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Dr. Octopus

In this thread I rank my favorite Rolling Stones songs: 204-1: Four Musketeers Get Their Ya-Yas Out

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8 hours ago, Dr. Octopus said:

178. Citadel

 

Year: 1967

US Album: Their Satanic Majesties Request

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

“Men at arms shout ‘Who goes there?’”

 

We go back to the Their Satanic Majesties Request album, their psychedelic response to Sgt. Peppers.

Earlier I mentioned how despite the Beatles v. Stones rhetoric that has been going on forever there was no real rivalry between the bands. In fact they planned to release psychedelic themed records together – I’d obviously have to admit the Beatles won this one despite my love for Satanic Majesties. A look at both record covers show their love for each other – the doll on Sgt. Peppers’ cover is wearing a shirt that reads: “Welcome the Rolling Stones. Good Guys”, while the Satanic Majesties 3D album cover shows all four Beatles’ faces hiding in the field of flowers where the Rolling Stones are sitting, Mick in his wizard hat:

https://www.bing.com/images/search?view=detailV2&id=4CB934F33A0553696AAD4EDCCE85E2E0D15446B8&thid=OIP.2-sVkMWMB0w3CiRGEhziEwHaEL&mediaurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.centrosangiorgio.com%2Fsubliminale%2Farticoli%2Fimmagini%2Fsatanic_majesties.jpg&exph=763&expw=1354&q=Satanic+Majesties+&selectedindex=2&ajaxhist=0&vt=0&eim=1,2,6

The chorus of the song refers to Candy (Darling) and Taffy who were Andy Warhol hang arounds that Mick and Keith had met at one of his parties.

This one, too.

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177. Shake Your Hips

Year: 1972

US Album: Exile on Main Street

Songwriter: Slim Harpo

 

Another Blues cover, this one originally done by Slim Harpo. Mick sounds very nasally on this one, likely by design as it adds a grittiness. He also blows a pretty mean harp on this one. While this is a reworking of a Harpo song, the Stones added a bit of a Bo Diddley beat to it.

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176. Cry To Me

Year: 1965

US Album: Out of Our Heads

Songwriter: Bert Berns

 

So much emotion in this one. This is a cover of a Bert Berns penned song first performed by R&B legend Solomon Burke in 1961.

Mick really sells this one as Bill provides a nice bass line and Keith and Brian throw in some solid guitar riffs. It’s Jack Nitzsche playing the organ on this one.

Edited by Dr. Octopus
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175. It's Not Easy

Year: 1965

US Album: Aftermath

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

“You got me running like a cat in a thunderstorm”

 

A straight-out rocker that still maintains its pop sensibilities. This song features probably the most prominent Brian Jones' vocals, backing up Mick. Bill’s fuzzy bass and Charlie’s drum fills are a large part of what really works in this song.

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174. I'm Going Down

Year: 1975

US Album: Metamorphosis

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards/Taylor

 

The song was originally recorded in 1969, and it ended up making its way onto the Metamorphosis compilation record.

Line up: Mick Jagger (vocals), Keith Richards (guitar), Mick Taylor (bass), Charlie Watts (drums), Bobby Keys (sax), Rocky Dijon (percussion) Stephen Stills (guitar)

Mick’s vocals are a bit distorted and buried in the mix but this song is really all about Keith and Mr. Stills’ burning guitars.

 

Edited by Dr. Octopus
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24 minutes ago, Dr. Octopus said:

175. It's Not Easy

Year: 1965

US Album: Aftermath

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

“You got me running like a cat in a thunderstorm”

 

A straight-out rocker that still maintains its pop sensibilities. This song features probably the most prominent Brian Jones' vocals, backing up Mick. Bill’s fuzzy bass and Charlie’s drum fills are a large part of what really works in this song.

Talk about your triggers - brought up a memory i havent thought about in over 50 years.

