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Dr. Octopus

In this thread I rank my favorite Rolling Stones songs: 204-1: Four Musketeers Get Their Ya-Yas Out

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On 5/8/2019 at 1:25 PM, wikkidpissah said:
On 5/8/2019 at 1:23 PM, zamboni said:

We've been a bit overdue for a Rush love/hate match. Someone else can tackle a top 200 Rush song list next.

and i'll list my 204 favorite porcine grooming habits after that!

love the Rush, but that's still funny.  

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9 hours ago, Leroy Hoard said:

Billy was both the 6th Stone & the 5th Beatle!

But there's only one third stone from the sun.

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191. Have You Seen You Mother, Baby, Standing in the Shadow?

Year: 1966

US Album: Flowers

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

“Baby, where have you been all your life? Talking about all the people who should try anything twice”

 

This is probably the Stones best known song to appear on this list so far. It reached number five on the UK charts and number nine (number nine, number nine) on the US Charts.

It’s the first Stones song to feature a horn section – something that would be a staple of their early seventies sound. It’s also the first song Keith claims to have written on the piano rather than on the guitar – although it was Jack Nitzsche playing the piano on the recording.

The record is a cacophony of sounds played at a break-neck frantic pace: the blaring horns, the twangy guitars, Bill’s thumping bass, Keith and Brian on high register back-up vocals, and Mick, ever the showman, selling the chaos.

Edited by Dr. Octopus
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190. Crazy Mama

Year: 1976

US Album: Black and Blue

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

“Well your old time religion is just a superstition. Your going to pay high prices for your sacrifices”

 

Another rocker with session musician Wayne Perkins taking the lead guitar. This song creates a nice groove with Keith and Wayne that carries the song from beginning to end.

Those that get turned off with Mick’s vocals will likely not be pleased with this one because he surely mugs it up even letting out some “whooos” and “whoooops” that would make David Lee Roth blush.

During the Hand of Fate write up I mentioned that Perkins was auditioning on this record to replace Mick Taylor, an honor that would go to Ronnie Wood, but in addition to those two, other hopefuls to join Mick and Keith at the time were Peter Frampton, Harvey Mandel and Steve Marriott.

Edited by Dr. Octopus
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189. Rip This Joint

Year: 1972

US Album: Exile on Main St.

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

Keith Richards calls this rockabilly song “one of the fastest ones of the lot and it really keeps you on your toes.” The lyrics which are delivered frantically by Mick tell the tale of coast to coast America through the eyes of a foreigner.

Without getting political, these particular lines would be very timely today:

“Mama says yes, Papa says no, make up you mind 'cause I got to go.
I'm gonna raise hell at the Union Hall, drive myself right over the wall.
Mister President, Mister Immigration Man, let me in, sweetie, to your fair land.“

The Exile on Main Street album was famously recorded in Keith Richards rented home in France while the Stones were tax exiles from England. This song features more horns with two sax solos from Bobby Keys who is a longtime player in the Stones, who made his debut with the band in 1969, and recorded and toured with them up until his death in 2014.

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1 hour ago, Dr. Octopus said:

 

1 hour ago, Dr. Octopus said:

190. Crazy Mama

 

Both seem kinda low. Are we getting to the dense part already? Coo-ul, if so. HYSYMB was smack dab in the middle of that crazy great run of Jones era singles: Satisfaction/Cloud/Breakdown/Paintitblack/Ruby/Let's Spend/etc. They never will get the credit they deserve for figuring out how to be hard without losing their pop currency. Crazy Mama was kinda the dawn of the era that gave krista & her kind such a distaste for Jagger - rehash of the BrownSugar/JJackFlash beat with Mick salaciously overarticulating each syllable in a way that made him sound like he was trying to work foreign matter out of his mouth. good times....

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25 minutes ago, wikkidpissah said:

 

Both seem kinda low. Are we getting to the dense part already? Coo-ul, if so. HYSYMB was smack dab in the middle of that crazy great run of Jones era singles: Satisfaction/Cloud/Breakdown/Paintitblack/Ruby/Let's Spend/etc. They never will get the credit they deserve for figuring out how to be hard without losing their pop currency. Crazy Mama was kinda the dawn of the era that gave krista & her kind such a distaste for Jagger - rehash of the BrownSugar/JJackFlash beat with Mick salaciously overarticulating each syllable in a way that made him sound like he was trying to work foreign matter out of his mouth. good times....

