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krista4

In this thread I rank my favorite Beatles songs: 204-1.

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18 hours ago, krista4 said:

11.  Strawberry Fields Forever (single, 1967)

 

One other interesting technical aspect of the song is that the finished product is actually two very different takes spliced together.  John had decided that he liked the first half of one take but the second half of another, which had been recorded in a different key and at a different tempo! John was never concerned with the technical details and left it to George Martin to figure out how to give him the version he wanted.  Martin and Geoff Emerick finally figured out that if they sped up the first one and slowed down the second, they could get the pitch and tempo to match.  Then they had to figure out where to make the edit. If you listen closely around the one-minute mark, as John sings the beginning of the second chorus, you can hear the edit on the word “going” – “let me take you down ‘cause I’m going…” 

 

I think it is great as-is but if I had to choose I would definitely take the electric version over the strings version.

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14 hours ago, krista4 said:

10.  I'm So Tired (White Album, 1968)

 

Obviously I like this song a great deal but would not even be close to my Top Ten.  I doubt it would make my top 50.  Oh well, to each his/her own.

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Every time @krista4 posts a song now, I wonder how I left it out of my top 25 - and then I look at my top 25 and I honestly only see two songs that I could boot to make room and not feel like I was throwing away an old photo album with pictures I could never part with. Only my #24 and #25 songs seemed to have been just thrown in there because I couldn't bear sorting it out anymore.

ETA: and even those two songs bring me joy.

Edited by Dr. Octopus
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Yeah, I don't have much to say other than I was jazzed to see Rain included, as this very board was how I was introduced to the song in one of the old, old music threads. Anyway, "Rain" and "For No One" are both great tracks accompanied by informative takes, not the least of which is the story about the horn in "For No One." Sort of a neat anecdote that says a lot about the place, time, idealism, generational pull...

Interesting.   

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1 hour ago, fatguyinalittlecoat said:

Guitar guy outside my subway stop was singing a song just for krista this morning:  https://youtu.be/QKjaK_JWDgg

With only seven songs left, I was surprised we hadn’t come to the second one where you rock our faces off, and then I realized that it must be that you are going to perform the entire Abbey Road medley. Bravo!

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Just now, krista4 said:

With only seven songs left, I was surprised we hadn’t come to the second one where you rock our faces off, and then I realized that it must be that you are going to perform the entire Abbey Road medley. Bravo!

Well it will be a special treat that I get to post a video of me butchering one of your favorite Beatles songs.

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11 hours ago, krista4 said:

What’s the JD Salinger short story?  Seymour Glass is the protagonist.  It’s a couple at a resort, and then the guy walks off the elevator and kills himself.  It seemed like that.  Where it only hinted at loneliness and despair, then it makes it explicit. 

What an intriguing idea for a story. It's a good day for intriguing ideas.

Also, the repeated use of "nananas" is confusing.

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14 hours ago, krista4 said:

9.  Rain (single, 1966)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

While Paul's unbelievable bass work prevents me from declaring this A RINGO SHOWCASE!, it's undoubtedly one of his best performances.  Ringo agrees:  "My favorite piece of me is what I did on 'Rain.'  I think I just played amazing.  I think it was the first time I used this trick of starting a break by hitting the hi-hat first instead of going directly to a drum off the hi-hat.  I think it's the best out of all the records I've ever made.  'Rain' blows me away.  I know me and I know my playing, and then there's 'Rain.' I feel as though that was someone else playing – I was possessed!"  You go, Ringo!

The deep, heavy feel of this song was accomplished via a technical trick that was novel at the time.  The rhythm tracks were played at an extremely fast tempo and then slowed down at playback, giving that "big, ponderous, thunderous backing" that Paul ended up loving.  Considering how amazing both Paul and Ringo sound on the song, imagine how much even more impressive their playing was when heard at the speed they actually played it! 

Much like the accidental brilliance of the backward guitar on "Tomorrow Never Knows," this song has a backward vocal and backward guitar that also came about by chance.  John had left the studio after the original sessions for this song, taking the tapes with him to listen later that night.  When, under the influence of The Evil Weed, he threaded the tape, he accidentally did it backwards and loved the sound.  He brought it back into the studio the next day and asked (well, more like demanded) that the engineers find a way to run his vocals backward for the song's fade-out and George's guitar backward for parts of the song, which they dutifully accomplished, making this the first recording to feature a backward vocal track.  

