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krista4

In this thread I rank my favorite Beatles songs: 204-1.

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43 minutes ago, rockaction said:

Huh. I'm going to insist that there are songs I like better on Pet Sounds, which this was supposed to be the answer to. 

Personal preference. I sort of like my vocals ascending to the heavens rather than discordant orchestras. 

But it's still brilliant.  I love the time signature change, piano, and Paul. "And somebody spoke and I went into a dream..." 

Then John adds backing. Quite lovely. I'm still missing the counting, I think. 

Regardless, totally worth a listen again. Love it.  

If we are taking greatest songs of the 60s, I do think Good Vibrations has an edge on A Day in the Life.

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2 minutes ago, Ilov80s said:

If we are taking greatest songs of the 60s, I do think Good Vibrations has an edge on A Day in the Life.

Wow, that's a tough call.

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2 hours ago, Sconch said:

Meh.  Basically rides in on the coattails of "Drive My Car".  

See yourself out 

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3 minutes ago, Ilov80s said:

If we are taking greatest songs of the 60s, I do think Good Vibrations has an edge on A Day in the Life.

Blasphemy!

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Just now, Mr. Mojo said:

Wow, that's a tough call.

Yep, yep all time classics. I like A Day in the Life but one could argue it’s two very good song fragments that were never fully fleshed out so they just got stuck together. It obviously works incredibly well and it’s a masterpiece but I’m not entirely sure why it works so well. 

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2 minutes ago, Ilov80s said:

Yep, yep all time classics. I like A Day in the Life but one could argue it’s two very good song fragments that were never fully fleshed out so they just got stuck together. It obviously works incredibly well and it’s a masterpiece but I’m not entirely sure why it works so well. 

Good Vibrations is basicly the same setup. Mike Love provided the chorus to Wilson's main theme.

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3 hours ago, krista4 said:

7.  Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown) (Rubber Soul, 1965)

and the harmonies switched to a minor key on the bridge are gorgeous

The harmonies in this song are sublime. Like, they've become the dictionary definition of vocal harmony in a song to me.

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7 minutes ago, Gr00vus said:

The harmonies in this song are sublime. Like, they've become the dictionary definition of vocal harmony in a song to me.

Dude, why are you talking about this in the Beach Boys thread?

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30 minutes ago, Leroy Hoard said:

Good Vibrations is basicly the same setup. Mike Love provided the chorus to Wilson's main theme.

GV takes shifts but thematically it’s much more unified. It feels like one song to me much more than A Day in the Life which has what I assume is the effect of a collage. I never feel the two parts of A Day in the Life ever meet where I feel they do in Good Vibrations. In both cases it’s what makes them great.

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3 minutes ago, krista4 said:

Dude, why are you talking about this in the Beach Boys thread?

God only knows.

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1 hour ago, krista4 said:

:lmao: But not with me, for saying it first?

ETA:  DOES NO ONE READ MY WRITE-UPS?

Sorry, I usually just jump to read what Mr K wrote.

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2 hours ago, pecorino said:

Funny, I’ve always heard that count. It presumably goes to 24, you know, hours in a day. I believe this is the most commonly covered Beatles song that Phish does. No link, they are easy to find online and fairly true to the original. Still fantastic to hear live. I agree with wikkid that this is, more or less objectively, the Beatles best song and possibly the greatest piece of popular music ever written. 

HARD CHEESE THERE PAL!!!

...and after that grate performance with your lucky guesses and all.  :)

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17 minutes ago, Dinsy Ejotuz said:

I know there's an answer.

But I'm waiting for the day...

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34 minutes ago, Ilov80s said:

GV takes shifts but thematically it’s much more unified. It feels like one song to me much more than A Day in the Life which has what I assume is the effect of a collage. I never feel the two parts of A Day in the Life ever meet where I feel they do in Good Vibrations. In both cases it’s what makes them great.

Maybe it's meant to be separate. Just like what you dream (john) is separate from what is real life (paul).

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7 minutes ago, Leroy Hoard said:

Maybe it's meant to be separate. Just like what you dream (john) is separate from what is real life (paul).

Yeah we have to think it was intentionally disconnected.