I think it starts to get pretty thick in a hurray, but I can't promise that you'll think some of the songs that are forthcoming deserve to be ahead of these two. Heck, I can't promise by next week I will think they should have been either.

With some of these songs so close together at this point, there is a certain aspect of a bit of "cooking the books" to the list in order to highlight different eras and give bonus points for some unique aspect to the song. Also I don't want people to lose interest. My ultimate goal is to celebrate the music, introduce songs others may not have heard and to get discussion going - not necessarily concentrate on specific placement in the ranks.

Once we get  to the top 100 though I think the rankings are more "straight forward" with my actual appreciation for each song and also paying reverence to the heavy hitters in their catalogue (despite my thinking they are perhaps overplayed to the point I may personally prefer deeper cuts). For example I can't exactly ding Satisfaction because we've all heard in 1,000+ times. 

Edited by Dr. Octopus
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15 minutes ago, Dr. Octopus said:

For example I can't exactly ding Satisfaction because we've all heard in 1,000+ times. 

i dated an Akron girl once who said she knew the Mothersbaugh brothers (Devo) when they were kids. Apparently, there was a Holiday Inn out on the interstate which had a room that was the only place rock bands could gig for decent money and that a cousin or family friend of the Mothersbaughs had the house band there. They'd go to listen to him and he would play Satisfaction like 7 times a night, which is apparently how the song distilled down into its DEVOlutionary treatment

Edited by wikkidpissah
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4 hours ago, Dr. Octopus said:

191. Have You Seen You Mother, Baby, Standing in the Shadow?

Year: 1966

US Album: Flowers

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

“Baby, where have you been all your life? Talking about all the people who should try anything twice”

 

This is probably the Stones best known song to appear on this list so far. It reached number five on the UK charts and number nine (number nine, number nine) on the US Charts.

It’s the first Stones song to feature a horn section – something that would be a staple of their early seventies sound. It’s also the first song Keith claims to have written on the piano rather than on the guitar – although it was Jack Nitzsche playing the piano on the recording.

The record is a cacophony of sounds played at a break-neck frantic pace: the blaring horns, the twangy guitars, Bill’s thumping bass, Keith and Brian on high register back-up vocals, and Mick, ever the showman, selling the chaos.

Big thumbs up from me. 👍

Tell me a story about how you adore me
Live through the shadow, see through the shadow,
Live through the shadow, tear at the shadow
Hate in the shadow, love in the shadow life

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5 hours ago, Dr. Octopus said:

191. Have You Seen You Mother, Baby, Standing in the Shadow?

Year: 1966

US Album: Flowers

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

“Baby, where have you been all your life? Talking about all the people who should try anything twice”

 

This is probably the Stones best known song to appear on this list so far. It reached number five on the UK charts and number nine (number nine, number nine) on the US Charts.

It’s the first Stones song to feature a horn section – something that would be a staple of their early seventies sound. It’s also the first song Keith claims to have written on the piano rather than on the guitar – although it was Jack Nitzsche playing the piano on the recording.

The record is a cacophony of sounds played at a break-neck frantic pace: the blaring horns, the twangy guitars, Bill’s thumping bass, Keith and Brian on high register back-up vocals, and Mick, ever the showman, selling the chaos.

EASY top 10 for me, prolly top 5 

fight me :boxing:

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4 minutes ago, otb_lifer said:

EASY top 10 for me, prolly top 5 

fight me :boxing:

I'd rather just have a drink :suds: and talk music.

I can see that though - the beauty is that there is probably someone out there that probably thinks that for each song on this list.

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1 minute ago, Dr. Octopus said:

I'd rather just have a drink :suds: and talk music.

I can see that though - the beauty is that there is probably someone out there that probably thinks that for each song on this list.

:suds:

whut i love about "Shadow" is it's proto glam/punk ethos - that #### coulda come out 10/20 years later and been relevant to the alterna kidz, etc

ps - i'm a suckah for the Jonesy era, one of the rotating 4th busts on my Rushmore of Music - dude was quantum.

