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*** OFFICIAL *** COVID-19 CoronaVirus Thread

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6 minutes ago, Doug B said:

There should be no debate -- both are already well-known to spread COVID-19 and have been for several months.

Exhaled aerosols collect in indoor spaces without sufficient space to disperse aerosols, without sufficient HVAC to help disperse aerosols, and with little to no air exchange with the outdoors (typically via HVAC).

Droplets are more a concern when around people you can tell are sick (obvious and frequent coughing, for example). Droplets can also come into play with shouting, singing, and (probably) eating in close proximity to others without sufficient ventilation.

They might be well known to me and you and others in here, but I don't think you realize how much of a debate this has been in the medical and scientific community. 

 

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8 minutes ago, parasaurolophus said:

They might be well known to me and you and others in here, but I don't think you realize how much of a debate this has been in the medical and scientific community. 

A real scientific debate, or a political debate about a scientific matter?

There are actually scientists studying this stuff who think exhaled aerosols are no danger whatsoever regarding COVID-19 transmission? Or else aren't much of a danger? If that's known to be true, then matuski has been right about masks all along.

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Good bud just tested positive. 

We spent the entire day together exactly 16 days ago in my home and in his car. 

I should be fine? 

Luckily enough, we had dinner plans (double date at that) this past weekend but I backed out. 

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20 minutes ago, AndrewClark said:

Good bud just tested positive. 

We spent the entire day together exactly 16 days ago in my home and in his car. 

I should be fine? 

You could have it asymptomatically. In your shoes, unless local testing is difficult and slow (say, results come back in 2 weeks), I would get tested.

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4 minutes ago, Doug B said:

You could have it asymptomatically. In your shoes, unless local testing is difficult and slow (say, results come back in 2 weeks), I would get tested.

OK will do. I'd be considered an at risk person so just trying to be careful. 

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1 hour ago, dgreen said:

I’m not following you here. My assumption is that it was up there because it did receive the necessary signatures through the agency’s approved process. Are you suggesting it was accidentally released before those things happened so it was removed and they will put it back up once the process is complete?

With approved changes, yes, that is my expectation.

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@Cold Dead Hands , @parasaurolophus and all ... check out this ridiculousness (link to thread in Political Forum). Seems like a lot more afoot than "getting changes approved."
 

Quote

 

NIH official to 'retire' after being ID'd as author of anti-Fauci posts on right-wing blog (CNN, 9/21/2020)

A public affairs official at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases will "retire" after a news report identified him as the anonymous author of blog posts on a conservative website that disparaged Dr. Anthony Fauci and mocked the use of masks, a spokesperson for the health agency said Monday.

The Daily Beast reported Monday that William Crews, who worked in NIAID's communications branch, is a managing editor working under a pseudonym for the right-wing opinion website RedState who had mocked Fauci as a "mask Nazi" and described wearing face coverings as "a political statement."

"NIAID first learned of this matter this morning, and Mr. Crews has informed us of his intention to retire," a NIAID spokesperson told CNN. "We have no further comments on this as it is a personnel matter."

The NIAID spokesperson then referred CNN to policies at NIAID's parent agency, the National Institutes of Health, and federal ethics regulations about using government time and equipment for unauthorized purposes.

An NIH official familiar with the matter told CNN that the agency confirmed The Daily Beast's report that Crews was the person writing for RedState.

Phone calls and emails to Crews were not returned. CNN also sent an email to the RedState account identified by The Daily Beast as belonging to Crews, but did not receive an immediate response.

Jonathan Garthwaite, the vice president of RedState's parent company, Townhall Media, also did not respond to an email seeking comment.

The Daily Beast's Lachlan Markay, who broke the story for the news website, said he was able to identify Crews as the RedState editor through public records, social media postings and, internal NIH records.

"It illustrates the extent to which the response to the pandemic has become deeply politicized, even within the agencies at the front lines of fighting it," Markay wrote. "Crews isn't just a civil servant anonymously disagreeing with his bosses online; he's actively undermining their work and even suggesting retribution against them."

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Doug B said:

A real scientific debate, or a political debate about a scientific matter?

There are actually scientists studying this stuff who think exhaled aerosols are no danger whatsoever regarding COVID-19 transmission? Or else aren't much of a danger? If that's known to be true, then matuski has been right about masks all along.

No danger whatsoever is a unicorn.

They say things more along the lines of not proven, only circumstantial evidence, possible, minimal spread, etc. 

 

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20 hours ago, Jayrod said:

My MILs sister (aunt-in-law?) has gone full blown cray-cray.

She lost her husband a year ago to cancer, doesn't have a job (and has more than enough $) and lives in Oregon.  She has lost her mind over COVID-19 and is self quarantining for "2 years".  On the rare occasions she has had to go out, she wears gloves, a mask and keeps a 13 ft minimum distance from all people.

