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krista4

In this thread I rank my favorite Beatles songs: 204-1.

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20 minutes ago, krista4 said:

Guys?  Guys???

We're 10% done.

The following albums have not yet been touched:  A Hard Day's Night, Help!, Rubber Soul, Revolver, Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, and oddly enough, Yellow Submarine.  Guess I'm a "middle Beatles" fan.

Feels like I'm losing y'all a bit.  Hang in there with me; great stuff still to come.

no, I'm out. :loco:

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Sorry, didn't mean to seem needy.  

184.  Thank You Girl (single, 1963)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

The b-side to "From Me to You," this was originally intended to be an a-side single, but the Beatles decided it "didn't work."  John in particular seems to have disliked the final results here, as he's described it as "hacky," among other things.  Like many of the earlier songs, they seems to be speaking directly to the listener, and in this case they intended the song to be a thank-you to their fans.  The off-kilter "ohs" from John, the reverb-y harmonica, and Ringo's drum fills are what draw me into this one; otherwise I might call it a little boring.

Mr. krista:  "I like the “oh oh” with all the reverb on it. I think that was them trying to do something to keep it interesting for themselves, cause otherwise it’s kind of dull."

Suggested cover:  Not a lot to choose from here, but this Argentinean hard rock version is kinda fun:  Airbag

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One more before I start having some conference calls.  

183.  Baby It's You (Please Please Me, 1963)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

Oops, I thought I had cleared out my lowest tier of covers, but this one snuck through.  This is the last cover in that tier.  One of two covers the Beatles did of songs by The Shirelles ("Boys" is the other), this is a nice enough Burt Bacharach composition that for me is made special by John's compelling vocal - one of my favorites of his - and George Martin on celesta.  There's something about the way John sings the "uh oh" that is utterly charming, and "I'm gonna love you any old way" is downright soulful.  The backing "shoop-shoops" are kind of annoying, but the "cheat, cheat" makes me laugh.  There's a lot I like about this, but it can't match the original.

Mr. krista:  "This song is by a girl group, too.  I like when the Beatles sound like girl groups, cuz…I like girl groups.  This is something I’ve learned about myself while listening to this.”

 

 

Edited by krista4
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16 minutes ago, krista4 said:

One more before I start having some conference calls.  

183.  Baby It's You (Please Please Me, 1963)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

Oops, I thought I had cleared out my lowest tier of covers, but this one snuck through.  This is the last cover in that tier.  One of two covers the Beatles did of songs by The Shirelles ("Boys" is the other), this is a nice enough Burt Bacharach composition that for me is made special by John's compelling vocal - one of my favorites of his - and George Martin on celesta.  There's something about the way John sings the "uh oh" that is utterly charming, and "I'm gonna love you any old way" is downright soulful.  The backing "shoop-shoops" are kind of annoying, but the "cheat, cheat" makes me laugh.  There's a lot I like about this, but it can't match the original.

Mr. krista:  "This song is by a girl group, too.  I like when the Beatles sound like girl groups, cuz…I like girl groups.  This is something I’ve learned about myself while listening to this.”

 

 

I  would very much like to buy Mr. Krista a bourbon/scotch of his choice and talk music with him. 

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I had no idea the Beatles did this many covers.

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Needed to catch up. Your audience is still here. I'm just thrilled to see who is checking in. Like a music draft.  

San Dimas High School Football Rules!  

Middle Beatles are the best! 

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27 minutes ago, shuke said:

I had no idea the Beatles did this many covers.

I think the covers were really important to the Beatles making it here. I think it helped bridge the "alien" gap. Granted, the fact that they were different from anything seen on these shores before and that undeniably made them attractive. But I also think that the covers helped some who may have been on the fence about these weird dudes from overseas - "hey, they can play OUR music, too"

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39 minutes ago, shuke said:

I had no idea the Beatles did this many covers.

It was fairly common in those days for artists, not just the Beatles, to cover other artists. And the Beatles were vocal about their own influences.

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On 1/11/2019 at 11:20 PM, Dinsy Ejotuz said:

@krista4, you have inspired me to make a top-25 list of post-breakup Beatles songs.  Not that I listened to everything any of them have done (it has to be at least double the Beatles' output).  I went with what I already knew and cut out stuff to get to 25.  John Lennon fans, I apologize in advance.

