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Faust

Dynasty: QB Joe Burrow, LSU

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I'm not taking him 1.01 in superflex right now.  Maybe 1.05. 

That's totally against my usual superflex strategy, but this year is different for me. 

 

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13 minutes ago, starks said:

Non superflex where will he go? Late first/early second sound about right?

I always love it when people draft QBs in the first round in 1 QB leagues.  Even the best, already proven, QBs are not worth more than an early 2nd rounder in non superflex. Jackson and Mahomes are probably the exceptions there. 

I wouldn't touch Burrow until the late 3rd in this deep draft. 

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Best QB prospect since Luck? 

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LSU redshirt senior QB Joe Burrow was named the winner of the Maxwell Award.

The Maxwell is awarded to the "Player of the Year", and the former four-star recruit out of Athens High School in Ohio, Burrow, is a well deserving recipient of the honor. Burrow (6'4/216) is going to need some assistance transporting all his hardware back home, as he already won the Davey O'Brien Award and the Walter Camp Player of the Year Award earlier in the evening. Burrow broke the all-time SEC marks for passing yards with 4,715, and passing touchdowns with 48, becoming the first player in SEC history to throw for 4,000 yards and 40 touchdowns in the same season. He is the early-favorite to win the Heisman Trophy and to be the first pick in the 2020 NFL Draft.

SOURCE: 247 Sports

Dec 12, 2019, 9:31 PM ET

 

 

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LSU redshirt senior QB Joe Burrow was named winner of the Davey O'Brien Award.

Mercy, Joe. This was Burrow's second award of the night -- Thursday is essentially serving as CFB's Oscar Night -- as he had previously won the Walter Camp Player of the Year. The Davey O'Brien is handed out annually to the top quarterback in the country. Burrow beat out Justin Fields and Jalen Hurts for the honor, something that has become a familiar theme on the awards circuit. Over the past week or thereabouts, Burrow has now won the Johnny Unitas Golden Arm, AP Player of the Year, Walter Camp Player of the Year and Davey O'Brien. More almost certainly to come as Burrow burns his path toward Saturday's Heisman.

SOURCE: Yahoo Sports College Football on Twitter

Dec 12, 2019, 7:17 PM ET

 

 

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LSU redshirt senior QB Joe Burrow was named winner of the Walter Camp Player of the Year award.

Burrow (6'4/216) has already been named AP Player of the Year and winner of the Johnny Unitas Golden Arm. He can add the Walter Camp PoY honor, now, too. The star LSU gunslinger threw for 4,715 yards (77.9% completions) with a 48/6 TD/INT ratio across 13 games this fall. He'd best make additional room on the shelf, because he probably has a Heisman coming his way on Saturday, among other honors.

SOURCE: Walter Camp Football on Twitter

Dec 12, 2019, 7:03 PM ET

 

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Associated Press voted LSU QB Joe Burrow as the Player of the Year "in a landslide."

The AP Player of the Year isn't the same as the Heisman Trophy, but in function, it's pretty close. Of the 53 AP voters, 50 of them cast first-place votes for Burrow. Ohio State EDGE Chase Young was the only other player to receive any first-place votes. It seems voters were pretty decided on the best offensive and defensive players in college football this season.

SOURCE: NBC Sports

Dec 12, 2019, 1:39 PM ET

 

 

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LSU redshirt senior QB Joe Burrow has been named the 2019 Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award winner, which is awarded to the best senior or fourth-year quarterback in the country.

Though LSU has a storied football program, Burrow (6'4/216) is the first winner of the Golden Arm award in school history. Burrow has thrown 44 touchdowns to just six interceptions this year while carrying LSU to a likely playoff spot. Burrow beat out others such as Oklahoma's Jalen Hurts and Oregon's Justin Herbert for the prestigious award.

SOURCE: NBC Sports

Dec 4, 2019, 7:36 PM ET

 

 

Edited by Faust

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25 minutes ago, kittenmittens said:

I always love it when people draft QBs in the first round in 1 QB leagues.  Even the best, already proven, QBs are not worth more than an early 2nd rounder in non superflex. Jackson and Mahomes are probably the exceptions there. 

I wouldn't touch Burrow until the late 3rd in this deep draft. 

