, c'mon.  It's almost not fair.  It's not at all one of my favorite Beatle's songs but it's a massively important one.  

I just want to be that cool for once.  You know, have a day where I hear someone say, look at that Yankee23fan, all he does is practice law, and then I get all angry and just, I don't know, open a BBQ place that becomes the cornerstone of Northeast BBQ for the next 50 years.  Yeah, that's Paul.  And me.  Practically twins.

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32 minutes ago, krista4 said:

25.  Helter Skelter (White Album, 1968)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

@wikkidpissah, do you want to comment on this one, since (1) it's in your top three, and (2) you're a better writer than the rest of us combined?  If not (and probably also if so), I'll come back in and do a write-up later.

Mr. krista:  "Everything about it is great.  Everybody calls it proto-heavy-hetal, but there were heavy bands already playing (Blue Cheer, etc.), but there are whole bands that wouldn’t exist without that.  Hüsker Dü owes a huge debt to how terrifyingly noisy that was.  There are thousands of noisy, heavy bands that can just point their origin story to that song.  I think Paul McCartney tried to out-Who the Who, and it turns out they were better than that.  And they were ####ed up as a band, so it’s a chaotic recording.  It’s just a ####### mint jam from a mint band."

Suggested cover:  This seems like a bad idea.

To be honest, this is my favorite Beatle song. For all you headbangers who know how glorious it is when music hits that spot where rage turns into triumph, imagine the first time that spot was ever hit by music and you have Helter Skelter. The fact that every scintilla of noise in this thing is as musical and and tactile and sensible to me as Chopin makes it indeed a triumph. I also actually knew the Helter Skelter "ride" in Blackpool from my Irish summers and the first stanza...

When I get to the bottom I go back to the top of the slide
Where I stop and I turn and I go for a ride
Till I get to the bottom and I see you again

....of the song actually meant something to me, because i know the buzz of cheap joy, as well as the smells of rancid chip grease and holiday coach buttsweat, that came with a hazy, July day on a Lancashire boardwalk. nufced.

Edited by wikkidpissah
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If you haven't read the book Helter Skelter by Vincent Bugliosi and Curt Gentry, I can't recommend it enough. Beyond being the definitive story of the Manson murders and trial, it dedicates a fair amount of space to Charlie's fascination with the Beatles. 

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10 minutes ago, krista4 said:

 

With only 25 to go, I feel at a point of exhaustion.  

 

Then stop for a while, GB k4. This seems to me to be a thread about joy. If it's become a chore, then scale back. 

 

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1 minute ago, Uruk-Hai said:

Then stop for a while, GB k4. This seems to me to be a thread about joy. If it's become a chore, then scale back. 

 

True - we can fill the time with Gerry and the Pacemakers stories and skiffle tunes.

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2 minutes ago, zamboni said:

True - we can fill the time with Gerry and the Pacemakers stories and skiffle tunes.

I was gonna do my Top 100 Freddie And The Dreamers tunes, according to Pitchfork.

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14 minutes ago, wikkidpissah said:

To be honest, this is my favorite Beatle song. For all you headbangers who know how glorious it is when music hits that spot where rage turns into triumph, imagine the first time that spot was ever hit by music and you have Helter Skelter. The fact that every scintilla of noise in this thing is as musical and and tactile and sensible to me as Chopin makes it indeed a triumph. I also actually knew the Helter Skelter "ride" in Blackpool from my Irish summers and the first stanza...

When I get to the bottom I go back to the top of the slide
Where I stop and I turn and I go for a ride
Till I get to the bottom and I see you again

....of the song actually meant something to me, because i know the buzz of cheap joy, as well as the smells of rancid chip grease and holiday coach buttsweat, that came with a hazy, July day on a Lancashire boardwalk. nufced.

This line is actually from John's first attempt at the third verse of "Come Together."  

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1 hour ago, krista4 said:

Brilliant.

And I’d drink any of these other than the Sauternes.  (Paul guys:  “You just hate Paul! :cry:“)

we may have to talk about the brilliance of sauternes.  where do you stand on resiling, specially, brilliant german resiling?  

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1 hour ago, krista4 said:

25.  Helter Skelter (White Album, 1968)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

@wikkidpissah, do you want to comment on this one, since (1) it's in your top three, and (2) you're a better writer than the rest of us combined?  If not (and probably also if so), I'll come back in and do a write-up later.