I was a damn fine Boy Scout, on the Eagle track til i quit for Civil Air Patrol (part of the AirForce/Astronaut dream every kid had til Nam sploded). Went to Boy Scout camp up in Maine for  a couple wks for 3 summers. One year, our Scoutmaster had to leave for a family emergency, so we were supervised by a member of camp staff couldnta been more than 17-18 and had never dealt w city kidz b4. We ran him ragged all week then, just before the big session-ending Olympics-type competition, we swarmed his ### and strapped him to his cot, gagged him & wrote various slurs on his chest in Indian war paint. Once we had him well-tressed (knots being a BSA specialty) we serenaded him with this song before going down to the competition. Well, it's haaaard.......

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33 minutes ago, wikkidpissah said:

Talk about your triggers - brought up a memory i havent thought about in over 50 years.

I was a damn fine Boy Scout, on the Eagle track til i quit for Civil Air Patrol (part of the AirForce/Astronaut dream every kid had til Nam sploded). Went to Boy Scout camp up in Maine for  a couple wks for 3 summers. One year, our Scoutmaster had to leave for a family emergency, so we were supervised by a member of camp staff couldnta been more than 17-18 and had never dealt w city kidz b4. We ran him ragged all week then, just before the big session-ending Olympics-type competition, we swarmed his ### and strapped him to his cot, gagged him & wrote various slurs on his chest in Indian war paint. Once we had him well-tressed (knots being a BSA specialty) we serenaded him with this song before going down to the competition. Well, it's haaaard.......

:unsure:

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173. I Just Want to Make Love to You

Year: 1964

US Album: England’s Newest Hit Makers

Songwriter: Willie Dixon

 

The Stones rock out on this Willie Dixon tune that was first recorded by Muddy Waters. Brian Jones does some serious harmonica work on this one.

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On 5/14/2019 at 9:29 AM, Dr. Octopus said:

180. Parachute Woman

Year: 1968

US Album: Beggars Banquet

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

"Parachute woman will you blow me out? My heavy throbber's itching just to lay a solid rhythm down.”

 

A Stones original that could have been a Robert Johnson or Muddy Waters original. It’s raw and muddy sounding blues and features Mick in his mumbling vocal style bragging about his many sexual conquests in cities all over America. Another song that features only the five original Stones and no one else.

There is conflicting information about whether the harmonica on this track was Brian or Mick and even some stories saying each played and contributed separate harmonica parts.

Really like this song - plus, I absolutely love the video.

Especially the final cameo by Parachute Woman

Excellent!

Edited by Man of Constant Sorrow
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172. I Am Waiting

Year: 1966

US Album: Aftermath

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

“See it come along and
Don't know where it's from
Oh yes, you will find out
Well, it happens all the time
It's censored from our minds
You'll find out”

The ever versatile Brian Jones provides the main instrumentation via dulcimer, which gives the song a light but eerie tone. I particularly like the change in tempo during the bridges in the song.  The much maligned (in this thread) Mick does a great job with the vocals on this one.

The song was reintroduced to a younger generation via a pivotal montage scene in the movie Rushmore: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xrtlStki1aE

 

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171. You Don't Have to Mean It

Year: 1997

US Album: Bridges to Babylon

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

“just say those little words
Sit on my shoulder like a little bird
Baby baby sing those words for me”

 

For the first time on this list we get to listen to Keith Richards sing lead vocals – there will be many more opportunities to come. Richards has always had an affinity for reggae music and contributed many reggae songs to the Stones catalogue and even produced and played on a record with a group of reggae musicians, calling the project the Wingless Angels.

This song is more dance hall reggae and Keith has a gran old time with it. I’m not sure how people feel about Keith’s voice but he’s even less of a “technically” good singer than Mick. There’s a dylanesque nasal quality to his voice in his later years, but in the early days it was a tad bit sweeter.

I should also point out by this time, Bill Wyman was no longer with the band and was replaced with Daryl Jones in 1993.

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1 hour ago, Dr. Octopus said:

172. I Am Waiting

Year: 1966

US Album: Aftermath

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

Low. Way low. My favorite acoustic Stones (don't like the drawl-y stuff).