The songs:

John:  Instant Karma, Imagine, Give Peace a Chance, Happy X-mas, Whatever Gets You Through the Night, Starting Over, Watching the Wheels, Woman, #9 Dream

Paul:  Baby I'm Amazed, Band on the Run, Silly Love Songs, Jet, Live and Let Die, Listen to What the Man Says, With a Little Luck, Uncle Albert, Another Day, Coming Up, Let 'Em In

George:  My Sweet Lord, Give Me Love, What is Life

Ringo:  It Don't Come Easy, Photograph

 

:wall:

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Its funny. I always thought I was a Beatles fan. Im questioning that right now

 

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1 minute ago, AcerFC said:

Its funny. I always thought I was a Beatles fan. Im questioning that right now

 

Their top 175 might change your mind.

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1 minute ago, Leroy Hoard said:

Their top 175 might change your mind.

Im not sure I have even heard any of these songs. Sure, I like Elanor Rigby, Blackbird, A day in the life and Hide your love away but Im not sure that makes me a fan

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5 minutes ago, Leroy Hoard said:

Their top 175 might change your mind.

I am thinking favorites might be a bit of a misnomer.  

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1 hour ago, Yankee23Fan said:

I  would very much like to buy Mr. Krista a bourbon/scotch of his choice and talk music with him. 

He'd have a blast. 

1 hour ago, rockaction said:

San Dimas High School Football Rules!  

Middle Beatles are the best! 

:lmao: 

56 minutes ago, Uruk-Hai said:

I think the covers were really important to the Beatles making it here. I think it helped bridge the "alien" gap. Granted, the fact that they were different from anything seen on these shores before and that undeniably made them attractive. But I also think that the covers helped some who may have been on the fence about these weird dudes from overseas - "hey, they can play OUR music, too"

Spot-on.  And many more covers to come.

36 minutes ago, Godsbrother said:

:wall:

OMG @Godsbrother is here!  Everyone be on your best behavior!  (He knows more about the Beatles than the rest of us combined.)

29 minutes ago, AcerFC said:

Im not sure I have even heard any of these songs. Sure, I like Elanor Rigby, Blackbird, A day in the life and Hide your love away but Im not sure that makes me a fan

We'll get into some soon that you might not have heard but surely will love.

27 minutes ago, jon_mx said:

I am thinking favorites might be a bit of a misnomer.  

You mean in my title?  Yeah, the wording makes it seem like I"m saying these are my favorites, but the intention of "my favorite" was to mean "in the order in which I prefer them," to distinguish from some thought that I might be saying what is best (which I'm not qualified to judge).  These aren't my favorites; these are all of them committed to vinyl.

Edited by krista4
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On 1/11/2019 at 6:58 PM, krista4 said:

 

To put together the list, I started by, over the course of months, sitting with Mr. krista at night and listening to the 12 British LPs and one British EP in order from Please Please Me through Abbey Road.  Then we listened to the singles that hadn’t been already covered, most of them collected on Past Masters.  I excluded the German versions as well as Real Love and Free as a Bird, which make me angry.  If I had it to do over, I would have worked the singles in in their correct chronological order instead.

 

I wonder why?   I like them quite a bit.

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1 hour ago, krista4 said:

Sorry, didn't mean to seem needy.  

184.  Thank You Girl (single, 1963)

 

1 hour ago, krista4 said:

One more before I start having some conference calls.  

183.  Baby It's You (Please Please Me, 1963)

Any perceived slowdown is likely a function of this tier of songs, rather than your excellent work (truly, and i'm not just blowing wind up your algorithim).

The bottom of your list had a lot of unimportant songs that people could have differing affections for, but now you're in the zone where two like the above would, on their own, have them with the Pacemakers or Chad & Jeremy in our estimations but kinda run together in the Beatle oeuvre

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Yes, well said Krista4. Like when I tell others that I graduated in the top 50 of my class and there were only 49 of us.

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6 minutes ago, krista4 said:

He'd have a blast. 

:lmao: 

Spot-on.  And many more covers to come.

OMG @Godsbrother is here!  Everyone be on your best behavior!  (He knows more about the Beatles than the rest of us combined.)

 

I am enjoying the thread.  Of course we all have our favorites and may disagree on some but I like the discussion.  

One comment I will make is that I get the sense that a lot of people that talk about Paul's solo work haven't really listened that closely to his LPs over the last 20 years.   He's been VERY introspective.

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3 minutes ago, krista4 said:

 

OMG @Godsbrother is here!  Everyone be on your best behavior!  (He knows more about the Beatles than the rest of us combined.)