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4 hours ago, Dr. Octopus said:

190. Crazy Mama

 

3 hours ago, Dr. Octopus said:

OK, after listening to these 2 as well - just now - I have come to a new revelation regarding my Stones vs. Beatles childhood.

My early memories of The Beatles are like an ideal Easter morning - bright, and shiny - full of hope and wonder - just happy to be alive!

My early memories of the Stones are like an ideal Halloween night - dark, and subtle - full of mystery and intrigue - just happy to be TP'ing someones house and car!

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5 minutes ago, otb_lifer said:

:suds:

whut i love about "Shadow" is it's proto glam/punk ethos - that #### coulda come out 10/20 years later and been relevant to the alterna kidz, etc

ps - i'm a suckah for the Jonesy era, one of the rotating 4th busts on my Rushmore of Music - dude was quantum.

If it makes you feel better he'll be a contributor to 1/2 of the top 10.

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188. Black Limousine

Year: 1981

US Album: Tattoo You

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards/Wood

 

“We used to shine, shine, shine, shine, Say what a pair, say what a team”

This song is a hard blues tune that harks back to their early years in tempo – but the lyrics are too upbeat to be the blues. It’s actually a touching song where the narrator appreciates the woman he has now grown old with.

This is one of the few songs where Mick and Keith reluctantly gave song writing credit to another band member – which is what I said earlier was a major reason Mick Taylor left the band. Commenting on his songwriting credit Wood stated, "I fought until I was blue in the face to get the credit, going on and on: 'I wrote that, I wrote that.' One of the lessons I had to learn was that if you want to get a credit, it has to happen there and then in the studio, as you're recording it."

Mick plays a mean harmonica on this one, with Ronnie playing slide guitar and the rest of the boys doing what they do.

 

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3 minutes ago, Dr. Octopus said:

If it makes you feel better he'll be a contributor to 1/2 of the top 10.

befitting his unparalleled mad brilliance :hifive:

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4 hours ago, Dr. Octopus said:

189. Rip This Joint

Year: 1972

US Album: Exile on Main St.

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

Got a feelin' David Johansen listened to this song 40 times a day at one point.

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187. In Another Land

Year: 1967

US Album: Their Satanic Majesties Request

Songwriter: Bill Wyman

 

“We walked across the sand
And the sea and the sky and the castles were blue
I stood and held your hand”

 

The second (and last) Bill Wyman composition, and this time he actually sings lead – the only time he ever did so on a Stones record.

The song was recorded on a night when Wyman showed up at the studio and found that the session had been cancelled. Feeling frustrated that he had potentially wasted time in driving there, engineer Glyn Johns asked him if he had anything that he'd like to record. "I'd been messing with this song. It was a bit ... what I thought was kind of spacy, you know ... a bit kind of Satanic Majesties-like. And psychedelic in a way.”

Mick, Keith and Brian liked it and decided that it should be part of the album. Mick added some background vocals and Charlie laid down some drum-work but the rest of the track was as recorded that night with Wyman playing bass and Steve Marriott of the Small Faces on guitar and Nicky Hopkins on keyboards. The snoring at the end of the song is actually Wyman who was recorded sleeping at the studio by Mick and Keith who then stuck in on the end of the track as a joke, unbeknownst to Bill.

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Just now, wikkidpissah said:

Got a feelin' David Johansen listened to this song 40 times a day at one point.

ok, so we have the Glimmer twins (Mick/Keef), their stepbro spinoff Toxic Twins (Tyler/Perry) ... the Dolls era sandwiches right in between, and all three cut from that same cloth ... DaJo and the mighty god of Thunders ... nom de plume?

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23 minutes ago, Dr. Octopus said:

188. Black Limousine

Year: 1981

US Album: Tattoo You

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards/Wood

Comic relief & comeuppance in one song.

To refer to the Richards' autobio again, it was the art school thing to be absolute blues purists, because they knew they were culture appropriating and they wanted to be true and honorable. Keef wanted nothin but to stay with that, which is why he went into songwriting kickin&screamin.

