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Dylan's Influence: Eephus Reviews Albums, Tells Tales, And Recommends A Song

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Posted (edited)

I'm about to make a purchase of a Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab Ultra Analog Recording in 180 Gram Vinyl. It'll be my first Dylan album, though I'm familiar with a lot of his music. 

Assume most albums are available. Which Dylan album or collection or compilation should I buy and why? Throw in links to songs, anecdotal reasons, anything.

Thanks in advance.

-rock

As we all know (at least those of us in the thread), Eephus has taken to listening to Bob Dylan while taking his nightly walk with his dog, Bosley. Eeph is music historian and ear unparalleled on this board, so I figured I'd compile all his reviews and thoughts documenting the time spent together with Boz in one place. This is for posterity; well-written, and a labor of love. We appreciate it very much. Thanks, Eeph. 

Link to Eephus's Playlist

https://open.spotify.com/playlist/7nw6YIN2yIQd6c2vZ1CS0b?si=_u1IltTER66_p9x7N1crQw

*Includes picture of Bosley

Links to Eephus's Thoughts About Walks With Bosley and Bob Dylan Albums

Shadows In The Night (2015)

John Wesley Harding (1967)

Knocked Out Loaded (1986)

Time Out Of Mind (1997)

Street Legal (1978)

Modern Times (2006)

Rolling Thunder Revue Doc (sans Boz)

Saved (1980)

Infidels (1983)

Together Through Life (2009)

New Morning (1970)

World Gone Wrong (1993)

Down In The Groove (1988)

Pat Garrett and Billy The Kid - Soundtrack (1973)

Shot Of Love (1981)

Self Portrait (1970)

Bringing It All Back Home (1965)

Love And Theft (2001)

Blood On The Tracks (1975)

The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan (1963)

Slow Train Coming (1979)

The Basement Tapes (1967, 1975)

Highway 61 Revisited (1965)

Dylan (1973)

Desire (1976)

Oh Mercy (1989)

The Times They Are A-Changin' (1964)

Empire Burlesque (1985)

Nashville Skyline (1969)

Good As I Been To You (1992)

Another Side of Bob Dylan (1964)

Bob Dylan (1962)

Tempest (2012)

Blonde On Blonde (1966)

Dylan-Related Albums:

Joan Baez - Joan (1967)

Daniel Lanois - Goodbye To Language (2016)

The Dylans - The Dylans (1991)

Edited by rockaction

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Posted (edited)

No Mercy. Early Dylan is well trodden already. Mid and late period Dylan is worth appraising on its own merits. 

Edited by saintfool
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Basement Tapes is my favorite, but Highway 61 deserves consideration.

Blood on the Tracks is my RC Cola pick here.

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6 minutes ago, saintfool said:

Oh Mercy. Early Dylan is well trodden already. Mid and late period Dylan is worth appraising on its own merits. 

Thanks. I guess everything to be said might have been said, but assume the well trod-upon grounds of anecdotes and links are up for grabs to a new ear, where '62-'66 is the period I'm actually really concentrating on just because it's so unfamiliar as album territory for me. I mean, I know a a decent amount of songs, but I'm truly a layman here. I can admit that. I came to Dylan really late in life. It took a deal of musical and emotional maturity to appreciate him and his wryness and counter-cultural brilliance.

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Posted (edited)
7 minutes ago, Mister CIA said:

Basement Tapes is my favorite, but Highway 61 deserves consideration.

Blood on the Tracks is my RC Cola pick here.

Basement Tapes is definitely up for grabs as a purchase, Highway 61 comes straight with a fifteen dollar discount from Amazon.

Blood On The Tracks is $125 pre-order, so I think that's out.  It's actually quite the third cola, apparently. 

What song is your favorite off of Basement Tapes? 

Edited by rockaction

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2 minutes ago, rockaction said:

Thanks. I guess everything to be said might have been said, but assume the well trod-upon grounds of anecdotes and links are up for grabs to a new ear, where '62-'66 is the period I'm actually really concentrating on just because it's so unfamiliar as album territory for me. I mean, I know a a decent amount of songs, but I'm truly a layman here. I can admit that. I came to Dylan really late in life. It took a deal of musical and emotional maturity to appreciate him and his wryness and counter-cultural brilliance.