This week her father died.  The only reason she even came to Missouri was because she had left Oregon due to the wildfires and had driven to Utah already.  She was in town at a hotel, but refused to come to the funeral.  She came to the burial and stood 25 feet from everyone.  Her sister had to do everything for the arrangements, but write the obit.  She wouldn't even visit with the dozens of relatives that came from hundreds of miles away and refused to help clear out the retirement home or help with setup and breakdown for the services.

Most of the family was super pissed with how selfish she has been.

Seems like she was being cautious

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On 9/20/2020 at 6:18 AM, parasaurolophus said:

Vitamin d has been talked about a lot in here. 

If you are deficient in Vitamin-D, that does have an impact on your susceptibility to infection,” Fauci, head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said in an interview posted on Instagram last week. “So I would not mind recommending—and I do it myself—taking vitamin-D supplements.”

 

Key part bolded. Many people (~40% in the US) are deficient, and the likelihood increases during dark winter months - it's one of the reasons for seasonality of upper respiratory infections.

The utility of supraphysiologic vitamin D supplementation to prevent or treat covid is controversial at best.

If you're gonna take it, make sure it's D3, 1-2,000 IU daily. Don't go crazy with 10K+ units, unless truly deficient and advised by a physician.

 

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4 minutes ago, shader said:

Seems like she was being cautious

Yes, she did a good job of taking the 99.9% level of precaution almost everyone else was taking and went to the 99.9999999% level at the expense of the relationship with her only sibling, the respect of the extended family and celebrating the life of her father.

But hey, at least she probably didn't get the virus.  Then again I'd be shocked if anyone from the funeral got it.  Masks were worn, distances were maintained and precautions were taken.

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3 hours ago, Doug B said:

A real scientific debate, or a political debate about a scientific matter?

There are actually scientists studying this stuff who think exhaled aerosols are no danger whatsoever regarding COVID-19 transmission? Or else aren't much of a danger? If that's known to be true, then matuski has been right about masks all along.

It's thought to be predominately droplet spread, with a component of aerosolization. And a smattering of fomite transmission, plus maybe fecal-oral, too.

The issue is defining the primary mode of transmission in most exposures, as airborne and droplet transmission exist on a continuum. Aerosol-generating procedures like intubation are a no brainer, and we err on the side of caution in healthcare settings, routinely wearing N95 masks if PPE is available. But for typical risk individuals who aren't partaking in high risk activities, it's hard to give advice that will satisfy everyone. There probably is some aerosolization with everyday encounters, but it doesn't appear to be enough (outside of super spreader events...still poorly understood) to practice universal aerosol precautions. Close contact with infected individual(s) for extended time periods is thought to occur in the lion's share of transmissions - less than 6 feet for greater than 15 minutes are the somewhat arbitrary cut-offs. 

Imo, they should stop focusing on all the transmission terminology, and keep it simple with guidelines for distancing, face covering, cough and hand hygiene. Secondary considerations include adequate ventilation and duration of exposure, but all this stuff has grey areas. 

Unfortunately, it's too late to extricate politics from the equation, but clearly there is a lot of non-scientific noise which interferes with a consistent message.

And matuski has made a few good points, but his overall message has been terrible.

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4 hours ago, AndrewClark said:

Good bud just tested positive. 

We spent the entire day together exactly 16 days ago in my home and in his car. 

I should be fine? 

Luckily enough, we had dinner plans (double date at that) this past weekend but I backed out. 

In general, no symptoms and 2+ week after exposure = no need to be tested. This assumes you haven't been exposed to anybody else who's infected in the interim.

You mentioned increased risk though - if you are severely immunocompromised (AIDS, transplant recipient, on high dose immune-suppressing meds or chemo) or live with someone who falls in those groups, I'd talk to your doctor about the need for testing.

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14 hours ago, Terminalxylem said:

And matuski has made a few good points, but his overall message has been terrible.

Agreed, but I thought his message was off more because aerosol transmission was locked in as THE #1, #2, and #3 means of transmission. With direct droplet transmission a distant fourth, and with fomites barely mattering. And it seemed also that matuski was invoking medical-level guidance for non-medical situations.

However, if quick exposures to aerosols aren't really a big deal - and if that can be carved in stone with as few hedges as scientifically possible -- then masks for the general public can go away tomorrow. Masks help defeat aerosol transmission. Distancing helps defeat droplets (i.e. close exposure to some else's coughs/sneezes/spittle).

To be fair, masks obviously clamp down on droplet transmissions, too. But if I can start going to restaurants again because I don't have to worry whether any patrons breathing over at the next table are asymptomatic carriers ... that's a big change in personal COVID-19 mitigation strategy.

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I mean ... in a naive pre-COVID population, how often are we non-medical really breathing in or ingesting other people's droplets anyway? Big droplets, I mean -- the ones that are said to fall to the ground within a few feet. I guess an uncovered sneeze in an elevator or something. But do we really hang out in other people's "cough zones" all that much?

