Fantasy Football - Footballguys Forums
rockaction

Bob Dylan, Tangentials, and Eephus's Review Thread 2019: The Nobel Poet And A Fine Essayist With A Musical Corpus

Recommended Posts

Walked Bosley tonight after the Warriors game.  Picked an older one that I haven't listened to in a long while

John Wesley Harding (1967)

The album came after a long layoff (by 1960s Dylan standards) following his motorcycle crash.  The event was shrouded in mystery at the time and has since been hyped to semi-legendary proportions.  He'd written and recorded Bringing It All Back Home, Highway 61 Revisited and Blonde on Blonde in a little over a year and a half.  This was in addition to a heavy tour schedule.  By some accounts, he was burning out and the accident was an excuse to withdraw for a while.

He emerged from seclusion with a quiet album, recorded quickly in Nashville with session players on bass and drums.  It has a very cohesive sound to me, especially the series of ballads on side one.  I think I prefer side two (tracks 7-12) though.  I'm not qualified to analyzed Dylan's lyrics; people have devoted their lives to it.  Side one is very third person while the songs on the second side seem more personal.  The words aren't as dense as on his three previous electric LPs.  The lyrics, like the arrangements are sparse but hint at a deeper spirituality that Dylan would return to later in his career.

My one gripe with the record is too much harp.  The lack of a lead guitar coupled with fewer sung verses means there's a lot of Bob blowing his harmonica.   The last two songs introduce a pedal steel for what I think is its first appearance on a Dylan record.  The steel mimics horns on the verse of Down Along the Cove and anticipates Dylan's next career move on I'll Be Your Baby Tonight.

All Along the Watchtower is the best known song on the album but it's always seemed unfinished to me.  My favorites are I Dreamed I Saw St. Augustine and Dear Landlord

Boz was moving pretty well so we did the longer loop on Hayes St.  He got passed by a bulldog with her hind legs strapped in a cart.  I just made normal chatter with other dog owners.  The light sculpture that's been in the middle of Hayes Green for the past year is completely down now.  We'll see what goes up in that space next.

  • Like 5
  • Love 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Eephus said:

The light sculpture that's been in the middle of Hayes Green for the past year is completely down now.  We'll see what goes up in that space next.

That is so cool. Do you know how they did the light? It looks emitted rather than reflected, but I am not sure. LED maybe?

They gonna put it back up or maybe take it on tour?

On the Bob stuff that is great. I have always loved him but don't know a wide range.

9 minutes ago, Eephus said:

Dreamed I Saw St. Augustine

This is great. My first listen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

14 minutes ago, Man of Constant Sorrow said:
24 minutes ago, Eephus said:

The light sculpture that's been in the middle of Hayes Green for the past year is completely down now.  We'll see what goes up in that space next.

That is so cool. Do you know how they did the light? It looks emitted rather than reflected, but I am not sure. LED maybe?

They gonna put it back up or maybe take it on tour?

After a bit of Googling, it appears the light sculpture is supposed to be replaced by a 15 foot tall Buddha made out of machine parts

They switch the artwork out every year or so.  Bosley peed on most of them at one time or another but he rarely lifts his leg anymore.  He hit this one right in front of the artist. :bag:

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Eephus said:

After a bit of Googling, it appears the light sculpture is supposed to be replaced by a 15 foot tall Buddha made out of machine parts

Very nice. The site won't let me link direct to the pics - s0

2nd picture on page - the sky motion is really good. It gives the feel of the statue approaching the camera. The detail in the piece is really defined in this shot as well. It makes me feel serene. I'm guessing the "pieces" on the deck are lotus flowers. Desert back and mountains blend well with it too. I really like this playing along side Augustine.

Thnx.

40 minutes ago, Eephus said:

They switch the artwork out every year or so.  Bosley peed on most of them at one time or another but he rarely lifts his leg anymore.  He hit this one right in front of the artist. :bag:

I like the work a lot. Tree of of life - tabernacle - is the image I get.