I felt that way about Elvis Costello a few years ago. I knew the hits and loved them but felt like it was worth going deep for. 

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, Mister CIA said:

Blonde on Blonde is sweet.

I just listened to that song you linked last night. It's one of my favorites from that era. I almost went and saw Nada Surf perform "Let Go" in its entirety last year, but spit the bit. A Love Song For Bobby Long is sort of a guilty pleasure of mine, and the album Let Go was featured heavily in that movie, at appropriate times. 

Edited by rockaction

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1 minute ago, saintfool said:

I felt that way about Elvis Costello a few years ago. I knew the hits and loved them but felt like it was worth going deep for. 

That's another artist that has come to me later in life. Elvis Costello is new to my ears with deep cuts. He's also no stranger to Mobile Fidelity giving his works the upscale analog treatment. I have This Year's Model on LP from MoFi. That's what sort of led me down this rabbit hole. The recording sounds detailed, great. 

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Sorry i didn’t see before. @ me for all things Dylan. My question is what songs do you like by him? What’s your ideal Dylan since he took so many forms?

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Posted (edited)

Funny you should start a thread now.  For the past week and a half, I've been listening to a different, random Dylan album every night when I walk the dog.  Bosley is 14 and pretty blind and deaf so we walk slowly, which gives me lots of time to ponder Dylan's music.

You can't go wrong with the classics (e.g. Another Side, Hwy 61, Blonde and Blood) but allow me to overthink this one.  The 60s recordings aren't going to benefit a lot from an audiophile pressing and sound system.  They're terrific records that were as revolutionary and influential as any in rock 'n roll but their stereo mixes are pretty dated.  The recordings are good and the musicianship excellent but they have a w-i-d-e  soundstage.  Blood on the Tracks has a more sounding modern mix but I've always thought the songs with full band have kind of a muddy sound.

Throughout his career, Dylan mostly eschewed shiny, flashy studio techniques.  This is generally a good thing because it keeps the music sounding timeless.  Most of his more recent albums have a very live sound, like he just stopped off at the studio to cut a few sides on the way to tonight's show.

I think the best sounding records he made from a pure audiophile perspective are probably No Mercy, his 1989 album produced by Daniel Lanois, and the first album from his born-again period Slow Train Coming, recorded in Muscle Shoals by Jerry Wexler and Barry Beckett.  As far as his many live recordings go, I think the best sounding is his very strange Live at Budokan album recorded on his 1978 tour.  The big band arrangements of his hits miss the target most of the time and Dylan's vocals seem kind of indifferent but they're recorded really well.  I wish Dylan used the same engineers when he cut his other live albums.  Before the Flood and Hard Rain both have crappy live sound.  The Bootleg series recordings cleaned up well but are still limited by their source material.  I'm hoping there are some high fidelity shows in the vault from the Never Ending Tour period.

Edited by Eephus
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I don't buy albums anymore, but I still use my CD collection at times - when I can't use Spotify.

This is not "deep", but it is my favorite Bob to have when I can't stream:

The Essential Bob Dylan

Quote

2016 vinyl version[edit]

Side One

No.TitleLength

1."Blowin' in the Wind"2:49

2."Don't Think Twice, It's All Right"3:41

3."The Times They Are a-Changin'"3:14

4."It Ain't Me, Babe"3:36

5."Maggie's Farm"3:57

6."Mr. Tambourine Man"5:28

7."Subterranean Homesick Blues"2:20

 

Side Two

No.TitleLength

1."Like a Rolling Stone"6:11

2."Positively 4th Street"4:09

3."Just Like a Woman"4:52

4."Rainy Day Women #12 & 35"4:36

5."Lay Lady Lay"3:21

6."Knockin' on Heaven's Door"2:31

 

Side Three

No.TitleLength

1."Forever Young"4:58

2."Tangled Up in Blue"5:43

3."Gotta Serve Somebody"5:26

4."Jokerman"6:17

5."Make You Feel My Love"3:33

 

Side Four

No.TitleLength

1."Things Have Changed"5:09

2."Mississippi"5:23

3."When the Deal Goes Down"5:00

4."Beyond Here Lies Nothin'" (Dylan, Hunter)3:51

5."Long and Wasted Years"3:46

I bought it in 2000 - upon 1st CD release.