Over the past five years I haven't seen a QB who I even considered in the first round. In retrospect Mahomes and Jackson would have been worthy. I'm hyped about Burrow though. He plays with elite offensive talent but he looks like a pure stud. He's competitive, seems like a leader. Even though he'll probably end up on the Bengals I'd consider him at the end of the first.

 

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Bleacher Report draft analyst Matt Miller moved LSU redshirt senior QB Joe Burrow to the top of his position rankings following the Tigers' win at Alabama.

Burrow (6'4/216) has been outstanding this season, with the most recent accomplishment being his performance in LSU's 46-41 win over the Crimson Tide. The redshirt senior accounted for 457 total yards and three passing touchdowns last weekend, and he did not turn the ball over. Not only did that make Burrow a Heisman Trophy favorite in the eyes of some, but it also made him the top draft-eligible quarterback prospect. "His play in the pocket is poised, athletic, patient and smart," Miller wrote in his analysis of Burrow. "His throwing motion is quick with the ability to dial up speed when needed and a soft touch when the pass calls for it." Burrow is the top quarterback and second overall draft prospect (Ohio State EDGE Chase Young is No. 1) on Miller's board.

SOURCE: Bleacher Report

Nov 12, 2019, 12:57 PM ET

 

 

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Speaking with Bleacher Report's Matt Miller, a longtime quarterbacks coach said that LSU redshirt senior QB Joe Burrow "just has it."

"You can't coach it; you can't develop it. Some guys just have it. Baker has it. Gardner Minshew has it," the QB coach said, adding that the 6-foot-4, 216-pound Burrow "has better size than both and a much better arm than Minshew." Miller also touched base with a scout who believes that Tua Tagovailoa's history of ankle issues could potentially push Burrow up to QB1 for the spring. Tagovailoa -- assuming he can play -- and Burrow will be squaring off on Saturday, in the biggest game of the college season to date.

SOURCE: Bleacher Report

Nov 8, 2019, 3:32 PM ET

 

 

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The Athletic's Dane Brugler ranks Joe Burrow second in his updated quarterback rankings for the 2020 NFL Draft.

As you can probably guess, the only player ahead of Burrow is Alabama's Tua Tagovailoa. An afterthought coming into the 2019 season, Burrow has been absolutely sensational in 2019 with 29 touchdown passes. As Brugler notes, Burrow did play better down the stretch, but the leap in his game from last year to this is substantial. "Burrow’s ability to negotiate muddy pockets and deliver an accurate football downfield are NFL-ready skills," he writes. "He has a stone-cold demeanor on the field and looks unfazed by whatever is thrown at him." As Brugler also notes, he has a showdown with Alabama coming up on November 9. That game will be massive for the 6-foot-4, 216-pound quarterback's draft stock.

SOURCE: The Athletic

Oct 22, 2019, 4:36 PM ET

 

 

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Pro Football Focus notes that LSU redshirt senior QB Joe Burrow leads the country in yards-per-attempt on play-action passes.

"At this point, its getting difficult to find stats that Joe Burrow does NOT lead," the tweet says while showing the statistical leaders. Burrow is averaging 16.8 YPA on play-action passes, and the only player within a yard and a half of him is Minnesota's Tanner Morgan at 15.3. Burrow is having a special season, and this is just a number that illustrates how good he's been in 2019.

SOURCE: PFF College on Twitter

Oct 18, 2019, 9:16 PM ET

 

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In the latest edition of his Big Board, ESPN's Mel Kiper Jr., slotted LSU redshirt senior QB Joe Burrow as the No. 14 draft-eligible prospect for the spring.

"With a great release, much better accuracy at all levels of the field (than he showed last season) and enough athleticism to maneuver the pocket to evade rushers, Burrow reminds me of Tony Romo," Kiper writes of the 6-foot-4, 216-pound redshirt senior. This latest incarnation of the Big Board is the first which has been graced by Burrow's presence. The LSU gunslinger is one of four quarterbacks to land on Kiper's 25-man board, rubbing shoulders with Tua Tagovailoa (No. 1), Justin Herbert (No. 6) and Jacob Eason (No. 19).

SOURCE: ESPN Insider

Oct 17, 2019, 4:22 PM ET

 

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An NFL scout told Bleacher Report's Matt Miller that LSU redshirt senior QB Joe Burrow is "throwing big time balls."