Bosley seems to be a pretty harsh critic.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can anybody recommend a biography of Dylan?

There are a bunch including an autobiography Chronicles vol. 1.  He's had such a long career and contradicted himself so many times that I don't know if it's possible that there's a single  definitive one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Eephus said:

Can anybody recommend a biography of Dylan?

There are a bunch including an autobiography Chronicles vol. 1.  He's had such a long career and contradicted himself so many times that I don't know if it's possible that there's a single  definitive one.

No Direction Home, 2011 edition

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Man of Constant Sorrow said:

In an attempt to practice my right brain art viewing - I just did a google and randomly picked something using as little conscious thought as possible. I have not even read the poem yet. I just clicked a link and copied the text.

So Vanna - what did our contestant win?   (Note - that song I have not listened to either - I just thought - "Vanna" - ok)

I will listen to the song and read the poem after I post.  hmmmmm  Good luck, otb.

  Reveal hidden contents

The Drunken Boat

BY ARTHUR RIMBAUD

TRANSLATED BY WALLACE FOWLIE

 

As I was going down impassive Rivers,

I no longer felt myself guided by haulers:

Yelping redskins had taken them as targets

And had nailed them naked to colored stakes.

 

I was indifferent to all crews,

The bearer of Flemish wheat or English cottons

When with my haulers this uproar stopped

The Rivers let me go where I wanted.

 

Into the furious lashing of the tides

More heedless than children's brains the other winter

I ran! And loosened Peninsulas

Have not undergone a more triumphant hubbub

 

The storm blessed my sea vigils

Lighter than a cork I danced on the waves

That are called eternal rollers of victims,

Ten nights, without missing the stupid eye of the lighthouses!

 

Sweeter than the flesh of hard apples is to children

The green water penetrated my hull of fir

And washed me of spots of blue wine

And vomit, scattering rudder and grappling-hook

 

And from then on I bathed in the Poem

Of the Sea, infused with stars and lactescent,

Devouring the azure verses; where, like a pale elated

Piece of flotsam, a pensive drowned figure sometimes sinks;

 

Where, suddenly dyeing the blueness, delirium

And slow rhythms under the streaking of daylight,

Stronger than alcohol, vaster than our lyres,

The bitter redness of love ferments!

 

I know the skies bursting with lightning, and the waterspouts

And the surf and the currents; I know the evening,

And dawn as exalted as a flock of doves

And at times I have seen what man thought he saw!

 

I have seen the low sun spotted with mystic horrors,

Lighting up, with long violet clots,

Resembling actors of very ancient dramas,

The waves rolling far off their quivering of shutters!

 

I have dreamed of the green night with dazzled snows

A kiss slowly rising to the eyes of the sea,

The circulation of unknown saps,

And the yellow and blue awakening of singing phosphorous!

 

I followed during pregnant months the swell,

Like hysterical cows, in its assault on the reefs,

Without dreaming that the luminous feet of the Marys

Could constrain the snout of the wheezing Oceans!

 

I struck against, you know, unbelievable Floridas

Mingling with flowers panthers' eyes and human

Skin! Rainbows stretched like bridal reins

Under the horizon of the seas to greenish herds!

 

I have seen enormous swamps ferment, fish-traps

Where a whole Leviathan rots in the rushes!

Avalanches of water in the midst of a calm,

And the distances cataracting toward the abyss!

 

Glaciers, suns of silver, nacreous waves, skies of embers!

Hideous strands at the end of brown gulfs

Where giant serpents devoured by bedbugs

Fall down from gnarled trees with black scent!

 

I should have liked to show children those sunfish

Of the blue wave, the fish of gold, the singing fish.

—Foam of flowers rocked my drifting

And ineffable winds winged me at times.

 

At times a martyr weary of poles and zones,

The sea, whose sob created my gentle roll,

Brought up to me her dark flowers with yellow suckers

And I remained, like a woman on her knees...