58 minutes ago, Dr. Octopus said:

171. You Don't Have to Mean It

Year: 1997

US Album: Bridges to Babylon

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

Love me some Keef, man. Not only the most important musician in Rock history, but i knew him, backinaday, so to speak. Time to trot out my Keef story, which many of you have heard before.

One of my bands, Cricket Hill, was on the bill at the great Shaboo rock club near UConn with the Chambers Bros and headliner Martha Reeves of Vandellas fame. She had just recorded her first solo album, supported by many of the Stones and was more-or-less premiering it. Stones keyboardist Nicky Hopkins was in her band for this and that attracted most of the Stones family, including Keef, up to Connecticut at points during the week. Everybody partied together the whole time so i ended up partying with my one of my idols but we had no special moment or anything. I partied w the Chambers Bros bass player that wk and i dont remember name or face, know'm'sayin?

Flash forward 2-3 years. I'm partying on the beach on Fla's Sanibel Island, which was a very tony address in those days. One of those sitches where you're in & out of people's houses without knowing the folk, just following the crowd & cocaine. One of the mansions was owned by Bill Wyman and we ended up at a party there. Who should i see sitting on a couch strumming a guitar but me ol' chum Keef. I was loaded, he was loaded, if it was Chambers Bros bass player i mightn't have recognized him and certainly wouldn't remember his name. I go up to introduce myself and hope he might remember our brief encounter and he goes, "Hey, i know you! You were at Shaboo wif Maaahfa (the official NLondon pronunciation of Martha), yeah?! Dayuuwwww (the official NLondon pronunciation of my Christian name), innit? I was gobsmacked, of course, and we didn't have a great moment together then either, but this famous blotto remembering my name after 3 yrs is my favorite celebrity story, even better than seeing Jimmy Carter's penis.

That said, he can't sing. Four-note range and still can't find & keep notes sometimes. There are songs where that dont matter and this is one of em but....can't sing a lick. Howl, li'lbit, can't sing.

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8 minutes ago, wikkidpissah said:

I was gobsmacked, of course, and we didn't have a great moment together then either, but this famous blotto remembering my name after 3 yrs is my favorite celebrity story,

I've heard a similar story from some one else once. Keith remembered him a few years later after only a brief conversation with him at the original meeting. Supposedly, despite his image he's super sharp and wicked smart.

I agree he has very limited range in his vocals, but I always dug his high range when singing backup and as you said there are songs where he can pull it off.

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12 minutes ago, wikkidpissah said:

Low. Way low. My favorite acoustic Stones (don't like the drawl-y stuff).

Yeah, I'm having some remorse on a few of the placements but I'm trying not to drive myself crazy by over tweaking the list - it also helps that (imo) everything left has something great about it.

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1 minute ago, Dr. Octopus said:

Yeah, I'm having some remorse on a few of the placements but I'm trying not to drive myself crazy by over tweaking the list - it also helps that (imo) everything left has something great about it.

Like with krista - they're not mistakes, merely a function of making large lists by oneself. Especially up in the all-great zone.

And time makes our wheelhouses different anyway. Earlier they are, the more elementally i'll react to anomalous choices. My transistor was often my best friend - i was an insomniac even as a kid and often listened under my pillow well into the night - and you never lose those connections

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170. Soul Survivor

Year: 1972

US Album: Exile on Main St.

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

“When you're flying your flags
All my confidence sags
You got me packing my bags
I'll stowaway at sea, yeah
You make me mutiny
Where you are, I wanna be
You're gonna be the death of me, yeah”

 

It’s a Charlie Showcase!!! But seriously he provides such a great rhythmic groove on this one with a few real nice fills.

This one closes out the Exile album and does so messily and loud – just the way that record should go out.

Keith is doing double duty on this one playing guitar and bass and providing those great backing vocals I love him for so much.