Mr. krista:  "Everything about it is great.  Everybody calls it proto-heavy-hetal, but there were heavy bands already playing (Blue Cheer, etc.), but there are whole bands that wouldn’t exist without that.  Hüsker Dü owes a huge debt to how terrifyingly noisy that was.  There are thousands of noisy, heavy bands that can just point their origin story to that song.  I think Paul McCartney tried to out-Who the Who, and it turns out they were better than that.  And they were ####ed up as a band, so it’s a chaotic recording.  It’s just a ####### mint jam from a mint band."

Suggested cover:  This seems like a bad idea.

Top 25 for me. 

And, it made for an apt soundtrack while making my list:

When I get to the bottom I go back to the top of my list
Where I stop and I read and I see what I missed
Till I get to the bottom and I start it again

Do, don't you want me to rank you
I'm counting down fast and I may have to yank you
Tell me, tell me, tell me, come on, why you the answer? 
Well, you may be a winner but see my eraser 

Helter skelter, helter skelter
Helter skelter

Will you, won't you want me to pick you
I'm counting down fast and may have to kick you
Tell me, tell me, tell me the answer
You may be a winner but meet my eraser 

Look out
Helter skelter, helter skelter
Helter skelter
Look out, 'cause here it comes

When I get to the bottom I go back to the top of my list
And I stop and I read and I see what I missed
And I get to the bottom and I start it again, yeah, yeah

Well do you, don't you want me to list you
I'm counting down fast and I may have dissed you
Tell me, tell me, tell me your answer
You may be a winner but eat my eraser! 

Look out
Helter skelter, helter skelter
Helter skelter

Look out, helter skelter
She's counting down fast
Yes, she is
Yes, she is
Counting down fast
 

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36 minutes ago, zamboni said:

If you haven't read the book Helter Skelter by Vincent Bugliosi and Curt Gentry, I can't recommend it enough. Beyond being the definitive story of the Manson murders and trial, it dedicates a fair amount of space to Charlie's fascination with the Beatles. 

It’s excellent. But I always sort of got the feeling that Bugliosi is the one who made the phrase “Helter Skelter” into more than it was. Yes, Manson liked the song. But the killing spree his followers went on was not called “Helter Skelter”; it wasn’t called anything. It was Bugliosi that wanted a title for his book on Manson that people would remember, and so ever since we associate Helter Skelter with Manson. 

My understanding is that the  song that was more closely related to the murders, particularly the first set (Tate) was Harrison’s “Piggies”. 

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15 minutes ago, timschochet said:

It’s excellent. But I always sort of got the feeling that Bugliosi is the one who made the phrase “Helter Skelter” into more than it was. Yes, Manson liked the song. But the killing spree his followers went on was not called “Helter Skelter”; it wasn’t called anything. It was Bugliosi that wanted a title for his book on Manson that people would remember, and so ever since we associate Helter Skelter with Manson. 

My understanding is that the  song that was more closely related to the murders, particularly the first set (Tate) was Harrison’s “Piggies”. 

True, Helter Skelter became more famous with the book, but the term/title was written at the Tate crime scene (along with "Piggies", "Rise" and other terms) as well as at their ranch they stayed at.

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27 minutes ago, DA RAIDERS said:

we may have to talk about the brilliance of sauternes.  where do you stand on resiling, specially, brilliant german resiling?  

I like a sweet white, but they are definitely the Paul of wines.

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1 hour ago, krista4 said:

25.  Helter Skelter (White Album, 1968)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

@wikkidpissah, do you want to comment on this one, since (1) it's in your top three, and (2) you're a better writer than the rest of us combined?  If not (and probably also if so), I'll come back in and do a write-up later.

Mr. krista:  "Everything about it is great.  Everybody calls it proto-heavy-hetal, but there were heavy bands already playing (Blue Cheer, etc.), but there are whole bands that wouldn’t exist without that.  Hüsker Dü owes a huge debt to how terrifyingly noisy that was.  There are thousands of noisy, heavy bands that can just point their origin story to that song.  I think Paul McCartney tried to out-Who the Who, and it turns out they were better than that.  And they were ####ed up as a band, so it’s a chaotic recording.  It’s just a ####### mint jam from a mint band."

Suggested cover:  This seems like a bad idea.

I GOT BLISTERS ON MY FINGERS!!!!