I still play it often.

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Posted (edited)
52 minutes ago, Eephus said:

Funny you should start a thread now.  For the past week and a half, I've been listening to a different, random Dylan album every night when I walk the dog.  Bosley is 14 and pretty blind and deaf so we walk slowly, which gives me lots of time to ponder Dylan's music.

You can't go wrong with the classics (e.g. Another Side, Hwy 61, Blonde and Blood) but allow me to overthink this one.  The 60s recordings aren't going to benefit a lot from an audiophile pressing and sound system.  They're terrific records that were as revolutionary and influential as any in rock 'n roll but their stereo mixes are pretty dated.  The recordings are good and the musicianship excellent but they have a w-i-d-e  soundstage.  Blood on the Tracks has a more sounding modern mix but it's 

I'mma let you finish...

Heh. You got cut off by the editor or something happened.

That's interesting you've been on walks and pondering a different Dylan recording each night recently. I'm sad to hear about Bosley's decline. That's never a fun thing, watching a living thing aging to infirmity. My neighbors just lost a beloved pet to pancreatic cancer and were distraught. He was a Scottish Terrier, apparently not known for longevity in years, but he was a joy to them. I have never owned a dog, but am a dog person and love them. 

I can't really hold too deep of a discussion about Dylan, his importance, and his oeuvre, and I think ilov80s has gone to bed, but as far as the audiophile nature of the pressing, I'm looking at mono mixes. Perhaps this is unwise, but I'm taking a bit of a chance here. I know there was a mono box set issued by Sony and I get the distinct feeling that these were meant for mono. That's not to discount the nature of stereo remixes, their importance, and their desirability, and I don't necessarily have the most audiophile of rigs nor the most trained of ears, but one can hear the difference in different pressings, different remasters. This is supposedly Mobile Fidelity re-mastering these records to be played at 45 RPM and the whole shebang, so we'll see.

I've ordered The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan for a reasonable price from Discogs. Highway 61 Revisited is cheap(er) from Amazon, and The Times They Are a-Changin' is on sale at MoFi for twenty bucks off, so those are next in line, in the cart. I was supposed to stop at one, but I have the quid. I think Another Side... and Bringing It All... are my next ones to look at, but I want to hear these records and relish them rather than simply rushing to collect or consume, if that makes sense. I think the three I've ordered could take years to really set into my consciousness, though I do know most of Freewheelin' and Highway 61 just from socially hanging out with people who liked Dylan. The Times... is more of a protest album and less likely to be heard in social settings, and I've found this to be the case. That record and Another Side... are foreign waters for me, as is the whole of Bringing It All Back Home and Blonde on Blonde, even. Those will wait for another year, and get a good amount of listening on Spotify before I purchase. 

Anyway, this is where I stand near midnight on Friday, May 31st, 2019.

Edited by rockaction
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10 minutes ago, rockaction said:

... but I want to hear these records and relish them rather than simply rushing to collect or consume, if that makes sense. I think the three I've ordered could take years to really set into my consciousness, ...

Yeah. It makes perfect sense to me. 

When you start to listen, let me know and I will listen too. I want to hear how your new setup compares to what I hear via streaming.

I may one day decide to collect some more vinyl. Heh - I will need a phonograph tho.

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can't go wrong with anything mentioned thus far ... but i'll chuck a recommendation for "Desire" up in here - the scintillating work by Emmylou alone is worth the price of admission (amazing throughout, but "Oh, Sister" is anuddah level of quantum) ... come for her vox gymnastics, stay for some of my favorite Dylan tunes - "Joey", an ode to renegade Mafioso Joey Gallo, merits mention here because i attended the funeral procession (was a toddler, so i have zero recollection, but - attended, nonetheless - thanks, Dad) ... plotz at the "Romance in Durango/Black Diamond Bay" bleed-segue ... wind it down with the greatest love song evah: "Sara"  i can still hear the sound/of those Methodist bells/after taking the cure/and just gotten through/stayin' up for days/ in the Chelsea Hotel/writing 'Sad Eyed Lady of the Lowlands' for you ...