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Similar to the Beatles thread, I will share my back story with respect to the Stones. As I was born in '65, my initial access was via my older cousins, who were much more in the Beatles camp than the Stones. So would say my early exposure was through the prism of their hits vs. LPs (think Hot Rocks for the assortment). My own plug in to the Stones started with Some Girls and continued through Steel Wheels, so it is unfortunate that I likely have some affinity for their slow decline downwards more than others. Of course, this was bolstered by digging into the back catalog, but even there, beyond the big 4 from Beggars thru Exile, my memory is spotty.

So, will share where I can (and may be embarrassed to), but look forward to learning some new stuff and being able to associate the song titles with the tunes (has already happened on a few occassions so far.


On with the show...

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35 minutes ago, Big Blue Wrecking Crew said:

My own plug in to the Stones started with Some Girls and continued through Steel Wheels, so it is unfortunate that I likely have some affinity for their slow decline downwards more than others.

We will still have some (more) of that era represented for sure. While their 80s albums do not stack up to their 60s and 70s catalogue - there are surely songs that do.

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169. Suzie Q

Year: 1964

US Album: 12 x 5

Songwriter: Dale Hawkins

 

This very short song probably should have been a little lower (or higher OR LOWER – ummm...closer to 204) than it is since it’s a cover and so short – and if I I'm being honest, CCR did it even better. However, I just love Keith’s jam on this one. He channels his inner Chuck B but makes it a bit nastier.

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168. Honest I Do

Year: 1964

US Album: England’s Newest Hit Makers

Songwriter: Jimmy Reed

 

“Please tell me you love me. Stop driving me mad.”

 

Another early Blues cover which was first recorded by Jimmy Reed in 1957. Another stellar harp performance by the great Brian Jones and thumping Bill Wyman bass line on this one.

Mick gives a very touching soulful performance on this one – the guy could sing the blues.

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9 hours ago, Dr. Octopus said:

172. I Am Waiting

Year: 1966

US Album: Aftermath

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

“See it come along and
Don't know where it's from
Oh yes, you will find out
Well, it happens all the time
It's censored from our minds
You'll find out”

The ever versatile Brian Jones provides the main instrumentation via dulcimer, which gives the song a light but eerie tone. I particularly like the change in tempo during the bridges in the song.  The much maligned (in this thread) Mick does a great job with the vocals on this one.

The song was reintroduced to a younger generation via a pivotal montage scene in the movie Rushmore: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xrtlStki1aE

 

This wasn't doing much for me until I hit the first bridge.  Those bridges are heavenly, as are the transitions back to the verses.

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167. Hang Fire

Year: 1981

US Album: Tattoo You

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

“You know marrying money is a full time job.  I don't need the aggravation. I'm a lazy slob”

 

Most of the Tattoo You album consisted of songs that were recorded for prior records, and this one was originally recorded for Some Girls but didn’t make the cut. The Stones don’t have too many political songs, and while this one isn’t overt in its political commentary it’s a bleak look at the unemployed working class citizens of England and the politicians that created the situation.

The term “hang fire” is slang for doing nothing.

Bill and Charlie steal the show musically here and of course are the only two not having any fun in the linked video.

Edited by Dr. Octopus
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4 minutes ago, Dr. Octopus said:

167. Hang Fire

Year: 1981

US Album: Tattoo You

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

“You know marrying money is a full time job.  I don't need the aggravation. I'm a lazy slob”

 

Most of the Tattoo You album consisted of songs that were recorded for prior records, and this one was originally recorded for Some Girls but didn’t make the cut. The Stones don’t have too many political songs, and while this one isn’t overt in its political commentary it’s a bleak look at the unemployed working class citizens of England and the politicians that created the situation.

The term “hang fire” is slang for doing nothing.

Bill and Charlie steal the show musically here and of course are the only two not having any fun in the linked video.

love the post-punk vibe of this one, fit perfectly into the more modern landscape of '81

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23 hours ago, Dr. Octopus said:

172. I Am Waiting

Year: 1966

US Album: Aftermath

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

The song was reintroduced to a younger generation via a pivotal montage scene in the movie Rushmore: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xrtlStki1aE

I love this song because of Rushmore, making me the younger generation, I guess... Regardless, I went out and bought Aftermath because of it. It's probably my favorite Stones album, actually.

