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krista4

In this thread I rank my favorite Beatles songs: 204-1.

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8 hours ago, Man of Constant Sorrow said:

Ok K4, 

Here's the way I see it:

K4+M+C=Ha+Hb : (Ha=hike1, Hb=hike2) 

But... Oops. Thus, 

K4+M+C=Hb

But, because, 

C+D=Ha

This happened, 

M-C=Hbx0

However, 

Costco=? 

Therefore, 

K4=😖

While previously, 

D+M2=BFF

But, recently 

M2+C=BFF

And when, 

M2-C=☠️

The irrational result was, 

M2-K4-B=☠️

Leading to, 

C+M2exBFF=C-K4-M

 

Man, that sucks. 😥

 

But, maybe I'm wrong, as my calculations regarding the female human has never been very good. 🤔

 

Keep the chin up. 😁


 

Visually

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I haven’t been able to do a write-up because there’s been a cat on me for three hours and I can’t reach my computer.  Send help.

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2 minutes ago, krista4 said:

I haven’t been able to do a write-up because there’s been a cat on me for three hours and I can’t reach my computer.  Send help.

dictate to the cat

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6 minutes ago, krista4 said:

I haven’t been able to do a write-up because there’s been a cat on me for three hours and I can’t reach my computer.  Send help.

No wonder you lean Lennon 😄

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32 minutes ago, krista4 said:

I haven’t been able to do a write-up because there’s been a cat on me for three hours and I can’t reach my computer.  Send help.

I've seen enough cats on keyboards to know they can put your posts in for you.

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35 minutes ago, krista4 said:

I haven’t been able to do a write-up because there’s been a cat on me for three hours and I can’t reach my computer.  Send help.

Huh.  I thought maybe things got patched up and you went out snowshoeing.....

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While we wait for the cat.....  it's in my ears


 

Penny Lane there is a barber showing photographs
Of every head he's had the pleasure to know
And all the people that come and go
Stop and say "Hello"

On the corner is a banker with a motorcar,
And little children laugh at him behind his back
And the banker never wears a mac
In the pouring rain, very strange

Penny Lane is in my ears and in my eyes
There beneath the blue suburban skies
I sit, and meanwhile back
In Penny Lane there is a fireman with an hourglass,
And in his pocket is a portrait of the Queen
He likes to keep his fire engine clean,
It's a clean machine

Penny Lane is in my ears and in my eyes
A four of fish and finger pies
In summer. Meanwhile back
Behind the shelter in the middle of the roundabout
The pretty nurse is selling poppies from a tray
And though she feels as if she's in a play,
She is anyway

In Penny Lane the barber shaves another customer,
We see the banker sitting waiting for a trim,
And then the fireman rushes in
From the pouring rain - very strange

Penny Lane is in my ears and in my eyes
There beneath the blue suburban skies
I sit, and meanwhile back
Penny Lane is in my ears and in my eyes
There beneath the blue suburban skies
Penny Lane!

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Roll up roll up for the Mystery Tour
Roll up roll up for the Mystery Tour

Roll up
That's an invitation
Roll up for the Mystery Tour
Roll up
To make a reservation
Roll up for the Mystery Tour

The Magical Mystery Tour
Is waiting to take you away
Waiting to take you away

Roll up
Roll up for the Mystery Tour
Roll up
Roll up for the Mystery Tour

Roll up
They've got everything you need
Roll up for the Mystery Tour
Roll up
Satisfaction guaranteed
Roll up for the Mystery Tour

The Magical Mystery Tour is hoping to take you away
Hoping to take you away

The Mystery Tour

Ah

The Magical Mystery Tour
Roll up
Roll up for the Mystery Tour

Roll up
That's an invitation
Roll up for the Mystery Tour
Roll up
To make a reservation
Roll up for the Mystery Tour

The Magical Mystery Tour
Is coming to take you away
Coming to take you away

The Magical Mystery Tour
Is dying to take you away
Dying to take you away
Take you today

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Love, love, love
Love, love, love
Love, love, love

There's nothing you can do that can't be done
Nothing you can sing that can't be sung
Nothing you can say, but you can learn how to play the game
It's easy
Nothing you can make that can't be made
No one you can save that can't be saved
Nothing you can do, but you can learn how to be you in time
It's easy

All you need is love
All you need is love
All you need is love, love
Love is all you need

All you need is love
All you need is love
All you need is love, love
Love is all you need

There's nothing you can know that isn't known
Nothing you can see that isn't shown
There's nowhere you can be that isn't where you're meant to be
It's easy

All you need is love
All you need is love
All you need is love, love
Love is all you need

All you need is love (all together now)
All you need is love (everybody)
All you need is love, love
Love is all you need

Love is all you need
(Love is all you need)
Love is all you need
(Love is all you need)
Love is all you need
(Love is all you need)
Love is all you need
(Love is all you need)
Love is all you need
(Love is all you need)
Love is all you need
(Love is all you need)
Love is all you need
(Love is all you need)
Love is all you need
(Love is all you need)
Love is all you need
(Love is all you need)
Love is all you need
(Love is all you need)
Love is all you need
(Love is all you need)
(Love is all you need)
(Love is all you need)
(Love is all you need)
Yesterday
(Love is all you need)
Oh
Love is all you need
Love is all you need
Oh yeah
Love is all you need
(She love you, yeah, yeah, yeah)
(She love you, yeah, yeah, yeah)
(Love is all you need)
(Love is all you need)