 

Resembling an island tossing on my sides the quarrels

And droppings of noisy birds with yellow eyes

And I sailed on, when through my fragile ropes

Drowned men sank backward to sleep!

 

Now I, a boat lost in the foliage of caves,

Thrown by the storm into the birdless air

I whose water-drunk carcass would not have been rescued

By the Monitors and the Hanseatic sailboats;

 

Free, smoking, topped with violet fog,

I who pierced the reddening sky like a wall,

Bearing, delicious jam for good poets

Lichens of sunlight and mucus of azure,

 

Who ran, spotted with small electric moons,

A wild plank, escorted by black seahorses,

When Julys beat down with blows of cudgels

The ultramarine skies with burning funnels;

 

I, who trembled, hearing at fifty leagues off

The moaning of the Behemoths in heat and the thick Maelstroms,

Eternal spinner of the blue immobility

I miss Europe with its ancient parapets!

 

I have seen sidereal archipelagos! and islands

Whose delirious skies are open to the sea-wanderer:

—Is it in these bottomless nights that you sleep and exile yourself,

Million golden birds, o future Vigor? –

 

But, in truth, I have wept too much! Dawns are heartbreaking.

Every moon is atrocious and every sun bitter.

Acrid love has swollen me with intoxicating torpor

O let my keel burst! O let me go into the sea!

 

If I want a water of Europe, it is the black

Cold puddle where in the sweet-smelling twilight

A squatting child full of sadness releases

A boat as fragile as a May butterfly.

 

No longer can I, bathed in your languor, o waves,

Follow in the wake of the cotton boats,

Nor cross through the pride of flags and flames,

Nor swim under the terrible eyes of prison ships.

:hifive:

as good as it gets up on here, MoCS - making me wonder what other quantum goodness i missed out on during my 365 days on Elba  :kicksrock:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/31/2019 at 10:51 PM, Mister CIA said:

Blonde on Blonde is sweet.

it's my favorite my a long shot although Blood on the Tracks is can't miss.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Eephus said:

Can anybody recommend a biography of Dylan?

There are a bunch including an autobiography Chronicles vol. 1.  He's had such a long career and contradicted himself so many times that I don't know if it's possible that there's a single  definitive one.

Chronicles is excellent however I wouldn't take any of it as gospel. There is probably a better option if you want to get the facts.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, BobbyLayne said:

No Direction Home, 2011 edition

Shelton's book gets a lot of good reviews.

2 hours ago, Ilov80s said:

Chronicles is excellent however I wouldn't take any of it as gospel. There is probably a better option if you want to get the facts.

Dylan has always understood the importance of myth.

Thanks for the replies.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/1/2019 at 8:06 AM, General Malaise said:

Blonde on Blonde is an album everybody should listen to at least once. My personal fave - Visions of Johana is one of the best songs I've ever heard.  

Highway 61 also spectacular.  

You ever see the movie High Fidelity?  Got a rather obscure Dylan song in there from 1980ish called "Most of Time".   Beautiful song.

Agree with GM, Blonde on Blonde FTW. Visions of Johanna, fantastic song.

 

My top 3 which you can't go wrong with any of these at the top:

Blonde on Blonde

Highway 61 Revisited

Freewheelin Bob Dylan

 

Desire is in this convo too. Isis is one of my favorite Dylan songs.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Visions of Johana is my favorite song- I would agree on that. I'll never get tired of that one. Sad Eyed Lady of the Lowlands ain't bad either. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I appreciated Dylan growing up, in the same way I appreciated Joan Baez, the Mamas & the Papas, Arlo Guthrie, et al. I was just never smitten by him in the same way as I was with say Joni Mitchell, Harry Chapin, Jackson Browne, et al.

I find it so odd sometimes trying to discuss subjective appreciation on the internet. We saw this constantly in K4’s Beatles thread. It was a ranking of her personal favorites, but people would constantly rail about placement - as if she were ranking the GoAT.

Anyway, read Sam Shepherd’s Rolling Thunder Revue at age 15 when it came out. Was always acutely aware of Dylan’s stature and the reverence many held him in, its impossible to escape. He just wasn’t my bag, man.