The scout noted that Burrow has an "It" factor which "you can't put a price on." Miller, himself, notes that the 6-foot-4, 216-pound redshirt senior "isn't yet in the tier of Tua Tagovailoa at quarterback, but as the season goes on, he has a chance to make himself many fans in the NFL scouting community." In his two biggest tests of the season -- against Texas and Florida -- Burrow has thrown for a combined 764 yards (82% completions) with a 7/1 TD/INT ratio. He has legitimately worked himself into the first-round discussion at this juncture.

SOURCE: Bleacher Report

Oct 16, 2019, 1:48 PM ET

 

 

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Pro Football Focus currently ranks LSU senior QB Joe Burrow number one on its list of all 130 starting quarterbacks in college football.

LSU installed a new offense in the spring, and the Tigers have been one of the most explosive teams in college football. Burrow (6'4/216) has been outstanding, completing 78.4% of his pass attempts and throwing for 1,864 yards and 22 touchdowns with just three interceptions. According to Pro Football Focus, the senior quarterback is 57-of-77 for 1,285 yards and 16 touchdowns on passes of ten yards or longer. Saturday's matchup with Florida will be a challenge given how good the Gators are defensively, but it also represents an opportunity for Burrow to prove himself not only when it comes to the Heisman Trophy but his NFL Draft prospects as well.

SOURCE: Pro Football Focus

Oct 11, 2019, 5:39 PM ET

 

 

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Speaking with Fran Duffy on the 'Journey to the Draft' podcast, Senior Bowl executive director Jim Nagy said that LSU senior QB Joe Burrow has "definitely played his way into the first-round conversation."

Setting aside Burrow's volcanic offensive output to date -- 1,520 passing yards (80.6% completions) with a 17/2 TD/INT ratio in four games -- one aspect of the senior's persona which particularly stands out to Nagy is his leadership quality. Said the Senior Bowl's head honcho, "You watch him on the field, you can tell guys love playing with him." Nagy compares Burrow's game attitude to that of former Bears QB Jim McMahon, noting that the LSU gunslinger "talks trash on the field" and possesses "that brashness to him." Nagy believes that if Burrow attends the Senior Bowl in January, the NFL might come away salivating.

SOURCE: Journey to the Draft

Oct 4, 2019, 3:12 PM ET

 

 

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Per Pro Football Focus, LSU senior QB Joe Burrow leads the SEC with 10 big-time throws.

Big-time throws on the outlet are classified as ones which include deep balls, tight window throws and throws which create legitimate opportunities for the offense. Burrow (6'3/212) has 10 such throws this season, leading Tua Tagovailoa (7), Nick Starkel (6), Sawyer Smith (5) and Kelly Bryant (5) in the conference. The Heisman contender has thrown for 1,520 yards (80.6% completions) with a 17/2 TD/INT ratio in four games this season. He is averaging an absurd 12.3 YPA.

SOURCE: PFF College on Twitter

Oct 2, 2019, 6:00 PM ET

 

 

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45 minutes ago, Ilov80s said:

Best QB prospect since Luck? 

Not even close, IMO. 

His prospect status has never passed Trever Lawrence.  Fields is also regarded as a better prospect than Burrow, and many would day that Tua is also a better prospect who Burrow has never passed. 

Burrow is 23 already and didn't do much of anything until this year. 

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16 minutes ago, kittenmittens said:

Not even close, IMO. 

His prospect status has never passed Trever Lawrence.  Fields is also regarded as a better prospect than Burrow, and many would day that Tua is also a better prospect who Burrow has never passed. 

Burrow is 23 already and didn't do much of anything until this year. 

Age is a fair assessment. I wouldn’t say he did nothing last year. 3400 total yards, 23 TDs/5 interceptions. He struggled against the top SEC teams but overall it was a solid season for an LSU QB. It’s hard for me to see what he’s done this year on an offense that isn’t one of these historically high powered systems like Oklahoma or Washington State (quite the opposite really) and not be totally impressed. I don’t think Tua was ever really close to this level prospect and certainly isn’t now. Trevor is a good call and may surpass Burrow and Luck.