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166. Flight 505

Year: 1966

US Album: Aftermath

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

“With the whole world at my feet. Of course I’ll have a drink.”

I love this song more than I probably should for two reasons. I love Ian Stewart's soft piano intro that breaks into the riff from “Satisfaction” just before the song kicks in. I also think Alanis Morrisette should have taken some notes on “irony” as the hero of this song is a man so fed up with his life he decides to just run away, head to the airport and randomly book a flight. He gets on the plane so happy and looking forward to starting a whole new life just to see the plane go down above the ocean.

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165. Dear Doctor

Year: 1968

US Album: Beggars Banquet

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

“I was tremblin, as I put on my jacket
 It had creases as sharp as a knife
I put the ring in my pocket, but there was a note
And my heart it jumped into my mouth

It read, ‘Darlin', I'm sorry to hurt you
But I have no courage to speak to your face
But I'm down in Virginia with your cousin Lou
There be no wedding today’”

 

I realize this country blues tune is likely not for everyone but it cracks me up and even beyond that there’s a lot to like. Keith’s backing vocals and acoustic guitar are fantastic. The whole song is acoustic including the upright bass Bill plays.

The song is about a guy getting all liquored up on his wedding day as he would prefer not to marry the “bow legged sow” he’s engaged to. Relief comes when he finds out she’s a no-show at the wedding because she’s gone away with the hero’s cousin Lou.

I’m sure there will be a few people not so impressed with Mick’s imitation of the bride – but that always cracked me up so it beats out a few songs that are objectively better.

Edited by Dr. Octopus
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second best thing to come out of this thread for me so far is I went and bought a Chuck Berry greatest hits compilation The Great Twenty Eight :thumbup:

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As to Mick's "country" voice, here is what Bill Janovitz (who is the singer, guitarist and songwriter for Buffalo Tom and a music writer) had to say about "Dear Doctor":


 

Quote

 

With all acoustic instruments — guitar, tack piano, 12-string, harmonica, tambourine, and upright bass — ...the band manages to sound authentically old-time and primitive, with Mick Jagger employing the fake-American hick accent that he would continue to mine in future blues and country numbers throughout the Stones' career....

...Jagger may be poking fun a little, but he could not nail the parlance of the characters so precisely if he had not studied it closely as a fan of the music... In a sense, they have been musicologists, interpreting musical forms that were in danger of dying out.

 

 

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4 hours ago, Dr. Octopus said:

167. Hang Fire

Year: 1981

US Album: Tattoo You

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

I'm starting to get why people younger than me have no special affection for the Stones. If the mugging, self-congratulatory, twitchy oldsters in the vids are the reference point and those werent the very same people who taught you how to rock in the first place, yeah, i get that. Good song, craftily done but really, get over yourselves

4 hours ago, Dr. Octopus said:

166. Flight 505

Year: 1966

US Album: Aftermath

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

This is what i imagine the Stones envisioned they'd be when they started.

I have a picture in my head that has entered my dreamscape - i can't remember if it was specifically taken directly from by Keef's autobio descriptions of his adolation of Stew or if my head created the image as a result - of climbing a narrow club staircase to a cramped hall at the top with an upright piano up against the wall and Ian Stewart fashioning new musical figures out of sweaty, delta agonies. The piano player at the top of the stairs might be the most repeated trope of my dreams these days, which is better than my old one of pushing car radio buttons to no result.

