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I heard there’s a really fast white guy in high school somewhere here in the states.  So, yaknow, that’s cool and whatnot

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1 hour ago, That one guy said:

I heard there’s a really fast white guy in high school somewhere here in the states.  So, yaknow, that’s cool and whatnot

White men can't run.  He must be from West Africa. 

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Just saw this.

Ok, cool.

This will be the NFL  Fantasy 4x1 Relay.

One time Raider***

lane

1.Cowboys...Herschel Walker...Terrance Newman...Deion Sanders...Bob Hayes

2.Bills....J.D.Hill...Bo Roberson***...O.J.Simpson...Elbert "Golden Wheels" Dubenion

3.Chiefs...Joe Delaney....Sammie Parker...Stone Johnson..Tyreek Hill

4.Raiders A...Jacoby Ford...Cliff Branch...James Jett...Sam Graddy

5.Rams...Travis Williams...Bob Boyd...Ollie Matson....Ron Brown***

6.Bears...Willie Gault***...Cecil Turner...Virgil Livers...Curtis Conway

7.Giants...Richmond Flowers....Homer Jones &&&&....Clarence Childs...Henry Carr

8.Niners...James Owens.....Marquies Goodwin ...Ray Norton ....Renaldo Nehemiah

&&&& daddy of the spike, yep, first NFLer to spike the ball. He was also the first to return a KO to score on MNF and....once beat Bob Hayes in a college 200m.

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, rockaction said:

White men can't run.  He must be from West Africa. 

Let's see...

Charles Paddock Olympic gold medal

Mel Patton WR 9.3 Olympic 200m gold

Dave Sime WR 9.3 Olympic silver

Armin Hary Olympic gold....Germany

Lindy Remigino  Olympic gold

Harold Abrahams Olympic gold...Great Britian

Percy Williams all 125 pounds of him, Olympic gold...Canada

Bobby Morrow  Olympic gold medal

Rocky Woods 9.3

Kevin Little 10.13

Marty Krulee 10.18

Frank Wykoff WR 9.4  Olympian

Gerry Ashworth 9.4 Olympian

Wayne Herman 9.4

Christophe LeMaitre  9.92

George Anderson WR 9,4

Clyde Jeffrey WR9.4

Hal Davis WR9.4

Darel Newman 9.2 beat Bob Hayes in a 60

Doug Hawken 9.2

Mark Lutz 9,3 Olympic 200,

Larry Questad 9.3 Olympic 200

Valery Borzov Olympic 100m gold...USSR

John Roderick 9.3 Miami Dolphins

Cy Leland  WR 9.4 TCU footballer

It goes like this.....

White men can sprint, just not as fast as those with western African roots.

 

Edited by ZenoRazon

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Posted (edited)

Right now we have three big stories.

That Texas kid Matthew Boling.

Nigerian sprinter Divine Oduduru at Texas Tech cooking a 9.94/19.76

Michael Norman running a 43,4 400m the 4th fastest 400m ever ran.

Edited by ZenoRazon

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Posted (edited)

Just showing off.

5 minutes ago, Rodrigo Duterte said:

What about Taysom Hill of the Saints?  Don't argue against or there will be some kind of racism thing attached.

Taysom Hill is no great speedster. 

The fastest Saint would be Larry Burton an Olympic 200m cat back in the day.

This racism thing is so weak, why anyone even wastes time on that is a...?  IF....talking sports.

This would be the All Time NFL Fastest Paleface 100m

lane

1.Don Hutson a 9.7yds in the 30's....Packers/Alabama

2.Richmond Flowers a great hurdler/9.4  Giants/Tennessee

3.Tim Dwight  Big10 100 champ 10.33....Falcons/Iowa

4.John Roderick  9.3  Dolphins/SMU

5.Billy Cannon  9.5 Heisman winner out of LSU/Oilers

6.Lance Alworth a 9.6 at Arkansas/Chargers

7.Glen Davis the Mr.Outside at Army a 9.6/Lions

8.Who has someone?

 

Edited by ZenoRazon

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Posted (edited)

World Class Speed............just what is that really?  First off there are no WORLD CLASS sprinters messing around with a football 40 (Christian Coleman did run one to show perspective...4.12)

There is only one current NFL athlete who with a few months of getting it back could run in a world class 100m, that would obviously be Tyreek Hill.  He does possess that level of speed. Nobody else in the NFL coming close right now. BUT....there has been around 50ish former NFLers with legit World Class speed.  The Raiders have had...