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20 minutes ago, Leroy Hoard said:

Either of the Traveling Wilburys albums would be nice.

I always wondered what would happen when this board, otherwise reverent of these guys, met Jeff Lynne. 🤫

I'm still unsure.  Regardless, it's alright. 

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22 minutes ago, rockaction said:

I always wondered what would happen when this board, otherwise reverent of these guys, met Jeff Lynne. 🤫

I'm still unsure.  Regardless, it's alright. 

dunno where i land on that cat ... love a couple ELO offerings, most notably "Can't Get It Outta My Head" - but i find most of the canon to be bogged down by the overwrought bombast that otherwise mars some whipsmart pop sensibilities- which makes a ton of sense (the sensibilities), seeing as how it all was so derivative of the Beatles. 

but i guess that's where it falls flat for me - gimme my bloated prog/quasi prog with goth undertoned brilliance like King Crimson, or the eccentric British "zero ####s to give" of Tull ("Thick as a Brick", "Passion Play") - ELO loses in translation because, while being derivative is really the template for all of rock, their particular forays felt stale - perhaps because their heyday was still confined to the same decade that saw the fabs split.  

conversely, i think both Badfinger and Oasis are more than mere tribute bands (which is what i see ELO as) - i just dug the more accessible pop urgency of the those two, they spoke more to my preferences in said genre. 

ok, ok ... maybe ELO weren't true prog - and Lynne certainly carried on a very successful post ELO career, wearing many hats ... but, meh - gimme a chap like Ian Hunter any day of the week over this dude. 

am i finished here?

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Posted (edited)
7 minutes ago, otb_lifer said:

dunno where i land on that cat ... love a couple ELO offerings, most notably "Can't Get It Outta My Head" - but i find most of the canon to be bogged down by the overwrought bombast that otherwise mars some whipsmart pop sensibilities- which makes a ton of sense (the sensibilities), seeing as how it all was so derivative of the Beatles. 

but i guess that's where it falls flat for me - gimme my bloated prog/quasi prog with goth undertoned brilliance like King Crimson, or the eccentric British "zero ####s to give" of Tull ("Thick as a Brick", "Passion Play") - ELO loses in translation because, while being derivative is really the template for all of rock, their particular forays felt stale - perhaps because their heyday was still confined to the same decade that saw the fabs split.  

conversely, i think both Badfinger and Oasis are more than mere tribute bands (which is what i see ELO as) - i just dug the more accessible pop urgency of the those two, they spoke more to my preferences in said genre. 

ok, ok ... maybe ELO weren't true prog - and Lynne certainly carried on a very successful post ELO career, wearing many hats ... but, meh - gimme a chap like Ian Hunter any day of the week over this dude. 

am i finished here?

That's all well and good, but I think there's a comparison or two based on gut feeling or freedom of association that you didn't make, GB... :)

Srsly, I can't even wrap my head around an intelligent discussion of King Crimson or Tull. Just was never my bag, and I stayed in my lane. 

Yes, I used "srsly."

Back to Dylan: I'm seriously enjoying Bringing It All Back Home right now. Yes, as we speak. Mr. Tambourine Man is on right now. The Nyrds really did this well (that was a typo, but I left it) -- love the track, says Captain Obvious.

Edited by rockaction
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3 minutes ago, rockaction said:

That's all well and good, but I think there's a comparison or two based on gut feeling or freedom of association that you didn't make, GB... :)

Srsly, I can't even wrap my head around an intelligent discussion of King Crimson or Tull. Just was never my bag, and I stayed in my lane. 

Yes, I used "srsly."

Back to Dylan: I'm seriously enjoying Bringing It All Back Home right now. Yes, as we speak. Mr. Tambourine Man is on right now. The Nyrds really did this well (that was a typo, but I left it) -- love the track, says Captain Obvious.

mood :coffee:

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That fact that those other four guys signed on twice to work with JL tells me most of what I need to know.