The holy grail recording for Beatle fans that want every take of every song is the 27 minute version that has never been released, officially or on any bootleg I've ever heard of.   Reportedly it is similar to the Anthology 3 version which is slower and not quite as great as the released version but still quite good.  

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14 hours ago, krista4 said:


Yesterday

While My Guitar Gently Weeps

Rain

 

These are probably my three most regretful omissions from my top 25 (but I could probably only find 2 I'd be willing to boot from the list).

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1 hour ago, Uruk-Hai said:

Then stop for a while, GB k4. This seems to me to be a thread about joy. If it's become a chore, then scale back. 

 

Thanks, GB.  I might slow down a little, but not stop.  Think I was struggling with Helter Skelter because what could I possibly say that hasn't been said and isn't pretty well known?  Figure wikkid would have some new insight, and I was correct.   I'll feel the same about A Day In The Life, when we get there.  

20 minutes ago, Godsbrother said:

I GOT BLISTERS ON MY FINGERS!!!!

:heart: this part.

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Maybe my favorite PM lyric ever.

Tell me tell me come on tell me the answer

You may be a lover but you ain't no dancer 

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5 minutes ago, Leroy Hoard said:

Maybe my favorite PM lyric ever.

Tell me tell me come on tell me the answer

You may be a lover but you ain't no dancer 

Better than "Her name was Magill, and she called herself Lill, but everyone knew her as Nancy"?  Strong take.  

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24.  Yesterday (Help!, 1965)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

I didn't purposefully rank "Helter Skelter" and "Yesterday" next to each other, but I like the way this turned out, showing the incredible diversity of the Beatles and in particular the breadth of Paul's songwriting talent.  As Yankee mentioned above, Paul somehow developed this reputation as the soft, "ballad" guy despite having written songs that in my opinion showed much wider range than the others, so he wanted to write the hardest rock song he could, specifically to out-rock The Who, and I think he accomplished that.

But we're not here to talk about "Helter Skelter"!  We've moved on!  Instead I'll discuss what is merely the most covered and most played song in history.  The song was innovative at the time for using a string quartet, redefining what "pop" or "rock" could be.  It was also the first solo song by a Beatle, since no others joined Paul on the recording.  Unlike when they were going their separate ways on, for instance, the White Album, this wasn't a sign of splintering of the group, but instead was confirmation of its strength and security.  It's not that Paul didn't want to include anyone else, but that when he played the song to the others, they liked it and couldn't come up with any way to improve upon it, suggesting to Paul that he should record it solo.  Paul recorded his vocal and guitar in only a couple of takes, thinking the song was done.  

Naturally, it was George Martin who then suggested adding the string quartet instead of finishing there, which Paul was initially skeptical of, believing that it wouldn't be proper for a rock group.  Martin convinced him to give it a try, assuring Paul they would just drop the string part if it didn't work.  They sat down together the next day at Martin's house to see if they could sketch it out.  Paul described this collaboration:  “We’d sit down and it would be quite straightforward because I’d have a good idea of how I wanted to voice it.  Or George would show me possibilities... There was just one point in it where I said, ‘Could the cello now play a slightly bluesy thing, out of the genre, out of keeping with the rest of the voicing?’  George said, ‘Bach certainly wouldn’t have done that, Paul.’  I said, ‘Great!’  I mean, obviously it was my song, my chords, my everything really, but because the voicing now had become Bach’s, I needed something of mine again to redress the balance.  So I put a 7th in, which was unheard of.  It’s what we used to call a blue note, and that became a little bit well known.  It’s one of the unusual things in that arrangement.”  (You can hear this "blue note" just after "she wouldn't say" in the second bridge.) 

The melody for "Yesterday" first came to Paul in a dream.  When he awoke, it seemed so familiar that Paul was afraid he had inadvertently copied an existing song, so he played it for a few friends who all confirmed they'd never heard it before.  The lyrics didn't come in the dream, though; as a placeholder, he initially sang the opening lines as "scrambled eggs, oh, my baby, how I love your legs."  I still sing the song aloud as "scrambled eggs" to amuse myself juvenilely.  

I love that this song is more subtle than many of the other Paul "love" songs.  I do appreciate how the song establishes itself immediately with the word "yesterday," followed by a 1/2 beat too long pause, to tell us that we're going to spend the rest of our time evoking loss.  We don't really know what happened - the song actually has few differing lyrics - but somehow it still kindles a compelling sense of loss without those descriptors.  The song also doesn't reach a resolution, as John pointed out in an interview as a possible flaw, but that doesn't make it incomplete.  So much of life remains unresolved that I think this sense of its being incomplete is what makes the song so universally understood and appreciated.  Who among us hasn't had a relationship end in an unsettled fashion?  I'd expect we all have experienced that feeling of an incomplete ending, for which we'll not ever get the answers we want.  

