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FBG Movie Club: December Holiday-ish Comedies with Monty Python and Jack Lemmon

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Posted (edited)

Now that I think about it - for some reason I had Juliette Lewis stuck in my head, which is why I kept saying Lewis.   I guess I was having flashes of Natural Born Killers in the performance? 

Edited by KarmaPolice

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1 hour ago, KarmaPolice said:

Now that I think about it - for some reason I had Juliette Lewis stuck in my head, which is why I kept saying Lewis.   I guess I was having flashes of Natural Born Killers in the performance? 

Now just add Rosie Perez and Melanie Griffith to Juliette Lewis and you'll have my 3 least favorite actresses of all time. :X

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Just now, Mr. Mojo said:

Now just add Rosie Perez and Melanie Griffith to Juliette Lewis and you'll have my 3 least favorite actresses of all time. :X

1. Perez doesn't seem like she's acting in any of the movies I've seen her in--either one of them.

2. Won't argue about Griffiith.

3. Once I learned who Lewis' father is/was, I saw her and her career in a different light. I like/respect that she has pretty much stuck to her niche and was lucky to outkick her coverage so to speak by getting to work with Scorsese and Oliver Stone (before we learned he was full-on nutty).

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Posted (edited)
5 minutes ago, Charlie Steiner said:

1. Perez doesn't seem like she's acting in any of the movies I've seen her in--either one of them.

2. Won't argue about Griffiith.

3. Once I learned who Lewis' father is/was, I saw her and her career in a different light. I like/respect that she has pretty much stuck to her niche and was lucky to outkick her coverage so to speak by getting to work with Scorsese and Oliver Stone (before we learned he was full-on nutty).

How so?  I guess I don't know who her pops is or any background about the family.  

 

Oh, and Oliver Stone is nutty?  ;)

 

Edited by KarmaPolice

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6 minutes ago, KarmaPolice said:

How so?  I guess I don't know who her pops is or any background about the family.  

 

Oh, and Oliver Stone is nutty?  ;)

 

Juliette is the daughter of Geoffrey Lewis, better known for his many supporting roles in the 70's and 80's, specifically as Clint Eastwood's sidekick Orville in Every Which Way But Loose and Any Which Way You Can.  He also more or less had a niche in acting and was very good and memorable in those niche roles.  Not sure if she's crazy like her characters, but she doesn't strike me as a prima donna actress as much as just one who is good at a specific type of character.

 

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29 minutes ago, Charlie Steiner said:

Juliette is the daughter of Geoffrey Lewis, better known for his many supporting roles in the 70's and 80's, specifically as Clint Eastwood's sidekick Orville in Every Which Way But Loose and Any Which Way You Can.  He also more or less had a niche in acting and was very good and memorable in those niche roles.  Not sure if she's crazy like her characters, but she doesn't strike me as a prima donna actress as much as just one who is good at a specific type of character.

 

Geoffrey Lewis was a great character actor and could play likable characters as mentioned above as well as ruthless villains like in High Plains Drifter. 

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1 minute ago, Mr. Mojo said:

Geoffrey Lewis was a great character actor and could play likable characters as mentioned above as well as ruthless villains like in High Plains Drifter. 

And Night of the Comet

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5 hours ago, Charlie Steiner said:

Juliette is the daughter of Geoffrey Lewis, better known for his many supporting roles in the 70's and 80's, specifically as Clint Eastwood's sidekick Orville in Every Which Way But Loose and Any Which Way You Can.  He also more or less had a niche in acting and was very good and memorable in those niche roles.  Not sure if she's crazy like her characters, but she doesn't strike me as a prima donna actress as much as just one who is good at a specific type of character.

 

Gotcha - I took your post as meaning it was a mess up family life, so that's why she was good at playing crazy.  

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Posted (edited)

Just finished Magnificent 7. Been a long time since I saw it last. Holds up imo.

ETA: kept thinking of  the Three Amigos. I was waiting for Eli Wallach to get a sweater.

Edited by Osaurus
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45 minutes ago, Osaurus said:

Just finished Magnificent 7. Been a long time since I saw it last. Holds up imo.

 

I watched it over the last couple of days, too, based on this thread. It's probably been 20 years since my last viewing. 

