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TheMagus

My Walls are Oozing

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11 minutes ago, TheMagus said:

Just a damp rag. It seemed to come up fairly easily but was thick and sticky to the touch and was a pain to get off my skin.

Got it. I will have some other thoughts/questions after the game or tomorrow.¬†ūüĎć

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1 hour ago, Man of Constant Sorrow said:

Got it. I will have some other thoughts/questions after the game or tomorrow.¬†ūüĎć

Btw... You are doing phenomenal work in here. :thumbup:

This comes to mind- born out of the utmost love and respect

ETA...I must've taken...music lessons- one of my favorite all time lines.

Edited by El Floppo
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7 minutes ago, El Floppo said:

ETA...I must've taken...music lessons- one of my favorite all time lines.

I must've sniffed a lot of paint fumes .... 

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Easy to say because it’s not me, but it might be time to cut a small hole in the wall. Maybe drill a hole and wait a while to see if anything comes out and then make a bigger hole if nothing comes out. 

ETA: would be nice to take bees off the table. 

Edited by dgreen

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What about using a thermal camera to see if you can see the bees/wasps moving behind the walls?

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3 minutes ago, bcat01 said:

Stethoscope to try and hear them better?

Do they make stethoscopes small enough for bees? 

That'd be ...

 

 

... the BEE's KNEES!

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Jesus dude just cut a small hole and look.  First sign of anything just cover it up.  

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33 minutes ago, The Z Machine said:

What about using a thermal camera to see if you can see the bees/wasps moving behind the walls?

 

26 minutes ago, bcat01 said:

Stethoscope to try and hear them better?

 

That's what I thought this dude was going to show up with today. Instead he just stood in my living room and hypothesized that there weren't any bees. 

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If the ooze comes back again, I will burrow into the wall. And take pictures. 

Don't want to mess up the walls right now when there may not actually be a problem.

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8 minutes ago, TheMagus said:

If the ooze comes back again, I will burrow into the wall. And take pictures. 

Don't want to mess up the walls right now when there may not actually be a problem.

Keep a sample of the residue as well. A local paint shop can test it for you if it is paint related.

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10 minutes ago, TheMagus said:

If the ooze comes back again, I will burrow into the wall. And take pictures. 

Don't want to mess up the walls right now when there may not actually be a problem.

It's covered by a picture right?

1. Drill hole. 
2. Look. 
3. Patch drywall.  
4. Prime
5. Paint

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1 minute ago, shuke said:

It's covered by a picture right?

1. Drill hole. 
2. Look. 
3. Patch drywall.  
4. Prime
5. Paint

2b) Get stung in eyeball.

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20 minutes ago, TheMagus said:

If the ooze comes back again, I will burrow into the wall. And take pictures. 

Don't want to mess up the walls right now when there may not actually be a problem.

Sticky goo oozing from the walls is not a sign of normalcy.  You have a problem.  How severe is the problem is question at this point.

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buy one of those heat guns on Amazon. upside: you can point it at your wife and tell her she's so hot she broke the thermometer  :moneybag:

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If this were me I would cut a hole in the wall if for no other reason than to report back to the FFA

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8 minutes ago, mr. furley said:

buy one of those heat guns on Amazon. upside: you can point it at your wife and tell her she's so hot she broke the thermometer  :moneybag:

Wait...pause for clarification...a heat gun or a temperature gun? 

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37 minutes ago, Man of Constant Sorrow said:

Keep a sample of the residue as well. A local paint shop can test it for you if it is paint related.

You serious Clark?

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13 minutes ago, Ron Swanson said:

Wait...pause for clarification...a heat gun or a temperature gun? 

yes

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8 minutes ago, culdeus said:

You serious Clark?

Most definitely.

A latex paint can leach surfactants that are similar to what was described here.

An oil based paints can excrete oils that are similar, in certain circumstances.

A milk based paint (old) can have its casein react.

And, if it is a substrate, a test with various solvents can determine if it is structural residue.

Lots of crap can be lernt.

Edited by Man of Constant Sorrow

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42 minutes ago, Man of Constant Sorrow said:

Most definitely.

A latex paint can leach surfactants that are similar to what was described here.

An oil based paints can excrete oils that are similar, in certain circumstances.

A milk based paint (old) can have its casein react.

And, if it is a substrate, a test with various solvents can determine if it is structural residue.

Lots of crap can be lernt.

What about honey based paint?

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4 minutes ago, Dickies said:

What about honey based paint?

Honey makes a good binder in watercolors.

The sugar content helps - keeps things together; so to speak.

 

It goes well with milk paint for breakfast. Casein is a good protein source and the honey will cover the carbs.

I recommend sniffing toluene for dessert.

 

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3 minutes ago, Man of Constant Sorrow said:

Honey makes a good binder in watercolors.