I don't have a lot of deep analysis of why I love this song; the lyrics, for instance, aren't notable to me, and the vocals are great but y'know, Beatles.  I just love the heavy groove and that it rocks my face off.

Bonus!  Around this time the Beatles started doing promotional videos for their singles; here's the one for "Rain."

Mr. krista:  "It’s called Rain and the whole song sounds like it’s underwater.  Gives this great impression of being sung in a rainstorm or a car wash or something. You can listen to the Velvet Underground and imagine 16-year-old Iggy Pop listening to it.  With this you just know 16-year-old Robyn Hitchcock listened to that song and thought, 'there’s a new direction.'  There are whole genres of music based on that song.  I don’t know why it’s not more popular or lauded.  It sounds perfectly contemporary; there’s nothing dated about it at all."

Suggested cover:  This is so disappointing.  Some musical heavy-hitters apparently love this song, because I listened to all their versions - from Freddie Mercury to Fairport Convention, Gregg Allman to Todd Rundgren, even listened to the Grateful Dead! - and I disliked all of them.  Why oh why can't someone do a great cover of this song?  :cry:  

I've listened to it again 5 times since it was posted as #9 and still just find it boring.  It probably works on too deep of a level for me to appreciate.

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11 hours ago, krista4 said:

8.  For No One (Revolver, 1966)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

For all my inconsistency, there's one thing I believe I've been consistent on, which is that I much prefer Paul's more personal songs to those about fictitious worlds.  It's fitting that the two purely Paul songs in my top 10 (I'll give him 85% of the Abbey Road medley) fit this category, and in fact that are opposite ends of the same spectrum, from first moments of love in "I've Just Seen A Face" to the end of love in this song.  When he's not just spitting out perfect pop songs - when he stops being polite and starts getting real (hey, I love terrible reality TV) - he writes lyrics that are as deeply affecting as John's or anyone else's.

While there's much to love about this song, I have to start there, with the lyrics, because those are the main reason this song is propelled into my top 10.  I think "You Won't See Me" and "I'm Looking Through You" have some devastating lyrics, but they fall more into bitterness than deep sorrow, and none of them compare to the misery of these:

And yet you don't believe her when she says her love is dead
You think she needs you

Or:

You stay home, she goes out
She says that long ago she knew someone but now he's gone
She doesn't need him

Or, the most devastating part:

And in her eyes you see nothing
No sign of love behind the tears
Cried for no one

To repeat:  "cried for no one."  She has erased you completely. I love how Paul wrote this in the second person, to pull us even more strongly into the story and make us relate to what is occurring.  It feels as if it's just happened to me.  Good god, it practically brings me to tears simply reading the lyrics.

This song is so despondent that it could have slipped into maudlin in the hands of someone not named Paul, John, or George.  Paul is clearly too brilliant to let that happen, so instead of cheesing it up with a bunch of orchestration or backing vocals, he kept it very simple with single-tracked vocals with no harmonies, little reverb, subtle hi-hats, and piano and clavichord on the verses, then bringing in light bass and tambourine beginning with the chorus.  Neither John nor George played on this song, though John frequently referred to this as one of Paul's best works, "superb" even.  Just Paul, Ringo, and Alan Civil, the French horn player.   

I adore the piano parts on the choruses, and as a piano player I always air play them when they come on, which can be a problem since I'm usually driving when I hear this.  Love the use of the clavichord, too, and Paul's vocal is gorgeous, with a cold affect that works to cast him as the narrator of someone else's pathos.  The change from major to minor keys from the verse to the chorus accentuates the most despairing lyrics, and the transition back into major through the addition measure at the end of the choruses is a lovely, unexpected touch.