I also think it holds up fairly well, though the Method stylings of Robert Vaughn & the dude who played Chico are a little over the top. Hell, even Bronson was James Dean-ing it some. On the other hand, you have Brenner, McQueen, and Coburn just dealing in lead (I'm guessing Sergio Leone was watching closely to these three).  Wallach was awesome, as were some of the villager actors.

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3 minutes ago, Uruk-Hai said:

I watched it over the last couple of days, too, based on this thread. It's probably been 20 years since my last viewing. 

I also think it holds up fairly well, though the Method stylings of Robert Vaughn & the dude who played Chico are a little over the top. Hell, even Bronson was James Dean-ing it some. On the other hand, you have Brenner, McQueen, and Coburn just dealing in lead (I'm guessing Sergio Leone was watching closely to these three).  Wallach was awesome, as were some of the villager actors.

Speaking of Coburn, I knew very little of his body of work (I think I saw In Like Flynt once when I was little; other than that I only know him from the Maverick movie), so seeing him in his prime was a revelation. 

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I've watched both now. I like Magnificent 7 better than Hateful Eight. 

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1 hour ago, whoknew said:

I've watched both now. I like Magnificent 7 better than Hateful Eight. 

It’s not close imo

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Finished them both and I enjoyed them both. I did like M7 better.

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All right, I'm going in. Firing up The Hateful Eight extended version.  :popcorn: 

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8 minutes ago, krista4 said:

All right, I'm going in. Firing up The Hateful Eight extended version.  :popcorn: 

:scared:

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1 hour ago, krista4 said:

All right, I'm going in. Firing up The Hateful Eight extended version.  :popcorn: 

How’s that going?

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4 minutes ago, KarmaPolice said:

H8 bluray bonus features were lame. 

Do you think the extended Netflix series was worth the watch?

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7 minutes ago, Ilov80s said:

Do you think the extended Netflix series was worth the watch?

I honestly don't know.  It had been so long since I saw the original that I couldn't tell you what the added scenes were.  The only thing that stuck out were the few really odd and rough spots where it seemed to be poorly edited.  

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I'd never seen either movie. Well, I'd seen the M7 remake, I guess, a couple years back. But westerns aren't really my thing. And H8 has been on my to-do list for a while, but the ambivalence (at best) and criticism of QT just kept me putting it off. So this gave me an excuse to watch both.

 

I found it interesting to watch them back-to-back (well, at least on consecutive nights) for the first time. Good paring, @Ilov80s.  Wouldn't list either film as a favorite of mine, but good watching and fun to do them like this. 

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1 hour ago, Walking Boot said:

I'd never seen either movie. Well, I'd seen the M7 remake, I guess, a couple years back. But westerns aren't really my thing. And H8 has been on my to-do list for a while, but the ambivalence (at best) and criticism of QT just kept me putting it off. So this gave me an excuse to watch both.

 

I found it interesting to watch them back-to-back (well, at least on consecutive nights) for the first time. Good paring, @Ilov80s.  Wouldn't list either film as a favorite of mine, but good watching and fun to do them like this. 

Thanks, glad you enjoyed the pairing. My feelings are pretty similar. Glad you enjoyed them even if you aren’t a big fan of Westerns. It’s interesting to see how different the perspectives of the two films are. 

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On 7/5/2019 at 9:41 PM, krista4 said:

All right, I'm going in. Firing up The Hateful Eight extended version.  :popcorn: 

Did you survive?

On 7/5/2019 at 12:05 AM, prosopis said:

Finished them both and I enjoyed them both. I did like M7 better.

Curious to you and others who are watching Mag7 for the first time, have you seen a lot of old school westerns or old action movies from that 50s-60s era? 

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1 minute ago, Ilov80s said:

Did you survive?

Curious to you and others who are watching Mag7 for the first time, have you seen a lot of old school westerns or old action movies from that 50s-60s era? 

I've seen all the way through

  • Rio Bravo (Big fan of this one)
  • True Grit (John Wayne version)

I think I've seen parts of How the West Was Won and 2-3 others I can't remember.

I've also seen Silverado, Unforgiven, the Coen Brothers' version of True Grit and maybe bits and pieces of other newer westerns.