 

I love Godsbrother's Beatles takes - he's very knowledgeable, even if he IS a Stillers fan. However, I know there's one cover of a Beatles song he hates and if you don't post it when you throw the original out, I WILL - because he's a Stillers fan.

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23 minutes ago, Godsbrother said:

I wonder why?   I like them quite a bit.

I like them as songs, particularly Free as a Bird.  I just don't like having something John did alone being added to by the others post-mortem and calling them Beatles songs.  We've no idea if John would have approved of the finished product.

23 minutes ago, wikkidpissah said:

 

The bottom of your list had a lot of unimportant songs that people could have differing affections for, but now you're in the zone where two like the above would, on their own, have them with the Pacemakers or Chad & Jeremy in our estimations but kinda run together in the Beatle oeuvre

Excellent point.

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20 minutes ago, krista4 said:

I like them as songs, particularly Free as a Bird.  I just don't like having something John did alone being added to by the others post-mortem and calling them Beatles songs.  We've no idea if John would have approved of the finished product.

This is true but I like the spirit in which they were done:  "John had started the tracks, went off on holiday and three were just finishing them up".  I also like the story that Yoko had found the tapes that John had made and one tape had written, in John's handwriting, the words "For Paul".   The two songs on that tape,  "Grow Old With Me" and "Now and Then" were worked on but never finished but it is a cool story I think.

 

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Another that falls into that group that wikkid aptly described above:

182.  Baby's in Black (Beatles for Sale, 1964)

Spotify  YouTube

This song about a love triangle among three people, only two of them living, was a staple of the Beatles's live performances, all the way through the last concert (setting aside the rooftop thingie) at Candlestick Park in 1966.  It's one of the best examples of true co-writing of Paul and John, having been written by them together in one day in a room at John's house in Kenwood.  There's a ton I like about this song - the harmonies, the 3/4 waltz time, the darker mood, whatever the hell that is that George is doing on guitar - but we're in the realm now of good songs that I just don't enjoy as much as those above them.

Mr. krista:  "It’s hard to conceive of a more selfish song, or someone who is less considerate of a protagonist in mourning. But I really like it. What the #### man. I think they were trying to write a county song.  Of all the people in there, you’re the most prutnate.*   There’s the dead dude, the woman who loved the dead dude, and you have nothing to do with this.  But again the harmonies are killer, the refrains are great, the melody’s great, so everything is enjoyable.  But they’re so powerful at this time that you could put any horrible message in your song, but it’s great.  Oh, here, murder your kids, and we would have all just been singing along."

*Since there was drinking involved in some of our forced listening sessions, sometimes my notes are a little hard to interpret.  Like "covfefe," take it to mean whatever you wish.

Suggested cover:  Wish I could find a better-quality live version than this one, but I think Earle sounds good (and he's a favorite of mine); actual song starts around 0:57  Shawn Colvin and Steve Earle; also if anyone can find the Elvis Costello/T-Bone Burnett version that I know exists but cannot seem to locate again, you'd be my hero.

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10 minutes ago, Godsbrother said:

This is true but I like the spirit in which they were done:  "John had started the tracks, went off on holiday and three were just finishing them up".  I also like the story that Yoko had found the tapes that John had made and one tape had written, in John's handwriting, the words "For Paul".   The two songs on that tape,  "Grow Old With Me" and "Now and Then" were worked on but never finished but it is a cool story I think.

 

And this is why I'm glad you're here.  :) 

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4 minutes ago, krista4 said:

Another that falls into that group that wikkid aptly described above:

182.  Baby's in Black (Beatles for Sale, 1964)

Spotify  YouTube

This song about a love triangle among three people, only two of them living, was a staple of the Beatles's live performances, all the way through the last one at Candlestick Park in 1966.  It's one of the best examples of true co-writing of Paul and John, having been written by them together in one day in a room at John's house in Kenwood.  There's a ton I like about this song - the harmonies, the 3/4 waltz time, the darker mood, whatever the hell that is that George is doing on guitar - but we're in the realm now of good songs that I just don't enjoy as much as those above them.

It's a broken waltz, not a full waltz.  A full waltz is elegant and continuous.  By having that guitar part in the middle of the song you understand the broken nature of the song.

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1 minute ago, krista4 said:

Another that falls into that group that wikkid aptly described above:

182.  Baby's in Black (Beatles for Sale, 1964)

 

This is one of my favorite early tracks.  John and Paul both loved it and included it their live shows though there were a lot of songs that their audience would rather hear.