My BIL met him 40 years ago in City Lights. He’s a huge fan & was totally star struck. They both rounded the corner at the same time on opposite ends of the same bookshelf, both stopped five feet away. BIL kept staring with his mouth agape, Dylan was looking at the dust jacket of the book he held. After an uncomfortably long time, he looked up, mumbled “hey” quietly and slipped past.

BTW - TIL Lawrence Ferlinghetti is still alive & turned 100 a few months ago. Amazing!

Edited by BobbyLayne
typo
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Eephus said:

Walked Bosley tonight after the Warriors game.  Picked an older one that I haven't listened to in a long while

John Wesley Harding (1967)

Saw many copies of this in the store I went to, but wasn't familiar with most of it. Definitely got the MoFi treatment. I think it's on sale on the website. St. Augustine would be appealing to Dylan, it seems. I think I ought to listen to the song and read its lyrics. 

eta* Just received Highway 61 Revisited. Listening now. Awesome.

Edited by rockaction
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, rockaction said:

Saw many copies of this in the store I went to, but wasn't familiar with most of it. Definitely got the MoFi treatment. I think it's on sale on the website. St. Augustine would be appealing to Dylan, it seems. I think I ought to listen to the song and read its lyrics. 

JWH is a great record that's lost in history because it immediately followed one of music's great runs.  I guess Dylan's answer to "how do you follow up Highway 61 and Blonde on Blonde?" is "you don't".  Changing lanes is a recurring move in pop music.  It resembles his early acoustic albums a bit except with a rhythm section.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, BobbyLayne said:

My BIL met him 40 years ago in City Lights. He’s a huge fan & was totally star struck. They both rounded the corner at the same time on opposite ends of the same bookshelf, both stopped five feet away. BIL kept staring with his mouth agape, Dylan was looking at the dust jacket of the book he held. After an uncomfortably long time, he looked up, mumbled “hey” quietly and slipped past.

BTW - TIL Lawrence Ferlinghetti is still alive & turned 100 a few months ago. Amazing! 

City Lights is a treasure.  They were fortunate and smart to have bought the building back when it was semi-affordable.

We're heading there on Thursday night for a reading by John Doe.

  • Love 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/1/2019 at 2:16 AM, Eephus said:

As far as his many live recordings go, I think the best sounding is his very strange Live at Budokan album recorded on his 1978 tour.  The big band arrangements of his hits miss the target most of the time and Dylan's vocals seem kind of indifferent but they're recorded really well.  I wish Dylan used the same engineers when he cut his other live albums.  Before the Flood and Hard Rain both have crappy live sound.  The Bootleg series recordings cleaned up well but are still limited by their source material.  I'm hoping there are some high fidelity shows in the vault from the Never Ending Tour period.

I saw Dylan on this tour.  IT wasn't truly awful but I came away very disappointed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
57 minutes ago, rockaction said:

Saw many copies of this in the store I went to, but wasn't familiar with most of it. Definitely got the MoFi treatment. I think it's on sale on the website. St. Augustine would be appealing to Dylan, it seems. I think I ought to listen to the song and read its lyrics. 

eta* Just received Highway 61 Revisited. Listening now. Awesome.

Highway was my first real introduction to Dylan albums. I knew I wanted one, wasn’t sure which one to get and that was my dad’s suggestion. He was right on, I was hooked immediately.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have maybe 100 albums or so from my brother who passed away.  70's mostly.  he was quite particular in handling and storage of his albums.  I am guessing they all play beautifully.  He use to buy new sleeves as soon as he got them, something about the ph of the standard liner.  he only played them with a Stanton 681 EEE, which means little or nothing to me but I understand means something to audiophiles. Me, I just know that when he gave me his Philips turn table with a brand new 681 triple e I was suppose to be impressed. What do you suppose old albums like that may be worth, or do I have ot investigate each title to know?