What's special about the instrumentation of this song, though, is obviously that French horn.  Paul had loved the French horn as a child and wanted to use it here, so George Martin arranged for Alan Civil, formerly of the London Philharmonic and at that time the principal horn player for the BBC Symphony Orchestra, to join the session.  When Martin asked Paul what he wanted Civil to play, Paul tried to sketch it out as a vocal.  As Martin wrote it out, he came to the end and explained to Paul that the high E was the furthest the French horn could go, not the F that Paul wanted.  Paul was not dissuaded:  "We came to the session and Alan looked up from his bit of paper: 'Eh, George? I think there's a mistake here – you've got a high F written down. Then George and I said, 'Yeah,' and smiled back at him, and he knew what we were up to and played it. These great players will do it. Even though it's officially off the end of their instrument, they can do it, and they're quite into it occasionally."  Geoff Emerick describes Martin as having played a bit of a middleman between the two generations - the "kids" like Paul who didn't understand any limitations, and the more staid generation of Civil and Martin who weren't quite sure how to relate to this new type of musician, but appreciated being included in it.  

The solo that Civil laid down was extraordinary, including that high F, somehow expressing a loss even deeper than that suggested by the lyrics.  Sometimes music can suggest what mere words are insufficient to express.  As much as I love the solo, I'm even more entranced by the way the horn reappears in the last verse, softly repeating a portion of its solo on top of Paul's vocal, as if one last memory of this love affair appears and then fades away.  It's magical.  I also love the ending of this song...if you hadn't heard it before, you might expect a resolution, an additional note to get you back down into the home key, but instead the last note floats out there and it just...ends.  That's it, life sucks, sorry, g'bless.

Mr. krista:  "“Was that a real song?  I mean, was it when he broke up with Jane Asher or something?  It’s really cold, and the ending is cold.  What’s the JD Salinger short story?  Seymour Glass is the protagonist.  It’s a couple at a resort, and then the guy walks off the elevator and kills himself.  It seemed like that.  Where it only hinted at loneliness and despair, then it makes it explicit. Ended just like that song ended."

Suggested covers:  Much like Otis Redding, if there's an Emmylou Harris cover you can be guaranteed I'm going to post it.  Good chance I'll always post a Diana Krall cover (this one with James Taylor), too.

Amazing write up!   How did this not make my top 25?   Ugh!!!!!    

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53 minutes ago, bananafish said:

What an intriguing idea for a story. It's a good day for intriguing ideas.

Also, the repeated use of "nananas" is confusing.

Is that where your username came from (the story, I mean)?

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56 minutes ago, fatguyinalittlecoat said:

Well it will be a special treat that I get to post a video of me butchering one of your favorite Beatles songs.

You are good. If I played it, it would be butchered

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11 hours ago, krista4 said:

8.  For No One (Revolver, 1966)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

For all my inconsistency, there's one thing I believe I've been consistent on, which is that I much prefer Paul's more personal songs to those about fictitious worlds.  It's fitting that the two purely Paul songs in my top 10 (I'll give him 85% of the Abbey Road medley) fit this category, and in fact that are opposite ends of the same spectrum, from first moments of love in "I've Just Seen A Face" to the end of love in this song.  When he's not just spitting out perfect pop songs - when he stops being polite and starts getting real (hey, I love terrible reality TV) - he writes lyrics that are as deeply affecting as John's or anyone else's.

While there's much to love about this song, I have to start there, with the lyrics, because those are the main reason this song is propelled into my top 10.  I think "You Won't See Me" and "I'm Looking Through You" have some devastating lyrics, but they fall more into bitterness than deep sorrow, and none of them compare to the misery of these:

And yet you don't believe her when she says her love is dead
You think she needs you

Or:

You stay home, she goes out
She says that long ago she knew someone but now he's gone
She doesn't need him

Or, the most devastating part:

And in her eyes you see nothing
No sign of love behind the tears
Cried for no one

To repeat:  "cried for no one."  She has erased you completely. I love how Paul wrote this in the second person, to pull us even more strongly into the story and make us relate to what is occurring.  It feels as if it's just happened to me.  Good god, it practically brings me to tears simply reading the lyrics.

