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*** OFFICIAL *** COVID-19 CoronaVirus Thread

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Good news from California

Doctors see flatter curve after 2 weeks of social isolation

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State leaders and doctors are cautiously optimistic that the Bay Area's early moves to lock down residents two weeks ago have prevented surges of coronavirus patients from overwhelming the region's health care capacity thus far.

After 14 days — the outermost period at which symptoms are believed to emerge post-infection — doctors at area hospitals are now reporting fewer cases than they expected to see at this point, and officials credit the lockdown with stemming the tide of patients they feared would flood into emergency rooms.

Health officials across the nation are eyeing the Bay Area as a bellwether to determine the effects of social distancing, since the region's policies were replicated in various states and cities in subsequent days.

 

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26 minutes ago, shader said:

I think depression is going to be a real problem over the next few weeks.  Quarantine was fun for a week or two, especially for introverts.  But we are soon going to move into a phase where people start to lose it. 

Please get outside, walk, (stay away from people) and do everything you can to keep your sanity.  We have an annoying cool snap that ends today where I live but I plan on spending as much of the springtime outside in my back yard as I possibly can.

Yeah...I can see that for some.  Been working in regular time for my kids outside and making sure my wife gets out for a walk or to take our son for "driving lessons" in a local school parking lot.  We get out and walk some...I have been running, walking, or biking just about every day since this all started.  For multiple reasons.  An hour out of the house on my own...its my time.  Clears my head to reset and everything.  Used to enjoy this when I was into running more and got away from it for a while (and that is when anxiety issues and others were setting in as well...this has definitely helped again).  Also, being in the more higher risk categories with hereditary heart issues and asthma...Im making sure if I do catch this thing, Im in as good of shape as I can be to help my body fight it.

 

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From Dr. Fauci's editorial in the New England Journal of Medicine (3/26/20)

Covid-19 — Navigating the Uncharted

Quote

If one assumes that the number of asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic cases is several times as high as the number of reported cases, the case fatality rate may be considerably less than 1%. This suggests that the overall clinical consequences of Covid-19 may ultimately be more akin to those of a severe seasonal influenza (which has a case fatality rate of approximately 0.1%) or a pandemic influenza (similar to those in 1957 and 1968) rather than a disease similar to SARS or MERS, which have had case fatality rates of 9 to 10% and 36%, respectively.

 

See also: Estimates of the severity of coronavirus disease 2019: a model-based analysis

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Probably a silly question but how does the virus get in through your eyes?

I understand the nose and mouth as a direct access to your lungs.

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My wife's grandfather had Parkinsons for about a decade before he passed away a few years ago.  He used to have essentially 24-hour home-care nurses who would rotate shifts.  One of the nurses was a man who's probably in his 60s now.  We just found out that's he's hospitalized with the virus, and his wife just died from it in the last 24 hours.  Awful.

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Just now, jamny said:

Probably a silly question but how does the virus get in through your eyes?

I understand the nose and mouth as a direct access to your lungs.

Through the tear ducts, which drain into the nasal cavity.

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53 minutes ago, shader said:

I think depression is going to be a real problem over the next few weeks.  Quarantine was fun for a week or two, especially for introverts.  But we are soon going to move into a phase where people start to lose it. 

Please get outside, walk, (stay away from people) and do everything you can to keep your sanity.  We have an annoying cool snap that ends today where I live but I plan on spending as much of the springtime outside in my back yard as I possibly can.

Came across this article recently that I think can help a lot of people experiencing this.

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4 minutes ago, jamny said:

Probably a silly question but how does the virus get in through your eyes?

I understand the nose and mouth as a direct access to your lungs.

Connected via the sinus passages...

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1 hour ago, shader said:

I'm glad to see them taking this seriously. 6-8 weeks of excellent social distancing should pretty much take care of this first wave.  Hopefully in the next 2-3 months someone can work out rapid testing and a team of contact tracing folks for wave 2.  

I wonder how/if that will work in practice though. It seems like something the feds will leave to the states or assume the states will do it. Then we still have 50 piecemeal approaches with varying levels of implementation that greatly hinders the success of a necessary top down universal approach.

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10 minutes ago, Steve Tasker said:

My wife's grandfather had Parkinsons for about a decade before he passed away a few years ago.  He used to have essentially 24-hour home-care nurses who would rotate shifts.  One of the nurses was a man who's probably in his 60s now.  We just found out that's he's hospitalized with the virus, and his wife just died from it in the last 24 hours.  Awful.