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Just now, Leroy Hoard said:

That fact that those other four guys signed on twice to work with JL tells me most of what I need to know.

Natch. Good point. 

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Posted (edited)
6 minutes ago, otb_lifer said:

mood :coffee:

A great cover...Jackie baby

https://youtu.be/YeR6aDTdpMc?t=8

eta* We're going down the Desire rabbit hole. Emmylou on the tracks? How can it get any better? 

Edited by rockaction
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4 minutes ago, Leroy Hoard said:

That fact that those other four guys signed on twice to work with JL tells me most of what I need to know.

 

2 minutes ago, rockaction said:

Natch. Good point. 

no denying the guy's chops for arrangement/production ... a very talented bloke ... i'm just not a fan of ELO, 'cept in the sense that they were emblematic of all Punk looked to tear down. 

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3 minutes ago, rockaction said:

A great cover...Jackie baby

https://youtu.be/YeR6aDTdpMc?t=8

:bow:  new to me, and now etched in mah brain

5 minutes ago, rockaction said:

 

 We're going down the Desire rabbit hole. Emmylou on the tracks? How can it get any better? 

this

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Posted (edited)

You know, I do some really dumb things. One of those things is starting threads, getting some responses and then impulsively going ahead. The problem here are the parameters. Desire's songs are awesome.  So probably aren't Eephus's recommendations. Pretend I don't have the other two purchased yet. What other album besides Freewheelin' should I buy and why? Let's throw out the '62-'66 requirement due to the input of otb and Eeph. 

Let's let this play out and hopefully be an appreciation for all things Dylan. Anything goes here. 

 

Edited by rockaction

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love all of his earlier work ... his prodigious genius was unparalleled- but, for my money, the back to back releases of "Blood on the Tracks" and the aforementioned "Desire" ("Basement Tapes" was sandwiched here, but not a proper 'studio' offering, as it were) are my absolute go-to Dylan.   

Blood features my favorite Dylan song eeeee-ehhhh-deee-ut-weeeendamong many other classics ... it's remarkable.  just incredible. 

and, well ... "Desire" hits every note perfectly ..  only meh offering up in the lot is "Isis", but the lyrics more than salvage the day.  Emmylou and Scarlet Rivera begin their gorgeous onslaught of vox/violin on "Hurricane", and they are unrelenting throughout, though Emmylou sits out "Sara"  

those two albums/CDs have travelled with me everywhere since '78 ... essential in my library, would never wanna be without 'em. 

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3 minutes ago, otb_lifer said:

love all of his earlier work ... his prodigious genius was unparalleled- but, for my money, the back to back releases of "Blood on the Tracks" and the aforementioned "Desire" ("Basement Tapes" was sandwiched here, but not a proper 'studio' offering, as it were) are my absolute go-to Dylan.   

Blood features my favorite Dylan song eeeee-ehhhh-deee-ut-weeeendamong many other classics ... it's remarkable.  just incredible. 

and, well ... "Desire" hits every note perfectly ..  only meh offering up in the lot is "Isis", but the lyrics more than salvage the day.  Emmylou and Scarlet Rivera begin their gorgeous onslaught of vox/violin on "Hurricane", and they are unrelenting throughout, though Emmylou sits out "Sara"  

those two albums/CDs have travelled with me everywhere since '78 ... essential in my library, would never wanna be without 'em. 

My two favorites as well.

for more “modern” Dylan, Time out of Mind and Together Through Life are both excellent as well - Time for its haunting delivery and Together for the fun Dylan and his band have with the Americana genre.

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45 minutes ago, rockaction said:

That's all well and good, but I think there's a comparison or two based on gut feeling or freedom of association that you didn't make, GB... :)

Srsly, I can't even wrap my head around an intelligent discussion of King Crimson or Tull. Just was never my bag, and I stayed in my lane. 

Yes, I used "srsly."

Back to Dylan: I'm seriously enjoying Bringing It All Back Home right now. Yes, as we speak. Mr. Tambourine Man is on right now. The Nyrds really did this well (that was a typo, but I left it) -- love the track, says Captain Obvious.

There are just soooo many things that I like about this post.