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Day after day, alone on a hill
The man with the foolish grin is sitting perfectly still
Nobody wants to know him
They can see that he's just a fool
But he never gives an answer

But the fool on the hill
Sees the sun going down
And the eyes in his head
See the world spinning round

His head in a cloud
The man with a foolish grin is talking perfectly loud
But nobody wants to hear him
They can see that he's just a fool
But he never gives an answer

But the fool on the hill
Sees the sun going down
And the eyes in his head
See the world spinning round

But nobody wants to know him
They can see that he's just a fool
But he never gives an answer

But the fool on the hill
Sees the sun going down
And the eyes in his head
See the world spinning round

But the fool on the hill
Sees the sun going down
And the eyes in his head
See the world spinning round

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Let me take you down
'Cause I'm going to Strawberry Fields
Nothing is real
And nothing to get hung about
Strawberry Fields forever

Living is easy with eyes closed
Misunderstanding all you see
It's getting hard to be someone
But it all works out
It doesn't matter much to me

Let me take you down
'Cause I'm going to Strawberry Fields
Nothing is real
And nothing to get hung about
Strawberry Fields forever

No one I think is in my tree
I mean it must be high or low
That is you can't, you know, tune in
But it's all right
That is, I think, it's not too bad

Let me take you down
'Cause I'm going to Strawberry Fields
Nothing is real
And nothing to get hung about
Strawberry Fields forever

Always, no, sometimes think it's me
But you know I know when it's a dream
I think, er, no, I mean, er, yes
But it's all wrong
That is I think I disagree

Let me take you down
'Cause I'm going to Strawberry Fields
Nothing is real
And nothing to get hung about
Strawberry Fields forever
Strawberry Fields forever
Strawberry Fields forever

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On 2/22/2019 at 10:24 AM, krista4 said:

21.  You've Got To Hide Your Love Away (Help!, 1965)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

C'mon.  I realize some Beatles songs are love/hate, but this has to be one that nobody hates, right?  Every person in the world sings along starting with that "Hey!", don't they?  C'mon.

Everybody knows this was heavily influenced by Bob Dylan, but did you also know that it was banned in Lilliput because the line "feeling two-foot small" was deemed offensive to the island's inhabitants?  Well of course not, because that's just dumb.  C'mon.

Back to Dylan, though.  The musical influence of Dylan is obvious, from the (nearly all) acoustic nature to the folky feel; perhaps even John's sometimes off-key vocal are an homage?  In addition to the music, though, we can hear Dylan's influence on John's lyrics.  While John had started to explore more personal themes on a few songs in this same time period (such as "I'm a Loser," also influenced by Dylan), this song seemed like the most significant break from the lighter lyrics on earlier works, becoming more introspective and delving much deeper into John's personal pain.  Some of the themes seen in many of John's later works - isolation, bitterness, vulnerability - seem to have first been explored here.  I guess I should mention that some have speculated that this was about Brian Epstein, or about John's alleged tryst with Epstein, but none of that has ever been confirmed.

As @Nigel Tufnel pointed out, this song is simpler than many that I have rated lower than it.  As a result, I don't have a ton to say about the musical style or structure.  What I love about it is more the overall feel; it hits some unidentifiable magic for me.  I love the folk ballad style in 3/4 time.  I love that the lyrics are evocative rather than obvious.  I love John's slightly off-key and subdued vocal performance that then gains strength in the later verses, and I love that in this case there aren't harmonies or double-tracked vocals that would detract from the gravelly lead.  I love the gradual addition of more percussion and other instrumentation, from the tambourine to the maracas to, of course, those flutes.  To me the most musically interesting part of the song is that final verse, which is all instrumental and acts as the finale to the song instead of going into another chorus; that was a bold and unexpected step at the time.

Fun fact:  This was the first Beatles song to feature a session musician, flautist Johnnie White.  (I pretend the Andy White session on "Love Me Do" did not happen.)  "Flautist" is a fun word to say.  Fla-u-tist.  Flau-tist.

Mr. krista:  "Obviously I really like it and especially what Lennon does with his voice, in that lower register like Alex Chilton in the Box Tops. Cool anthemic quality.  Singing in that register means everybody can sing that song.  All folk songs should be in that key."

Suggested cover:  Since @JZilla just rejoined the thread, this is a good time for Eddie Vedder.  So many covers by him of this song, but I guess this is "official"?  I like this live version quite a bit.  

love this one!  my parents were huge dylan fans.  they sorta knew him, ran in the same circles and what not.  my mom has always referred to me , as her '"blue eyed son".  because, i have blue eyes, duh, and this song.   rather deep song, for a baby.  

 

eta: flau - tist.  

Edited by DA RAIDERS
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17 hours ago, krista4 said:

 

She had a phenomenal voice.  She should stay off drums the same way Ringo should stay off vocals.  :lol: 

Karen was also actually a very accomplished drummer as well.

https://youtu.be/H47v7yYRfjA

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On 2/22/2019 at 3:17 PM, krista4 said:

I suspect this is one of the consensus top three for which my ranking won't move the needle, so here we go!