The sugar content helps - keeps things together; so to speak.

 

It goes well with milk paint for breakfast. Casein is a good protein source and the honey will cover the carbs.

I recommend sniffing toluene for dessert.

 

I think I’m following.... @TheMagus Time to taste it. 

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My old man was a hobbyist beekeeper.  Growing up, we always had bee hives on our property and collected honey for personal use and bartered with neighbors.  When I was a boy, I went along with him and other workers on several bee colony removal ops from all kinds of places where bees congregate.

If you truly have a bee infestation in your home, you’re screwed.  The colony could be massive taking up an entire exterior wall of your house.  And yes, honey and water collected in the honeycomb can ooze from interior walls.

Try to identify the point of entry on your home’s exterior where you suspect the bees are entering and leaving the walls.  You should be able to see this clearly during a sunny day.

Bees will only leave an area if it becomes unsustainable to maintain the population. ¬†If you want to save the colony you‚ÄĚll need to open the walls, remove all the honeycomb and setup artificial hives nearby so they setup shop in the hives (assuming you can move or replace the queen), then move the hives off your property.

Otherwise, the only option after removing the honeycomb in the walls, is extermination.  You would also need to patch up exterior openings in the home so your house doesn’t invite a bee colony in the future.  

G/L.

 

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2 hours ago, Freaky Styley said:

My old man was a hobbyist beekeeper.  Growing up, we always had bee hives on our property and collected honey for personal use and bartered with neighbors.  When I was a boy, I went along with him and other workers on several bee colony removal ops from all kinds of places where bees congregate.

If you truly have a bee infestation in your home, you’re screwed.  The colony could be massive taking up an entire exterior wall of your house.  And yes, honey and water collected in the honeycomb can ooze from interior walls.

Try to identify the point of entry on your home’s exterior where you suspect the bees are entering and leaving the walls.  You should be able to see this clearly during a sunny day.

Bees will only leave an area if it becomes unsustainable to maintain the population. ¬†If you want to save the colony you‚ÄĚll need to open the walls, remove all the honeycomb and setup artificial hives nearby so they setup shop in the hives (assuming you can move or replace the queen), then move the hives off your property.

Otherwise, the only option after removing the honeycomb in the walls, is extermination.  You would also need to patch up exterior openings in the home so your house doesn’t invite a bee colony in the future.  

G/L.

 

Good stuff.

I couldn't sleep (my ears were buzz'n) - so, I checked in.

I have a question. I'm an avid outdoorsman, and for the most part, I just ignore bees and wasps that are native to my area. (KY) If I don't bother them, they don't bother me. Now, irt drilling and wall removal, while I don't fear "stinging things" in the wild, I have never interfered with their home. Thus, my main concern about drilling/etc is that it could agitate the hive and lead to more aggressive behavior. I have seen bee-keepers work with a smoke of sort to pacify them. Would this kind of thing be necessary before tampering with the area? Or, is increased aggression not very significant?

Really curious. Thnx.

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Similar thing happened to me years back when I refinished my basement. Dude that did it didn't attach the exhaust fan for the dryer properly so that moisture was coming back into the house and the bathroom looked like it was crying every time we did laundry. 

 

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Why are you so scared to cut an exploratory hole?

 

get a hole saw. I would do 3 inches. It will also show you the ‚Äúprofile‚ÄĚ / layers of the wall and you can get an idea of what it might be besides bees (hint - it‚Äôs not bees).¬†

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8 hours ago, shuke said:

Jesus dude just cut a small hole and look.  First sign of anything just cover it up.  

 

1 hour ago, wilked said:

Why are you so scared to cut an exploratory hole?

 

get a hole saw. I would do 3 inches. It will also show you the ‚Äúprofile‚ÄĚ / layers of the wall and you can get an idea of what it might be besides bees (hint - it‚Äôs not bees).¬†

HAVEN'T YOU GUYS EVER SEEN MY GIRL!

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9 hours ago, Man of Constant Sorrow said:

Most definitely.

A latex paint can leach surfactants that are similar to what was described here.

An oil based paints can excrete oils that are similar, in certain circumstances.

A milk based paint (old) can have its casein react.

And, if it is a substrate, a test with various solvents can determine if it is structural residue.

Lots of crap can be lernt.

Well my question was more like if I take a cup of jizz to the home Depot they can tell me if it's paint?

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15 hours ago, TheMagus said:

OK so here's a real update. I called a local bee guy who had 24x7 service on their website on Saturday and explained the situation and his response was that it sounded like it was probably honey bees (I was on the phone with him for about a half an hour) and they didn't do that, but he would get me in contact with his honey bee guy and then he conferenced me into a call with another company who took down all my info. That company was apparently Terminix and put in a service call for routine exterior pest control and apparently signed me up for some kind of recurring contract. So the guy who showed up today thought he was spraying around the outside of my house and he didn't really seem like an authority on bees. 