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On 2/18/2019 at 11:08 PM, Oliver Humanzee said:

I don't think that "casual" Beatles' fans appreciate "And Your Bird Can Sing" enough. 
 
Musically speaking, my own personal crank is turned primarily by a particular kind of combustion (not occurring entirely in rock music, though mostly that is where it happens) that has little to do with the "pop" aspects of music that most folks seem to respond to.  That is to say, I truly don't give a fig about a song's "catchiness", its "tunefulness", or whether or not one can bop one's painfully Caucasoid head along to it while driving.  "Danceability" is hahahah whatever chief people manage to dance to Stravinsky and I look like a raccoon drunk on fermented crabapples when I try to perform a movement more artful than "walk briskly in a straight line".  

That said, "And Your Bird Can Sing" burns in the ways that the best rock music does:  it is funny and spiteful and is built around a seemingly endless, hall-of-fame caliber riff as good as "Black Dog" or "Supernaut".  

And Christ if it isn't "catchy" and "hooky" and "fuzzy" and two minutes of absurdly radio-friendly pop music from one of the best bands on the planet at the height of their powers. 

I mean, The Posies, Guided By Voices, Cheap Trick, Game Theory and that whole LA "Paisley Underground" spent whole decades trying to achieve that kind rock/pop/art synthesis and it has just been hanging out there on side B of Revolver this whole time. 

The hell.  Why aren't all of you "power pop" music aficionados jabbering about this song so ceaselessly that I have to mute you on Twitter?  Why the hell do you all keep jabbering about Weezer?  (I mean, I assume.  That's what you were all jabbering about when I muted you on Twitter.) 

5.  And Your Bird Can Sing (Revolver, 1966)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

I've bumped Mr. krista's prior post on this song; between that post and his comments below, he covers much of what I have to say about why I love the song, plus some.  One thing he doesn't mention is that this has one of those blast starts that I've mentioned in several of my top 25 Beatles songs, immediately launching you into the ride, and the ride remains energetic and ebullient throughout.  The vocals, both lead by John and the harmonies from Paul and George, are outstanding.  And as Mr. krista references below, the lyrics are fantastic, with plays on words throughout; in addition to the one he mentions, John also cycles through double meanings on the senses of sight ("you can't see me") and hearing ("you can't hear me") to emphasize the absence of understanding and empathy.

Both "She Said She Said" and "Ticket To Ride" have been mentioned as the most Beatle-y Beatles songs, but I'd like to throw this one in the mix for consideration as well.  I can't wait to hear @fatguyinalittlecoat rock our faces off by simultaneously playing both George's and Paul's guitar parts!

Mr. krista's earlier comments:  "What I love most in rock music is a good riff, though I don’t know how to describe what makes a riff better than other riffs. But that is The Good Riff. [instructs me to use initial caps there] A great riff.  Unlike a lot of riffs, it’s ascending, and it goes over two bars. But it’s fuzzy.  The tempo is really fast.  It’s really tough to play a good riff that fast.  The best metal riffs are slowed down.  It’s very fast but unhurried.  Says a lot about what a great drummer Ringo is.  Everything could go off the rails easily, but he keeps it together. While the riff ascends, Lennon’s vocals go down.  The lyrics are incredibly good – you’ve seen seven wonders but a total inability to empathize (“but you don’t get me”).  Double meaning of “you don’t get me”?  It’s like a really happy ####-you song.  Gleefully being pissed off.  Not explicit but smarter – #### you."

Suggested cover:  Not in the same league (how could it be), but adequate:  The Jam

Edited by krista4
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2 minutes ago, krista4 said:

Sorry, wikkid.  :( 

Great choice as a top 5 song. Maybe it’s becoming less underrated?  And, yes, that locks down our bet. Very generous of wikkid to offer the field on his bet. Just saved me a hundred bucks. Did I mention that I’m thrilled to see this as #5 (and not #1)?

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8 minutes ago, pecorino said:

Great choice as a top 5 song. Maybe it’s becoming less underrated?  And, yes, that locks down our bet. Very generous of wikkid to offer the field on his bet. Just saved me a hundred bucks. Did I mention that I’m thrilled to see this as #5 (and not #1)?

:lmao:  You're welcome!  I felt bad as soon as I saw that.