In terms of the music itself, of course I love Paul's simple but poignant delivery.  It's amazing that the guy who shredded in "Helter Skelter" can also capture such loneliness in a pure way, without being at all overwrought.  The string arrangement, again a breakthrough at the time, is my favorite of George Martin's arrangements, though some credit goes to Paul for this as well; in agreeing to the strings, he insisted that they remain pure and without any vibrato. The arrangement's perfection is in supplementing the song without intruding on it, always finding ways to bring us back onto the vocal; for instance, listen for how the viola(s) provide a low harmony beginning partway through the third verse.   And the melody...ohhhhh, uncomplicated as it might seem on the surface, there's so much going on, from the hopeful rise of the first line of each verse followed by the melancholic fall of the second...  The way the last line of the verse enhances the longing and despondency by the drop off, "yes-ter-da-a-a-ay"...  The descending bass notes as a counterpoint to Paul's vocal rise on "had to go"...  

This is a song that, now that I've written it out, I wish I had put higher.  Damn it.

Fun fact:  Before recording it himself, Paul offered the song to two singers, Billy J. Kramer and Chris Farlowe, who each rejected it.  Maybe a not-so-fun fact for those two guys.

Fun story:  Paul was especially (understandably) proud of this song, which sometimes drove the other Beatles crazy.  Paul claimed George once said, "Blimey, he's always talking about 'Yesterday'; you'd think he was Beethoven or somebody."  But it was John who was sometimes irritated and sometimes amused by always being congratulated for his work on a song that he had little or nothing to do with:  "I sat in a restaurant in Spain and the violinist insisted on playing 'Yesterday' right in my ear.  Then he asked me to sign the violin.  I didn't know what to say so I said 'OK,' and I signed it, and Yoko signed it.  One day he's going to find out Paul wrote it.  But I guess he couldn't have gone from table to table playing 'I Am The Walrus.'"

Mr. krista:  ""It's anti-nostalgia.  Not every break-up song can evoke regret like this.  It reminds me of my favorite genre of literature, which can be described as 'old man sits in chair and reckons with troubling past and then either dies or doesn't, whichever is most tragic.'  I usually don’t like the strings, but these seem in service of the song. I’d like to hear a naked version. I like hearing super-successful person in despair.  It’s such a special song.  When they’re just like everyone…regretting…"

Suggested cover:  Marvin Gaye

Edited by krista4
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1 hour ago, Shaft41 said:
1 hour ago, Leroy Hoard said:

Maybe my favorite PM lyric ever.

Tell me tell me come on tell me the answer

You may be a lover but you ain't no dancer 

Better than "Her name was Magill, and she called herself Lill, but everyone knew her as Nancy"?  Strong take.  

Beep beep, beep beep, yeah!!

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Ack!  I forgot John's funny "I Am The Walrus" story in that write-up!  Edited and added!

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Update!

  1. simey – Abbey Road medley
  2. Mister CIA – She Said She Said
  3. timschochet – Paperback Writer
  4. pecorino – Hey Jude
  5. Binky the Doormat – In My Life
  6. wikkidpissah – Taxman
  7. Dr. Octopus – Got To Get You Into My Life
  8. Nigel Tufnel – You’ve Got to Hide Your Love Away
  9. Uruk-Hai – Ticket to Ride
  10. Dinsy Ejotuz – Let It Be
  11. Tom Hagen – Eleanor Rigby
  12. Spock – Rain
  13. Leroy Hoard – A Day in the Life
  14. rockaction  - I Want to Hold Your Hand
  15. Ted Lange as Your Bartender – In My Life
  16. shuke – Abbey Road medley
  17. Alex P Keaton – Something
  18. Getzlaf15 – With A Little Help From My Friends
  19. zamboni – While My Guitar Gently Weeps
  20. neal cassady – While My Guitar Gently Weeps
  21. Shaft41 – Hey Bulldog
  22. Ilov80s – Norwegian Wood
  23. Officer Pete Malloy – I Want to Hold Your Hand
  24. Godsbrother – Dear Prudence
  25. ManofSteelhead – Eleanor Rigby
  26. mike9289 – I’m Looking Through You
  27. heckmanm - Eleanor Rigby
  28. Atomic Punk – A Day in the Life
  29. [Mrs. Punk – In My Life]
  30. bananafish – Abbey Road medley
  31. bonzai – Abbey Road medley
  32. fatguy – Here Comes the Sun
  33. ScottNorwood- Yesterday
  34. Sebowski – I’m So Tired

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13 minutes ago, krista4 said:

Ack!  I forgot John's funny "I Am The Walrus" story in that write-up!  Edited and added!