So after talking to him and showing him some of the areas that still had stains on the walls, he said he doesn't think it's bees for the following reasons:

  • He said if we had hives that were producing that much honey to leak through multiple walls in that many places, there would be 10s of 1000s of bees in the wall and it would sound like a freight train in my living room
  • He doesn't think it is likely that they would have spread to two different walls on opposite sides of the room
  • He says we would have noticed "activity" all summer around the outside of the house

But then he said he was going to call an expert and called his buddy and had him on speaker phone who apparently is a bee guy and that guy said it sounded like it was bees. He also said it may be wasps because even though they don't make honey, they have a "mess."

The guy said to just wait and see if it happens again and if so don't clean up the mystery substance and call him. He also suggested cutting a hole in the wall.¬†ūüė≤

So I don't even know if we just leave it and assume it was some weird condensation/leeching and move on or get a real bee person here with appropriate investigative equipment. 

New update as I am typing: I mentioned this earlier in the story, while I was investigating the ooze, there was a "bee" flying around my living room that I thought came out of the curtains which is what set us down the bee path in the first place. Well when I was telling my wife what the guy said,¬† she said that the bee that was in the house was actually a wasp (she opened the door and it flew outside). And my response was - well that was in the curtains and could have just been a coincidence. She then told me that she actually saw it crawl out of the recessed lighting in the ceiling before it went into the curtains.¬†ūüė™

So this guy today had me convinced that it was just a weird freak ooze and there was nothing to worry about and I'm doing a 180 again. I have to get a real bee guy out here. 

Well we had a nest of yellow jackets that was in our ceiling, there was a uncaulked hole between the brick and the soffit on the exterior of the house and that's how that got in. Maybe a few hundred of them. We had them in the house and could easily hear them when you walked over to where the nest was. Saw a TON of activity in and out by that part of the house outside.

I doubt you have any type of bees if you can't hear them or see a lot of them outside your house.

Edited by Hawks64

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when i find myself in a time of trouble like this i always say to myself brohan what would the really fat guy from ice road truckers do so in your situation the thing to do is load er up and hit the damn road cause you aint makin no money if you aint driving across a crackling sheet of lake ice take that to the bank bromigo

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2 hours ago, Dan Lambskin said:

Also possible new theory is Candyman is living in your walls

 

Well that one is easy to disprove.  @TheMagus do you live in the projects in Chicago?

 

If it is wasps, they eat the gypsum from the backside of the drywall leaving you with just the paper facing.  I had a nest in my garage wall over the summer.  Was moving some stuff around and when I bumped into the wall heard it buzzing.  Tapped around and found a 12"x12" area where the wall was not solid, just the paper facing.  Screwed a piece of plywood over the area to make sure they stayed in the wall. Looked outside and found the hole they were using as their door.  Sat there for a few days with a can of wasp spray and kept soaking the opening.   Then I used a 2 gallon sprayer full of dish soap and water (the soap breaks down their surface "wax" and they soak up all the water basically drowning).  If you sproy one while they are flying they will fall to the ground and die within seconds.   Once I killed what I could from the outside I went inside.  Bought a can of wasp killer with the straw attachment, drilled a hole just bigger than the straw, stuck the straw in the wall and emptied the can.  When I pulled hte sraw out I put a piece of duct tape over the hole.  Mover over 12" and did the same thing.  When I did the first spray you could hear the wall get louder as they were pissed and trying to save the queen.  When I was drilling my holes, the drill bit would come out covered in a sticky residue where I actually drilled into the hive.

 

So, if your "hive" is behind a picture, drill a small hole, stick the wasp killer straw in and see what happens.  If nothing happens you only have a small hole to patch.  If the wall gets loud, your bee guy will be making a much larger hole so who cares.

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4 minutes ago, UOFI_316 said:

Well that one is easy to disprove.  @TheMagus do you live in the projects in Chicago?

 

If it is wasps, they eat the gypsum from the backside of the drywall leaving you with just the paper facing.  I had a nest in my garage wall over the summer.  Was moving some stuff around and when I bumped into the wall heard it buzzing.  Tapped around and found a 12"x12" area where the wall was not solid, just the paper facing.  Screwed a piece of plywood over the area to make sure they stayed in the wall. Looked outside and found the hole they were using as their door.  Sat there for a few days with a can of wasp spray and kept soaking the opening.   Then I used a 2 gallon sprayer full of dish soap and water (the soap breaks down their surface "wax" and they soak up all the water basically drowning).  If you sproy one while they are flying they will fall to the ground and die within seconds.   Once I killed what I could from the outside I went inside.  Bought a can of wasp killer with the straw attachment, drilled a hole just bigger than the straw, stuck the straw in the wall and emptied the can.  When I pulled hte sraw out I put a piece of duct tape over the hole.  Mover over 12" and did the same thing.  When I did the first spray you could hear the wall get louder as they were pissed and trying to save the queen.  When I was drilling my holes, the drill bit would come out covered in a sticky residue where I actually drilled into the hive.