It seems like it might be getting recognized more.  When I first started getting into the Beatles about 20 years ago, this one immediately stood out to be and became one of my favorites, a perch from which it's never fallen.  But at the time, it seemed like no one talked about it at all.  

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5 minutes ago, krista4 said:

5.  And Your Bird Can Sing (Revolver, 1966)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

I've bumped Mr. krista's prior post on this song; between that post and his comments below, he covers much of what I have to say about why I love the song, plus some.  One thing he doesn't mention is that this has one of those blast starts that I've mentioned in several of my top 25 Beatles songs, immediately launching you into the ride, and the ride remains energetic and ebullient throughout.  The vocals, both lead by John and the harmonies from Paul and George, are outstanding.  And as Mr. krista references below, the lyrics are fantastic, with plays on words throughout; in addition to the one he mentions, John also cycles through double meanings on the senses of sight ("you can't see me") and hearing ("you can't hear me") to emphasize the absence of understanding and empathy.

Both "She Said She Said" and "Ticket To Ride" have been mentioned as the most Beatle-y Beatles songs, but I'd like to throw this one in the mix for consideration as well.  I can't wait to hear @fatguyinalittlecoat rock our faces off by simultaneously playing both George's and Paul's guitar parts!

Mr. krista's earlier comments:  "What I love most in rock music is a good riff, though I don’t know how to describe what makes a riff better than other riffs. But that is The Good Riff. [instructs me to use initial caps there] A great riff.  Unlike a lot of riffs, it’s ascending, and it goes over two bars. But it’s fuzzy.  The tempo is really fast.  It’s really tough to play a good riff that fast.  The best metal riffs are slowed down.  It’s very fast but unhurried.  Says a lot about what a great drummer Ringo is.  Everything could go off the rails easily, but he keeps it together. While the riff ascends, Lennon’s vocals go down.  The lyrics are incredibly good – you’ve seen seven wonders but a total inability to empathize (“but you don’t get me”).  Double meaning of “you don’t get me”?  It’s like a really happy ####-you song.  Gleefully being pissed off.  Not explicit but smarter – #### you."

Suggested cover:  Not in the same league (but how could it be), but adequate:  The Jam

Somehow in my childhood, despite being raised by a mother who LOVES music AND the Beatles, a woman who was in college when Revolver was released.......I didn't hear the whole album until college (at the earliest).   As such, I've underappreciated it until recent years.  My mom still doesn't really know many songs on this album.....so anyway, it's taken me a long time to hear the album enough times that I've developed my own attachment to it.

That said, this was the one song on the album that I immediately loved the first time I heard it.  You and Mr k have already explained why it is amazing......including the way it just hits you right out of the gate.   I also have a soft spot for songs that are directed toward & written as a personal message for individual people the writer knew.  (Example:  Dylan and Positively 4th Street)   When listening to those types of songs I often think....what is it like to hear a popular song that is basically written about you.....that says essentially "you suck ballz" or "go #### yourself"?   And to do that, as a writer and musician, in a way where the song is still amazing for any random person to listen and enjoy it?   Unreal.

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Nice choice. I never would have guessed that would be so high I but like the call.  

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11 minutes ago, Alex P Keaton said:

Somehow in my childhood, despite being raised by a mother who LOVES music AND the Beatles, a woman who was in college when Revolver was released.......I didn't hear the whole album until college (at the earliest).   As such, I've underappreciated it until recent years.  My mom still doesn't really know many songs on this album.....so anyway, it's taken me a long time to hear the album enough times that I've developed my own attachment to it.

That said, this was the one song on the album that I immediately loved the first time I heard it.  You and Mr k have already explained why it is amazing......including the way it just hits you right out of the gate.   I also have a soft spot for songs that are directed toward & written as a personal message for individual people the writer knew.  (Example:  Dylan and Positively 4th Street)   When listening to those types of songs I often think....what is it like to hear a popular song that is basically written about you.....that says essentially "you suck ballz" or "go #### yourself"?   And to do that, as a writer and musician, in a way where the song is still amazing for any random person to listen and enjoy it?   Unreal.

Great post.  Excellent point on that last part.