Thing is, their early blues recording sucked. If Jagger hadn;t put some strut in Rooster, they all woulda been worthless. They did Berry, Bo Diddley, Buddy Holly and R&B hella better than they did blues.

Funny thing is that 20 yrs after they started, after the fame, money, women, drugs, red-blooded boys wondering if they'd kick Mick outta bed, serious drugs, turbulent friendships & alliances & affairs they actually came to discover what the blues was all about. it's reflected in this song...

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23 minutes ago, Dr. Octopus said:

187. In Another Land

Year: 1967

US Album: Their Satanic Majesties Request

Songwriter: Bill Wyman

 

honest-to-god, i used to initiate make-up sex w Scary Mary by kissing her just below the navel and limply singing "nobody else will do", completely having forgotten where it came from til now.

 

 

ETA: worked like a charm...

Edited by wikkidpissah
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4 hours ago, wikkidpissah said:

honest-to-god, i used to initiate make-up sex w Scary Mary by kissing her just below the navel and limply singing "nobody else will do", completely having forgotten where it came from til now.

 

 

ETA: worked like a charm...

Nice

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if i may, now that the "Shadow" cherry has been popped, chuck my top 10 up in here ...

Satisfaction, Child of the Moon, Winter, Play With Fire, Mother's Little Helper, Wild Horses, She's A Rainbow, Paint It Black, Shadow ... all in a blender for spots 2-10, no quibble with ranking in any order - the permanent #1 of Sister Morphine is undefeated and still heavyweight champ of my rock n' roll world (yep, much as i love Jonesy, he was gone for this one).

 

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On 5/8/2019 at 1:34 PM, Dinsy Ejotuz said:

Just took a quick look at some of the online rankings and was pleased to see my #1 is frequently listed as #1 or #2. 

Remember dozing on my GF's coach the summer after HS with that song on in the background and was in that perfect place between waking and sleeping, just taking in all the perfectly blended layers, and it seemed like it went on for an hour.  Top five musical moment for me.  Can still recall exactly how it felt.

Probably felt even longer for the coach.

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22 minutes ago, Rustoleum said:

Probably felt even longer for the coach.

That coach must have really needed her on the team.

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186. Come On

Year: 1963

US Album: England’s Newest Hitmakers

Songwriter: Chuck Berry

 

“Every time the phone rings, sounds like thunder. Some stupid guy trying to reach another number.”

 

Come On is the first of five Chuck Berry covers that will appear on this list. It should be obvious that Chuck Berry was a major influence on the Stones, particularly with Keith Richards.

”Come On” was picked to be the Rolling Stones first single and is one of a handful of songs that features the five original members and no one else playing on it. Brian and Bill sing backup on this one while Brian is also on Harmonica.

It’s pretty much a straight forward cover of Berry’s version and it was rumored the Stones did not like their version as it was too “poppy” and they considered themselves a Blues band.

 

Edited by Dr. Octopus
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185. Summer Romance

Year: 1980

US Album: Emotional Rescue

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

“Just a few days and you'll be back in your school
I'll be sitting around by the swimming pool
And you'll be studying history and you'll be down the gym
And I'll be down the pub, probably playing pool and drinking”

Emotional Rescue was the follow up record to Some Girls and continued the Stones penchant for trying to stay current musically, continuing to feature punk and disco songs scattered among their blues based rock and roll.

This is a pop/punk based song with a great bass line that is actually Ronnie Wood and not Bill Wyman. It’s a fun rollicking song that harkens back to their ability to make pop songs that have still sound heavy and dark on some level. It’s (strangely enough) about a summer romance between a school girl and an older boy who relishes in the fact that unlike his love, the summer ending doesn’t mean the end of fun.

Edited by Dr. Octopus

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184. Down in the Hole

Year: 1980

US Album: Emotional Rescue

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

“Will all your money
Buy you forgiveness
Keep you from sickness
Or keep you from cold?”

 

Some real gut-wrenching gritty blues here with a Stones twist. You can just see Mick sitting in an alleyway somewhere belting this out with Keith playing next to him right after shooting up in the corner.