 

20.  While My Guitar Gently Weeps (White Album, 1968)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

George's inspiration for this song began with a notion he gleaned from I Ching:  "In the West we think of coincidence as being something that just happens...  But the Eastern concept is that whatever happens is all meant to be, and that there's no such thing as coincidence - every little item that's going down has a purpose....I decided to write a song based on the first thing I saw upon opening any book – as it would be relative to that moment, at that time.  I picked up a book at random, opened it – saw 'gently weeps' – then laid the book down again and started the song."  I likewise decided to write a song based on this inspiration, so just now opened my favorite book, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, stabbed my finger in without looking, and got:  "Mongolian" and "cheese."  I'm not sure I'm going to get the same masterpiece out of these two words, but I'll do my best.

The introduction to this song is one of my favorites in any Beatles composition; there's something about the way it builds that's like no other.  (Yes, I did that.)  Those sometimes-doubled piano notes begin a driving tempo, with the guitars and hi-hat adding to this progression toward what we know is going to be exciting.  While I love the groove of the verses, my favorite part of the song is that bridge, especially the double-tracked soaring vocals and the organ on those high notes.  I think the transitions on this song are especially good, especially the last note of the second verse becoming the first note of the guitar solo.  With each transition, the song seems to become fuller and more infectious, as more instrumentation is added and the energy increases, building to that wonderful moaning fade-out.  George's vocal sounds more confident and wildly more expressive on this song than I hear in his prior work; to me, with the possible exception of "Here Comes The Sun," he's never sounded better on a Beatles track.  

I expect that what many people love here is the guitar solo, but I'd find the song just as appealing without it.  Though I don't feel as strongly about it as Mr. krista apparently does (below), I would love this song even more if it were George on the lead guitar.  I'm just such a fan of George's style and manner of expressing himself through his guitar, and I'd like to have heard the entire song as being an extension of George's emotions instead of what I find so on-the-nose as to be a little wan and colorless.  George did initially try to do a backward guitar solo himself, such as he'd pioneered in "I'm Only Sleeping," and during earlier sessions also had John on electric guitar instead, but he wasn't satisfied with any of these early recordings, in part because he (likely correctly) thought the others weren't taking the song seriously or giving much effort to it.  A bit bummed out, George had an idea while driving into London with Eric Clapton, and he asked Clapton to perform the solo instead.  Clapton recorded the solo in one take, with a bunch of flanging added later at his request to make it sound more Beatles-y.  Credit to him, then, for giving George some encouragement when the other Beatles weren't; he also lifted the spirits of the group generally during the otherwise tense sessions.  Paul recalls Clapton being nice, accommodating, and allowing them all to have "good fun" for a while. 

Dozens of recordings of this song were made and scrapped with a variety of instrumentation, different line-ups, different almost everything.  I usually don't post any of these early versions in my write-ups, mostly because I'm already taking so much time and valuable FBG space with each one, but the first take of this song, with only George and Paul, is special. George's vocal is spectacular!

Mr. krista:  "The weeping guitar is just the cheesiest effect. And I feel like bringing Clapton in gives this veneer of professionalism that makes it so boring.  Outside of Cream and the Yardbirds, he is just so ####### boring. They bring him in just to en-boring something.  I don’t know, this is rough-edged and exciting and seemed to express the artist. Let’s just spread wax over it all and look, I’m making the guitar weep.  Mememememe.  Listen, it’s like weeping.  ####### hack. I wish he’d fallen out the window."

Suggested cover:  Aw, you know I'm not going to post anything but this.  

love love love this one!  i have a feeling, i'm going to be saying that a lot, from here on out.  i had this as your #1.  i randomly threw my guess into a post, long after the deadline.

 

i love this thread.

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On 2/23/2019 at 12:18 PM, krista4 said:

18.  Dear Prudence (White Album, 1968)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

The award for Biggest Jump in the Rankings goes to "Dear Prudence."  This is a song that I used to turn off when it came on; I was convinced that I couldn't stand it.  Would have been in Tier 5 were it not for forcing myself to listen to it over and over, and now it lands in the top 20!  WTG Prudence!

Prudence herself was Mia Farrow's crazy little sister, who was at the Maharishi's ashram at the same time as the lads in 1968.  According to John, Prudence "seemed to go slightly barmy, meditating too long, and couldn't come out of the little hut that we were living in. They selected me and George to try and bring her out because she would trust us. ... She'd been locked in for three weeks and wouldn't come out, trying to reach God quicker than anybody else."  Others described Prudence as being in a near-catatonic state, and the Maharishi provided her a full-time nurse.  While the song didn't lure her out - she didn't hear it until the album was released - Prudence did finally emerge from her state and spend some time with John and George, who told her that the song had been written about her. 

Ringo alert!  This is my highest ranked song with no Ringo, having been recorded while he'd temporarily quit the band.  That's Paul on drums, and, unlike on "Back in the U.S.S.R.," I think Paul acquits himself quite nicely here, especially on the fills and in the last verse when he goes nutso playing every pattern known to man.  Paul also played, in addition to the usual bass, piano and flugelhorn.  Because if you're Paul McCartney and see a flugelhorn lying around, naturally you can play it.  