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9 minutes ago, krista4 said:

Another that falls into that group that wikkid aptly described above:

182.  Baby's in Black (Beatles for Sale, 1964)

Spotify  YouTube

This song about a love triangle among three people, only two of them living, was a staple of the Beatles's live performances, all the way through the last concert (setting aside the rooftop thingie) at Candlestick Park in 1966.  It's one of the best examples of true co-writing of Paul and John, having been written by them together in one day in a room at John's house in Kenwood.  There's a ton I like about this song - the harmonies, the 3/4 waltz time, the darker mood, whatever the hell that is that George is doing on guitar - but we're in the realm now of good songs that I just don't enjoy as much as those above them.

Mr. krista:  "It’s hard to conceive of a more selfish song, or someone who is less considerate of a protagonist in mourning. But I really like it. What the #### man. I think they were trying to write a county song.  Of all the people in there, you’re the most prutnate.*   There’s the dead dude, the woman who loved the dead dude, and you have nothing to do with this.  But again the harmonies are killer, the refrains are great, the melody’s great, so everything is enjoyable.  But they’re so powerful at this time that you could put any horrible message in your song, but it’s great.  Oh, here, murder your kids, and we would have all just been singing along."

*Since there was drinking involved in some of our forced listening sessions, sometimes my notes are a little hard to interpret.  Like "covfefe," take it to mean whatever you wish.

Suggested cover:  Wish I could find a better-quality live version than this one, but I think Earle sounds good (and he's a favorite of mine); actual song starts around 0:57  Shawn Colvin and Steve Earle; also if anyone can find the Elvis Costello/T-Bone Burnett version that I know exists but cannot seem to locate again, you'd be my hero.

I love everything about this record except the harmonies. Which is odd, since they are the selling point and I couldn't say at death's door why they bother me - trying too hard, maybe?. But this is definitely an attempt at a country-death song - given the pressure this album was made under, I think all 4 Beatles wished they had been the one in black. And it's certainly sung better than Mick Jagger trying to do Hank Williams.

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12 minutes ago, Godsbrother said:

This is one of my favorite early tracks.  John and Paul both loved it and included it their live shows though there were a lot of songs that their audience would rather hear.

Inserted a link to a live performance.  Absolutely no one else was writing this kind of stuff in 64.

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5 minutes ago, Uruk-Hai said:

I love everything about this record except the harmonies. Which is odd, since they are the selling point and I couldn't say at death's door why they bother me - trying too hard, maybe?. But this is definitely an attempt at a country-death song - given the pressure this album was made under, I think all 4 Beatles wished they had been the one in black. And it's certainly sung better than Mick Jagger trying to do Hank Williams.

Yeah that is odd.  I think the harmonies between Paul and John are fantastic in Baby's in Black.

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4 minutes ago, Godsbrother said:

Inserted a link to a live performance.  Absolutely no one else was writing this kind of stuff in 64.

This is a great point that many miss. Time reference is huge when comparing artists. 

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Look out, it's another cover song!

181.  Mr. Moonlight (Beatles for Sale, 1964)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

We're into a new tier of covers.  In these, I don't think the Beatles versions are worse, but they don't do anything to make the songs better, either.  

This one sounds awfully corny in some ways, in particular Paul's "roller rink" Hammond organ solo in the middle, but I suspect it's meant to be.  All the goofiness - why is George on African drum?  why is Ringo hitting those tom-toms so hard?  why is the harmony so monotone? oh no, here comes that organ solo - makes the energy of John's blistering vocals stand out even more.  John's commitment to this song makes it shine through the zaniness.

Mr. krista:  "Vocals are so great though.  He clearly loves that song more than anybody else in the band."

The original by Dr. Feelgood and the Interns has a similarly stellar vocal.   

Edited by krista4
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7 minutes ago, Godsbrother said:

Yeah that is odd.  I think the harmonies between Paul and John are fantastic in Baby's in Black.

I know. I can't explain it.

 

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33 minutes ago, Godsbrother said:

This is one of my favorite early tracks.  John and Paul both loved it and included it their live shows though there were a lot of songs that their audience would rather hear.

This, like many songs, has moved around on my list a ton.  It's been 25 slots higher at one time or another.  And though I thought I had finished my rankings, at this point I'm winging it.  In general groupings, I'm still moving everything up and down a lot.  It's the hazard of trying to rank the songs of your favorite band.

Edited by krista4

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4 hours ago, krista4 said:

Guys?  Guys???

We're 10% done.

The following albums have not yet been touched:  A Hard Day's Night, Help!, Rubber Soul, Revolver, Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, and oddly enough, Yellow Submarine.  Guess I'm a "middle Beatles" fan.