Ronnie and Keith carry the day weaving in and out of eachother’s leads with solos that go right through your insides. Sugar Blue, a blues harmonica player out of Harlem (who also played on Miss You) helps create the mood with some bad mofo blowing on the harp. This may be the most under-rated song in the Stones catalogue – heck I’m probably doing it a disservice myself by keeping it out of the top 100.

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1 hour ago, Dr. Octopus said:

185. Summer Romance

Year: 1980

US Album: Emotional Rescue

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

“Just a few days and you'll be back in your school
I'll be sitting around by the swimming pool
And you'll be studying history and you'll be down the gym
And I'll be down the pub, probably playing pool and drinking”

Emotional Rescue was the follow up record to Some Girls and continued the Stones penchant for trying to stay current musically, continuing to feature punk and disco songs scattered among their blues based rock and roll.

This is a pop/punk based song with a great bass line that is actually Ronnie Wood and not Bill Wyman. It’s a fun rollicking song that harkens back to their ability to make pop songs that have still sound heavy and dark on some level. It’s (strangely enough) about a summer romance between a school girl and an older boy who relishes in the fact that unlike his love, the summer ending doesn’t mean the end of fun.

- unlike the Beatles, with the formalistic (tho brilliant) producer and all the tracking & collaboration, the Stones' song personnel was often down to who was around when somebody got a song idea.

- in the early 70s there were two major questions for the rock concert goer - would Bonzo make it thru his Moby Dick solo and play the rest of the show and which of the Faces would pass out and/or spew during a show. I saw Ronnie play bass almost an entire Faces concert due to such a casualty. He missed his calling.

- boy, was Charlie Watts phoning it in by this time....

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183. Hey Negrita

Year: 1975

US Album: Black and Blue

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards (inspiration by Ronnie Wood)

 

In the “Black Limousine” write up there was a discussion about Ronnie Wood’s fight to get song writing credits, and this is where it all started. Wood apparently wrote the song's main riff, a piece of music he took with him to Munich's Musicland Studios where he and other guitarists were auditioning for the second guitarist slot left open after Mick Taylor’s departure and the best they would do for him is to list the song as “inspiration by…” in the songwriting credits.

This was one of the Stones first forays into reggae music, a genre they would explore many times, especially on Keith’s compositions and his lead vocals. Unlike many other this one is not straight reggae but adds elements of Latin and funk musical styles.

This one features the great Billy Preston on keyboards and backing vocals.

The video to this one is worth a watch – just for Mick’s outfit, Mick and Billy dancing with eachother and Charlie’s looks of sheer boredom throughout.

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182. Dandelion

Year: 1967

US Album: Through the Past, Darkly (Big Hits Vol. 2)

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

“One o'clock, two o'clock, three o'clock, four o'clock chimes. Dandelions don't care about the time.”

One of two songs on this list that feature Paul McCartney and John Lennon on backing vocals – there was no rivalry boys and girls. It was released as the B side to the other song that featured the two Beatles on it, and reached No.8 on the UK Singles chart and No. 14 on the US Billboard chart.

The ever versatile Brian Jones plays mellotron and saxophone on this track and Charlie’s drum outro is a nice bonus.

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7 minutes ago, Dr. Octopus said:

182. Dandelion

Year: 1967

US Album: Through the Past, Darkly (Big Hits Vol. 2)

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

“One o'clock, two o'clock, three o'clock, four o'clock chimes. Dandelions don't care about the time.”

One of two songs on this list that feature Paul McCartney and John Lennon on backing vocals – there was no rivalry boys and girls. It was released as the B side to the other song that featured the two Beatles on it, and reached No.8 on the UK Singles chart and No. 14 on the US Billboard chart.

The ever versatile Brian Jones plays mellotron and saxophone on this track and Charlie’s drum outro is a nice bonus.

love this one so much, would be top 25, at least, for me ... Jonesy's fingerprints smeared all over it - gotdamn with that coda - glorious. 

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3 hours ago, Dr. Octopus said:

182. Dandelion

Year: 1967

US Album: Through the Past, Darkly (Big Hits Vol. 2)

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

Would have been higher for me too. Even though they'd finally figured out how to resolve the Lady Jane songs Jonesy liked into actual r&r with Ruby Tuesday, i liked the Dandelion bridge into psychedelia even better.