John puts the finger-picking style he learned at the ashram from Donovan to great use here; I love how the song begins and ends with that delicate circling guitar line over Paul's soft one-note bass and tambourine.  Though it starts quietly and delicately, the song picks up incredible intensity, first by filling out the bass part and adding the drums in the first verse.  Though the second verse tracks the same melody with a continuation of that meandering double-tracked guitar line and John's double-tracked vocals, it adds a delicious descending bass line, then gorgeous high falsetto harmonies, and then George's low guitar chords to continue the build.  It's when Paul's descending bass starts providing those harmonies to John's guitar that this song gets exciting for me.  From that second verse we head into the bridge, which features George adding a more prominent lead vocal part and our first non-John vocals, with swelling harmonies provided by, among others, Mal Evans and Jackie Lomax (recently signed to the Apple label).  Rounding back out of the bridge, the intensity continues to build as George's guitar now distinctly winds around John's vocal, and Paul adds a series of slightly jarring downward arpeggios on piano; then handclaps and loud tambourines and double-tracked guitar and Paul's inexplicable drum solo and whirling high-pitched piano notes and gigantic glissando and things seem slightly out of control until...resolution.  This song has what must be the most satisfying resolution of any in the Beatles catalogue - John extends out the vocal lines while each of the instruments first briefly falls into a standard pattern instead of the preceding madness, and then each fades away, bringing us back to the beginning and leaving us with just John's finger-picking guitar. 

I find everything about this song mesmerizing.

Mr. krista: "I like it a lot.  Surprisingly heavy.  I didn’t think I liked it.  Love the Indian guitar sound with slight distortion coupled with the finger-picked part.  The drums sound kind of blowed out and heavy. You could put a song like that on a Flaming Lips record and it would not be at all out of place."

Suggested cover:  If you're not going to be able to capture it, and you're not, might as well go really different:  Siouxshie and the Banshees

 

i f'ing love the white album.  i had a little record player in my room.  wore that bad boy out.

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14.  Hey Jude (single, 1968)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

I initially placed this in my second tier, with notes that read in part, "Why is half the song nananas?  Did Paul McCartney look into the future and just see himself as a 78-year-old man who didn’t want to have to sing at his shows and could just turn it into a sing-along?  Does anyone actually listen to the whole song?  Pleasurably?  Needs 50% fewer "nanana"s".  Then I forced myself to keep listening to the song over and over, and it kept moving up my rankings despite the "nanana"s and later because of them (more on that below).  Paul actually did not intend for the "nanana"s to go on so long, but said he was having so much fun that he just kept going.  

As everybody knows, Paul wrote this song for Julian Lennon while Julian's parents were in the midst of the divorce; the song was initially written as "Hey Jules."  Paul came up with the song as he drove to visit them:   "I thought, as a friend of the family, I would motor out to Weybridge and tell them that everything was all right: to try and cheer them up, basically, and see how they were.... I started singing: 'Hey Jules – don't make it bad, take a sad song, and make it better...' It was optimistic, a hopeful message for Julian..."  John acknowledged the song as "one of Paul's masterpieces," and though he knew the song had been written to Julian, he also saw another meaning:  "I always heard it as a song to me.  If you think about it, Yoko's just come into the picture.  He's saying, 'Hey, Jude - hey, John.'  I know I'm sounding like one of those fans who reads things into it, but you can hear it as a song to me.  The words 'go out and get her' - subconsciously he was saying, 'Go ahead, leave me.' ...The angel inside him was saying, 'Bless you.'"

Listening to the song as if both Paul and John were singing directly to Julian gives it a sweetness that launches it into my first tier solely by virtue of that fact.  Layering in the emotion that John describes above, where he believes Paul is giving him a blessing, makes their vocals even more meaningful and touchingly beautiful.  I feel a warmth and generosity in John's vocal in the song that he didn't often show.  While John credits Paul wholly with this song, John did have one significant contribution:  when Paul first played it for John, he said he would be changing the line "the movement you need is on your shoulder" because "it sounds like a parrot."  John thought it was the best line in the song, though, and convinced Paul not to take it out, saying, "I know what it means - it's great."  That encouragement from John continues to affect Paul:  "Then I could see it through his eyes.  So when I play that song, that's the line when I think of John and I sometimes get a little emotional during that moment."

Luckily someone else has already done a thorough analysis of the song's lyrical structure, so I can skip that part.  As mentioned above, one of my favorite aspects of this song are the vocals, which I think Paul and John imbue with such warmth and richness as to expand the song from "buck up, kid" to a grander vision of how good life can be.  It's like the optimism of "Here Comes The Sun" x 1000, swollen into a pure joy that was rarely seen from the band at this point (or from John at any point).  Another aspect I particularly love about the song is the way it builds, which to me makes all this optimism believable.  It starts softly, with Paul's voice sounding warm and hopeful but not yet fully convincing.  At each verse and then the bridge, additional instrumentation or vocal comes in - first the guitar and a light tambourine, then the drums, then the backing vocals, then the harmonies.  With each addition, Paul's voice becomes stronger and more confident, moving from hopeful to insistent that everything is going to be all right, not just for Julian or John, but more broadly for the world as a whole.  By the "nanana"s, the band has reached a state of jubilation, and the "nanana"s extend for so long because they were so exhilarated that they didn't want to stop.  With that background, I found a whole new appreciation for the "nanana"s.  