FWIW, my local NPR station (88.5) plays old episodes of Gunsmoke on Sunday nights as part of their a old-time radio program from 7-11. They also run old Dragnet episodes right after.

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21 minutes ago, Charlie Steiner said:

I've seen all the way through

  • Rio Bravo (Big fan of this one)
  • True Grit (John Wayne version)

I think I've seen parts of How the West Was Won and 2-3 others I can't remember.

I've also seen Silverado, Unforgiven, the Coen Brothers' version of True Grit and maybe bits and pieces of other newer westerns.

FWIW, my local NPR station (88.5) plays old episodes of Gunsmoke on Sunday nights as part of their a old-time radio program from 7-11. They also run old Dragnet episodes right after.

Good to know- just kind of want to have info for the hope we keep this movie club running in perpetuity. 

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I can think of only 2 classic westerns I have watched all the way through, and Mag 7 was one of them for this endeavor.  

I've seen a handful of newer ones, but mostly it's a genre I avoid.  

 

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5 hours ago, Ilov80s said:

Did you survive?

I've made it through the first two episodes but then was distracted by going to Vancouver and back to see Paul McCartney.  Hoping to watch the third one and possibly also the last one tonight.

Better than expected so far, actually, though my expectations were low.

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14 hours ago, Ilov80s said:

Did you survive?

Curious to you and others who are watching Mag7 for the first time, have you seen a lot of old school westerns or old action movies from that 50s-60s era? 

This was not the first time I have seen M7. I have seen a lot of old school westerns.  was pretty much raised on them.

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16 hours ago, Ilov80s said:

Did you survive?

Curious to you and others who are watching Mag7 for the first time, have you seen a lot of old school westerns or old action movies from that 50s-60s era? 

This was the first time I've seen M7 but I'm a pretty big western fan in general. I love the old Clint Eastwood spaghetti westerns.

I thought M7 was really good for its era. 

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14 minutes ago, Andy Dufresne said:

Anyone seen Rio Bravo? It's said to be Howard Hawks' best film.

I love that movie.

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20 minutes ago, Andy Dufresne said:

Anyone seen Rio Bravo? It's said to be Howard Hawks' best film.

Great movie. I don’t think it’s the best Hawks film but he’s got one of the best lineups of any director and there’s probably 5-10 movies of his that could rightfully be declared his best.

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Posted (edited)

Just started Hateful Eight. HFS this movie is long. 

ETA: Yay. It’s over. Not impressed.

Edited by Osaurus
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19 hours ago, Ilov80s said:

Curious to you and others who are watching Mag7 for the first time, have you seen a lot of old school westerns or old action movies from that 50s-60s era? 

I was watching it for the first time.  I’ve seen some, but probably more “need to see” than “seen.”  High Noon is one of my all-time favorites.  Shane is great too.  

I’ve never seen Red River (think I started once on demand not too long ago, but it fell out of rotation before I could finish), The Searchers, The Wild Bunch, and Once Upon a Time in the West.  

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I think that the Mag7 >> H8.  Although the story with Mag7 was kind of hokey (especially the fact that Eli let's them off the hook), I found it very enjoyable to watch.  I must have seen Mag7 8-9 times.  I feel watching H8 once is more than enough.

I'd like to see how people equate Mag7 to the Dirty Dozen.  Keeping with the numerical slant.

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The plan is to discuss the films now and hopefully really get the discussion going next week as everyone who wanted to participate finishes it. I will probably pose some questions for people in attempt to stimulate some convo.

Next Friday, we will announce the pairing for July.

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It was a weird pairing overall for me.  I think I liked Mag 7 more overall but from the standpoint of having a discussion about the movies I would say that H8 interested me more so I actually find myself drawn to that one more and looking up info about.  Mag 7 feels more "out of sight, out of mind" for me, and I haven't really thought about it since I watched it.  

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17 minutes ago, Ilov80s said:

The plan is to discuss the films now and hopefully really get the discussion going next week as everyone who wanted to participate finishes it. I will probably pose some questions for people in attempt to stimulate some convo.