 

My Dylan Story.  I lived in Minnesota for a time and never ran into him.  I made a run down to Palenque to visit my brother, we are sitting in his palapa listening to his friend Jaime playing guitar.  I was out of it.  Someone next to me passes a joint.  I turn to see who and it was Bob Dylan.  I don't recall exchanging words beyond "thanks".

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Godsbrother said:

I saw Dylan on this tour.  IT wasn't truly awful but I came away very disappointed.

I'm probably not going to write up any of Dylan's many live albums because Bosley doesn't have the legs for a double album.  But for me, Dylan At Budokan remains one of the strangest  turns in a career full of them.  I remember the local progressive rock station in Madison played the whole album when it came out and it puzzled me then.

He took songs that had great meaning for a generation of fans and radically reworked them for a twelve-piece band.  I guess some of them work as standalone pieces but most are just strange.  Ballad of a Thin Man sounds like a Southside Johnny record.  Knocking on Heaven's Door becomes a reggae number.  At Budokan was recorded at the beginning of the tour and I've never had the inclination to listen to bootlegs to see if they evolved later on.

The 70s were the golden age of live albums but it always surprised me that At Budokan marked the third live album released in a six album stretch between 1974-78.  There were a couple of label changes (CBS to Asylum and back to CBS) in there, as well as Dylan's divorce but most artists don't release three live albums in a career.  If you add in the Bootleg Series vol.5 and almost a full album side in The Last Waltz, that's a whole lot of live Dylan in a very short time.

At Budokan is still probably worth a listen but I won't judge you if you don't make it to the end.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bosley and I took one for the cause tonight.

Knocked Out Loaded (1986)

I was pretty sure I'd never listened to this one before.  This wasn't the type of music I was listening to in 1986.  I knew that he had some less than stellar records in the 80s but I had no idea.  It has the reputation as one of Dylan's worst albums and I'm inclined to agree on first listen.

Dylan was presumably dealing with some writer's block which explains three covers and three collaborations among its eight tracks.  The best and worst song on the album is one and the same-- Brownsville Girl, an epic co-written with Sam Shepard that Dylan delivers in his inimitable style.  He interrupts the tale with asides about a movie with Gregory Peck but he can't seem to remember the name of the film.  The song is absolutely bonkers but it goes on for way too long.   At 11:03, it's clocks in 16 seconds shorter than Sad Eyed Lady of the Lowlands.

There's also a song co-written with Tom Petty that sounds like a Tom Petty song and a Junior Parker cover that sounds like Los Lobos.  His girl background singers never go far away even when you wish they would.  There's even a children's chorus to accompany Bob's ridiculous cover of Kris Kristofferson's They Killed Him.  Somebody let Floppo know.

As for Bosley, the last block of our nightly walk is the steepest part.  This is followed by ten steps up to our flat.  There are some days where Boz is comically slow but he seemed to be moving well tonight.  But he followed that up by peeing on the floor of my daughter's apartment when he went down to say hi. 

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You always start at he beginning, So....Bob Dylan....is where you start.  Here he does a fantastic cover of House of the Rising Sun. And a great Roy Acuff and Bukka White and Blind Lemon Jefferson covers also.  Here he is just finding himself, here is where you start.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_Dylan_(album)

Edited by ZenoRazon
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ve always enjoyed Eephuses posts but mixing in the Bosley chronicles is next level.

:thumbup:

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Eephus said:

Bosley and I took one for the cause tonight.

Knocked Out Loaded (1986)

Dylan was presumably dealing with some writer's block which explains three covers and three collaborations among its eight tracks.  The best and worst song on the album is one and the same-- Brownsville Girl, an epic co-written with Sam Shepard that Dylan delivers in his inimitable style.  He interrupts the tale with asides about a movie with Gregory Peck but he can't seem to remember the name of the film.  The song is absolutely bonkers but it goes on for way too long.   At 11:03, it's clocks in 16 seconds shorter than Sad Eyed Lady of the Lowlands.  Somebody let Floppo know.