I'm very sorry to hear this, Pedro.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, CurlyNight said:

Pence on CNN. Just said we all need to practice what we're doing and thinks memorial day weekend/June we'll see a good decline. I take it as stay at home will go to min June. 

Easter is coming up... are people going to make changes?

Edited by bradyfan

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Is this the end of the anti-vaxxers?

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6 minutes ago, Ilov80s said:

Is this the end of the anti-vaxxers?

One way or another so to speak.

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SIAP....Florida finally under state-wide stay at home order.

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Posted (edited)
10 minutes ago, Ilov80s said:

Is this the end of the anti-vaxxers?

We thought the end of the anti-vaxxers were smallpox, measles, and mumps.

There's very little you can do with the religiosity of the uncaring. I can guarantee you that even when there's a vaccine, there will be people that refuse the vaccine. They can't be forced to be inoculated by the State.

https://www.npr.org/2011/04/05/135121451/how-the-pox-epidemic-changed-vaccination-rules

And there are reasons for that, as often the good intentions of public health officials see the thrust of their campaigns foisted upon the poor and powerless, mostly immigrant and minority populations.

Edited by rockaction
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Posted (edited)

Anyone found a good comfortable mask that works well and doesn't make you hot and is breathable? Link?

For men

Edited by CurlyNight

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2 hours ago, Anarchy99 said:

I may be i the minority, but IMO that may have been propaganda and a photo op to illustrate how serious the situation was and how much the government was doing to stem the tide of the virus. Who knows if they did that whole scale and who knows if there was anything but water in those trucks. Either way, the perception was that they were disinfecting at an industrial and institutional level, which was the message they wanted to promote. 

TheAtlantic: Large-Scale Disinfection Efforts Against Coronavirus 

UPI: Mass animal die-off in China due to disinfectants, authorities say 😢

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10 minutes ago, Ilov80s said:

Is this the end of the anti-vaxxers?

One way or the other.

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10 minutes ago, Ilov80s said:

Is this the end of the anti-vaxxers?

Doubtful. But hopefully it's the end of them getting serious air time.

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6 minutes ago, tangfoot said:

I'm very sorry to hear this, Pedro.

I only met the guy a handful of times, but obviously it's a pretty sad situation.  I have a feeling we're about to get hit pretty hard in Buffalo, this is the week where #### starts to get real.

The Buffalo News posted this article yesterday, basically a long-from interview article with an anesthesiologist.  Apparently we now have a dedicated Covid floor for patients at the only Level 1 trauma center in the region.  As of last week, there were 0 patients, now there are 33 and counting.  The comments from the doctor, while not new from what plenty of doctors are saying, are pretty sobering:

Quote

Friday was his first shift on ECMC’s “Covid floor,” which has existed for only about a week on the hospital's 12th floor.

“I was not prepared for what I saw,” said Jensen, who sat down at home – shaken – and sent a text to a close friend that explained with raw emotion why he felt so stunned.

The friend transformed it into a Facebook post without using the doctor's name, a text that Jensen said has now been seen or shared thousands of times.

“These were the sickest patients I have ever cared for in 25 years of doing this medicine thing,” wrote Jensen, 49, a medical school graduate from the University at Buffalo who has spent his entire life in Western New York. “The whole floor was full of sick people and absolutely shell-shocked staff.”

On duty, he wore a surgical gown above his clothes, along with latex gloves and an N95 respirator — the kind that is increasingly precious in a state closing in on 60,000 confirmed cases of Covid-19, most in metropolitan New York City. Walking along that floor, surrounded by nurses, physicians and support staff for whom he has tremendous love and respect, Jensen felt an emotion in the air he has never sensed so keenly before.

Fear.

There is a shared awareness among his colleagues, he said, “that these people are sick from something that can make us all sick,” and the alarm he picked up from others on the staff was about something far beyond themselves.

It involves anxiety about what could happen to patients at the hospital if too many nurses and doctors were to become sick, as well as the knowledge of exactly what staff members might potentially carry home to those they love.

“You can read about this, you can see it on TV, but you’ve got to feel it to understand it,” Jensen said.

 

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A lot of countries with fewer cases are working to ensure they have enough food.  Unfortunately hoarding, export bans, and anything that disrupts the supply chains will make the situation worse.

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Posted (edited)
7 minutes ago, Steve Tasker said:

I only met the guy a handful of times, but obviously it's a pretty sad situation.  I have a feeling we're about to get hit pretty hard in Buffalo, this is the week where #### starts to get real.