I'm tempted, as always, to do an analysis of the structure of the song or the various ways in which the musicality is stunning.  But I don't think this song is best enjoyed that way.  I think you just have to let it envelop you, let it transport you to this euphoric, blissful place that it establishes.

One fun note about the recording is that Paul started the final take without realizing that Ringo had gone to the bathroom:  "...while I was doing it I suddenly felt Ringo tiptoeing past my back rather quickly, trying to get to his drums. And just as he got to his drums, boom boom boom, his timing was absolutely impeccable. So I think when those things happen, you have a little laugh and a light bulb goes off in your head and you think, 'This is the take!'  And you put a little more into it. You think, 'oh, ####! This has got to be the take, what just happened was so magic!'"  

After the recording was done, George Martin tried to get the band to cut down the length of the song, saying at over seven minutes it would not be played on the radio.  The band won out, and guess what?  It was still played on the radio.  A lot.  "Hey Jude" sold 10 million copies and had a longer run at #1 - nine weeks - than any other Beatles song.

Fun fact:  listen first for an "oh" ~2:56 and then a "####### hell" ~2:58 that was left in the mix.  John claimed this was Paul, but the more believable story is that it was John's reaction to flubbing a lyric just before that.

Mr. krista:  "That song just keeps going.  How long do you think they were in the studio nana'ing before they gave up the ghost and quit?  How many more nananas did they actually do before the fade out?  Like 15-20 minutes?  They nanana for so long you forget it’s a cheer up song for John Lennon’s kid after John Lennon abandoned his family.  Then he had nothing to do with Julian, after beating up his mom.  Man, your heroes will disappoint you every time.  What I’m saying is I don’t like it much."

Suggested cover:  Wilson Pickett

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I'm with mr. krista on this one.  It never ends.  

ETA:  just checked, not in my top 70 

Edited by Binky The Doormat

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54 minutes ago, zamboni said:

Karen was also actually a very accomplished drummer as well.

https://youtu.be/H47v7yYRfjA

I expected someone to point this out, but my quip wouldn't have been as good if I'd told the truth.

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1 minute ago, Binky The Doormat said:

I'm with mr. krista on this one.  It never ends.  

It's pretty cool at the end of a Paul concert.

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23 minutes ago, krista4 said:

14.  Hey Jude (single, 1968)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

I initially placed this in my second tier, with notes that read in part, "Why is half the song nananas?  Did Paul McCartney look into the future and just see himself as a 78-year-old man who didn’t want to have to sing at his shows and could just turn it into a sing-along?  Does anyone actually listen to the whole song?  Pleasurably?  Needs 50% fewer "nanana"s".  Then I forced myself to keep listening to the song over and over, and it kept moving up my rankings despite the "nanana"s and later because of them (more on that below).  Paul actually did not intend for the "nanana"s to go on so long, but said he was having so much fun that he just kept going.  

As everybody knows, Paul wrote this song for Julian Lennon while Julian's parents were in the midst of the divorce; the song was initially written as "Hey Jules."  Paul came up with the song as he drove to visit them:   "I thought, as a friend of the family, I would motor out to Weybridge and tell them that everything was all right: to try and cheer them up, basically, and see how they were.... I started singing: 'Hey Jules – don't make it bad, take a sad song, and make it better...' It was optimistic, a hopeful message for Julian..."  John acknowledged the song as "one of Paul's masterpieces," and though he knew the song had been written to Julian, he also saw another meaning:  "I always heard it as a song to me.  If you think about it, Yoko's just come into the picture.  He's saying, 'Hey, Jude - hey, John.'  I know I'm sounding like one of those fans who reads things into it, but you can hear it as a song to me.  The words 'go out and get her' - subconsciously he was saying, 'Go ahead, leave me.' ...The angel inside him was saying, 'Bless you.'"

Listening to the song as if both Paul and John were singing directly to Julian gives it a sweetness that launches it into my first tier solely by virtue of that fact.  Layering in the emotion that John describes above, where he believes Paul is giving him a blessing, makes their vocals even more meaningful and touchingly beautiful.  I feel a warmth and generosity in John's vocal in the song that he didn't often show.  While John credits Paul wholly with this song, John did have one significant contribution:  when Paul first played it for John, he said he would be changing the line "the movement you need is on your shoulder" because "it sounds like a parrot."  John thought it was the best line in the song, though, and convinced Paul not to take it out, saying, "I know what it means - it's great."  That encouragement from John continues to affect Paul:  "Then I could see it through his eyes.  So when I play that song, that's the line when I think of John and I sometimes get a little emotional during that moment."

Luckily someone else has already done a thorough analysis of the song's lyrical structure, so I can skip that part.  As mentioned above, one of my favorite aspects of this song are the vocals, which I think Paul and John imbue with such warmth and richness as to expand the song from "buck up, kid" to a grander vision of how good life can be.  It's like the optimism of "Here Comes The Sun" x 1000, swollen into a pure joy that was rarely seen from the band at this point (or from John at any point).  Another aspect I particularly love about the song is the way it builds, which to me makes all this optimism believable.  It starts softly, with Paul's voice sounding warm and hopeful but not yet fully convincing.  At each verse and then the bridge, additional instrumentation or vocal comes in - first the guitar and a light tambourine, then the drums, then the backing vocals, then the harmonies.  With each addition, Paul's voice becomes stronger and more confident, moving from hopeful to insistent that everything is going to be all right, not just for Julian or John, but more broadly for the world as a whole.  By the "nanana"s, the band has reached a state of jubilation, and the "nanana"s extend for so long because they were so exhilarated that they didn't want to stop.  With that background, I found a whole new appreciation for the "nanana"s.  