One main question that I had for people was in relation to the 70mm choice for a movie that was mostly inside.    At first I thought WTF was the point, then I really liked it as I thought about all that was in the shot even though it was inside. 

The specific question(s) that I had were:  What did you think of the choice of 70mm and did it add anything to the viewing for you?  Also, was there anything going on with the characters on the side that would add to the mystery of what was going on, or was this choice just QT being QT?

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Just now, KarmaPolice said:

One main question that I had for people was in relation to the 70mm choice for a movie that was mostly inside.    At first I thought WTF was the point, then I really liked it as I thought about all that was in the shot even though it was inside. 

The specific question(s) that I had were:  What did you think of the choice of 70mm and did it add anything to the viewing for you?  Also, was there anything going on with the characters on the side that would add to the mystery of what was going on, or was this choice just QT being QT?

My gut feel was that he chose 70mm as an 'homage' to past 'epic' westerns, but if anything it fell flat for me after the opening credits (which gave me a late 60's/early 70's vibe, and I thought that was kind of cool), as there were no sweeping landscapes to draw attention to, so after that, if there was any kind of cinematic advantage to 70mm, I don't think I noticed. 

I took your 2nd question 2 different ways; first, from a visual point of view, regarding things the characters were doing aside from the central action of the scene, and second as regarding the dynamics between the characters as they played out in front of us.

As for my first reaction, I didn't notice anything specific that foreshadowed anything significant that happened later, and the major pivotal actions not only took place off screen completely, but also QT apparently felt he needed to then circle back for us and point out what he figured the audience would have missed/couldn't have known in order to make what we already saw make more sense(?). I guess what I mean by this is it felt like QT was that overprotective parent that takes his kid for his first ever amusement park kiddie ride and just before the first thrill of whatever ride they're on, he says "okay, don't be scared, ___ is about to happen."

However, I'm guessing your second question was probably more along the lines of how the interactions/dynamic between/among the characters contributed to the story. In that case, any and all interaction between characters was kind of lessened to me by how I felt QT had set up an air of mistrust from the first scene. The first reaction from each character as they're introduced to the story and each other is suspicion.  I read that tone into every interaction between every character the rest of the movie, and actually felt a little vindicated at the very end in the form of the Lincoln letter.

Also, despite the movie being so long, the action felt rushed, like no sense of time passing, which I think could have nicely ratcheted up the tension. Instead of seeing tension and paranoia between the characters grow and draw us into it, they all were already wound up tight and before I felt really invested in the story, again despite how long the movie was, the action scenes seemed to happen right on top of each other without giving things a chance to have their normal dramatic effect.  Maybe QT did these things on purpose and it was part of his 'style', but there are better ways to misdirect an audience (see Fight Club or The Usual Suspects as good examples).

FWIW, I concede I had my bias against QT going into it and haven't really dug much into the background of this movie, so I'm going just by my pedestrian knowledge and experience, However, I also like to be shown things in a new light, so anything that refutes what I've said here will be given its due. TIA

 

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2 hours ago, KarmaPolice said:

It was a weird pairing overall for me.  I think I liked Mag 7 more overall but from the standpoint of having a discussion about the movies I would say that H8 interested me more so I actually find myself drawn to that one more and looking up info about.  Mag 7 feels more "out of sight, out of mind" for me, and I haven't really thought about it since I watched it.  

Yeah, thematically it was pretty loose. Numerical Westerns about an eclectic groups of mostly strangers coming together in a small town with the violent ending being inevitable. I liked Magnificent 7 more and have thought about it more. Hateful 8 highlighted some interesting things about race. Pretty much the only decent people in the movie were the black characters yet even the lowest white characters held out this racist ethos that just being white made them better. With Magnificent 7 my thoughts dwell more on it's place in movie history. It's an odd movie that shouldn't work but does. It wasn't a hit but it was the blueprint for some of the biggest hits of the 70s. Yet despite being highly influential, it didn't push the envvelope at all and if anything went less dark than many of 50s westerns. It also reminded me a lot of our modern super hero movies like The Avengers. Anyway, the biggest question I was left with is how can  a movie that was just pretty good and wasn't a big hit leave such a footprint? 