The Buffalo News posted this article yesterday, basically a long-from interview article with an anesthesiologist.  Apparently we now have a dedicated Covid floor for patients at the only Level 1 trauma center in the region.  As of last week, there were 0 patients, now there are 33 and counting.  The comments from the doctor, while not new from what plenty of doctors are saying, are pretty sobering:

 

I think some countries divid CV-workers by floors/sections to avoid widespread infection in the same hospital.  Of course, this will help only if they have enough PPEs.

Edited by bradyfan

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5 hours ago, bradyfan said:

oh no 😢

Coronavirus financial losses prompt Boston Medical Center to furlough 700 employees, 10% of hospital’s workforce Link
Boston: Beth Israel CEO, two dozen execs take pay cuts Link

Alteon Health, a staffing company backed by private-equity firm Frazier Healthcare Partners, will cut salaries, time off and retirement benefits for providers, citing lost revenue. Several hospital operators announced similar cuts. Link

Intermountain will cut pay for doctors and nurse practitioners amid coronavirus pandemic Link

Already Taxed Health Care Workers Not ‘Immune’ From Layoffs And Less Pay Link

This is ridiculous. Take on more debt, anything but hit the providers right now. 😡

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6 minutes ago, bradyfan said:

In this article, pics #5 & more like #14 are similar to what I was talking about earlier, atomizing the solution then blasting it out with a high cfm fan. Those pictures of the folks taking a shot to the face with whatever they were using is kinda scary. There is a reason why the guys spraying the stuff are decked out in full gear, these solutions don't tend to interact well with humans.

Someone mentioned above, there are going to be longer term effects from this we will see down the road. They are already seeing a spike in animal deaths from this from the other article @bradyfan posted. 

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10 minutes ago, Statorama said:

From Dr. Fauci's editorial in the New England Journal of Medicine (3/26/20)

Covid-19 — Navigating the Uncharted

 

See also: Estimates of the severity of coronavirus disease 2019: a model-based analysis

Not convinced. I really think there is some wishful thinking involved here. When you have both Vo Italy and the Diamond Princess performing comprehensive testing on 6700 people (this is about as controlled an environment you are going to get for now), for the death rate to be anywhere near .1%, literally everyone on that ship and town would need to be positive for the virus. You would then need to conjure up 4000 more people from thin air and have them be positive as well. Considering, only about 800 tested positive out of the 6700 (and we are missing the 4000 imaginary people). That is a boatload of positive people that we are missing. The second article bases its research on China's numbers which we know are bogus.

This underestimation happened with SARS too. I think people just don't want to believe the facts in front of them (or want to put the most optimistic view forward). For any of these rates significantly below 1% we have to be missing absolute boatloads of positive people. We're talking millions and millions. Just in the United States, if no one else died, we are missing 216,000 people to get to 1%. To get to .1% we are missing about 3.9 million positive people. That is with a death rate of death/total positive cases and all active cases not dying. If we just look at resolved cases (assuming the unresolved cases are of similar severity and outcome to the resolved ones) we are missing 6.6 million positive people to get to 1% and 68 million positive cases to get to .1%.

Just think, in the press conference yesterday, the Administration was flooring 100000 deaths currently. For that to be .1% mortality rate we'd need about 100 million Americans positive. For their ceiling of 240000 we would need 240 million Americans positive.

 

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welp, my wife has come down with a cough and has been tired lately.  Obviously, your mind jumps to the worst, but in reality, it's probably allergy season (pollen has been especially bad) coupled with not sleeping well due to anxiety.  No fever and the cough isn't persistent so I don't think she has the Rona.  Still, we are starting to make preparations to quarantine her in the basement for a couple of weeks.  Our basement is fully furninshed, two guest bedrooms, it's own bathroom with shower, mini-fridge, microwave, large screen TV and sofa - she'll be fine here.  also, it means that if we suspect she may be positive, we aren't leaving the house except for walks in the 'hood. 

How long do we wait for this to progress (or not) before one of us can go for groceries or the like?

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Just now, rcam said:

Not convinced. I really think there is some wishful thinking involved here. When you have both Vo Italy and the Diamond Princess performing comprehensive testing on 6700 people (this is about as controlled an environment you are going to get for now), for the death rate to be anywhere near .1%, literally everyone on that ship and town would need to be positive for the virus. You would then need to conjure up 4000 more people from thin air and have them be positive as well. Considering, only about 800 tested positive out of the 6700 (and we are missing the 4000 imaginary people). That is a boatload of positive people that we are missing. The second article bases its research on China's numbers which we know are bogus.