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On 5/10/2019 at 6:36 AM, Dr. Octopus said:

190. Crazy Mama

Year: 1976

US Album: Black and Blue

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

Those that get turned off with Mick’s vocals will likely not be pleased with this one because he surely mugs it up even letting out some “whooos” and “whoooops” that would make David Lee Roth blush.

 

Just catching up.  I was playing at the beach Fri-Sun and felt like I could only keep up with one music thread (shuke's, since his was first).  You nailed it on this description.  I started it up and thought, "Ooooh, I'm going to like this one," and then the vocal came in and NOPE.

I'm still finding new songs to like here, though.  Definitely seem to be tending to the 60s stuff in particular.  

Your write-ups are terrific and giving me a good education, too.

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15 hours ago, Dr. Octopus said:

185. Summer Romance

Year: 1980

US Album: Emotional Rescue

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

“Just a few days and you'll be back in your school
I'll be sitting around by the swimming pool
And you'll be studying history and you'll be down the gym
And I'll be down the pub, probably playing pool and drinking”

Emotional Rescue was the follow up record to Some Girls and continued the Stones penchant for trying to stay current musically, continuing to feature punk and disco songs scattered among their blues based rock and roll.

This is a pop/punk based song with a great bass line that is actually Ronnie Wood and not Bill Wyman. It’s a fun rollicking song that harkens back to their ability to make pop songs that have still sound heavy and dark on some level. It’s (strangely enough) about a summer romance between a school girl and an older boy who relishes in the fact that unlike his love, the summer ending doesn’t mean the end of fun.

The link here seemed to go back to this thread.

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13 hours ago, Dr. Octopus said:

184. Down in the Hole

Year: 1980

US Album: Emotional Rescue

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

“Will all your money
Buy you forgiveness
Keep you from sickness
Or keep you from cold?”

 

Some real gut-wrenching gritty blues here with a Stones twist. You can just see Mick sitting in an alleyway somewhere belting this out with Keith playing next to him right after shooting up in the corner.

Ronnie and Keith carry the day weaving in and out of eachother’s leads with solos that go right through your insides. Sugar Blue, a blues harmonica player out of Harlem (who also played on Miss You) helps create the mood with some bad mofo blowing on the harp. This may be the most under-rated song in the Stones catalogue – heck I’m probably doing it a disservice myself by keeping it out of the top 100.

LOVE this one.  I feel like Mick's voice really works with this style, even for me.  This is my favorite find so far.

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10 hours ago, Dr. Octopus said:

182. Dandelion

Year: 1967

US Album: Through the Past, Darkly (Big Hits Vol. 2)

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

“One o'clock, two o'clock, three o'clock, four o'clock chimes. Dandelions don't care about the time.”

One of two songs on this list that feature Paul McCartney and John Lennon on backing vocals – there was no rivalry boys and girls. It was released as the B side to the other song that featured the two Beatles on it, and reached No.8 on the UK Singles chart and No. 14 on the US Billboard chart.

The ever versatile Brian Jones plays mellotron and saxophone on this track and Charlie’s drum outro is a nice bonus.

Fantastic.

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181. Anybody Seen My Baby?

Year: 1997

US Album: Bridges to Babylon

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards/Lang/Mink

 

I’ve mentioned how more than almost any other band the Stones (particularly Mick) were very concerned with staying relevant to the music trends of the day, so their catalogue includes some pop, pyschadelic rock, punk, disco, and now here some hip hop – as this song contains a sample from rapper Biz Markie.

The Stones felt it necessary to give song writing credit to K.D. Lang and Ben Mink on this song as its chorus was very similar to Lang’s 1992 song “Constant Craving”.

This song has an R&B feel throughout it and while Stone’s purists likely hate it, I think it works and I kind of like the fact that they still put out new music and try and stay relevant despite the fact that they could easily rest on their laurels and tour under their greatest hits. Mick Jagger once famously said “I don’t want to be playing ‘Satisfaction’ when I’m forty”. Well he’s still playing it in his seventies but he’s still writing and performing new music as well.

The music video features a young Angelina Jolie as a stripper who is the focus of the song.