2 hours ago, KarmaPolice said:

One main question that I had for people was in relation to the 70mm choice for a movie that was mostly inside.    At first I thought WTF was the point, then I really liked it as I thought about all that was in the shot even though it was inside. 

The specific question(s) that I had were:  What did you think of the choice of 70mm and did it add anything to the viewing for you?  Also, was there anything going on with the characters on the side that would add to the mystery of what was going on, or was this choice just QT being QT?

I have a 50 inch TV but I don't think that is enough for me to truly appreciate the power of 70mm. If I ever watch it again, I will definitely be paying more attention to what is going on on the edges of the frame, in the background, etc. I wouldn't be surprised if there was interesting clues (and red herrings) in plainsight that we missed. 

1 hour ago, Charlie Steiner said:

My gut feel was that he chose 70mm as an 'homage' to past 'epic' westerns, but if anything it fell flat for me after the opening credits (which gave me a late 60's/early 70's vibe, and I thought that was kind of cool), as there were no sweeping landscapes to draw attention to, so after that, if there was any kind of cinematic advantage to 70mm, I don't think I noticed. 

I took your 2nd question 2 different ways; first, from a visual point of view, regarding things the characters were doing aside from the central action of the scene, and second as regarding the dynamics between the characters as they played out in front of us.

As for my first reaction, I didn't notice anything specific that foreshadowed anything significant that happened later, and the major pivotal actions not only took place off screen completely, but also QT apparently felt he needed to then circle back for us and point out what he figured the audience would have missed/couldn't have known in order to make what we already saw make more sense(?). I guess what I mean by this is it felt like QT was that overprotective parent that takes his kid for his first ever amusement park kiddie ride and just before the first thrill of whatever ride they're on, he says "okay, don't be scared, ___ is about to happen."

However, I'm guessing your second question was probably more along the lines of how the interactions/dynamic between/among the characters contributed to the story. In that case, any and all interaction between characters was kind of lessened to me by how I felt QT had set up an air of mistrust from the first scene. The first reaction from each character as they're introduced to the story and each other is suspicion.  I read that tone into every interaction between every character the rest of the movie, and actually felt a little vindicated at the very end in the form of the Lincoln letter.

Also, despite the movie being so long, the action felt rushed, like no sense of time passing, which I think could have nicely ratcheted up the tension. Instead of seeing tension and paranoia between the characters grow and draw us into it, they all were already wound up tight and before I felt really invested in the story, again despite how long the movie was, the action scenes seemed to happen right on top of each other without giving things a chance to have their normal dramatic effect.  Maybe QT did these things on purpose and it was part of his 'style', but there are better ways to misdirect an audience (see Fight Club or The Usual Suspects as good examples).

FWIW, I concede I had my bias against QT going into it and haven't really dug much into the background of this movie, so I'm going just by my pedestrian knowledge and experience, However, I also like to be shown things in a new light, so anything that refutes what I've said here will be given its due. TIA

 

Hitch gave us a shock with the twist, but he should have gone for the tension as you say. Show us the bomb in the room and let us worry about when it will go off.  

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3 minutes ago, Ilov80s said:

Yeah, thematically it was pretty loose. Numerical Westerns about an eclectic groups of mostly strangers coming together in a small town with the violent ending being inevitable. I liked Magnificent 7 more and have thought about it more. Hateful 8 highlighted some interesting things about race. Pretty much the only decent people in the movie were the black characters yet even the lowest white characters held out this racist ethos that just being white made them better. With Magnificent 7 my thoughts dwell more on it's place in movie history. It's an odd movie that shouldn't work but does. It wasn't a hit but it was the blueprint for some of the biggest hits of the 70s. Yet despite being highly influential, it didn't push the envvelope at all and if anything went less dark than many of 50s westerns. It also reminded me a lot of our modern super hero movies like The Avengers. Anyway, the biggest question I was left with is how can  a movie that was just pretty good and wasn't a big hit leave such a footprint? 

I have a 50 inch TV but I don't think that is enough for me to truly appreciate the power of 70mm. If I ever watch it again, I will definitely be paying more attention to what is going on on the edges of the frame, in the background, etc. I wouldn't be surprised if there was interesting clues (and red herrings) in plainsight that we missed. 