This underestimation happened with SARS too. I think people just don't want to believe the facts in front of them (or want to put the most optimistic view forward). For any of these rates significantly below 1% we have to be missing absolute boatloads of positive people. We're talking millions and millions. Just in the United States, if no one else died, we are missing 216,000 people to get to 1%. To get to .1% we are missing about 3.9 million positive people. That is with a death rate of death/total positive cases and all active cases not dying. If we just look at resolved cases (assuming the unresolved cases are of similar severity and outcome to the resolved ones) we are missing 6.6 million positive people to get to 1% and 68 million positive cases to get to .1%.

Just think, in the press conference yesterday, the Administration was flooring 100000 deaths currently. For that to be .1% mortality rate we'd need about 100 million Americans positive. For their ceiling of 240000 we would need 240 million Americans positive.

 

We've done the death rate thing so many times.  First of all, I think it's important to know why someone wants to discuss the death rate.  Why is a particular death rate "important"?  As an example, 1%?  Who decided that 1% was an ok number and anything below that is good, and above that is bad?  I have answers for that, but can't express them in this forum.

 

Models have their place, but they are just models.  Cuomo had a great line on models today.  He said that the frustrating thing about models is that they always change, and that's because we're always feeding new info into them.

As an example, the death rate numbers are HEAVILY dependent on Chinese data.  South Korea and China are the only two countries that have seen the back side of this virus (on a large scale).  If it turned out that China was lying and we have to toss out their numbers, who is the next hard-hit country to analyze?  Italy? I sure hope not, because their death rate looks atrocious at the moment.

I'm going to steal Cuomo's line on facts.  Facts are facts.  

The facts are that the non-China death rate is currently 4.9%.  In Italy it's almost 12%.  Yes, we know that there are a large number of cases that are likely not being counted.  But on the other hand, of all active cases, there are still a lot of people who unfortunately haven't died yet.  Death rates will always rise at the end of an outbreak. (see South Korea who had always been way below 1%, and as they've virtually eliminated new cases, they've seen their death rate rise to 2%)

 

In the end, the final death rate will end up being lower than it is.  By how much, who really knows or cares?  But using a "fantasy" death rate to try and prove why this virus is no big deal is an argument that I won't entertain any longer.

 

One last thing on Vo.  Yeah they did have a bunch of asymptomatic cases (at the time the study was done, we still don't know how many of those eventually became symptomatic), but even so they had 1 death among 89 people, so a CFR higher than 1%.

 

 

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30 minutes ago, gump said:

SIAP....Florida finally under state-wide stay at home order.

And my buddy's wife in JAX- a nurse-  was furloughed. 30 years of experience, but she was serving as an admissions nurse. Here we are sending out an APB for retired nurses, ex-nurses and soon to be nurses... but we're furloughing in position nurses with experience. :wall: 

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30 minutes ago, NorvilleBarnes said:

Doubtful. But hopefully it's the end of them getting serious air time.

They just jump to the Bill Gates conspiracy bandwagon. If they haven't already. My SIL is in BOTH camps.

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Co-workers wife has Alzheimers. He's retired military and they live a couple miles away from NAS JAX. Her main hobby was bingo games on base. Several times a week she'd play. Base has shut down bingo for 2 to 3 weeks now. He says that she has really gone downhill in the meantime and sleeping up to 16 hours a day.

He says that he's tried to keep her occupied with other games or walks but she just isn't interested in them.

I feel so badly for him after seeing my FIL go through Parkinson's. 

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39 minutes ago, rockaction said:

We thought the end of the anti-vaxxers were smallpox, measles, and mumps.

There's very little you can do with the religiosity of the uncaring. I can guarantee you that even when there's a vaccine, there will be people that refuse the vaccine. They can't be forced to be inoculated by the State.

https://www.npr.org/2011/04/05/135121451/how-the-pox-epidemic-changed-vaccination-rules

And there are reasons for that, as often the good intentions of public health officials see the thrust of their campaigns foisted upon the poor and powerless, mostly immigrant and minority populations.

Odd though, I think it's comfortably middle class American born women who I mostly see advocating against vaccines. 