Love it. Must have driven him a tad batty.

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55 minutes ago, krista4 said:

Beep beep, beep beep, yeah!!

coo coo kachoo

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4 minutes ago, DA RAIDERS said:

coo coo kachoo

Bless you!

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Yesterday is #2 on my list.  I suspect serious Beatles fans sometimes underrate it because it's probably the song non fans and super casual fans think of first and there is a tendency to be protective of all the great songs that are more complicated, rock harder or are not as well known.  I think it's a near perfect song.  A ridiculously catchy melody with simple lyrics that resonate with anyone who has ever struggled to figure out why a relationship fell apart. 

As Krista and Mr. K. said, the strings support Paul's vocals without overwhelming them like in Eleanor Rigby. I never knew why the other Beatles weren't involved but it makes sense.  As wonderfully talented as they all were, this is a song of intimate reflection and regret.

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I still have 8 of top 11 left.

Composite still has 12 of Top 15 left.

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1 hour ago, krista4 said:

24.  Yesterday (Help!, 1965)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

I didn't purposefully rank "Helter Skelter" and "Yesterday" next to each other, but I like the way this turned out, showing the incredible diversity of the Beatles and in particular the breadth of Paul's songwriting talent.  As Yankee mentioned above, Paul somehow developed this reputation as the soft, "ballad" guy despite having written songs that in my opinion showed much wider range than the others, so he wanted to write the hardest rock song he could, specifically to out-rock The Who, and I think he accomplished that.

But we're not here to talk about "Helter Skelter"!  We've moved on!  Instead I'll discuss what is merely the most covered and most played song in history.  The song was innovative at the time for using a string quartet, redefining what "pop" or "rock" could be.  It was also the first solo song by a Beatle, since no others joined Paul on the recording.  Unlike when they were going their separate ways on, for instance, the White Album, this wasn't a sign of splintering of the group, but instead was confirmation of its strength and security.  It's not that Paul didn't want to include anyone else, but that when he played the song to the others, they liked it and couldn't come up with any way to improve upon it, suggesting to Paul that he should record it solo.  Paul recorded his vocal and guitar in only a couple of takes, thinking the song was done.  

Naturally, it was George Martin who then suggested adding the string quartet instead of finishing there, which Paul was initially skeptical of, believing that it wouldn't be proper for a rock group.  Martin convinced him to give it a try, assuring Paul they would just drop the string part if it didn't work.  They sat down together the next day at Martin's house to see if they could sketch it out.  Paul described this collaboration:  “We’d sit down and it would be quite straightforward because I’d have a good idea of how I wanted to voice it.  Or George would show me possibilities... There was just one point in it where I said, ‘Could the cello now play a slightly bluesy thing, out of the genre, out of keeping with the rest of the voicing?’  George said, ‘Bach certainly wouldn’t have done that, Paul.’  I said, ‘Great!’  I mean, obviously it was my song, my chords, my everything really, but because the voicing now had become Bach’s, I needed something of mine again to redress the balance.  So I put a 7th in, which was unheard of.  It’s what we used to call a blue note, and that became a little bit well known.  It’s one of the unusual things in that arrangement.”  (You can hear this "blue note" just after "she wouldn't say" in the second bridge.) 

The melody for "Yesterday" first came to Paul in a dream.  When he awoke, it seemed so familiar that Paul was afraid he had inadvertently copied an existing song, so he played it for a few friends who all confirmed they'd never heard it before.  The lyrics didn't come in the dream, though; as a placeholder, he initially sang the opening lines as "scrambled eggs, oh, my baby, how I love your legs."  I still sing the song aloud as "scrambled eggs" to amuse myself juvenilely.  