This song is so despondent that it could have slipped into maudlin in the hands of someone not named Paul, John, or George.  Paul is clearly too brilliant to let that happen, so instead of cheesing it up with a bunch of orchestration or backing vocals, he kept it very simple with single-tracked vocals with no harmonies, little reverb, subtle hi-hats, and piano and clavichord on the verses, then bringing in light bass and tambourine beginning with the chorus.  Neither John nor George played on this song, though John frequently referred to this as one of Paul's best works, "superb" even.  Just Paul, Ringo, and Alan Civil, the French horn player.   

I adore the piano parts on the choruses, and as a piano player I always air play them when they come on, which can be a problem since I'm usually driving when I hear this.  Love the use of the clavichord, too, and Paul's vocal is gorgeous, with a cold affect that works to cast him as the narrator of someone else's pathos.  The change from major to minor keys from the verse to the chorus accentuates the most despairing lyrics, and the transition back into major through the addition measure at the end of the choruses is a lovely, unexpected touch.

What's special about the instrumentation of this song, though, is obviously that French horn.  Paul had loved the French horn as a child and wanted to use it here, so George Martin arranged for Alan Civil, formerly of the London Philharmonic and at that time the principal horn player for the BBC Symphony Orchestra, to join the session.  When Martin asked Paul what he wanted Civil to play, Paul tried to sketch it out as a vocal.  As Martin wrote it out, he came to the end and explained to Paul that the high E was the furthest the French horn could go, not the F that Paul wanted.  Paul was not dissuaded:  "We came to the session and Alan looked up from his bit of paper: 'Eh, George? I think there's a mistake here – you've got a high F written down. Then George and I said, 'Yeah,' and smiled back at him, and he knew what we were up to and played it. These great players will do it. Even though it's officially off the end of their instrument, they can do it, and they're quite into it occasionally."  Geoff Emerick describes Martin as having played a bit of a middleman between the two generations - the "kids" like Paul who didn't understand any limitations, and the more staid generation of Civil and Martin who weren't quite sure how to relate to this new type of musician, but appreciated being included in it.  

The solo that Civil laid down was extraordinary, including that high F, somehow expressing a loss even deeper than that suggested by the lyrics.  Sometimes music can suggest what mere words are insufficient to express.  As much as I love the solo, I'm even more entranced by the way the horn reappears in the last verse, softly repeating a portion of its solo on top of Paul's vocal, as if one last memory of this love affair appears and then fades away.  It's magical.  I also love the ending of this song...if you hadn't heard it before, you might expect a resolution, an additional note to get you back down into the home key, but instead the last note floats out there and it just...ends.  That's it, life sucks, sorry, g'bless.

Mr. krista:  "“Was that a real song?  I mean, was it when he broke up with Jane Asher or something?  It’s really cold, and the ending is cold.  What’s the JD Salinger short story?  Seymour Glass is the protagonist.  It’s a couple at a resort, and then the guy walks off the elevator and kills himself.  It seemed like that.  Where it only hinted at loneliness and despair, then it makes it explicit. Ended just like that song ended."

Suggested covers:  Much like Otis Redding, if there's an Emmylou Harris cover you can be guaranteed I'm going to post it.  Good chance I'll always post a Diana Krall cover (this one with James Taylor), too.

Man, I love this song.  It's my #6.  And, I really only developed an appreciation for it in the last 2 months.  At first, I loved the melody and was entranced by the french horn solo.  Then, I started listening to the lyrics, and "devastating" is the only apt word to describe them.  Did I read he wrote this on a boat in the Bahamas or something?  If so, you're surrounded by paradise and all this beauty, and you're just wrecked from your relationship falling apart and crumbling around you and you write this?  Unimaginably brilliant.  

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Probably won’t be able to do any write-ups until late this afternoon at earliest.  I mention this so that no one thinks I haven’t posted because I’m busy writing up all eight sections of the medley.

Edited by krista4
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1 hour ago, Dr. Octopus said:

Every time @krista4 posts a song now, I wonder how I left it out of my top 25 - and then I look at my top 25 and I honestly only see two songs that I could boot to make room and not feel like I was throwing away an old photo album with pictures I could never part with. Only my #24 and #25 songs seemed to have been just thrown in there because I couldn't bear sorting it out anymore.

ETA: and even those two songs bring me joy.