I'm tempted, as always, to do an analysis of the structure of the song or the various ways in which the musicality is stunning.  But I don't think this song is best enjoyed that way.  I think you just have to let it envelop you, let it transport you to this euphoric, blissful place that it establishes.

One fun note about the recording is that Paul started the final take without realizing that Ringo had gone to the bathroom:  "...while I was doing it I suddenly felt Ringo tiptoeing past my back rather quickly, trying to get to his drums. And just as he got to his drums, boom boom boom, his timing was absolutely impeccable. So I think when those things happen, you have a little laugh and a light bulb goes off in your head and you think, 'This is the take!'  And you put a little more into it. You think, 'oh, ####! This has got to be the take, what just happened was so magic!'"  

After the recording was done, George Martin tried to get the band to cut down the length of the song, saying at over seven minutes it would not be played on the radio.  The band won out, and guess what?  It was still played on the radio.  A lot.  "Hey Jude" sold 10 million copies and had a longer run at #1 - nine weeks - than any other Beatles song.

Fun fact:  listen first for an "oh" ~2:56 and then a "####### hell" ~2:58 that was left in the mix.  John claimed this was Paul, but the more believable story is that it was John's reaction to flubbing a lyric just before that.

Mr. krista:  "That song just keeps going.  How long do you think they were in the studio nana'ing before they gave up the ghost and quit?  How many more nananas did they actually do before the fade out?  Like 15-20 minutes?  They nanana for so long you forget it’s a cheer up song for John Lennon’s kid after John Lennon abandoned his family.  Then he had nothing to do with Julian, after beating up his mom.  Man, your heroes will disappoint you every time.  What I’m saying is I don’t like it much."

Suggested cover:  Wilson Pickett

i'm with the, "it's too long" crowd.  it's AMAZING for about 2:45.  the length of so many of their other songs.  then, it becomes tedious and starts to detract from the AMAZING first 2:45  :shrug: 

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How is everyone planning to celebrate George’s birthday tomorrow?

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2 minutes ago, krista4 said:

How is everyone planning to celebrate George’s birthday tomorrow?

I'm going out and spending my tax return on a new sitar.

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7 hours ago, DocHolliday said:

Oof.  I'm a bigger fan than most of Help! But it's songs are dropping like flies.  I listen to it as much as I listen to any Beatles record but K is always full of surprises.  The title track is one of the underrated Beatles songs and I already professed my love for Ticket to Ride.  Help! is a rocker way ahead of its time and is different than most of their tunes at that point.   

It only seems like this because it had more flies to drop (or some such) having placed five in the top 25.

49 minutes ago, Getzlaf15 said:

I have 4 songs left :lmao:

I only have 13 songs left out of my top 25.  It's brutal!

23 minutes ago, Sebowski said:

I'm thinking of going to this, but I ahte signing up for these without seeing the actual menu. 

https://www.instagram.com/p/BuCqOXsH-vf/?utm_source=ig_share_sheet&igshid=fqhpzemt5zdi

Sounds fun, actually.

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55 minutes ago, krista4 said:

How is everyone planning to celebrate George’s birthday tomorrow?

I’m thinking that offering up my wife to my guitar-playing good friend wouldn’t go over well.

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22 minutes ago, zamboni said:

I’m thinking that offering up my wife to my guitar-playing good friend wouldn’t go over well.

How about sleeping with your drummer's wife instead?

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Yeah no offense but Hey Jude is ranked at least 150 spots too high in my opinion.  So bloated.  Not that interesting to begin with.  If you have ever heard a person pick this at karaoke you have to leave immediately or your life will be forever worse.

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Oops, forgot to update.

  1. simey – Abbey Road medley
  2. Mister CIA – She Said She Said
  3. timschochet – Paperback Writer
  4. pecorino – Hey Jude
  5. Binky the Doormat – In My Life
  6. wikkidpissah – Taxman
  7. Dr. Octopus – Got To Get You Into My Life
  8. Nigel Tufnel – You’ve Got to Hide Your Love Away
  9. Uruk-Hai – Ticket to Ride
  10. Dinsy Ejotuz – Let It Be
  11. Tom Hagen – Eleanor Rigby
  12. Spock – Rain
  13. Leroy Hoard – A Day in the Life
  14. rockaction  - I Want to Hold Your Hand
  15. Ted Lange as Your Bartender – In My Life
  16. shuke – Abbey Road medley
  17. Alex P Keaton – Something
  18. Getzlaf15 – With A Little Help From My Friends
  19. zamboni – While My Guitar Gently Weeps
  20. neal cassady – While My Guitar Gently Weeps
  21. Shaft41 – Hey Bulldog
  22. Ilov80s – Norwegian Wood
  23. Officer Pete Malloy – I Want to Hold Your Hand
  24. Godsbrother – Dear Prudence
  25. ManofSteelhead – Eleanor Rigby
  26. mike9289 – I’m Looking Through You
  27. heckmanm: Eleanor Rigby
  28. Atomic Punk – A Day in the Life
  29. [Mrs. Punk – In My Life]
  30. bananafish – Abbey Road medley
  31. bonzai – Abbey Road medley
  32. fatguy – Here Comes the Sun
  33. ScottNorwood- Yesterday
  34. Sebowski – I’m So Tired

 

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17 minutes ago, fatguyinalittlecoat said:

Yeah no offense but Hey Jude is ranked at least 150 spots too high in my opinion.  So bloated.  Not that interesting to begin with.  If you have ever heard a person pick this at karaoke you have to leave immediately or your life will be forever worse.