I love that this song is more subtle than many of the other Paul "love" songs.  I do appreciate how the song establishes itself immediately with the word "yesterday," followed by a 1/2 beat too long pause, to tell us that we're going to spend the rest of our time evoking loss.  We don't really know what happened - the song actually has few differing lyrics - but somehow it still kindles a compelling sense of loss without those descriptors.  The song also doesn't reach a resolution, as John pointed out in an interview as a possible flaw, but that doesn't make it incomplete.  So much of life remains unresolved that I think this sense of its being incomplete is what makes the song so universally understood and appreciated.  Who among us hasn't had a relationship end in an unsettled fashion?  I'd expect we all have experienced that feeling of an incomplete ending, for which we'll not ever get the answers we want.  

In terms of the music itself, of course I love Paul's simple but poignant delivery.  It's amazing that the guy who shredded in "Helter Skelter" can also capture such loneliness in a pure way, without being at all overwrought.  The string arrangement, again a breakthrough at the time, is my favorite of George Martin's arrangements, though some credit goes to Paul for this as well; in agreeing to the strings, he insisted that they remain pure and without any vibrato. The arrangement's perfection is in supplementing the song without intruding on it, always finding ways to bring us back onto the vocal; for instance, listen for how the viola(s) provide a low harmony beginning partway through the third verse.   And the melody...ohhhhh, uncomplicated as it might seem on the surface, there's so much going on, from the hopeful rise of the first line of each verse followed by the melancholic fall of the second...  The way the last line of the verse enhances the longing and despondency by the drop off, "yes-ter-da-a-a-ay"...  The descending bass notes as a counterpoint to Paul's vocal rise on "had to go"...  

This is a song that, now that I've written it out, I wish I had put higher.  Damn it.

Fun fact:  Before recording it himself, Paul offered the song to two singers, Billy J. Kramer and Chris Farlowe, who each rejected it.  Maybe a not-so-fun fact for those two guys.

Fun story:  Paul was especially (understandably) proud of this song, which sometimes drove the other Beatles crazy.  Paul claimed George once said, "Blimey, he's always talking about 'Yesterday'; you'd think he was Beethoven or somebody."  But it was John who was sometimes irritated and sometimes amused by always being congratulated for his work on a song that he had little or nothing to do with:  "I sat in a restaurant in Spain and the violinist insisted on playing 'Yesterday' right in my ear.  Then he asked me to sign the violin.  I didn't know what to say so I said 'OK,' and I signed it, and Yoko signed it.  One day he's going to find out Paul wrote it.  But I guess he couldn't have gone from table to table playing 'I Am The Walrus.'"

Mr. krista:  ""It's anti-nostalgia.  Not every break-up song can evoke regret like this.  It reminds me of my favorite genre of literature, which can be described as 'old man sits in chair and reckons with troubling past and then either dies or doesn't, whichever is most tragic.'  I usually don’t like the strings, but these seem in service of the song. I’d like to hear a naked version. I like hearing super-successful person in despair.  It’s such a special song.  When they’re just like everyone…regretting…"

Suggested cover:  Marvin Gaye

Mentioning it's the most covered song in history is like saying "hey did you know nothing rhymes with silver?"

Everybody knows that.

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maxwelledison sighting in the thread

🔨🔨

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8 minutes ago, BobbyLayne said:

Mentioning it's the most covered song in history is like saying "hey did you know nothing rhymes with silver?"

Everybody knows that.

You sure bout that, Wilbur? 😉

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4 hours ago, krista4 said:

Such a lovely post; it means a lot to me.  Thank you.

With only 25 to go, I feel at a point of exhaustion.  I've used up all the adjectives I know, and 87% of the adverbs.  We're into the songs I love the most, though, so I want to give them proper attention.  Speaking of which, I'd better go give Helter Skelter a real write-up.  :) 

 

Departing Camp 4  and marching towards the summit.

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3 minutes ago, zamboni said:

  

maxwelledison sighting in the thread

🔨🔨

I’m a lurker, as you all probably know. I chose my handle as an homage to the band but not necessarily the song.  

This thread is fantastic. 

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1 hour ago, krista4 said:

Instead I'll discuss what is merely the most covered and most played song in history.

I somehow missed this line.

:bag:

IS ANYONE READING MY WRITEUPS!!

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Just now, maxwelledison said:

I’m a lurker, as you all probably know. I chose my handle as an homage to the band but not necessarily the song.  

This thread is fantastic. 

I feel like I should contribute something substantive despite my inclination that nobody cares about my $.02:

Day Tripper

We Can Work It Out

I Feel Fine

Ticket to Ride

These four make my top 20 and probably my top 10. 