I have a 35 minute drive to work.  Each morning, that drive is spent listening to Breakfast with the Beatles.  This morning, I probably heard about 10 or 11 songs during my drive.  AND I LOVED EVERY SINGLE ONE OF THEM.  Not just, "Hey, that song's pretty good."  I mean, loved them.  And, when I look at my top #25, only one of them is in it.  It's freakin' insane.  And these songs ran the gamut from 1964 on.  

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19 minutes ago, krista4 said:

Probably won’t be able to do any write-ups until late this afternoon at earliest.  I mention this so that no one thinks I haven’t posted because I’m busy writing up all eight sections of the medley.

Let's get a move on and wrap this up so @Binky The Doormat can begin his Todd retrospective and i can post my examination into the heuristics of Bananarama.

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36 minutes ago, Shaft41 said:

Man, I love this song.  It's my #6.  And, I really only developed an appreciation for it in the last 2 months.  At first, I loved the melody and was entranced by the french horn solo.  Then, I started listening to the lyrics, and "devastating" is the only apt word to describe them.  Did I read he wrote this on a boat in the Bahamas or something?  If so, you're surrounded by paradise and all this beauty, and you're just wrecked from your relationship falling apart and crumbling around you and you write this?  Unimaginably brilliant.  

Wow. Great way of describing your reaction to this song!   Man.   

 

Mrs APK saw me writing about this and said "how was this not in your top 25?!   Wtf is wrong with you?"

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49 minutes ago, krista4 said:

Is that where your username came from (the story, I mean)?

Yes ma'am. I read it in high school and it struck a chord with me. I'd never read anything like it and I became a big Salinger fan. I occasionally write fiction and I always name the protagonist Seymour after Seymour Glass (that's about as deep as it gets with me).

I'm always tickled when people get the bananafish reference. Tends to be good people :thumbup:

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2 hours ago, krista4 said:

Probably won’t be able to do any write-ups until late this afternoon at earliest.  I mention this so that no one thinks I haven’t posted because I’m busy writing up all eight sections of the medley.

please drag this out.  i will be uber bummed, when you finish

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2 hours ago, wikkidpissah said:

Let's get a move on and wrap this up so @Binky The Doormat can begin his Todd retrospective and i can post my examination into the heuristics of Bananarama.

I will be waiting for the Bananarama one, and so will Robert De Niro.

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14 minutes ago, Leroy Hoard said:

I will be waiting for the Bananarama one, and so will Robert De Niro.

Baaaa-na-na-rama-na-na, 'nanaramaaaa, De Ni-iro (talkin' Itali-ali-ali-aaaano, wOw, wOw), He-ey Bob!

 

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7.  Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown) (Rubber Soul, 1965)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

It’s my favorite song about an affair and my favorite song featuring arson, but only my second favorite Beatles song with “bird” in the title!  

This song hooks me immediately with that opening lyric, one of my top Beatles lyrics: “I once had a girl or should I say she once had me.”  Though John later acknowledged the song was about an affair, he claimed not to remember its being about any specific woman; he also stated that he had no idea where the title of the song came from.  Given that this was written in John’s self-described “Dylan phase,” it’s not surprising that the lyrics are more abstract and ambiguous in a Dylan fashion. John also made the lyrics purposefully cryptic so as not to upset his wife about the subject matter.  As a result, though, Beatles fans have spent 50+ years debating the meanings of each line, including the “I lit a fire” line, which some people believed referred to starting a fire in a fireplace or lighting up a joint.  But Paul has confirmed instead that it indeed meant the protagonist burned everything to the ground as an act of revenge. 

Musically this song is most notable for George’s sitar work, the first time a Beatle played a sitar on one of their songs.  Inspired by a Ravi Shankar record, George had bought a poor-quality sitar from a local shop and started messing around with it.  When they’d finished the backing track for this song, the guys thought it still needed something, so George pulled it out.  It’s hard to imagine now how a sound so crucial to this song was basically an afterthought.  And as with so many other groundbreaking ideas from the band, once the Beatles did it, everyone else did, too.