As for Bosley, the last block of our nightly walk is the steepest part.  This is followed by ten steps up to our flat.  There are some days where Boz is comically slow but he seemed to be moving well tonight.  But he followed that up by peeing on the floor of my daughter's apartment when he went down to say hi. 

 

Forgetting the name of the movie during the interlude: :lmao:

Somebody let Floppo know. :lmao: :thumbup:

Bosley and your daughter's apt: :kicksrock:

Edited by rockaction
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, rockaction said:

Forgetting the name of the movie during the interlude: :lmao:

Somebody let Floppo know. :lmao: :thumbup:

Bosley and your daughter's apt: :kicksrock:

and it's not even the same movie each time, that aside, I like the song

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Ilov80s said:

and it's not even the same movie each time, that aside, I like the song

The arrangement doesn't do the song any favors but it's certainly Dylanesque

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, BobbyLayne said:

I’ve always enjoyed Eephuses posts but mixing in the Bosley chronicles is next level.

:thumbup:

I realize our time with Bosley is short and this seems like a better way to record my memories with him than another dog thread.  Our walks have become an important part of the fabric of my day.  It's so routine (we take basically the same route every time because it's relatively flat) but always subtly different. I also find I'm able to concentrate on the music more than I do when I'm listening at home.

  • Like 2
  • Love 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Eephus said:

The arrangement doesn't do the song any favors but it's certainly Dylanesque

The song probably feels better than it is in the context of a poor album.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, ZenoRazon said:

You always start at he beginning, So....Bob Dylan....is where you start.  Here he does a fantastic cover of House of the Rising Sun. And a great Roy Acuff and Bukka White and Blind Lemon Jefferson covers also.  Here he is just finding himself, here is where you start.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_Dylan_(album)

I listened to his self-titled debut last week.  He's obviously still finding his voice but the two originals only hint at what would follow a couple of years later.  Talkin' New York is a fun glimpse at Dylan's life at the time.  I really didn't care for his rendition of Rising Sun though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, ZenoRazon said:

You always start at he beginning, So....Bob Dylan....is where you start.  Here he does a fantastic cover of House of the Rising Sun. And a great Roy Acuff and Bukka White and Blind Lemon Jefferson covers also.  Here he is just finding himself, here is where you start.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_Dylan_(album)

Starting at the beginning is necessary for the artist. Not so much for somebody coming to them new. Couldn't disagree more about steering somebody to that record first. It's not in his top 20 records.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We're walking back to the seventies with

Planet Waves (1974)

I've lived in houses with a copy of this record but I haven't listened to it a lot.  Dylan recorded it with The Band during his very brief time at David Geffen's Asylum Records.  It usually gets lost in the shuffle because Dylan followed it up with Blood on the Tracks.  But I found Planet Waves to be a very enjoyable listen.

Dylan and The Band had a history by 1974 of course but the Basement Tapes were still only available as bootlegs.  Planet Waves was recorded quickly (as usual for Dylan) a couple of months before they kicked off their USA tour documented on Before the Flood.  The Band is up there with the best of Dylan's many terrific backup bands.  Danko and Helm are a great rhythm section and the swirling keyboards of Garth Hudson adds color.  Robbie Robertson has a couple of nice solos in his distinctive shaky style.  One thing I found strange was how little The Band's members are used as backing vocalists.  Some of the Dylan later albums I've listened to recently have backing vocalists high in the mix on almost every song.  Here he has access to some of the most harmonious voices in rock 'n roll and you rarely hear them.

To me, it sounds like Dylan was trying for a radio hit with both the irresistible cajun-spiced "On a Night Like This" and the very poppy "You Angel You".  The latter sounds more like a Band song than a Dylan one.  "Forever Young" is probably the best known song on the album and definitely the most covered.  Dylan couldn't find a take he liked so he put two versions on the album--a slow one to close out side 1 and a "Country Honk" version to open the second.