Feels like I'm losing y'all a bit.  Hang in there with me; great stuff still to come.

Oh hell no.  I can't still can't get over the effort krista - this is phenomenal!

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9 minutes ago, krista4 said:

Look out, it's another cover song!

181.  Mr. Moonlight (Beatles for Sale, 1964)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

We're into a new tier of covers.  In these, I don't think the Beatles versions are worse, but they don't do anything to make the songs better, either.  

This one sounds awfully corny in some ways, in particular Paul's "roller rink" Hammond organ solo in the middle, but I suspect it's meant to be.  All the goofiness - why is George on African drum?  why is Ringo hitting those tom-toms so hard?  why is the harmony so monotone? oh no, here comes that organ solo - makes the energy of John's blistering vocals stand out even more.  John's commitment to this song makes it shine through the zaniness.

Mr. krista:  "Vocals are so great though.  He clearly loves that song more than anybody else in the band."

The original by Dr. Feelgood and the Interns has a similarly stellar vocal.   

I have heard this one a lot lately and I'm not a big fan of it.  But, as you say, you have to respect John's vocal.  But I feel the same about the harmonies.  As I stated earlier, I'm a sucker for the Beatles harmonies, but they do nothing for me in this one.  I'd put "Baby's in Black" way higher than this one.  

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3 hours ago, krista4 said:

Mr. krista:  "This song is by a girl group, too.  I like when the Beatles sound like girl groups, cuz…I like girl groups.  This is something I’ve learned about myself while listening to this.”

 

Krista is doing fantastic work, but Mr. Krista is quickly becoming the MVP of this thread. :lmao:

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25 minutes ago, Shaft41 said:

I have heard this one a lot lately and I'm not a big fan of it.  But, as you say, you have to respect John's vocal.  But I feel the same about the harmonies.  As I stated earlier, I'm a sucker for the Beatles harmonies, but they do nothing for me in this one.  I'd put "Baby's in Black" way higher than this one.  

Totally understandable.

13 minutes ago, Tom Hagen said:

Krista is doing fantastic work, but Mr. Krista is quickly becoming the MVP of this thread. :lmao:

Also totally understandable.

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Another cover first, and then one where I expect some blowback from the "late Beatles" crowd.

180.  Dizzy Miss Lizzy (Help!, 1965)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

Our first selection off the Help! album.  Its placement as the last song, after "Yesterday," is odd on the album but in keeping with the then-current thought that you had to end on an upbeat note.  It's a fine cover of another Larry Williams song.   I don't have much to say.  The song lacks some oomph.  I"m trying to type this up and realizing that I should have ranked this lower.  Oh well.

Mr. krista:  "Probably thought...we solved that.  Ringo and Paul find the pocket perfectly.  Maybe they don’t have to live up to Little Richard, etc.  But they played that on this record because they love it, and they figure they don’t have to do it anymore, but they just love it."  [Editor's note:  I think this was in reference to putting a cover on a later record than where most of them were.]

179.  Savoy Truffle (White Album, 1968)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

I get that it's supposed to be humo(u)rous.  "Oh, Eric Clapton's teeth are all rotted out, but he loves chocolate soooooo much!"  I don't need to hear about all the chocolates Eric Clapton likes, and I cringe when I hear the beginning "creeeee-am tangerine."  What I do like is the jazziness of it all - especially the horns and the organ.  Apparently George later apologized to the brass players for making their sound "dirty" through the distortion, but, as he explained to them, it's the way he wanted it.  I'm with George on that decision.  This is also a song where I think Ringo's drumming stands out by virtue of his refusal to stand out.  I need to do a separate "Ringo" write-up in here soon, but what I love most about him, evidenced well on this song, is his commitment to the support of the song, the subtle ways in which he makes a song better without making it about him.  Listen closely to his work on this one, hitting the perfect groove at every moment.  :heart: 

Mr. krista gets the humo(u)r:  "I think it’s funny.  And I think it’s funny that these bad-assed, drug-addled rockers are chocoholics.  Everybody’s heroin-addled and Clapton just wants a Milky Way.  And it rocks.  It’s a pretty good rock song.  The drums are good, and horns are good."

Suggested cover:  @Eephus might disapprove of this countdown, but I'm stealing his suggestion for a cover of this one anyway.  Ella Fitzgerald

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3 minutes ago, Leroy Hoard said:

179 a long time favorite of mine. 

yeah, Savoy Truffle would be way higher for me.  This song sticks with you - in a really good way.  