Edited by Ilov80s
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Steelers' defense the new Steel Curtain? Plus, Joe Burrow eval

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JOE BURROW: Evaluating the Heisman favorite's NFL potential

It might be a foregone conclusion that LSU quarterback Joe Burrow will walk away with the Heisman Trophy on Saturday night, earning recognition as the best player in college football. However, I'm not necessarily convinced that the senior signal-caller is the best player in the 2020 NFL Draft class. Despite being penciled in as the QB1 on most analysts' boards in the media world, I'm pumping the brakes on the hype building around Burrow's prospects as a franchise quarterback -- and I think the NFL scouting community will also pause before anointing him as the next great prospect at the position.

Now, I know that Tiger faithful will take to Twitter to scold me for my reluctance to hand Burrow the crown, but I've been taught by Hall of Fame-caliber executives, general managers and coaches that the No. 1 overall spot on the board should be reserved for transcendent talents with the potential to revolutionize the league.

Sure, that's a lofty standard for any NFL prospect to meet, but the elites in the class should flash that kind of potential when we see them at their best.

To his credit, Burrow has certainly enjoyed a spectacular 2019 season with 4,715 passing yards and a 48:6 touchdown-to-interception ratio while posting an FBS-best 77.9 percent completion rate. He has played well in big games, with 1,827 passing yards, a 15:2 TD-INT ratio and a 78.6 percent completion rate against AP Top 25 competition.

Those impressive numbers are backed up by exceptional performance on tape. Burrow checks the boxes as an accurate passer with the capacity to throw with touch, timing and anticipation. He shows excellent pocket awareness and his sound judgment enables him to toe the line as a gunslinger without taking the unnecessary risks that lead to turnovers. As a standout athlete, Burrow is an underrated dual-threat playmaker with the elusiveness and running skills to carve up defenses on read-option plays or impromptu scrambles.

Keep in mind, Burrow was Mr. Ohio (top prep player in the state) in football and an all-state selection as a point guard in high school. He combines those multi-purpose skills with the knowledge and wisdom that comes with being a coach's son to control the game like a field general. Burrow leads his teammates like a veteran and NFL coaches will love his ultra-confident demeanor when they sit across from him in pre-draft interviews.

That said, I don't know if Burrow really stands out as a high-level, blue-chip prospect on the strength of his individual traits. While he grades out well as a passer, playmaker, and leader, I don't see a transcendent or generational talent when I study the tape. Scouts will rate his arm talent at a B-/C+ level. And despite his on-field exploits as a runner, I don't expect him to blow anyone away with his athleticism when he works out in front of scouts this spring.

Additionally, I have questions about the massive increase in his production from his junior to senior season as a starter at LSU. In 2018, Burrow completed 57.8 percent of his passes for 2,894 yards, 16 TDs and 5 INTs in 13 games (the same number he's played in '19). I'm sure that the natural maturation process helped Burrow develop a better feel for the game heading into his second season as a QB1, but it's hard to ignore the impact made by Joe Brady, LSU's first-year passing game coordinator/wide receivers coach.

The former New Orleans Saints offensive assistant (2017-18) and Penn State graduate assistant (2015-16) helped revamp the Tigers' passing game by melding some traditional NFL concepts with some run-pass option concepts that he learned from working with RPO guru Joe Moorhead at PSU in 2016. As a result, the Tigers' offense features more layups and wide-open deep shots with Burrow simply asked to put the ball within the zip code of a pass catcher from a star-studded cast of wide receivers.

I'm not saying any of this to diminish what Burrow has accomplished as a player. He has improved from one year to the next as much as any quarterback that I've evaluated in recent memory, but it's not a coincidence that his completion percentage jumped 20 points and his touchdowns shot up by 300 percent(!) with Brady and offensive coordinator Steve Ensminger teaming to update the Tigers' scheme.

If I'm working for an NFL team, I need to understand how the scheme changes helped elevate Burrow's game and if the same system will be needed for him to continue to perform at a high level in the pros.

While I've been around the game long enough to know nearly every quarterback is a "system QB," I think it's important to separate the talents of the player from the scheme when performing the evaluation. How much of the production is due to the quarterback's talents? How much of it is generated by the scheme? Can the quarterback play in another offense or is he tied to playing a certain way within a specific system?