Cliff Branch 9.2

Jacoby Ford 10.10

James Jett 10.16...Olympian

James Trapp 10.14

Willie Gault 10.10....Olympian

Ron Brown 10.06...Olympian

Sam Graddy 10.09...Olympian

......all had that World Class speed.

How fast is Kyler Murray? I would feel safe going with a 10.45ish, ya see like all footballers without a sprint foundation, after around 50m he has..0....speed endurance so he's already decellerating.  Reggie Bush a 10.4ish.

 

While here...

Obea Moore was going to be the next big thing but after his HS days at Muir he........poof!   It was...Where is Obea Moore? 

This is what all the fuss is about, he will be on the anchor leg for Muir, check this out.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rhPKBnbWsR4

 

Edited by ZenoRazon

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Loved this game back in the day :thumbup:

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Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, Osaurus said:

Loved this game back in the day :thumbup:

Ever been to a track meet?

I don't think non track fans really get it.

Just the high school 4x1 for an example.

Serra has ran a 41.4 on anchor Tuqual Rawlings the state 100m champ a season ago, they will be in lane four.  In lane five Long Beach Poly with the Orange twins Edgar and Tyrod they just cooked a 41.2 a week ago.  Not to be ignored is the local team Edison of Fresno, they will have the current state leader at 10.34 Ivory Childs on anchor, this will be epic.

When you know the athletes. the history the sport is amazing, without that knowledge you won't get it.

Edited by ZenoRazon

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Just now, ZenoRazon said:

Ever been to a track meet?

I don't think non track fans really get it.

Just the high school 4x1 for an example.

Serra has ran a 41.4 on anchor Tuqual Rawlings the state 100m champ a season ago, they will be in lane 4.  In lane five Long Beach Poly with the Orange twins Edgar and Tyrod they just cooked a 41.2 a week ago.  Not to be ignore is the local team Edison of Fresno, they will have the current state leader at 10.34 Ivory Childs on anchor, this will be epic.

I was referring to this

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1 minute ago, Osaurus said:

I was referring to this

I owned a game featuring all the all time great decathletes starting with Jim Thorpe. Each athlete  (a dozen or so) had his card and what fit his talent. You'd roll the dice and.....whatever it read was the mark.  Yep, boring,

I did make a game using sprinters.

A card looked like this.

Bob Hayes

1.9.1....PR

2.9.2

3.9.3

4.9,4

5.9.5

6.9.1

You rolled the dice, just using the red one. and whatever number came up....that was his time.

A guy like George Anderson

1.9.3...PR

2.9.4

3.9.5

4.9.6

5.9.7

6.9.3

Could beat Hayes but his odds weren't very good.

 

I had about a 100 sprinters.

 

Yep, boring.

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Eliud Kipchoge of Kenya just ran a marathon in under two hours.

1:59:40 in Vienna.

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Kipchoge's not human, I don't care if there were pace setters etc, the guy ran 4:33 mile pace for 26.2

To put that into perspective, set the treadmill at 13.2 mph and run for 2 hours

Edited by Penguin

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14 minutes ago, Penguin said:

To put that into perspective, set the treadmill at 13.2 mph and run for 2 hours

That put it into perspective for me. 

I ran track and field in High School, the mile and the 800. 

My best time in the mile was around 4:20. I did that once. And I was seriously gassed after that. 

I bet if I tried to run another mile I couldn't have done better than 4:45 for my second mile. That's two miles. To average 4:33 for 26 miles? Ridiculous.

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On 10/12/2019 at 4:25 AM, Eephus said:

Eliud Kipchoge of Kenya just ran a marathon in under two hours.

1:59:40 in Vienna.

Marathon*

On 10/12/2019 at 8:26 PM, Penguin said:

Kipchoge's not human, I don't care if there were pace setters etc, the guy ran 4:33 mile pace for 26.2

To put that into perspective, set the treadmill at 13.2 mph and run for 2 hours

I agree with you completely. 1 mile at 4:33 is impressive...as is 2 and anything up. 26.2? Insane.

Absolutely amazing what he did, but I do think the * is worth the mention. Interesting read...

The planning that went into the event was a fantasy of perfectionism. The organizers scouted out a six-mile circuit along the Danube River that was flat, straight, and close to sea level. Parts of the road were marked with the fastest possible route, and a car guided the runners by projecting its own disco-like laser in front of them to show the correct pace. The pacesetters, a murderers’ row of Olympians and other distance stars, ran seven-at-a-time in a wind-blocking formation devised by an expert of aerodynamics. (Imagine the Mighty Ducks’ “flying V,” but reversed.)