And I love the Ella Fitzgerald version!!!  This song ranking gets my first asterisk. 

Edited by Binky The Doormat
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14 minutes ago, Leroy Hoard said:

179 a long time favorite of mine. 

I'll admit that some of my feelings toward the song might be influenced by my feelings toward Eric Clapton.

ETA:  As I mentioned in my intro, I knew a lot of people loved this song.  When people in tim's thread were trying to make a pared down version of the record, I think everyone put it on their 35-minute version.

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8 minutes ago, krista4 said:

 

Suggested cover:  @Eephus might disapprove of this countdown, but I'm stealing his suggestion for a cover of this one anyway.  Ella Fitzgerald

Good Lord, Ella's intro..........😍

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On 1/11/2019 at 4:59 PM, krista4 said:

These are the songs I’ll be posting about, grouped based on the UK releases plus singles:

Please Please Me:

With the Beatles:

A Hard Day’s Night:

Beatles for Sale:

Magical Mystery Tour:

The Beatles (aka White Album):

 

I've listened to all of these in the last 36 hours.  Thanks again for doing this @krista4

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I've had this queued up for a while but kept moving it up the rankings instead.  I need to stop doing that.

178.  The Continuing Story of Bungalow Bill (White Album, 1968)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

What I love:  the Ennio Morricone feel at the beginning, Yoko's dissonance, John's vocal, the way it leads into While My Guitar Gently Weeps.  What I don't, at all:  the singalong.  Unlike my view of Savoy Truffle, I do find this one funny.  It makes me smile to listen to it, until it starts to drive me mad with that chorus.  John wrote this one based on an experience in India, about "a guy in Maharishi's meditation camp who took a short break to go shoot a few poor tigers, and then came back to commune with God. There used to be a character called Jungle Jim and I combined him with Buffalo Bill. It's a sort of teenage social-comment song and a bit of a joke."  I like the joke.  Fun fact:  Yoko singing "Not when he looked so fierce..." was the first lead vocal from a woman on a Beatles record.

Mr. krista:  "I prefer this to Rocky Raccoon.  You can pick Yoko out of those background vocals. Did Bungalow Bill ever get back to us on what he killed?  Or was it just the Beatles’s self-respect?”"

Suggested covers:  Dawn Kinnard/Ron Sexsmith - I'm not 100% sold on this, but (1) I love Ron Sexsmith, and (2) I like the switch to an off-key female for the lead singer.  For some serious inventiveness, check out the version by Deerhoof.

 

Edited by krista4
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Did Bungalow Bill ever get back to us on what he killed?  Or was it just the Beatles’s self-respect?”"

🤣

 

ETA:  when the song uses the word "gun" with 5+ syllables you have to pay attention.  

Edited by Binky The Doormat
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2 minutes ago, krista4 said:

I've had this queued up for a while but kept moving it up the rankings instead.  I need to stop doing that.

178.  The Continuing Story of Bungalow Bill (White Album, 1968)

Beatles version:

What I love:  the Ennio Morricone feel at the beginning, Yoko's dissonance, John's vocal, the way it leads into While My Guitar Gently Weeps.  What I don't, at all:  the singalong.  Unlike my view of Savoy Truffle, I do find this one funny.  It makes me smile to listen to it, until it starts to drive me mad with that chorus.  John wrote this one based on an experience in India, about "a guy in Maharishi's meditation camp who took a short break to go shoot a few poor tigers, and then came back to commune with God. There used to be a character called Jungle Jim and I combined him with Buffalo Bill. It's a sort of teenage social-comment song and a bit of a joke."  I like the joke.  Fun fact:  Yoko singing "Not when he looked so fierce..." was the first lead vocal from a woman on a Beatles record.

Mr. krista:  "I prefer this to Rocky Raccoon.  You can pick Yoko out of those background vocals. Did Bungalow Bill ever get back to us on what he killed?  Or was it just the Beatles’ self-respect?”"

Suggested covers:  Dawn Kinnard/Ron Sexsmith - I'm not 100% sold on this, but (1) I love Ron Sexsmith, and (2) I like the switch to an off-key female for the lead singer.  For some serious inventiveness, check out the version by Deerhoof.

 

earworm top 5 for me.  Can never get it out of my head once I hear it.

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Mr Moonlight is probably my #204. I'm not going to comment on Savoy Truffle and Bungalow Bill because I may say something that I regret. Suffice to say I don't think they should be triple-digiters.

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