Hitch gave us a shock with the twist, but he should have gone for the tension as you say. Show us the bomb in the room and let us worry about when it will go off.  

I think one of the things that M7 did that added to its long-term appeal--and probably to its immediate appeal when it came out--is that it touched on 2 venerated themes that still tug at the heartstrings of today's audiences as well: redemption and home/family.  Collectively, the Seven were all characters with rough edges but believe in the common cause of protecting/valuing the home/family unit.  I think it's implied by each of them when they accept the job for the meager pay, and then more directly shown near the end when Bronson chastises the boys for their attitudes about their fathers.  By comparison, the last Avengers movie also made the effort to show how they all felt like family and how their true strength was in joining together to defeat the seemingly unbeatable enemy. To me, that demonstrates how little the human race has really changed over time.  Sure, 'cultures' change and certain attitudes fall in and out of favor, but what hasn't really yet lost its appeal is the sense of belonging/family/community.

And, I think that's also how H8 makes an interesting counterpoint to M7. To me, I think H8 is more of an anti-message.  I think I did read/see a video about the use of violence in movies, with H8 as an example.  I can see this serving as a cautionary tale about hatred itself, though, and maybe that was his angle.

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I agree with the earlier poster about H8 not quite living up to the tension of the bar scene in Inglorious Basterds, stretched out even longer. But that could also be due to my state of mind when watching IB, the tension literally had me on the edge of my seat and about to fall out.

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1 hour ago, Ilov80s said:

 Hateful 8 highlighted some interesting things about race. Pretty much the only decent people in the movie were the black characters yet even the lowest white characters held out this racist ethos that just being white made them better.

 

I thought it was interesting in each movie how we were "introduced" to the "good guys". In M7, Yul Brenner and Steve McQueen first appear as absolutely the good guys because they fight racism by driving a body up Boot Hill, despite guns pointed right at them.
 

Meanwhile, in H8, we meet SLJ literally sitting on a pile of dead bodies, who he murdered just because they're easier to move dead, and that's OK in this world. Kurt Russell punches a woman in the nose within a few minutes of meeting him. And Walton Goggins is introduced as absurdly racist, a former Confederate who was so violent he wasn't even part of the regular army and is so vocal about it that SLJ nearly shoots him point-blank. And these are the good guys in this story.

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5 minutes ago, Walking Boot said:

 

I thought it was interesting in each movie how we were "introduced" to the "good guys". In M7, Yul Brenner and Steve McQueen first appear as absolutely the good guys because they fight racism by driving a body up Boot Hill, despite guns pointed right at them.
 

Meanwhile, in H8, we meet SLJ literally sitting on a pile of dead bodies, who he murdered just because they're easier to move dead, and that's OK in this world. Kurt Russell punches a woman in the nose within a few minutes of meeting him. And Walton Goggins is introduced as absurdly racist, a former Confederate who was so violent he wasn't even part of the regular army and is so vocal about it that SLJ nearly shoots him point-blank. And these are the good guys in this story.

We sympathize with them, but I don't know if I can say Kurt Russell was really a good guy in the story. 

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Hateful Eight seemed more like Reservoir Dogs set out west to me.  While casting decisions may have played a role in that feeling, the action seemed to have a lot of parallels between being principally set in a room, disparate characters getting thrown together, and the endings.  While I liked Reservoir Dogs when it came out, it has not really held up for me.  Hateful Eight felt kind of the same to me.

I liked M7 a lot more.  While it is a bit derivative itself by transporting The Seven Samurai to the west, the score and cinematography made it feel fresh.  

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Posted (edited)
13 minutes ago, KarmaPolice said:

We doing spoilers, or waiting on that? 

I was thinking not till Monday- is that cool? At least not anything super spoilery

Edited by Ilov80s

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Aw crap.  I got some catching up to do

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I do like H8 but the more I see it the less I like it. I don't feel like its a good movie to re watch.  I think this is the fourth time  have seen it. What was kind of funny the first time - SHUT THE DOOR< YOU NEED TO USE TWO NAILS etc..... is now just an annoying scene and makes the movie to long. I have other things about this movie to speak about but I will wait as they are spoilerish.

 

 

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