Kipchoge himself came equipped with an updated, still-unreleased version of Nike’s controversial Vaporfly shoes, which, research appears to confirm, lower marathoners’ times. He had unfettered access to his favorite carbohydrate-rich drink, courtesy of a cyclist who rode alongside the group. And the event’s start time was scheduled within an eight-day window to ensure the best possible weather. The whole thing was as close as you can get to a mobile marathon spa treatment—if going to a spa were paired with the worst discomfort of your life.

Such an extensive level of support, combined with the fact that Kipchoge wasn’t actually competing against anybody, pushed the event outside of official marathon conditions and prevented his performance from counting as a true record. The organizers were fully aware of this; the event, as Outside magazine aptly referred to it, is perhaps best understood as an “exhibition marathon.” It was a time trial, albeit one that had been scienced to an almost entirely unrivaled level. The only professional marathon competition that has resembled it was 2017’s Breaking2, a much-hyped Nike campaign that put Kipchoge and two other athletes on an Italian motor-racing track under similar top conditions. They all failed at breaking the two-hour barrier, but Kipchoge got close enough to convince INEOS, a U.K.-based chemical company that owns several sports franchises, that two hours could be broken with just a little more optimization.


But with great optimization comes great controversy. Looked at one way, the INEOS 1:59 Challenge is a straightforward testament to how money can buy anything, including a branded sub-two-hour marathon. INEOS, which is owned by Jim Ratcliffe, Britain’s richest man, appeared to spare no expense when it came to either the groundbreaking science or the marketing blitz leading up to the event. “As much as they might like to present this as such, the first sub-2:00 marathon is not like the first sub-4:00 mile, or the first summit of Everest, much less the moon landing,” the running commentator Toni Reavis wrote before the event. “All those challenges carried in the public consciousness the possibility of death. This is a second-chance marketing exhibition for a plastics manufacturer and springy shoes.”

Corporate sponsorship is, of course, nothing new in sports, but when it arrives at the marathon with a monomaniacal focus on time, it rubs against the nature of the race itself. The 1:59 Challenge was less about Kipchoge exhibiting new abilities than it was about improving the marathon’s running conditions. But the marathon as it is popularly run is not really designed for records in the first place, precisely because of its shifting variables. It would be hard for a race organizer to design an ideal 26.2-mile course that would still attract spectators, entertain competitors, and net enough money to justify a race’s costs. (Imagine running a major marathon on an indoor track.)


By necessity, then, the marathon has resisted optimization. Different cities have different courses that are known for their unique challenges. Berlin has become the go-to race of late for official world records, but while that course is flat and fast, no one thinks it’s the ideal marathon path. (In fact, Kenya’s Brigid Kosgei set a jaw-dropping new women’s world record this morning in Chicago.) Presciently, the journalist Ed Caesar wrote in Two Hours, a 2015 book about the future of marathoning, that the only way to pull someone under the two-hour mark would be to manufacture a marathon entirely for the purpose of speed. Kipchoge’s new time suggests that part of the reason no one had broken two hours until yesterday is that marathoning simply hasn’t prioritized it.

“It’s meaningless,” the sports scientist Yannis Pitsiladis said of the new record in an interview with The Times of London. Pitsiladis was once a vocal advocate of sub-two attempts, but according to the running website Letsrun.com, he recently tried to pull together a marathon that sped runners down a mountain, so that he could point out that two hours can be broken with relative ease under extreme enough conditions.


And yet, and yet—the most compelling counterpoint to a cynical view of the performance is Eliud Kipchoge himself. Among a pack of mostly Kenyan runners who have recently pushed marathoning into a golden age, Kipchoge stands head and shoulders above the rest. He is the distance’s Michael Jordan, an era-defining and Kelly Clarkson–loving talent whose credentials—which include an Olympic gold medal and multiple big-city-marathon titles, on top of the official marathon world record—were secure well before yesterday.

If INEOS had found a way to usher any lesser runner beyond the two-hour barrier, its hyper-calculated efforts could easily be dismissed as too contrived to merit admiration. But perfect conditions and unavoidable INEOS logos can’t diminish Kipchoge’s magic. At the heart of the spectacle was still one of history’s most extraordinary athletes, flexing his skinny legs and giving the world yet another opportunity to behold him. Kipchoge’s performance was not necessarily better than some of his other great feats, but it’s hard to argue that it was any worse.