 

So, if your "hive" is behind a picture, drill a small hole, stick the wasp killer straw in and see what happens.  If nothing happens you only have a small hole to patch.  If the wall gets loud, your bee guy will be making a much larger hole so who cares.

This is how it's done boys. 

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6 hours ago, culdeus said:

Well my question was more like if I take a cup of jizz to the home Depot they can tell me if it's paint?

Thank you for the clarification.

I just ran an experiment, in order to provide an accurate answer.

Home Depot can ID semen. Both as a 100% pure sample and in a mixture with various other paints (that part was fun).

 

I'll do anything for science and the FFA.¬†ūüĎć

Unfortunately, I am now required to get all of my building materials from Lowe's. :(

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I give this thread 2 and a half stars.  Needs more updates, and pics, and videos, and narratives.

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2 minutes ago, culdeus said:

I give this thread 2 and a half stars.  Needs more updates, and pics, and videos, and narratives.

I will post the vids of my experiment later today. Still trying to find a host that will not ban me for it.

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9 minutes ago, culdeus said:

I give this thread 2 and a half stars.  Needs more updates, and pics, and videos, and narratives.

and a hole drilled in the wall

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14 minutes ago, culdeus said:

I give this thread 2 and a half stars.  Needs more updates, and pics, and videos, and narratives.

Or at least a disrespectful neighbor.  Or the bees in the wall have WhatsApp installed.  I mean, give us something.

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3 minutes ago, arrow1 said:

and a hole drilled in the wall

I'm no bee expert, but wouldn't the bees come flooding out if he did this?  Or are we thinking of a smaller hole that a bee couldn't fit through?  Are bees like cats, though, and able to squeeze through super-tight spaces?  

:popcorn:

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3 minutes ago, nirad3 said:

I'm no bee expert, but wouldn't the bees come flooding out if he did this?  Or are we thinking of a smaller hole that a bee couldn't fit through?  Are bees like cats, though, and able to squeeze through super-tight spaces?  

:popcorn:

3" hole and if bees come flooding out, stuff a sock in it.

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10 minutes ago, arrow1 said:

3" hole and if bees come flooding out, stuff a sock in it.

go on....slowly

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Get an IR camera, smack the wall a bunch of times, and then check the wall with the IR camera. Bees will start buzzing and vibrating when they get upset and actually heat the air up around them. So you should be able to see the difference in temperature.

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12 minutes ago, GroveDiesel said:

Get an IR camera, smack the wall a bunch of times, and then check the wall with the IR camera. Bees will start buzzing and vibrating when they get upset and actually heat the air up around them. So you should be able to see the difference in temperature.

This guy won't open a 3 inch hole in his wall, what makes you think he's going to be able to find an IR camera?

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9 hours ago, UOFI_316 said:

Well that one is easy to disprove.  @TheMagus do you live in the projects in Chicago?

 

If it is wasps, they eat the gypsum from the backside of the drywall leaving you with just the paper facing.  I had a nest in my garage wall over the summer.  Was moving some stuff around and when I bumped into the wall heard it buzzing.  Tapped around and found a 12"x12" area where the wall was not solid, just the paper facing.  Screwed a piece of plywood over the area to make sure they stayed in the wall. Looked outside and found the hole they were using as their door.  Sat there for a few days with a can of wasp spray and kept soaking the opening.   Then I used a 2 gallon sprayer full of dish soap and water (the soap breaks down their surface "wax" and they soak up all the water basically drowning).  If you sproy one while they are flying they will fall to the ground and die within seconds.   Once I killed what I could from the outside I went inside.  Bought a can of wasp killer with the straw attachment, drilled a hole just bigger than the straw, stuck the straw in the wall and emptied the can.  When I pulled hte sraw out I put a piece of duct tape over the hole.  Mover over 12" and did the same thing.  When I did the first spray you could hear the wall get louder as they were pissed and trying to save the queen.  When I was drilling my holes, the drill bit would come out covered in a sticky residue where I actually drilled into the hive.

 

So, if your "hive" is behind a picture, drill a small hole, stick the wasp killer straw in and see what happens.  If nothing happens you only have a small hole to patch.  If the wall gets loud, your bee guy will be making a much larger hole so who cares.

But then he doesn't get to keep any of the delicious honey - the only upside to this whole unfortunate situation. :(

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