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3 minutes ago, JaxBill said:

Co-workers wife has Alzheimers. He's retired military and they live a couple miles away from NAS JAX. Her main hobby was bingo games on base. Several times a week she'd play. Base has shut down bingo for 2 to 3 weeks now. He says that she has really gone downhill in the meantime and sleeping up to 16 hours a day.

He says that he's tried to keep her occupied with other games or walks but she just isn't interested in them.

I feel so badly for him after seeing my FIL go through Parkinson's. 

I wonder if there any YouTube video bingo "games" that he could play for her to get her fix?

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, CurlyNight said:

Pence on CNN. Just said we all need to practice what we're doing and thinks memorial day weekend/June we'll see a good decline. I take it as stay at home will go to min June. 

The 4th of July may be the breaking point for many that will insist on getting out (and inevitably being among crowds).  Even if it doesn't make sense then...we'll see.

2 hours ago, shader said:

I think depression is going to be a real problem over the next few weeks.  Quarantine was fun for a week or two, especially for introverts.  But we are soon going to move into a phase where people start to lose it. 

Please get outside, walk, (stay away from people) and do everything you can to keep your sanity.  We have an annoying cool snap that ends today where I live but I plan on spending as much of the springtime outside in my back yard as I possibly can.

Tend to agree.  As pleasant as nice weather may be right now, I was happy it (basically) rained from Friday night through Sunday afternoon here.  I'm now rooting for rainy weekends for the first time in my life.  Keep as many people doing the right things as possible.

Edited by trader jake

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27 minutes ago, rcam said:

Not convinced.

So the choice is between believing what you post on a message board vs. what Dr. Fauci documents in the New England Journal of Medicine?

I'll take my chances with Dr. Fauci.

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2 minutes ago, Ilov80s said:

Odd though, I think it's comfortably middle class American born women who I mostly see advocating against vaccines. 

Yes, the dynamic has indeed changed. The question of forced inoculation, though, is a bridge we'll have to address when we come to it. For now, let's just pray and hope and think rationally (or whatever people choose to do when they long) for a vaccine.

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4 minutes ago, tangfoot said:
9 minutes ago, JaxBill said:

Co-workers wife has Alzheimers. He's retired military and they live a couple miles away from NAS JAX. Her main hobby was bingo games on base. Several times a week she'd play. Base has shut down bingo for 2 to 3 weeks now. He says that she has really gone downhill in the meantime and sleeping up to 16 hours a day.

He says that he's tried to keep her occupied with other games or walks but she just isn't interested in them.

I feel so badly for him after seeing my FIL go through Parkinson's. 

I wonder if there any YouTube video bingo "games" that he could play for her to get her fix?

Yeah... Gotta be a way to get her engaged online somehow

https://www.google.com/search?q=online+bingo+game&rlz=1C1GCEU_enUS821US822&oq=online+bingo&aqs=chrome.1.69i57j0l7.4994j0j1&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

Might even be a way to set up games with her friends from the base?

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13 minutes ago, glock said:

And my buddy's wife in JAX- a nurse-  was furloughed. 30 years of experience, but she was serving as an admissions nurse. Here we are sending out an APB for retired nurses, ex-nurses and soon to be nurses... but we're furloughing in position nurses with experience. :wall: 

IL sent out an "all hands on deck" emergency state wide text seeking help from anyone with medical experience.

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All of Pa under Stay at Home as of 8 pm

Wont change a thing imo. Almost every business is somehow “life sustaining”...

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5 minutes ago, tangfoot said:

I wonder if there any YouTube video bingo "games" that he could play for her to get her fix?

I think it's more that Bingo was her thing to get her out of the house. Plus. from what he has told me about it, she was pretty serious about it and would bring home $$$.

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How are car washes deemed essential in Massachusetts :loco:

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31 minutes ago, moleculo said:

How long do we wait for this to progress (or not) before one of us can go for groceries or the like?

IMHO, if you're able to wear a mask when going out, you should be good to go. The worry is much, much more about you spreading it to others than you catching it from runs to the grocery.

Do you live in an area where it's kind of easy to grocery shop at slow times? Or is grocery shopping always kind of a crowded situation in your area these days?

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10 minutes ago, glock said:

And my buddy's wife in JAX- a nurse-  was furloughed. 30 years of experience, but she was serving as an admissions nurse. Here we are sending out an APB for retired nurses, ex-nurses and soon to be nurses... but we're furloughing in position nurses with experience. :wall: 

Some nurses in Florida are quitting and going to NJ and NY to double and  triple their salary as an ICU nurse to almost  $100 per hour. Travel nurse pay is spiking nationwide. 