This is a song I love not for any one element but overall atmosphere and mood.  While it’s all beautiful – this is one of my favorite melody lines, and the harmonies switched to a minor key on the bridge are gorgeous – it’s also feels furtive and slightly off balance.  The waltz time ( @rockaction alert!) would suggest a more straightforward narrative, but instead the lyrics make the song’s ambience allusive.  On top of that impressionistic atmosphere are placed unusual elements such as the sitar, adding to the uncertainty.  It’s extraordinarily mature and complex songwriting for such an early time in their careers, and the musical presentation of the ideas is perfectly.

Mr. krista:  "Clearly an amazing song.  Hardly any English language did that.  It’s no wonder Haruki Murakami wrote a whole novel about it.  For such a song that was his straightest, least weird novel.  Everything works in accord with one another.  You couldn’t pull one aspect out and have it still remain.  It all seems necessary."

Suggested cover:  Lots of jazz artists have covered this one, which makes sense.  I like this Kurt Elling version.

Edited by krista4
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6 hours ago, Shaft41 said:

I have a 35 minute drive to work.  Each morning, that drive is spent listening to Breakfast with the Beatles.  This morning, I probably heard about 10 or 11 songs during my drive.  AND I LOVED EVERY SINGLE ONE OF THEM.  Not just, "Hey, that song's pretty good."  I mean, loved them.  And, when I look at my top #25, only one of them is in it.  It's freakin' insane.  And these songs ran the gamut from 1964 on.  

I have this happen a lot, too!  It's especially noticeable since I started doing this; I'll be in the car and I'm LOVING a song and realize I ranked it in the 130s or something.

5 hours ago, bananafish said:

 I occasionally write fiction and I always name the protagonist Seymour after Seymour Glass (that's about as deep as it gets with me).

I think this is cool.

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15 minutes ago, krista4 said:

7.  Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown) (Rubber Soul, 1965)

 

Meh.  Basically rides in on the coattails of "Drive My Car".  

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24 minutes ago, krista4 said:

7.  Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown) (Rubber Soul, 1965)

The first song to be ranked the same by the Composite and K4!   Oh but wait, it moves up a spot and becomes the fourth song to have a one point difference.   Yes, I know this is TMI, sue me!

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6.  A Day In The Life (Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, 1967)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

It's opposite day in the write-ups; I'm not going to say much about this song, while I have comparatively a dissertation from Mr. krista. I'm not saying much, because c'mon.  There are like whole books that have written about just that final chord, so no one needs me talking about how much I love the drum fills (which are amazing, by the way).  I'm far from alone in stating that this is the best song the Beatles ever recorded.  It might be the best song anyone has ever recorded.

Mr. krista:  "That’s a pretty great song.  I like the part where you can hear someone talking, counting bars out loud on a shaker, that was supposed to be edited out but they ended up leaving it in.  The recording of that song took about 34 hours.  The entire Please Please Me album was 10:45.  Things were different then.  Can’t tell if it’s a major or a minor chord at the end.  Clearly many different instruments, but I don’t know if they’re all tuned differently.  I like the sped up part.  Always thought that was one’s life flashing before one’s eyes.  It might be the last time you hear the Beatles all working meaningfully toward the same goal.  The atonal, discordant crescendo – there’s whole genres of music based on that, and I really like a lot of those records.  It’s hard to believe that the most popular band in the world was doing stuff like this.  That’s just bonkers to me.  It’d be like if Taylor Swift put out a drony, death-metal record.  How is that possible?"

Suggested cover:  Chris Cornell

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19 hours ago, krista4 said:
On 2/25/2019 at 11:17 AM, krista4 said:

Here's who's left in the "guess my #1" thingie.  No one chose four of the songs that made my top 10:  Across The Universe, And Your Bird Can Sing, For No One, and I've Just Seen A Face. 

  1. simey – Abbey Road medley
  2. Binky the Doormat – In My Life
  3. Spock – Rain
  4. Leroy Hoard – A Day in the Life
  5. Ted Lange as Your Bartender – In My Life
  6. shuke – Abbey Road medley
  7. Ilov80s – Norwegian Wood
  8. Atomic Punk – A Day in the Life
  9. Mrs. Punk – In My Life
  10. bananafish – Abbey Road medley
  11. bonzai – Abbey Road medley
  12. Sebowski – I’m So Tired

 

Three of my five favorite songs weren't selected by anyone, so we're down to only "In My Life" and the medley as the possible winners.  