My treasures from this record are a couple of love songs:  the lovely "Hazel" and the album closer "Wedding Song".  The latter is a solo acoustic number that sounds more like something from Blood on the Tracks than anything on Planet Waves.  But love is rarely that simple with Dylan.

I've mentioned before Bosley is pretty much blind.  He also has cataracts that makes him very sensitive to light.  About six months ago, I noticed he was flinching a lot when he walked in the daytime.  It took me too long to figure out it was the sun that was bothering him but I eventually bought him a pair of cheap tinted dog goggles on eBay.  I fully expected he'd resist wearing them and  spend every bit of his dwindling attention on trying to get them off his head.  If I would have known he'd keep them on, I would have spent a extra couple of bucks on a more dignified pair.  A pair of cheap sunglasses have improved Bosley's quality of life and made it possible for him to walk during the daytime.  He looks cool and it gives people on the streets an opportunity to say something stupid about a dog wearing glasses.

I spoke to a guy tonight who was flinging flower seeds (Cosmos he said fittingly) over a fence onto a dirt patch in front of a school administration building.  He described himself as a guerilla gardener.  Anything to bring a little beauty into the world.

  • Like 3
  • Love 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Eephus said:

I've mentioned before Bosley is pretty much blind.  He also has cataracts that makes him very sensitive to light.  About six months ago, I noticed he was flinching a lot when he walked in the daytime.  It took me too long to figure out it was the sun that was bothering him but I eventually bought him a pair of cheap tinted dog goggles on eBay.  I fully expected he'd resist wearing them and  spend every bit of his dwindling attention on trying to get them off his head.  If I would have known he'd keep them on, I would have spent a extra couple of bucks on a more dignified pair.  A pair of cheap sunglasses have improved Bosley's quality of life and made it possible for him to walk during the daytime.  He looks cool and it gives people on the streets an opportunity to say something stupid about a dog wearing glasses.

I spoke to a guy tonight who was flinging flower seeds (Cosmos he said fittingly) over a fence onto a dirt patch in front of a school administration building.  He described himself as a guerilla gardener.  Anything to bring a little beauty into the world.

First, great story. It's amazing how similar experiences can be between us all. And how a little bit of sunglass help can make a big difference. And, the bold flashed me back to the Derby stories in the Palooza draft. ha.

14 minutes ago, Eephus said:

the lovely "Hazel" and the album closer "Wedding Song"

I'll listen to these when i go inside. Sitting on a porch now without headphones.

 

15 minutes ago, Eephus said:

Planet Waves (1974)

I love this title too.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Man of Constant Sorrow said:
17 minutes ago, Eephus said:

Planet Waves (1974)

I love this title too.

It was originally supposed to be titled Ceremonies of the Horsemen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Apple Jack said:

Starting at the beginning is necessary for the artist. Not so much for somebody coming to them new. Couldn't disagree more about steering somebody to that record first. It's not in his top 20 records.

If all you were ever going to own was one CD by Dylan (anyone) then I agree with you.  But......since that isn't the case and he can own all of Dylan's stuff you do want to begin at the beginning.  Watch the evolution, that's how it's done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Eephus said:

I listened to his self-titled debut last week.  He's obviously still finding his voice but the two originals only hint at what would follow a couple of years later.  Talkin' New York is a fun glimpse at Dylan's life at the time.  I really didn't care for his rendition of Rising Sun though.

We appear to be worlds apart if you didn't think House of the Rising Sun was a fantastic cover.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, Eephus said:

Clear sound to me - very clean. I hear it this way tho - after a few listens:

Hazel, stardust in your eye
You're goin' somewhere and so am I.
I'd give you the sky high above
Ooh, for a little touch of your love.

Hazel, dirty-blonde hair
I wouldn't be ashamed to be seen with you anywhere.
You got something I want plenty of
Ooh, a little touch of your love.

 

It's relaxing. 

 

1 hour ago, Eephus said:

Ah - more than time and more than love...

To the courtyard of the jester which is hidden from the sun,
I love you more than ever and I haven't yet begun.