4 hours ago, Dr. Octopus said:

165. Dear Doctor

Year: 1968

US Album: Beggars Banquet

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

'68 was the year that my voice changed. Broke my heart - me, my Catholic choirboy voice and cheesy Farfisa organ had wormed its way into a band (which was waaaay stoopit cuz my terrible left-hand coordination made it impossible to play a whole song without mistake) and school productions, and it all just crashed as my voice sunk into the crackling croak that took years to recover into sexyphonevoice. Then i got into a non-musical production and went up on my lines, developing the stagefright which ended my performing career and curses me to this day. My only salvation was Beggar's Banquet, an album and direction i really didn't care for, but it had a lot of songs you could yowl with your mates and cover your regular-person flaws. :kicksrock:

Edited by wikkidpissah
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On 5/16/2019 at 12:13 PM, Dr. Octopus said:

170. Soul Survivor

Year: 1972

US Album: Exile on Main St.

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

“When you're flying your flags
All my confidence sags
You got me packing my bags
I'll stowaway at sea, yeah
You make me mutiny
Where you are, I wanna be
You're gonna be the death of me, yeah”

 

It’s a Charlie Showcase!!! But seriously he provides such a great rhythmic groove on this one with a few real nice fills.

This one closes out the Exile album and does so messily and loud – just the way that record should go out.

Keith is doing double duty on this one playing guitar and bass and providing those great backing vocals I love him for so much.

Dr. This one is waaaaaaay up on the list - as a young teenage punk who bought this when it came out - this finish to the record is fantastic - the piano, slide, bass, the riffs,  as you said Charlie all mixed up perfectly in Stones style. When you were in high school stoned and with the headphones on it was the best - left you knowing you had heard the best Rock n Roll band ever. You had to take a few minutes to figure out what to play next. 

Edited by ffldrew
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3 hours ago, Dr. Octopus said:

166. Flight 505

Year: 1966

US Album: Aftermath

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

“With the whole world at my feet. Of course I’ll have a drink.”

I love this song more than I probably should for two reasons. I love Ian Stewart's soft piano intro that breaks into the riff from “Satisfaction” just before the song kicks in. I also think Alanis Morrisette should have taken some notes on “irony” as the hero of this song is a man so fed up with his life he decides to just run away, head to the airport and randomly book a flight. He gets on the plane so happy and looking forward to starting a whole new life just to see the plane go down above the ocean.

As much as the Stones are revered for visiting Chess and being influenced/extending  Chicago Blues styles - this one is an ode to another of their favorite spots - New Orleans. This is like old school out of the Dave Barthlomew and Allen Toussaint world - crashing into Chuck.

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1 hour ago, wikkidpissah said:

I'm starting to get why people younger than me have no special affection for the Stones. If the mugging, self-congratulatory, twitchy oldsters in the vids are the reference point and those werent the very same people who taught you how to rock in the first place, yeah, i get that. Good song, craftily done but really, get over yourselves

This version should be used from the 81 tour 

https://youtu.be/nlN5GFz-Fmc

 

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164. Good Times

Year: 1965

US Album: Out of Our Heads

Songwriter: Sam Cooke

 

A pretty straight cover of the Sam Cooke classic. I probably should have had this one a bit lower (higher?) on the list since it does nothing to better Cooke’s version but is a nice mellow change of pace for the Stones and features some nice bass work from Bill. Mick does not embarrass himself here but of course he can’t match Cooke on the vocals.

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163. Complicated

Year: 1967

US Album: Between the Buttons

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

“She looks so simple in her way
Does the same thing everyday
But she's dedicated
To having her own way
She's very complicated”

 

It’s a Charlie showcase!!!!

Between the Buttons album started the Stones foray into psychedeliac rock, although it featured a very eclectic assortment of songs. This was one of the more straight forwarded rockers. Brian was in the middle of his boredom with the guitar and plays the organ on this one.

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162. Long Long While

Year: 1966

US Album: More Hot Rocks (Big Hits & Fazed Cookies)

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

“Still you have those happy eyes. I will try and apologize”

 

The B side of the Paint It Black (may appear on this list at some point) single.

Another song featured in a pivotal movie scene, this one as Joe Pesci shoved a pen into some one’s neck.