I love most of these guys songs. But there are such things as overrated.

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2 hours ago, krista4 said:

14.  Hey Jude (single, 1968)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

I think they should have started fading out the song at the 4 minute mark when Paul sings Jude Judey Judey Judey Judey Judey Ow Wow. I still think it is a great song.

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40 minutes ago, fatguyinalittlecoat said:

Yeah no offense but Hey Jude is ranked at least 150 spots too high in my opinion.  So bloated.  Not that interesting to begin with.  If you have ever heard a person pick this at karaoke you have to leave immediately or your life will be forever worse.

Where do you rank Penny Lane?

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2 minutes ago, Getzlaf15 said:

Where do you rank Penny Lane?

About 4 minutes shorter.

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Na, na na, na na na na, na na na na, my number 3...number 3, 3, 3, 3, 3,...

Na, na na, na na na na.....

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17 hours ago, krista4 said:

I know; I messed up.  Should’ve been farther back.  Might still switch it.

Too soon.

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13.  Nowhere Man (Rubber Soul, 1965)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

John was struggling to come up with a new song, battling ennui and isolation in the London suburbs.  After several hours of frustration, he decided to lie down, and while he did, "Nowhere Man" came to him.  Though the song was a reflection of some despondency in his own life, John adopted a more Paul-like approach, writing it as if talking about an allegorical character.  (And in fact this song was used in Yellow Submarine as a song about sad but charming little Jeremy Hillary Boob.)  

The three-part harmonies in this song are incredible, not just in the notes they sing, but because their dreamy presentation does such an amazing job of on the one hand vivifying the melancholy lyrics, but on the other also weaving into the song as if to tell John he's not alone.  Paul's high harmonies at the end are especially chilling.  These lyrics are astonishingly good, summoning universal feelings of isolation and loneliness, but with hopeful notes as well (e.g., "the world is at your command").  It's almost like John is having a conversation with himself, emphasizing the downbeat lyrics of the verses in a downward motion of notes, but then bucking himself up on the bridges with brighter vocals and reminders that everyone goes through this and it will get better - not unlike what Paul was saying to Julian in "Hey Jude."  John's vocal is particularly sweet and vulnerable, making it one of my favorites; my favorite part is the hopefulness when he sings that line, "the world is at your command."  Every Beatle is phenomenal in support of the song's feel.  George's little fills are perfectly on-time supplements, and he and John support the lyrics well on their terrific double-tracked guitar solo that spirals down through the chords evoking the loneliness, but then ends with that hopeful high harmonic played by George to flow into the next verse.  George's work on this song is so distractingly excellent that I only recently started noticing Paul's bass line, and now I find it impossible not to focus on it; I'm convinced it's one of his best.

Mr. krista:  "Paul’s part at the end - that’s the best.  I love how the chime-y 12-string sounds like The Byrds if The Byrds were really good. Love how George Harrison really owned that sound. Particularly great lyrics.  That would have been an incredible band name – it says a lot without really saying anything.  Like I love the band Police Teeth…I don’t know what it means."

Suggested cover:  Low

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WE HAVE WINNERS!

With “Norwegian Wood” and “In My Life” making it into the top 10, @pecorino has clinched a share of the win, with six correct.  He had “Hey Jude” in the “singles” category, so won’t be able to reach severn.

@simey and @Tom Hagen each have five correct right now, with simey having chosen “Rain” in the “singles” category, and Tom Hagen going with “Strawberry Fields Forever.”  Since those are the two songs in the category that still remain, one of them has this correct and will move into a tie for win!

 

A Day In The Life

Shaft 41

Bonzai

Ted Lange 

Atomic Punk

bananafish

Heckmanm

fatguy

ilov80s

ManofSteelhead

Getzlaf

ScottNorwood

rockaction

simey

Dr. Octopus

tim

Spock

Tom Hagen

mike9289

Binky

pecorino

 

Across The Universe

ManofSteelhead

ScottNorwood

Mister CIA

simey

pecorino

 

And Your Bird Can Sing

Bonzai

ScottNorwood

Mister CIA

Simey

tim

Tom Hagen

Alex P Keaton

pecorino

 

For No One

Shaft41

Tim

 

I’m So Tired

Bonzai

Uruk

 

Abbey Road medley

Shaft

Bonzai

Ted Lange

bananafish

heckmanm

fatguy 

Ilov80s

Getzlaf

simey

Dr. Octopus

tim

Spock

Uruk

Alex P Keaton

Binky

pecorino

 

I’ve Just Seen A Face

fatguy

Ilov80s

Mister CIA

Tom Hagen

mike9289

 

In My Life

Ted Lange

Atomic Punk

fatguy

ManofSteelhead

Getzlaf

rockaction

simey

Spock

Tom Hagen

Uruk

Alex P Keaton

Binky

pecorino

 

Norwegian Wood

Ted Lange

Atomic Punk

heckmanm

Ilov80s

ScottNorwood

rockaction

Spock

Tom Hagen

mike9289

Binky

pecorino

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10 minutes ago, krista4 said:

WE HAVE WINNERS!