When I study Burrow and his game, I see an outstanding college player, but at this time, I'm not ready to anoint him as the best prospect in the draft or the next great NFL quarterback.

 

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20 minutes ago, Ilov80s said:

Age is a fair assessment. I wouldn’t say he did nothing last year. 3400 total yards, 23 TDs/5 interceptions. He struggled against the top SEC teams but over it was a solid season for an LSU QB. It’s hard for me to see what he’s done this year on an offense that isn’t one of these historically high powered systems like Oklahoma or Washington State (quite the opposite really). I don’t think Tua was ever really close to this level prospect and certainly isn’t now. Trevor is a good call and may surpass Burrow and Luck.

I want to believe, but I'm not sold enough yet.  I think that a recency bias fueled hype spiral is in play right now.  I might look really foolish looking back on this, but I think the collective we might be taking it way too far if him being the best prospect since Luck is even a question we are asking.  College stats are important, but sometimes a good or bad season goes beyond individual factors and gets too much weight.  Have we ever seen a prospect rise this fast? 

Some Devy rankings still have Tua ahead of Burrow.  Tua was also widely considered well ahead of Burrow before he got hurt, so I think he was definitely at the same or better level of prospect than Burrow is right now. 

Burrow is getting very hyped up now, but did that much really change in the last few weeks? 

I'm usually too conservative on fast rising players that hit, but for the purposes of Dynasty I think the chances that Burrow busts in the NFL are a lot higher than the top 3 or 4 RB/WR prospects this year, and those players might have a higher ceiling too. 

 

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1 hour ago, kittenmittens said:

I always love it when people draft QBs in the first round in 1 QB leagues.  Even the best, already proven, QBs are not worth more than an early 2nd rounder in non superflex. Jackson and Mahomes are probably the exceptions there. 

I wouldn't touch Burrow until the late 3rd in this deep draft. 

Generally I agree with firsts, but in the early 2nd recently you could of had Mahomes,Watson,Baker, Kyler or Lamar. 

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24 minutes ago, bicycle_seat_sniffer said:

poor bastard ends up on the Bengals.

 

 

Can't blame a guy for where he's drafted. But you can blame him if he signs an extension.

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18 hours ago, Ilov80s said:

Best QB prospect since Luck? 

I don't think many would take him over Lawrence if both were in the same draft.

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Good conversation in here. 

Would be a bummer for the Bengals to miss on another top drafted qb

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2 minutes ago, Doug B said:

Please let Burrow do an Aaron-Rodgers drop to the Saints.

keep dreaming, but anything can happen. 

There are a few teams that would change my mind about this class if they drafted a qb, because IMO destination is big; if a qb can sit for a year or two that's amazing for his development. Saints are one of them

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Good discussion in here. I thought I'd add some context on the huge jump in Burrow's numbers from last year to this year. 

I would recommend this breakdown from Sports Illustrated, which traces the change in offensive system (and the coaching changes that led to it) back to Les Miles's tenure and firing. Nobody needs that whole history, but some relevant highlights:

- 2016: LSU fires Miles largely due to his stubborn refusal to modernize the offense, which was terribly outmoded and ineffective for much of his tenure (most seasons our passing attack and total offense ranked near the bottom of FBS, as in 110th or lower out of 128 programs)

- 2018 (Burrow's first season): Ed Orgeron promotes Steve Ensminger from TEs coach  to offensive coordinator; Ensminger promises to modernize the offense (spread, RPOs etc.) but he hasn't coordinated in a long time and doesn't have a lot of direct experience with modern college offenses; the offense improves incrementally but by Ensminger's own admission the major overhaul never happens 

- 2019: LSU hires Joe Brady (an offensive assistant with the New Orleans Saints) to be the passing coordinator; Brady works side by side with Ensminger and the result is the modern offense you see now (shotgun, RPOs, 4-wide sets, all the amenities we LSU fans never thought we'd get). 