Edited by Dr. Octopus

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180. Parachute Woman

Year: 1968

US Album: Beggars Banquet

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

"Parachute woman will you blow me out? My heavy throbber's itching just to lay a solid rhythm down.”

 

A Stones original that could have been a Robert Johnson or Muddy Waters original. It’s raw and muddy sounding blues and features Mick in his mumbling vocal style bragging about his many sexual conquests in cities all over America. Another song that features only the five original Stones and no one else.

There is conflicting information about whether the harmonica on this track was Brian or Mick and even some stories saying each played and contributed separate harmonica parts.

Edited by Dr. Octopus
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179. Cool Calm Collected

Year: 1967

US Album: Between the Buttons

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

“She knows who to smile to today
She has just been brought up in that way
She knows all the right games to play
And she always just knows what to say”

 

Between the Buttons was a musically adventurous effort straying from the Blues/British pop records that were in their past. Brian barely picked up a guitar on this album and only contributes on the dulcimer and the kazoo on this track (pay no attention to the line-up listed on the linked YouTub clip). Jack Nitzsche played the piano on this one, with Mick on harmonica and the rest of the ban in their normal slots.

There is a sonic mish-mash on this record while Mick channels his inner Paul McCartney and goes a bit vaudevillian. The result comes across a bit campy but really works. I always have a big smile listening to this one.

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178. Citadel

 

Year: 1967

US Album: Their Satanic Majesties Request

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

“Men at arms shout ‘Who goes there?’”

 

We go back to the Their Satanic Majesties Request album, their psychedelic response to Sgt. Peppers.

Earlier I mentioned how despite the Beatles v. Stones rhetoric that has been going on forever there was no real rivalry between the bands. In fact they planned to release psychedelic themed records together – I’d obviously have to admit the Beatles won this one despite my love for Satanic Majesties. A look at both record covers show their love for each other – the doll on Sgt. Peppers’ cover is wearing a shirt that reads: “Welcome the Rolling Stones. Good Guys”, while the Satanic Majesties 3D album cover shows all four Beatles’ faces hiding in the field of flowers where the Rolling Stones are sitting, Mick in his wizard hat:

https://www.bing.com/images/search?view=detailV2&id=4CB934F33A0553696AAD4EDCCE85E2E0D15446B8&thid=OIP.2-sVkMWMB0w3CiRGEhziEwHaEL&mediaurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.centrosangiorgio.com%2Fsubliminale%2Farticoli%2Fimmagini%2Fsatanic_majesties.jpg&exph=763&expw=1354&q=Satanic+Majesties+&selectedindex=2&ajaxhist=0&vt=0&eim=1,2,6

The chorus of the song refers to Candy (Darling) and Taffy who were Andy Warhol hang arounds that Mick and Keith had met at one of his parties.

Edited by Dr. Octopus
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11 minutes ago, Dr. Octopus said:

178. Citade

We go back to the Their Satanic Majesties Request album, their psychedelic response to Sgt. Peppers.

Earlier I mentioned how despite the Beatles v. Stones rhetoric that has been going on forever there was no real rivalry between the bands. In fact they planned to release psychedelic themed records together – 

 

*** WARNING - a non PC word is used to describe Mick, don't wanna trigger anyone ***

not sure John got the memo on all that ... love me some classic/caustic Irish 'pudlian Lennon. 

Edited by otb_lifer

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18 minutes ago, otb_lifer said:

 

*** WARNING - a non PC word is used to describe Mick, don't wanna trigger anyone ***

not sure John got the memo on all that ... love me some classic/caustic Irish 'pudlian Lennon. 

I think it's a bit tongue in cheek (he sang on "We Love You" after all) and he was always a bit bitter that the Beatles were portrayed as the "good boys" while the Stones were the "bad boys" but he could have his moods as well. 

He and Keith were very good friends however and there's a long list of projects they worked on together.

I love me some John as well so it's all good. Ok, the rivalry is back on though  :boxing:

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5 hours ago, Dr. Octopus said:

181. Anybody Seen My Baby?

Year: 1997

US Album: Bridges to Babylon

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards/Lang/Mink

 

That's an awful lot of Les Paul for a Stones' song but, by hook or by crook, the ol' farts showed they could still build a record here.