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Day really is their magnum opus.  Not much else to be said but when you consider how many great songs they made that makes  even more impressive.

Edited by Leroy Hoard
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22 hours ago, krista4 said:

9.  Rain (single, 1966)

 

Suggested cover:  This is so disappointing.  Some musical heavy-hitters apparently love this song, because I listened to all their versions - from Freddie Mercury to Fairport Convention, Gregg Allman to Todd Rundgren, even listened to the Grateful Dead! - and I disliked all of them.  Why oh why can't someone do a great cover of this song?  :cry:  

Pearl Jam, August 20, 2016 Wrigley Field.

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To Mr and Mrs K.,

Thank you for all the hard work , dedication and :heart: put into this thread.   

Signed, Getz

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5 minutes ago, Getzlaf15 said:

To Mr and Mrs K.,

Thank you for all the hard work , dedication and :heart: put into this thread.   

Signed, Getz

Mr and Mrs K assure the public their production will be second to none.

Edited by Leroy Hoard
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3 hours ago, -fish- said:

Pearl Jam, August 20, 2016 Wrigley Field.

His voice sounds good but the music isn't heavy enough for me, though that could just be recording quality.  Oddly it seems like they also performed it exactly two years later; I liked that one more because you could hear the bass a lot better.

Edited by krista4

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26 minutes ago, krista4 said:

6.  A Day In The Life (Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, 1967)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

It's opposite day in the write-ups; I'm not going to say much about this song, while I have comparatively a dissertation from Mr. krista. I'm not saying much, because c'mon.  There are like whole books that have written about just that final chord, so no one needs me talking about how much I love the drum fills (which are amazing, by the way).  I'm far from alone in stating that this is the best song the Beatles ever recorded.  It might be the best song anyone has ever recorded.

Mr. krista:  "That’s a pretty great song.  I like the part where you can hear someone talking, counting bars out loud on a shaker, that was supposed to be edited out but they ended up leaving it in.  The recording of that song took about 34 hours.  The entire Please Please Me album was 10:45.  Things were different then.  Can’t tell if it’s a major or a minor chord at the end.  Clearly many different instruments, but I don’t know if they’re all tuned differently.  I like the sped up part.  Always thought that was one’s life flashing before one’s eyes.  It might be the last time you hear the Beatles all working meaningfully toward the same goal.  The atonal, discordant crescendo – there’s whole genres of music based on that, and I really like a lot of those records.  It’s hard to believe that the most popular band in the world was doing stuff like this.  That’s just bonkers to me.  It’d be like if Taylor Swift put out a drony, death-metal record.  How is that possible?"

Suggested cover:  Chris Cornell

Funny, I never noticed the bar count until the take included on the Anthology.  Now I can’t unhear it.

Sugarplum fairy, sugarplum fairy...

Edited by Ted Lange as your Bartender

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26 minutes ago, krista4 said:

6.  A Day In The Life (Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, 1967)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

 

No better way to say, "This is my labor of love" than to put the greatest song ever recorded @ #6

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2 hours ago, Ted Lange as your Bartender said:

Funny, I never noticed the bar count until the take included on the Anthology.  Now I can’t unhear it.

Sugarplum fairy, sugarplum fairy...

Funny, I’ve always heard that count. It presumably goes to 24, you know, hours in a day. I believe this is the most commonly covered Beatles song that Phish does. No link, they are easy to find online and fairly true to the original. Still fantastic to hear live. I agree with wikkid, Leroy Hoard and krista that this is, more or less objectively, the Beatles best song and possibly the greatest piece of popular music ever written. 

Edited by pecorino
making amends
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Album					Hi	Lo	Avg	Med
-----					---	---	---	---
Please Please Me			35	202	131	147
With the Beatles			12	194	140	149
A Hard Day’s Night			23	161	82	72
Beatles for Sale			56	185	137	149
Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band	6	165	92	89
Magical Mystery Tour			44	197	143	160
The Beatles (aka White Album)		10	204	114	120
Yellow Submarine			31	171	114	127

Yet to be completed: Help! (1), Rubber Soul (1), Revolver (1),  Abbey Road (1), Let it Be (1)

Hard Day's Night still holding on to the lead despite having nothing ranked above 23.