Edited by Dr. Octopus
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4 hours ago, Dr. Octopus said:

165. Dear Doctor

Year: 1968

US Album: Beggars Banquet

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

“I was tremblin, as I put on my jacket
 It had creases as sharp as a knife
I put the ring in my pocket, but there was a note
And my heart it jumped into my mouth

It read, ‘Darlin', I'm sorry to hurt you
But I have no courage to speak to your face
But I'm down in Virginia with your cousin Lou
There be no wedding today’”

Oh help me

Please dcotor

I'm damaged

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3 hours ago, Dr. Octopus said:

As to Mick's "country" voice, here is what Bill Janovitz (who is the singer, guitarist and songwriter for Buffalo Tom and a music writer) had to say about "Dear Doctor":


 

Quote

 

With all acoustic instruments — guitar, tack piano, 12-string, harmonica, tambourine, and upright bass — ...the band manages to sound authentically old-time and primitive, with Mick Jagger employing the fake-American hick accent that he would continue to mine in future blues and country numbers throughout the Stones' career....

...Jagger may be poking fun a little, but he could not nail the parlance of the characters so precisely if he had not studied it closely as a fan of the music... In a sense, they have been musicologists, interpreting musical forms that were in danger of dying out.

 

I'll say this...

Mick does a HELLA better job at this than Paul in Rocky Raccoon.

Seriously, as far as brits go, I think Mick does a damn fine job.

 

EDIT: Oh - I'll never confuse Mick with my Eastern KY kinfolk, but I think he developed a unique sound that works.

Edited by Man of Constant Sorrow
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Sorry for the tangent here, but you list the Great Debate in the title now, s0...

After Dear Doctor, and my comparison to Rocky Raccoon, I had a brain jolt in regards to something Paul said...

Quote

The song, a country ballad, is titled from the character's name, which was originally "Rocky Sassoon", but McCartney changed it to "Rocky Raccoon" because he thought "it sounded more like a cowboy".

source

 

Cowboy? 

Yeah.

All them raccoons storm'n the plains inspired many a cowboy to adopt the Raccoon moniker.

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52 minutes ago, Man of Constant Sorrow said:

Sorry for the tangent here, but you list the Great Debate in the title now, s0...

After Dear Doctor, and my comparison to Rocky Raccoon, I had a brain jolt in regards to something Paul said...

source

 

Cowboy? 

Yeah.

All them raccoons storm'n the plains inspired many a cowboy to adopt the Raccoon moniker.

Well "Rocky Sassoon" sure doesn't sound very Cowboy unless we're talking I Wish I Knew How to Quit You

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16 minutes ago, Dr. Octopus said:
1 hour ago, Man of Constant Sorrow said:

Sorry for the tangent here, but you list the Great Debate in the title now, s0...

After Dear Doctor, and my comparison to Rocky Raccoon, I had a brain jolt in regards to something Paul said...

source

 

Cowboy? 

Yeah.

All them raccoons storm'n the plains inspired many a cowboy to adopt the Raccoon moniker.

Well "Rocky Sassoon" sure doesn't sound very Cowboy unless we're talking I Wish I Knew How to Quit You

Ya got me... ☹️

 

But, how 'bout Rocky Baboon? That's just as cowboy, imo.

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On 5/17/2019 at 9:05 AM, Dr. Octopus said:

167. Hang Fire

Year: 1981

US Album: Tattoo You

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

“You know marrying money is a full time job.  I don't need the aggravation. I'm a lazy slob”

 

Most of the Tattoo You album consisted of songs that were recorded for prior records, and this one was originally recorded for Some Girls but didn’t make the cut. The Stones don’t have too many political songs, and while this one isn’t overt in its political commentary it’s a bleak look at the unemployed working class citizens of England and the politicians that created the situation.

The term “hang fire” is slang for doing nothing.

Bill and Charlie steal the show musically here and of course are the only two not having any fun in the linked video.

My first "way too low" of the thread.