 

 

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1 minute ago, BobbyLayne said:

I somehow missed this line.

:bag:

IS ANYONE READING MY WRITEUPS!!

Oh!  :lmao:  See my comment just before yours.  Think we both misunderstood.  :hifive:

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2 minutes ago, maxwelledison said:

I feel like I should contribute something substantive despite my inclination that nobody cares about my $.02:

Day Tripper

We Can Work It Out

I Feel Fine

Ticket to Ride

These four make my top 20 and probably my top 10. 

 

 

I care!  “We Can Work It Out” is the song that stands out to me as the one I wish I’d put higher.

”Ticket To Ride” still to come!

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That piece of trivia has always fascinated me because I’ve never heard a cover of Yesterday that I can recall. 

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14 minutes ago, Nigel Tufnel said:

That piece of trivia has always fascinated me because I’ve never heard a cover of Yesterday that I can recall. 

The Boyz II Men version is pretty good.

Bob Dylan's has Charlie Daniels playing bass and George Harrison on guitar.

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Yesterday is a song with no flaws that can be played by a rock band, orchestra, single piano, single guitar, or just about any other way.  It can be a campfire song and the emotional center of an arena concert.

They were so damn good.

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7 minutes ago, Yankee23Fan said:

Yesterday is a song with no flaws that can be played by a rock band, orchestra, single piano, single guitar, or just about any other way.  It can be a campfire song and the emotional center of an arena concert.

They were so damn good.

Like,  Wild Horses.

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6 hours ago, Shaft41 said:

I always had an irrational hatred for the Monkees growing up.  My brother and sister loved them, even well into the 90's, but I couldn't stand them.  

love the monkees - their music and the show.  

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6 hours ago, krista4 said:

25.  Helter Skelter (White Album, 1968)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

@wikkidpissah, do you want to comment on this one, since (1) it's in your top three, and (2) you're a better writer than the rest of us combined?  If not (and probably also if so), I'll come back in and do a write-up later.

Mr. krista:  "Everything about it is great.  Everybody calls it proto-heavy-hetal, but there were heavy bands already playing (Blue Cheer, etc.), but there are whole bands that wouldn’t exist without that.  Hüsker Dü owes a huge debt to how terrifyingly noisy that was.  There are thousands of noisy, heavy bands that can just point their origin story to that song.  I think Paul McCartney tried to out-Who the Who, and it turns out they were better than that.  And they were ####ed up as a band, so it’s a chaotic recording.  It’s just a ####### mint jam from a mint band."

Suggested cover:  This seems like a bad idea.

I like her voice.  

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When I was in elementary school we were required to be in choir and it sucked.  We did these boring old standard songs and Christmas carols and stuff that nobody liked and we all were just annoyed that we had to be there.  We complained about the music all the time, and one time the teacher said that at the end of the year we were gonna sing a rock song and we would probably like it.  I remember thinking about it a lot, I didn’t know much about music but I was excited to sing a real rock song like, I don’t know, David Lee Roth or someone that was popular then.

Well, the choir song turned out to be Yesterday.  Which was not what I was looking for at all.  I was so pissed.  I think I held a grudge against that stupid song for probably 20 years.  

Now I think it’s just perfect.  

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6 hours ago, zamboni said:
6 hours ago, Uruk-Hai said:

Then stop for a while, GB k4. This seems to me to be a thread about joy. If it's become a chore, then scale back. 

 

True - we can fill the time with Gerry and the Pacemakers stories and skiffle tunes.

maybe laugh about the point in time where there was a debate about who was better - The Beatles or The Dave Clark 5.  

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1 minute ago, fatguyinalittlecoat said:

When I was in elementary school we were required to be in choir and it sucked.  We did these boring old standard songs and Christmas carols and stuff that nobody liked and we all were just annoyed that we had to be there.  We complained about the music all the time, and one time the teacher said that at the end of the year we were gonna sing a rock song and we would probably like it.  I remember thinking about it a lot, I didn’t know much about music but I was excited to sing a real rock song like, I don’t know, David Lee Roth or someone that was popular then.

Well, the choir song turned out to be Yesterday.  Which was not what I was looking for at all.  I was so pissed.  I think I held a grudge against that stupid song for probably 20 years.  

Now I think it’s just perfect.  

Teacher should have gone with "Just a Gigilo", IMO.

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