For people wondering if the system is the reason for Burrow's explosion I'll resolve that for you: it's the system. But maybe not in the negative way we usually mean that. It's hard to explain how ingrained LSU's offensive problems have been for folks who haven't followed the program for the past decade plus. The 2018 offense was a small shift in the right direction, but many of the anachronistic, conservative tendencies of the Miles era remained (as did some key injuries along the offensive line). And Burrow still put up decent numbers. I think any concerns that he's only produced elite numbers for one season are completely legitimate. At the same time, this is the one season he's been in an offense that gave him a real chance at this kind of success. Burrow had experience in the current system going back to his teenage years and through to his time at Ohio State under Urban Meyer. In 2018, by contrast, he was under center a lot, playing in a system that didn't fit his skills or experience.

 

 

 

Edited by DAG
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42 minutes ago, bicycle_seat_sniffer said:
On 12/15/2019 at 8:09 AM, Doug B said:

Please let Burrow do an Aaron-Rodgers drop to the Saints.

um he is pretty much the unanimous #1 pick, sorry

:kicksrock:

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LSU QB Joe Burrow leads Pro Football Focus' "Big Time Throws" rankings with 32 of such passes this season.

"Big time throw" is explained as a high-difficulty throw either down the field or into a tight window. Given the subjective nature of what exactly counts for that criteria, it's worth questioning some, but nobody would be surprised to hear Burrow is the leader in this statistic. Burrow (6'4/216) has played with excellent accuracy all year to every single part of the field. The next-closest to Burrow on this list is Texas' Sam Ehlinger with 30 Big Time Throws.

SOURCE: PFF College on Twitter

Dec 19, 2019, 11:55 AM ET

 

 

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On 12/17/2019 at 9:31 PM, DAG said:

Good discussion in here. I thought I'd add some context on the huge jump in Burrow's numbers from last year to this year. 

I would recommend this breakdown from Sports Illustrated, which traces the change in offensive system (and the coaching changes that led to it) back to Les Miles's tenure and firing. Nobody needs that whole history, but some relevant highlights:

- 2016: LSU fires Miles largely due to his stubborn refusal to modernize the offense, which was terribly outmoded and ineffective for much of his tenure (most seasons our passing attack and total offense ranked near the bottom of FBS, as in 110th or lower out of 128 programs)

- 2018 (Burrow's first season): Ed Orgeron promotes Steve Ensminger from TEs coach  to offensive coordinator; Ensminger promises to modernize the offense (spread, RPOs etc.) but he hasn't coordinated in a long time and doesn't have a lot of direct experience with modern college offenses; the offense improves incrementally but by Ensminger's own admission the major overhaul never happens 

- 2019: LSU hires Joe Brady (an offensive assistant with the New Orleans Saints) to be the passing coordinator; Brady works side by side with Ensminger and the result is the modern offense you see now (shotgun, RPOs, 4-wide sets, all the amenities we LSU fans never thought we'd get). 

For people wondering if the system is the reason for Burrow's explosion I'll resolve that for you: it's the system. But maybe not in the negative way we usually mean that. It's hard to explain how ingrained LSU's offensive problems have been for folks who haven't followed the program for the past decade plus. The 2018 offense was a small shift in the right direction, but many of the anachronistic, conservative tendencies of the Miles era remained (as did some key injuries along the offensive line). And Burrow still put up decent numbers. I think any concerns that he's only produced elite numbers for one season are completely legitimate. At the same time, this is the one season he's been in an offense that gave him a real chance at this kind of success. Burrow had experience in the current system going back to his teenage years and through to his time at Ohio State under Urban Meyer. In 2018, by contrast, he was under center a lot, playing in a system that didn't fit his skills or experience.

 

 

 

Great write up.

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Well if everything else falls apart in Cincinnati, at least Joe can hand it off to Joe.

Edited by Leroy Hoard

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On 12/17/2019 at 8:31 PM, DAG said:

Good discussion in here. I thought I'd add some context on the huge jump in Burrow's numbers from last year to this year. 

I would recommend this breakdown from Sports Illustrated, which traces the change in offensive system (and the coaching changes that led to it) back to Les Miles's tenure and firing. Nobody needs that whole history, but some relevant highlights:

- 2016: LSU fires Miles largely due to his stubborn refusal to modernize the offense, which was terribly outmoded and ineffective for much of his tenure (most seasons our passing attack and total offense ranked near the bottom of FBS, as in 110th or lower out of 128 programs)

- 2018 (Burrow's first season): Ed Orgeron promotes Steve Ensminger from TEs coach  to offensive coordinator; Ensminger promises to modernize the offense (spread, RPOs etc.) but he hasn't coordinated in a long time and doesn't have a lot of direct experience with modern college offenses; the offense improves incrementally but by Ensminger's own admission the major overhaul never happens 

- 2019: LSU hires Joe Brady (an offensive assistant with the New Orleans Saints) to be the passing coordinator; Brady works side by side with Ensminger and the result is the modern offense you see now (shotgun, RPOs, 4-wide sets, all the amenities we LSU fans never thought we'd get). 