Yesterday leaves marathoning with a paradox. The INEOS 1:59 Challenge was indeed a brazen defiance of the marathon’s spirit. It was also a triumph of humanity. As the science of running continues to improve and new technologies creep in, that tension is only going to grow.

In a televised interview after he crossed the finish line, Kipchoge offered some characteristic platitudes: Running can make the world a more peaceful and beautiful place, and he wants to inspire people to get outside and move. But there was a glimmer in this invitation. He said he wants to inspire his competitors to move, too—to join him in what is now marathoning’s most exclusive club.

He didn’t really have to break 2 to motivate them, though. Two weeks ago, while Kipchoge was merely dreaming of landing on the moon, a legendary Ethiopian distance runner named Kenenisa Bekele arrived on Berlin’s famously fast course and dropped a 2:01:41—two seconds away from Kipchoge’s official world record.

PAUL BISCEGLIO is an associate editor at The Atlantic.

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On 10/12/2019 at 8:26 PM, Penguin said:

Kipchoge's not human, I don't care if there were pace setters etc, the guy ran 4:33 mile pace for 26.2

To put that into perspective, set the treadmill at 13.2 mph and run for 2 hours

done.

not that hard.

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30 minutes ago, Long Ball Larry said:

done.

not that hard.

Now...get on the treadmill while running.

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15 hours ago, El Floppo said:

Marathon*

I agree with you completely. 1 mile at 4:33 is impressive...as is 2 and anything up. 26.2? Insane.

Absolutely amazing what he did, but I do think the * is worth the mention. Interesting read...

 

 

That article is crap.  It's essentially a no offense, but.... :rolleyes: 

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38 minutes ago, Ned said:

That article is crap.  It's essentially a no offense, but.... :rolleyes: 

It shouldn't diminish what he did, but it points out how he was able to maximize what he did in ways that aren't ever going to he replicable in an actual race. And tbh, when I first started hearing the news about the time, it was about him setting the time in marathon in Vienna, not a closed course with pacers/drafters run when the conditions seemed optimal. Again...doesn't diminish it, but should be part of the conversation imo. In a different way than Lance Armstrong going sub 3 with the help of pacers...and dope.

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7 minutes ago, El Floppo said:

It shouldn't diminish what he did, but it points out how he was able to maximize what he did in ways that aren't ever going to he replicable in an actual race. And tbh, when I first started hearing the news about the time, it was about him setting the time in marathon in Vienna, not a closed course with pacers/drafters run when the conditions seemed optimal. Again...doesn't diminish it, but should be part of the conversation imo. In a different way than Lance Armstrong going sub 3 with the help of pacers...and dope.

No offense, but it's still crap to sit here and nitpick the achievement because he had extra support.  Do you discount the 1500 meter racers that have pacers for 2/3 of the race? 

First ever human to run 26.2mi in under 2 hours should stand alone.  I'm willing to bet this is the beginning of folks doing it without all the *.

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1 minute ago, Ned said:

No offense, but it's still crap to sit here and nitpick the achievement because he had extra support.  Do you discount the 1500 meter racers that have pacers for 2/3 of the race? 

First ever human to run 26.2mi in under 2 hours should stand alone.  I'm willing to bet this is the beginning of folks doing it without all the *.

I'm sure you're right about it happening a race soon...he's already so close.

I'll let you stand your hill there. And I don't disagree...as I've said with each post. But I do think there's enough personally catered elements for him to achieve this that it's worth mentioning. Mentioning....not diminishing.

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Roger Bannister's four-minute mile used two pace setters out of a field of six runners.  Bob Beamon's 29' 2" was set at elevation.

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1 hour ago, Ned said:

That article is crap.  It's essentially a no offense, but.... :rolleyes: 

Well, it points out a lot of relevant information I had no knowledge of, just being a casual observer reading the headline.  And while it is obviously an incredible human achievement, I think the circumstances do diminish the achievement somewhat.

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5 hours ago, Ned said:

No offense, but it's still crap to sit here and nitpick the achievement because he had extra support.  Do you discount the 1500 meter racers that have pacers for 2/3 of the race? 

First ever human to run 26.2mi in under 2 hours should stand alone.  I'm willing to bet this is the beginning of folks doing it without all the *.

Look, the guy’s a fraud. Might as well have done the whole thing in a golf cart

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