With “Norwegian Wood” and “In My Life” making it into the top 10, @pecorino has clinched a share of the win, with six correct.  He had “Hey Jude” in the “singles” category, so won’t be able to reach severn.

 

isn't he also the one i have the bet with? *gulp*

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7 minutes ago, wikkidpissah said:

isn't he also the one i have the bet with? *gulp*

Oh yeah, that's right!  You still have "For No One," "Rain," and "And Your Bird Can Sing" eligible from that bet, right?

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1 minute ago, krista4 said:

Oh yeah, that's right!  You still have "For No One," "Rain," and "And Your Bird Can Sing" eligible from that bet, right?

yeah - you had me all psyched with like 9 Revolver songs in your top 50, but have been faintpraising em out of contention pretty steadily since. just hope your favorite charity doesn't involve tabby mange or sumn. 

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32 minutes ago, krista4 said:

13.  Nowhere Man (Rubber Soul, 1965)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

John was struggling to come up with a new song, battling ennui and isolation in the London suburbs.  After several hours of frustration, he decided to lie down, and while he did, "Nowhere Man" came to him.  Though the song was a reflection of some despondency in his own life, John adopted a more Paul-like approach, writing it as if talking about an allegorical character.  (And in fact this song was used in Yellow Submarine as a song about sad but charming little Jeremy Hillary Boob.)  

The three-part harmonies in this song are incredible, not just in the notes they sing, but because their dreamy presentation does such an amazing job of on the one hand vivifying the melancholy lyrics, but on the other also weaving into the song as if to tell John he's not alone.  Paul's high harmonies at the end are especially chilling.  These lyrics are astonishingly good, summoning universal feelings of isolation and loneliness, but with hopeful notes as well (e.g., "the world is at your command").  It's almost like John is having a conversation with himself, emphasizing the downbeat lyrics of the verses in a downward motion of notes, but then bucking himself up on the bridges with brighter vocals and reminders that everyone goes through this and it will get better - not unlike what Paul was saying to Julian in "Hey Jude."  John's vocal is particularly sweet and vulnerable, making it one of my favorites; my favorite part is the hopefulness when he sings that line, "the world is at your command."  Every Beatle is phenomenal in support of the song's feel.  George's little fills are perfectly on-time supplements, and he and John support the lyrics well on their terrific double-tracked guitar solo that spirals down through the chords evoking the loneliness, but then ends with that hopeful high harmonic played by George to flow into the next verse.  George's work on this song is so distractingly excellent that I only recently started noticing Paul's bass line, and now I find it impossible not to focus on it; I'm convinced it's one of his best.

Mr. krista:  "Paul’s part at the end - that’s the best.  I love how the chime-y 12-string sounds like The Byrds if The Byrds were really good. Love how George Harrison really owned that sound. Particularly great lyrics.  That would have been an incredible band name – it says a lot without really saying anything.  Like I love the band Police Teeth…I don’t know what it means."

Suggested cover:  Low

Great write up.  Nothing more to say.  Just listened to it and still love it.

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Figured I'd just write this one up since it will be comparatively short.  

12.  All My Loving (With the Beatles, 1963)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

If I have a guilty pleasure among my top songs, I guess this would be it.  It's notable historically as being the first song that signaled that Paul was stepping out of John's shadow to become a co-leader of the group, and of course for being the first song The Beatles sang on their iconic Ed Sullivan Show appearance.  It's not lyrically interesting, and the structure isn't complex or ground-breaking  I love it, though, because it's loads of fun.  I can sing along with those fabulous harmonies, and the rhythm guitar lines get me happily bouncing and swaying more than any other Beatles song.  George's first Chet-Atkins-style solo is terrific, and I looooove Paul's walking bass part.  Even surly John loved this one:  "'All My Loving' is Paul, I regret to say.  [laughs]  Because it's a damn good piece of work.  [sings] All my loving... But I play a pretty mean guitar in the back."

Turn it up, sing and dance along, and have a blast!

Mr. krista:  "The breaks are key.  Surprised at how countrified the guitar solo is.  It’s great.  Guess it’s really a country song.  It’s neat.  It’s funny how much you internalize these songs without really listening to them."

Suggested cover:  The good singers (such as Amy Winehouse) turned this into a ballad, which loses everything I love about it.  Please enjoy this video of Paul and Ringo together not performing this song a few years ago instead.

Edited by krista4
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44 minutes ago, wikkidpissah said:

yeah - you had me all psyched with like 9 Revolver songs in your top 50, but have been faintpraising em out of contention pretty steadily since. just hope your favorite charity doesn't involve tabby mange or sumn. 

Well, the most you could expect would be three, since I said I'd have two Revolver songs and one single in the top 10, so you're still right there if "Rain" makes it.   :thumbup:  

ETA:  I'm going to calculate a weighted average for each record.  I don't know what happened to Revolver as I thought it was my favorite, but maybe Help! is based on the rankings.

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