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46 minutes ago, Alex P Keaton said:

Somehow in my childhood, despite being raised by a mother who LOVES music AND the Beatles, a woman who was in college when Revolver was released.......I didn't hear the whole album until college (at the earliest).   As such, I've underappreciated it until recent years.  My mom still doesn't really know many songs on this album.....so anyway, it's taken me a long time to hear the album enough times that I've developed my own attachment to it.

Most of my childhood exposure to the Beatles was the red and blue compilation albums. Other than an overzealous friend who insisted everything John did on the White album was gold, I really didn't get the Beatles album experience until well into adulthood. But yes, when I finally got around to Revolver, it was a revelation (and the red album only had two tracks on it from Revolver, one of those being Yellow Submarine). And another aside, some record exec in America listened to this album when it came out and decided to omit And Your Bird Can Sing from it. I hope he lost his job, or at least got his hearing fixed.

Edited by Kilgore Trout
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1 hour ago, krista4 said:

5.  And Your Bird Can Sing (Revolver, 1966)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

I've bumped Mr. krista's prior post on this song; between that post and his comments below, he covers much of what I have to say about why I love the song, plus some.  One thing he doesn't mention is that this has one of those blast starts that I've mentioned in several of my top 25 Beatles songs, immediately launching you into the ride, and the ride remains energetic and ebullient throughout.  The vocals, both lead by John and the harmonies from Paul and George, are outstanding.  And as Mr. krista references below, the lyrics are fantastic, with plays on words throughout; in addition to the one he mentions, John also cycles through double meanings on the senses of sight ("you can't see me") and hearing ("you can't hear me") to emphasize the absence of understanding and empathy.

Both "She Said She Said" and "Ticket To Ride" have been mentioned as the most Beatle-y Beatles songs, but I'd like to throw this one in the mix for consideration as well.  I can't wait to hear @fatguyinalittlecoat rock our faces off by simultaneously playing both George's and Paul's guitar parts!

Mr. krista's earlier comments:  "What I love most in rock music is a good riff, though I don’t know how to describe what makes a riff better than other riffs. But that is The Good Riff. [instructs me to use initial caps there] A great riff.  Unlike a lot of riffs, it’s ascending, and it goes over two bars. But it’s fuzzy.  The tempo is really fast.  It’s really tough to play a good riff that fast.  The best metal riffs are slowed down.  It’s very fast but unhurried.  Says a lot about what a great drummer Ringo is.  Everything could go off the rails easily, but he keeps it together. While the riff ascends, Lennon’s vocals go down.  The lyrics are incredibly good – you’ve seen seven wonders but a total inability to empathize (“but you don’t get me”).  Double meaning of “you don’t get me”?  It’s like a really happy ####-you song.  Gleefully being pissed off.  Not explicit but smarter – #### you."

Suggested cover:  Not in the same league (how could it be), but adequate:  The Jam

Have to come in with another Anthology cut for this.  They lose it pretty quick in this and it delolves into hysterics but I really enjoy how much they seem to be enjoying themselves.  George was quoted as saying how much he enjoyed the Revolver sessions and you can hear that that’s the case (or it’s because of the pot, either way...)

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And Your Bird Can Sing is a great song off of an outstanding album.  But, even though it is a rocker, it isn't in my top 25.  As always K is full of surprises.  

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1 hour ago, krista4 said:

Sorry, wikkid.  :( 

 

1 hour ago, pecorino said:

Great choice as a top 5 song. Maybe it’s becoming less underrated?  And, yes, that locks down our bet. Very generous of wikkid to offer the field on his bet. Just saved me a hundred bucks. Did I mention that I’m thrilled to see this as #5 (and not #1)?

pecorino & i discussed it yesterday and we would like the bet to be paid to a charity of krista's choice.

ETA: congrats, sheepcheese

Edited by wikkidpissah
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51 minutes ago, wikkidpissah said:

 

pecorino & i discussed it yesterday and we would like the bet to be paid to a charity of krista's choice.

ETA: congrats, pec

Aw, that is so kind of you guys.  Let's send it to the Boys & Girls Club, either the national org or one near you.  My dad was pretty much solely responsible for getting one built in the town where I grew up, doing all the organization and fundraising, and as a result the club was named after him.  I served on the board of the Memphis chapter for a bit while I lived there, too.  Great organization that, in addition to all the good works they do, fundraises and spends wisely.