1) 

Quote

That's all well and good, but I think there's a comparison or two based on gut feeling or freedom of association that you didn't make, GB... :)

Yes. This is what I was trying to express in the Iconic Song of the Decade thread. I'll concede that "iconic" goes deeper than I originally gave proper credit, but - I strongly stand by my position that music as art should be solely judged by the response of it's observer. In other words, what moves you? What resonates deep inside you in response to the music you love? How does it make you feel?

Now, in regards to music history, influence an other objective critiques; I don't know enough to play that game, but I see it merits. So, I am not harshing.

2)

Quote

Srsly, I can't even wrap my head around an intelligent discussion of King Crimson or Tull. Just was never my bag, and I stayed in my lane. 

Yeah. Very wise. Thus, I am not going to get into deep discussions on lots of music stuff. It really is not my lane.

3)

Quote

Yes, I used "srsly."

:hifive:

I just used it in Nipsey's thread!

4) 

Quote

Back to Dylan: I'm seriously enjoying Bringing It All Back Home right now. Yes, as we speak. Mr. Tambourine Man is on right now. The Nyrds really did this well (that was a typo, but I left it) -- love the track, says Captain Obvious.

THE BEST! 

Only you rock, would edit a post to point out how it had not been edited.

💘

 

 

Oh, I feel ELO is super-duper-ultra ... eh - I like em a lot.

so - piss off 🍑

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Posted (edited)
6 minutes ago, Man of Constant Sorrow said:

There are just soooo many things that I like about this post.

1) 

Yes. This is what I was trying to express in the Iconic Song of the Decade thread. I'll concede that "iconic" goes deeper than I originally gave proper credit, but - I strongly stand by my position that music as art should be solely judged by the response of it's observer. In other words, what moves you? What resonates deep inside you in response to the music you love? How does it make you feel?

3)

:hifive:

I just used it in Nipsey's thread!

4)

Only you rock, would edit a post to point out how it had not been edited.

Bolded: Thanks!

1) Interesting. I think art should be thought of in terms of its desired effect on the listener according to the artist/actual effect on the listener

3) I probably read it there

4) Heh. Yeah, I kind of like the neologism nyrds; hence, the edit. 

Edited by rockaction

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5 minutes ago, Man of Constant Sorrow said:

Oh, I feel ELO is super-duper-ultra ... eh - I like em a lot.

so - piss off 🍑

sounds like a ####### toof paste ad, which is kinda fitting

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5 minutes ago, rockaction said:

1) Interesting. I think art should be thought of in terms of its desired effect on the listener according to the artist/actual effect on the listener

Cool. Now, this is something that I love discussing about music and all art.

I don't know if your Bob thread is the place for it - and I don't have time now - but, I promise I will find a way to continue this discussion.

:thumbup:

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1 minute ago, otb_lifer said:

sounds like a ####### toof paste ad, which is kinda fitting

Hmmm - I know why that popped into my noggin.

I still need to brush my teeth ... 

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1 minute ago, Man of Constant Sorrow said:

Cool. Now, this is something that I love discussing about music and all art.

I don't know if your Bob thread is the place for it - and I don't have time now - but, I promise I will find a way to continue this discussion.

:thumbup:

Heh. Generally, anything in the ether goes. These things tend to be freeform. I'm sure Dylan will get his due here. Already looking at the recommendations; would appreciate more anecdotes and links about the man.

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13 minutes ago, rockaction said:

Heh. Generally, anything in the ether goes. These things tend to be freeform. I'm sure Dylan will get his due here. Already looking at the recommendations; would appreciate more anecdotes and links about the man.

vid features unsung hero John Hammond, who championed "Bobby" early on (among many others) - this focuses on his return for Blood on the Tracks, and the inner machinations of the process, including the great liner notes (REMEMBER THOSE?!?) by legendary NYC gadfly Pete Hamil 

here, pack a light lunch

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Blonde on Blonde is an album everybody should listen to at least once. My personal fave - Visions of Johana is one of the best songs I've ever heard.  

Highway 61 also spectacular.  

You ever see the movie High Fidelity?  Got a rather obscure Dylan song in there from 1980ish called "Most of Time".   Beautiful song.