For people wondering if the system is the reason for Burrow's explosion I'll resolve that for you: it's the system. But maybe not in the negative way we usually mean that. It's hard to explain how ingrained LSU's offensive problems have been for folks who haven't followed the program for the past decade plus. The 2018 offense was a small shift in the right direction, but many of the anachronistic, conservative tendencies of the Miles era remained (as did some key injuries along the offensive line). And Burrow still put up decent numbers. I think any concerns that he's only produced elite numbers for one season are completely legitimate. At the same time, this is the one season he's been in an offense that gave him a real chance at this kind of success. Burrow had experience in the current system going back to his teenage years and through to his time at Ohio State under Urban Meyer. In 2018, by contrast, he was under center a lot, playing in a system that didn't fit his skills or experience.

 

 

 

Great post.

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Cincinnati clinched the first overall pick in this spring's NFL Draft with its overtime loss to Miami.

With the Bengals now officially holding the first overall pick, LSU QB Joe Burrow has been viewed by many as the favorite to go first overall. The Heisman Trophy winner cleaned up on the postseason awards circuit, and he's helped lead LSU to a 13-0 record and the top seed in the College Football Playoff. Burrow's completed nearly 78 percent of his passes this season, throwing for 4,715 yards and 48 touchdowns with just six interceptions. Cincinnati trailed Miami by 23 with just under seven minutes remaining in regulation, but the Bengals were able to come back and force overtime before losing.

Dec 22, 2019, 5:16 PM ET

 

 

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Really wish Cincy didn’t clinch the 1.1. I think Burrow is mentally tough enough to not get ruined by a bad o line but this seems like a brutal situation for the short term. I know things change fast in the NFL, but the Bengals ownership being awful seems pretty fixed. I’m hoping they bring back Dalton for a year and work on the line. 

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The line may need some work but at least the team has some decent runners and receivers. I think #1 overall QB have fallen into worse spots.

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49 minutes ago, Warhogs said:

The line may need some work but at least the team has some decent runners and receivers. I think #1 overall QB have fallen into worse spots.

Agreed. After drafting Burrow ... the Bengals need to invest most of the rest of their draft capital through 2022 on their interior lines.

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3 hours ago, DAG said:

Really wish Cincy didn’t clinch the 1.1. I think Burrow is mentally tough enough to not get ruined by a bad o line but this seems like a brutal situation for the short term. I know things change fast in the NFL, but the Bengals ownership being awful seems pretty fixed. I’m hoping they bring back Dalton for a year and work on the line. 

 

Someone with pocket instincts and the ability to step up while keeping eyes downfield could work wonders with these weapons. Obviously a high draft pick and FA pick up on the OL would be ideal, but Dalton is not the paragon of pocket awareness and anticipation. 

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7 hours ago, ConnSKINS26 said:

 

Someone with pocket instincts and the ability to step up while keeping eyes downfield could work wonders with these weapons. Obviously a high draft pick and FA pick up on the OL would be ideal, but Dalton is not the paragon of pocket awareness and anticipation. 

I agree with that. They have some nice skill position players. And Burrow is very composed under pressure. I think his mental toughness will help. Just hoping they improve the line early enough to give him a chance at success. 

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This is me being more eye test than anything and I’m not an eye test guy normally- BUT- Joe Burrows is the best QB prospect for me since Luck. Just incredible at almost every aspect. 

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2 minutes ago, Anarchy99 said:

400/7 in a half isn’t bad. 

Yeah... thankfully I didn't start him in fantasy though. He could be pulled early after all.

 

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Just now, Koya said:

Yeah... thankfully I didn't start him in fantasy though. He could be pulled early after all.

 

I texted our son that goes to Ohio State if only OSU could find a QB to throw for 400 and 7 in a half. 

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