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18 minutes ago, shader said:

We've done the death rate thing so many times.  First of all, I think it's important to know why someone wants to discuss the death rate.  Why is a particular death rate "important"?  As an example, 1%?  Who decided that 1% was an ok number and anything below that is good, and above that is bad?  I have answers for that, but can't express them in this forum.

That exact Fauci quote from that exact same article, we dispatched of last week. Might have even been Statorama that quoted it last week, not sure.

I spent about 20 minutes looking for my post in response, but could not locate with various searches and even with going through my own posts one-by-one over the last week. Point was: Fauci said "If I make certain assumptions, then outcomes are mathematically different". Well, no ish. Means nothing.

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2 minutes ago, Doug B said:

IMHO, if you're able to wear a mask when going out, you should be good to go. The worry is much, much more about you spreading it to others than you catching it from runs to the grocery.

Do you live in an area where it's kind of easy to grocery shop at slow times? Or is grocery shopping always kind of a crowded situation in your area these days?

suburbia.  It's always at a medium level.  I mean, the stores are never vacant but it's not too hard to steer clear of everyone else.

Spreading to everyone else is my major concern.  If we have even the slightest suspicion that the has it, we shouldn't be going anywhere.

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22 minutes ago, shader said:

We've done the death rate thing so many times.  First of all, I think it's important to know why someone wants to discuss the death rate.  Why is a particular death rate "important"?  As an example, 1%?  Who decided that 1% was an ok number and anything below that is good, and above that is bad?  I have answers for that, but can't express them in this forum.

As someone who took this thread seriously from the beginning but didn't contribute because I lacked the expertise, I'm struck by the possibility that people aren't playing politics when they talk about the death rate but instead want to juggle the very difficult choices that must be made per the death rate against quarantine until some undetermined date. Our systems may not be able to handle a quarantine that long, and it might be, for some people, better to brace for the worst and the truth than not to know it at all. The more data, the more certainty, the more certainty, the more we can make our very difficult decisions moving forward. It is nice to say that all life is valued, and valued the same, but it's not. Our system puts monetary values on lives, through our wrongful death suits to our insurance premiums and policies. It's not about the re-election and politics necessarily, if that's where you're going with that sentiment.

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10 minutes ago, Statorama said:

So the choice is between believing what you post on a message board vs. what Dr. Fauci documents in the New England Journal of Medicine?

I'll take my chances with Dr. Fauci.

Dr. Fauci didn't say anything definitive at all in the quote you pulled. "If X, then Y". But he didn't say "X is true" ... he said "assume X". He spoke hypothetically.

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5 minutes ago, Doug B said:

Dr. Fauci didn't say anything definitive at all in the quote you pulled. "If X, then Y". But he didn't say "X is true" ... he said "assume X". He spoke hypothetically.

Aren’t there two components to death rate...what the disease will claim, but also what the increase will be based on the healthcare systems inability to provide adequate care?  On March 24, the N.Y. death rate was .8%.  Based on today’s numbers, it’s 2.3%...I have to believe the stretched nature of NY healthcare system has some effect here.

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8 minutes ago, Doug B said:

Dr. Fauci didn't say anything definitive at all in the quote you pulled. "If X, then Y". But he didn't say "X is true" ... he said "assume X". He spoke hypothetically.

Aren't they all speaking hypothetically??? Nobody knows yet. 

 

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Just now, TheDirtyWord said:

Aren’t there two components to death rate...what the disease will claim, but also what the increase will be based on the healthcare systems inability to provide adequate care

In a sense .. the part in red doesn't exist independently as a trait of this illness (or any other). IOW, what "the disease will claim" is always dependent on other 'external' considerations -- the item in blue being an example of one.

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WWYD: My daughter, 19, is a part time hourly employee for the state. She lives with her sister but also stays at her boyfriends house (he is 21, lives with mom, dad, aunt). Daughters boss told them a coworkers son will be flying from Connecticut to stay with his mom on Friday. They will not require the mom to stay home while he isolates. The office shares doors, scanners, restrooms, etc. The boss can’t lay off the part timers but said they can stay home and try to file for the two week sick leave they are allotting them. 
What should I advise her? I told her to avoid the lady, wash hands etc. Or just stay home? Quit? She’s already hosed in that she doesn’t get the stimulus relief because we claimed her on our 2019 taxes. We don’t get the $500 for her because she was over 17. 

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