ETA:  Or if you prefer, The Innocence Project.  I got to know them well when they helped me on my pro bono death penalty case, and are also a worthy organization for their work and the way they use their funds.

Edited by krista4
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So after #3, what about posting the final 2 write ups side by side w\o rankings initially and maybe post up a poll to let us all guess your #1 favorite before the big reveal?

Feels like we need to add some nanananas before the end.

Edited by Rustoleum
Pole, poll, Paul, Pol, whatever
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3 hours ago, Ilov80s said:

See yourself out 

I will....

 

to your Mom’s house...

 

as usual

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Good Vibrations!? What's happening here? That's not even a top ten Beach Boys song. What's going on. Can't we stay focused here? 

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Day in the Life is GOAT unless the medley is considered one. IN MY imo

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8 hours ago, krista4 said:

:lmao: But not with me, for saying it first?

ETA:  DOES NO ONE READ MY WRITE-UPS?

write ups?

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11 hours ago, Gr00vus said:

The harmonies in this song are sublime. Like, they've become the dictionary definition of vocal harmony in a song to me.

Agreed. Way earlier in the thread we were discussing best harmonies by the Beatles. I considered Nowhere Man a slight notch above all the other great harmonies, but to me “Norwegian Wood” are right there, too. 

Edited by zamboni
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10 hours ago, Ted Lange as your Bartender said:

Have to come in with another Anthology cut for this.  They lose it pretty quick in this and it delolves into hysterics but I really enjoy how much they seem to be enjoying themselves.  George was quoted as saying how much he enjoyed the Revolver sessions and you can hear that that’s the case (or it’s because of the pot, either way...)

:lmao: delightful

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10 hours ago, Kilgore Trout said:

Most of my childhood exposure to the Beatles was the red and blue compilation albums. Other than an overzealous friend who insisted everything John did on the White album was gold, I really didn't get the Beatles album experience until well into adulthood. But yes, when I finally got around to Revolver, it was a revelation (and the red album only had two tracks on it from Revolver, one of those being Yellow Submarine). And another aside, some record exec in America listened to this album when it came out and decided to omit And Your Bird Can Sing from it. I hope he lost his job, or at least got his hearing fixed.

I'm using this as my excuse for my lack of familiarity with the song prior to this thread.

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New leader in the clubhouse: Revolver (with a bullet, if you will)

Please Please Me			35	202	131	147
With the Beatles			12	194	140	149
A Hard Day’s Night			23	161	82	72
Beatles for Sale			56	185	137	149
Revolver				5	159	58	48
Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band	6	165	92	89
Magical Mystery Tour			44	197	143	160
The Beatles (aka White Album)		10	204	114	120
Yellow Submarine			31	171	114	127
Singles, etc.				9	198	98	99

Remaining: 1 each from Help!, Rubber Soul, Abbey Road, Let it Be

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1 hour ago, zamboni said:

Agreed. Way earlier in the thread we were discussing best harmonies by the Beatles. I considered Nowhere Man a slight notch above all the other great harmonies, but to me “Norwegian Wood” are right there, too. 

Because is another song where the vocals are recorded perfectly. They cheated by triple tracking John, Paul, and George to get 9 voices.

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She is actually doing it.  The absolute madwoman is going to finish this.

Edited by ScottNorwood
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14 minutes ago, ScottNorwood said:

She is actually doing it.  The absolute madwoman is going to finish this.

Rocky Road (Raccoon) without pistachios? 

Totally not nuts.

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23 minutes ago, ScottNorwood said:

She is actually doing it.  The absolute madwoman is going to finish this.

Has to be the greatest achievement in FFA history no?

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5 minutes ago, Dinsy Ejotuz said:

Has to be the greatest achievement in FFA history no?

Why limit it to the FFA?

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35 minutes ago, ScottNorwood said:

She is actually doing it.  The absolute madwoman is going to finish this.

Pin it.  

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6 minutes ago, ScottNorwood said:

Why limit it to the FFA?

Moon landing?  Antibiotics?  Printing Press?

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2 minutes ago, Dinsy Ejotuz said:

Moon landing?  Antibiotics?  Printing Press?

Those probably didn't cause as much collective mental anguish.

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