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15 minutes ago, pecorino said:

Funny, I’ve always heard that count. It presumably goes to 24, you know, hours in a day. I believe this is the most commonly covered Beatles song that Phish does. No link, they are easy to find online and fairly true to the original. Still fantastic to hear live. I agree with wikkid that this is, more or less objectively, the Beatles best song and possibly the greatest piece of popular music ever written. 

:lmao: But not with me, for saying it first?

ETA:  DOES NO ONE READ MY WRITE-UPS?

Edited by krista4
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1 minute ago, krista4 said:

:lmao: But not with me, for saying it first?

ETA:  DOES NO ONE READ MY WRITE-UPS?

i agree with wikkid that, no matter how much we love them, no one reads your write-ups....

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9 minutes ago, wikkidpissah said:

i agree with wikkid that, no matter how much we love them, no one reads your write-ups....

Perfectly played.  :lmao: 

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50 minutes ago, krista4 said:

6.  A Day In The Life (Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, 1967)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

My favorite part of this song is right after Paul sings, "Somebody spoke and I went into a dream" and then John goes, "Aaaaaahh Aaaaaahhh, Aaaahhhhhh, Aaaahhhh, etc."  Love those dreamy aaahhs.

Edited by simey
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Huh. I'm going to insist that there are songs I like better on Pet Sounds, which this was supposed to be the answer to. 

Personal preference. I sort of like my vocals ascending to the heavens rather than discordant orchestras. 

But it's still brilliant.  I love the time signature change, piano, and Paul. "And somebody spoke and I went into a dream..." 

Then John adds backing. Quite lovely. I'm still missing the counting, I think. 

Regardless, totally worth a listen again. Love it.  

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1 minute ago, simey said:

My favorite part of this song is right after Paul sings, "Somebody spoke and went into a dream" and then John goes, "Aaaaaahh Aaaaaahhh, Aaaahhhhhh, Aaaahhhh, etc."  Love those dreamy aaahhs.

Uh, oh my. See the post below yours.  

eta* We wrote it at nearly the same time.  

Edited by rockaction

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I actually went to the Royal Albert Hall and started counting holes. :nerd:

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1 minute ago, rockaction said:

Uh, oh my. See the post below yours.  

eta* We wrote it at nearly the same time.  

:tinfoilhat:

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5 minutes ago, zamboni said:

I actually went to the Royal Albert Hall and started counting holes. :nerd:

I hope you fixed at least one.

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9 minutes ago, simey said:

My favorite part of this song is right after Paul sings, "Somebody spoke and went into a dream" and then John goes, "Aaaaaahh Aaaaaahhh, Aaaahhhhhh, Aaaahhhh, etc."  Love those dreamy aaahhs.

I love that part, too!

Other favorites:

The little piano fills, especially the one after "the English army had just won the war," which combines with the drum fill to be particularly intense, and all of the fills in Paul's middle part.

Someone's (John's?) heavy breathing after the line "I noticed I was late."

Every Ringo fill and how they all seem to be different, but especially the one above, the one after "he blew his mind out in a car," and all of the ones in the last verse about the holes, which all sound like he is drumming what the lyrics are saying!

The alarm sound ~2:18, which was another happy accident.  Mal Evans set off the clock's alarm, and it ended up fitting the lyrics that followed, so it was left in (also because they couldn't find a way to edit it out).

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25 minutes ago, rockaction said:

Huh. I'm going to insist that there are songs I like better on Pet Sounds, which this was supposed to be the answer to. 

Personal preference. I sort of like my vocals ascending to the heavens rather than discordant orchestras. 

But it's still brilliant.  I love the time signature change, piano, and Paul. "And somebody spoke and I went into a dream..." 

Then John adds backing. Quite lovely. I'm still missing the counting, I think. 

Regardless, totally worth a listen again. Love it.  

You can hear it most clearly starting ~1:52-1:53.

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