5 hours ago, Dr. Octopus said:

180. Parachute Woman

Year: 1968

US Album: Beggars Banquet

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

Not the Beggar's Banquet lover that most Stones' fans are, but still awrightawrightawright

47 minutes ago, Dr. Octopus said:

179. Cool Calm Collected

Year: 1967

US Album: Between the Buttons

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

This came out about the same time as a lot of those British movies that had wild parties and ended with people riding go-karts & such, so i'd close my eyes and make my own movie to this'n

31 minutes ago, Dr. Octopus said:

178. Citadel

 

Year: 1967

US Album: Their Satanic Majesties Request

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

I discovered psychedelics not long after this album came out and, for some reason, i listened to it a LOT more than Magical Mystery Tour

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3 minutes ago, Dr. Octopus said:

I think it's a bit tongue in cheek (he sang on "We Love You" after all) and he was always a bit bitter that the Beatles were portrayed as the "good boys" while the Stones were the "bad boys" but he could have his moods as well. 

He and Keith were very good friends however and there's a long list of projects they worked on together.

I love me some John as well so it's all good. Ok, the rivalry is back on though  :boxing:

oh yeah, they certainly hobnobbed and collabed durung the heyday ... the "Yer Blues" scorcher in R n' R Circus most notable among the many. 

but John directed all the vitriol there at Mick, and i think he was speaking for all the Beatles, no doubt.  

allowing also that the above was culled from the classic Wenner sessions, which lasted hours upon hours ... a fascinating listen, just so compelling, every damn word - John was in rare form, ripping #######s left and right - guy was en fuego ...

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16 minutes ago, wikkidpissah said:

I discovered psychedelics not long after this album came out and, for some reason, i listened to it a LOT more than Magical Mystery Tour

In college, some 20+ years after the record was released, it was our go to soundtrack for many a pot smoking session.

My buddy Steve used to hold a lit cigarette upwards on his head and dance around the room to what will be the No. 9 (No. 9, No. 9) song on this list.

Edited by Dr. Octopus
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On ‎5‎/‎11‎/‎2019 at 12:36 PM, otb_lifer said:

if i may, now that the "Shadow" cherry has been popped, chuck my top 10 up in here ...

Satisfaction, Child of the Moon, Winter, Play With Fire, Mother's Little Helper, Wild Horses, She's A Rainbow, Paint It Black, Shadow ... all in a blender for spots 2-10, no quibble with ranking in any order - the permanent #1 of Sister Morphine is undefeated and still heavyweight champ of my rock n' roll world (yep, much as i love Jonesy, he was gone for this one).

 

Three of these will be in my top 10, with one almost making it (at 11) - and all but one in the top 50. 

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16 minutes ago, Dr. Octopus said:

Three of these will be in my top 10, with one almost making it (at 11) - and all but one in the top 50. 

hmmmm .... that's a pretty nice haul for my choices :hifive:

now, as a bettin' man, if i had to venture a wager, methinks the following:

as far as the 4 in the top 11 ... the chalk there is Satisfaction, obviously, with Horses about a length behind, and that one a 1/2 length ahead of PIB ... the superfecta should be rounded out by Morphine - it's just so ####### brilliant, im'ma definitely portend a very high ranking from a Stones aficionado such as yourself.

my rankings would differ from the above, except for SM.

these are guesses as to your placements, of course. 

ETA: no need to confirm or divulge ... will be fun waiting them all out and enjoying the ride :thumbup:

Edited by otb_lifer
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12 hours ago, Dr. Octopus said:

180. Parachute Woman

Year: 1968

US Album: Beggars Banquet

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

"Parachute woman will you blow me out? My heavy throbber's itching just to lay a solid rhythm down.”

 

A Stones original that could have been a Robert Johnson or Muddy Waters original. It’s raw and muddy sounding blues and features Mick in his mumbling vocal style bragging about his many sexual conquests in cities all over America. Another song that features only the five original Stones and no one else.

There is conflicting information about whether the harmonica on this track was Brian or Mick and even some stories saying each played and contributed separate harmonica parts.

Another link issue.

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