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I really like New Morning. I found it looking for the Lebowski song and I'm surprised I never hear anyone talk about it. 

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Posted (edited)

Bobby & Kiki D Sing the Hits of Barry McGuire has always been a favorite in the wikkid household

ETA: and i think it's in STEREO!!

Edited by wikkidpissah
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Times They Are A-Changin' is a favorite. The run of Boots of Spanish Leather>When the Ship Comes In>Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll is as good as it gets.

Also, Time Out of Mind is is brilliant record from his third act. Produced by Daniel Lanois. I love it. Oh, Mercy was too, but I much prefer TOOM. Series of Dreams is also a good song that came from the Oh, Mercy sessions and can be found on the first bootleg series release. There are two versions, one significantly better than the other.

Great song many have not heard is the last song on Street Legal, Where Are You Tonight? (Journey Through Dark Heat).

Visions of Johanna might be the greatest song ever written.

You really just need to get everything from Freewheelin' to Blonde on Blonde. Every one of them is must-own.

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35 minutes ago, Apple Jack said:

Wow, Dylan is now allowing his studio material on youtube. I wonder what changed.

The times?

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 “My friend, Bob, what do we need to make the country grow?”

Brigitte Bardot, Anita Ekberg, Sophia Loren/ Country’ll grow.”

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It's probably because  I was a teenager at the time and had just become aware of Dylan but one of my favorite periods of his career is the Rolling Thunder Revue.  

His Bootleg Series Vol. 5 documents this tour.  Even though it only scratches the surface, it's a great listen and companion piece to Desire and Blood on the Tracks.  For completists, there's going to be a 14 disc box set released later this month that includes five full sets from the first leg of the tour.  For everybody else, there's going to be a Netflix documentary directed by Martin Scorsese dropping on June 14th.  Can't wait.

A show from the second leg of the tour was broadcast on NBC in 1976 and released on album as Hard Rain.  The one-hour video is on YouTube.  The album has its moments but it's not as good as the Bootleg Series release IMO.

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As far as real bootlegs go, Dylan is probably second only to the Dead in quantity and quality of available shows.

I've never been heavy into bootlegs but I can wholeheartedly recommend two soundboard recordings from his Never Ending Tour.  Roseland Ballroom NYC from 1994 and San Jose from 1998 are both excellent.  His touring band was battle tested and respond instinctively to whatever Dylan does.  I won't post links but will say that the guitars101 forums are a great resource.

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Per Eephus's first "e.g." and other suggestions, I just bought Another Side Of Bob Dylan on MoFi at a discount at the local record shop. Loving it. Sounds great...lovely pressing, lovely sound. Sounds great even on a sort of low-budget system, comparatively. 

Enjoying the heck out of it.

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Walked Bosley tonight to the dulcet tones of Dylan singing the standards.

Shadows in the Night (2015)

Dylan hasn't released an album of originals since 2012 but like other veteran artists, he's taken a shot at interpreting the Great American Songbook.  In this case, it's a collection of songs recorded by Frank Sinatra.

Dylan gets a lot of flack for his voice and perhaps deservedly so.  There are times where he's displayed all the range of Adam Dunn.  But I think he's in comparatively good voice here.  He no longer can reach the high tenor that he pulled off circa Nashville Skyline but he can carry a tune.  His phrasing has always been unique and flexible but he doesn't do anything extreme here.

It's not a great album but it certainly has its moments.  I especially like Why Try to Change Me Now, a Cy Coleman tune Sinatra recorded in 1959.  The album closes with That Lucky Old Sun, a pop spiritual that works pretty well.  On the other hand, Some Enchanted Evening from South Pacific is landfill.

Boz did well on his walk.  Got yapped at by a pug named Emma and took his crap in the middle of the street.  Weekend nights on Hayes are usually pretty lively.  I had two random encounters with strangers.  I chatted with a homeless guy while waiting for a light.  He's an old Black man pushing a cart and complaining about his neck.  Before the light changed, it turned out we were both born in the same year.  Later while Bosley was sniffing the grass at the park, a woman commented on my tattoos which led to a conversation about the band Flipper and the parties they used to hold on 29th and Mission.  Small world.

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