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161. I'd Much Rather Be With the Boys

Year: 1975

US Album: Metamorphosis

Songwriter: Oldham/Richards

 

This is one of a handful of songs that was co-written by Andrew Loog Oldham the Stones manager from 1963-1967.

Oldham was responsible for keeping Ian Stewart out of the band because six members were too many and Stewart was too old (Bill Wyman was actually tow years older than Stewart. He was also responsible for promoting a "bad boy" image for the Rolling Stones in contrast to the Beatles. Oldham generated widely reprinted headlines like "Would You Let Your Sister Go with a Rolling Stone?" and provocative album-cover notes, such as a satirical incitement to fans to mug a blind beggar for funds to buy the album.

This songs has a real 50s doo-wop type sound with some great backing vocals by Keith and Brian with Mick sounding pretty soulful.

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160. Can You Hear the Music

Year: 1973

US Album: Goats Head Soup

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

“Love is a mystery I can't demystify, oh, no. And sometimes I wonder why we're here But I don't care, I don't care. Can you hear the music, can you hear the music?”

 

This one sounds like Brian Jones should have been on it with its middle eastern sound and exotic instruments but it falls within the Mick Taylor era.

There are multiple percussionists on this track, including long time Stones partner Jimmy Miller, and some flute. Even the lyrics are a bit mystical here.

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1 hour ago, Dr. Octopus said:

161. I'd Much Rather Be With the Boys

Year: 1975

US Album: Metamorphosis

Songwriter: Oldham/Richards

 

This is one of a handful of songs that was co-written by Andrew Loog Oldham the Stones manager from 1963-1967.

Oldham was responsible for keeping Ian Stewart out of the band because six members were too many and Stewart was too old (Bill Wyman was actually tow years older than Stewart. He was also responsible for promoting a "bad boy" image for the Rolling Stones in contrast to the Beatles. Oldham generated widely reprinted headlines like "Would You Let Your Sister Go with a Rolling Stone?" and provocative album-cover notes, such as a satirical incitement to fans to mug a blind beggar for funds to buy the album.

This songs has a real 50s doo-wop type sound with some great backing vocals by Keith and Brian with Mick sounding pretty soulful.

my first 'way too high'. good excuse to spotlight Oldham - whose cat-wrangling thru the Stones' 1st decade may have have been as valuable to music as George Martin's studio craft - but there are some really good songs behind this

46 minutes ago, Dr. Octopus said:

160. Can You Hear the Music

Year: 1973

US Album: Goats Head Soup

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

“Love is a mystery I can't demystify, oh, no. And sometimes I wonder why we're here But I don't care, I don't care. Can you hear the music, can you hear the music?”

 

This one sounds like Brian Jones should have been on it with its middle eastern sound and exotic instruments but it falls within the Mick Taylor era.

There are multiple percussionists on this track, including long time Stones partner Jimmy Miller, and some flute. Even the lyrics are a bit mystical here.

I remember being in the record store w my bff Jeff - not long after we'd gone to a Stones concert (i believe it was the tour Stevie Wonder opened) that, for the first time, was more peopled w yobbos & yahoos than Stones fans - and pulling out the GHS album to reference the rather fey cover and saying "They're not ours anymore".

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4 minutes ago, wikkidpissah said:

 

I remember being in the record store w my bff Jeff - not long after we'd gone to a Stones concert (i believe it was the tour Stevie Wonder opened) that, for the first time, was more peopled w yobbos & yahoos than Stones fans - and pulling out the GHS album to reference the rather fey cover and saying "They're not ours anymore".

GHS and IORn'R their "glam" period, so to speak? 

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159. Silver Train

Year: 1973

US Album: Goats Head Soup

Songwriter: Jagger/Richards

 

“But I sure love the way that she laughed and took my money”

 

This straight-out rocker was a song about the narrator’s relationship with a prostitute and the B-side to “Angie.” Another stellar honky tonk piano performance from the great Ian Stewart. The linked video shows Bill Wyman playing bass, but it was actually Keith on the recording. Bill only played on four tracks on the GHS album.

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