@shuke is currently in a sun and time theme in his song list. This is poetry.

😎

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm always extra interested in the 1st song on an album. I don't know all of the reasons for organizing songs. i'm sure there are lots of different reasons and ways, but - it still interests me. Thus, I next listened to On a Night Like This next.

Quote

On a night like this
So glad you came around
Hold on to me so tight
And heat up some coffee grounds
We got much to talk about
And much to reminisce
It sure is right
On a night like this

On a night like this
So glad you've come to stay
Hold on to me, pretty miss
Say you'll never go away to stray
Run your fingers down my spine
Bring me a touch of bliss
It sure feels right
On a night like this

On a night like this
I can't get any sleep
The air is so cold outside
And the snow's so deep
Build a fire, throw on logs
And listen to it hiss
And let it burn, burn, burn, burn
On a night like this

Put your body next to mine
And keep me company,
There is plenty a room for all
So please don't elbow me

Let the four winds blow
Around this old cabin door
If I'm not too far off 
I think we did this once before
There's more frost on the window glass
With each new tender kiss
But it sure feels right
On a night like this

I feel like he is singing to a book. To a story. He is setting us up for his tale.

And - of course - his story is his lover as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, ZenoRazon said:

We appear to be worlds apart if you didn't think House of the Rising Sun was a fantastic cover.

Dylan supposedly recorded another version of Rising Sun during the Planet Waves sessions but it's never seen the light of day.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Man of Constant Sorrow said:

I'm always extra interested in the 1st song on an album. I don't know all of the reasons for organizing songs. i'm sure there are lots of different reasons and ways, but - it still interests me. Thus, I next listened to On a Night Like This next.

I feel like he is singing to a book. To a story. He is setting us up for his tale.

And - of course - his story is his lover as well.

I just thought it was a song about ####ing.  This is why I don't try to analyze Dylan's lyrics.

  • Laughing 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Eephus said:

I just thought it was a song about ####ing.  This is why I don't try to analyze Dylan's lyrics.

One of the things I like best about Dylan words, is that they can be read so many ways. 

I don't ever suppose I got him figured out, but I know how he makes me feel. 

I like it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, ZenoRazon said:

No, I don't think that's it.  It sounds like 60s Dylan not mid-70s.

According to this, there were two takes of Rising Sun recorded with The Band (excluding Levon whose flight was delayed) during the first session for Planet Waves.  One of these was bootlegged on the The Genuine Bootleg Series volume 2 not to be confused with The Bootleg Series Volumes 1-3 which was an official CBS release.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Planet Waves was the 2nd Dylan album I bought as a teen- mostly because I liked The Band and knew they were on it, it was something different from what everyone recomended and the local CD store had a limited selection. It still holds a special place for me. My dad hadn't heard it so I was able to introduce it to him. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, ZenoRazon said:

If all you were ever going to own was one CD by Dylan (anyone) then I agree with you.  But......since that isn't the case and he can own all of Dylan's stuff you do want to begin at the beginning.  Watch the evolution, that's how it's done.

If one is a completist or historian, it is interesting to get the first Dylan record but even then it's not where I would start. Just like I wouldn't recommend 1925's Pleasure Garden if someone asked me which Hitchcock film to checkout and if someone wanted to get into Mozart, I wouldn't direct them to the minuet he wrote at 5. Evolution is cool, but when first getting into an artist, I think it is best to find their most revered works or the works that best capture who they were. 

Edited by Ilov80s

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Which Bob Dylan Album Did You Buy And Why?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dylan has been releasing records for almost 60 years and has rarely repeated himself.  He's not a singles-oriented artist so a greatest hits compilation won't suffice.  I think it'll take at least five albums to get a chalk outline of his career.

  1. one of his early acoustic records
  2. choose one from Bringing It All Back Home, Hwy 61 or Blonde on Blonde
  3. Blood on the Tracks or Desire
  4. A live album
  5. Something from his late career (post-1989) revival

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.