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41 minutes ago, Doug B said:

However, if quick exposures to aerosols aren't really a big deal - and if that can be carved in stone with as few hedges as scientifically possible -- then masks for the general public can go away tomorrow. Masks help defeat aerosol transmission. Distancing helps defeat droplets (i.e. close exposure to some else's coughs/sneezes/spittle).

It is hard to seperate the benefits of general masking for something like individual shoppers vs employees as an example even in a world where we can say conclusively quick aerosol is no big deal. 

 

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If there is any way we could start a social media rumor that sandboxes at daycare facilities are covid superspreaders I would be very grateful. 

#mycarisabeach

Edited by parasaurolophus
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1 hour ago, Doug B said:

I mean ... in a naive pre-COVID population, how often are we non-medical really breathing in or ingesting other people's droplets anyway? Big droplets, I mean -- the ones that are said to fall to the ground within a few feet. I guess an uncovered sneeze in an elevator or something. But do we really hang out in other people's "cough zones" all that much?

Anytime I go to a bar in Wisconsin I feel people's spit shrapnel hitting my face.  It's super annoying.  But in a loud atmosphere, it is inevitable with drunk people.  But I wonder if there are droplets that are big enough to carry a sizable viral load but still small enough that you don't feel it physically hitting you?  So it wouldn't have to be someone coughing or sneezing, just someone talking normally but face-to-face within 2-3 feet?

Edited by Don Hutson

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On 9/15/2020 at 10:58 PM, Jayrod said:

These kinds of deaths aren't even remotely comparable and it is nothing but fear mongering to point it out.

This is a disease not a military foe.  The demographics of the deaths are so strikingly different that the only reason to bring this kind of thing up is to make political inferences. 

Interestingly, in CNN's current headline article on the U.S. reaching 200,000 deaths, they state this:

"Already, Covid-19 has killed more people in the US than Americans killed in battle during the five most recent wars combined: the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the Iraq War, the War in Afghanistan and the Persian Gulf War.

The loss of life is like suffering the effects of 109 Hurricane Katrinas. Or enduring the 9/11 attacks every day for 66 days."

The war comparison is actually the subheading on their current lead.  Just sayin'.  :rolleyes:

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6 hours ago, Doug B said:

Agreed, but I thought his message was off more because aerosol transmission was locked in as THE #1, #2, and #3 means of transmission. With direct droplet transmission a distant fourth, and with fomites barely mattering. And it seemed also that matuski was invoking medical-level guidance for non-medical situations.

However, if quick exposures to aerosols aren't really a big deal - and if that can be carved in stone with as few hedges as scientifically possible -- then masks for the general public can go away tomorrow. Masks help defeat aerosol transmission. Distancing helps defeat droplets (i.e. close exposure to some else's coughs/sneezes/spittle).

To be fair, masks obviously clamp down on droplet transmissions, too. But if I can start going to restaurants again because I don't have to worry whether any patrons breathing over at the next table are asymptomatic carriers ... that's a big change in personal COVID-19 mitigation strategy.

I don’t think it’s that simple, but I also don’t recall anyone saying aerosols are the primary mode of transmission. And certainly not fleeting exposures.

Masks have multiple benefits, and we have enough epidemiological evidence they work to deny their efficacy, primarily as source control, but also to mitigate personal risk of infection. But distancing would trump mask benefit in many situations, if applied uniformly at all times. Realizing the latter is impractical, a combination of NPI (including cough and hand hygiene) has been deemed the best course of action.

 

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Hospitalizations hit an all time high in WI today. Now unfortunately, as always it seems with covid data, that isnt a pure metric since they did away with the "pending" number and now they are all lumped together.

But the increase from a week ago is pure, which is obviously alarming. 

 

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On 9/22/2020 at 10:41 AM, Doug B said:

I mean ... in a naive pre-COVID population, how often are we non-medical really breathing in or ingesting other people's droplets anyway? Big droplets, I mean -- the ones that are said to fall to the ground within a few feet. I guess an uncovered sneeze in an elevator or something. But do we really hang out in other people's "cough zones" all that much?

 

On 9/22/2020 at 11:44 AM, Don Hutson said:

Anytime I go to a bar in Wisconsin I feel people's spit shrapnel hitting my face.  It's super annoying.  But in a loud atmosphere, it is inevitable with drunk people.  But I wonder if there are droplets that are big enough to carry a sizable viral load but still small enough that you don't feel it physically hitting you?  So it wouldn't have to be someone coughing or sneezing, just someone talking normally but face-to-face within 2-3 feet?

 

9 minutes ago, parasaurolophus said:

Hospitalizations hit an all time high in WI today. Now unfortunately, as always it seems with covid data, that isnt a pure metric since they did away with the "pending" number and now they are all lumped together.

But the increase from a week ago is pure, which is obviously alarming. 

 

Indoor bars are really a tough setting to avoid other people's droplets, let alone the overall accumulation of aerosols. In many of these situations (loud music, crowded, etc.) people end up basically screaming in each other's faces. Amazing how much of a petri dish they are, even pre-COVID. 

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2 minutes ago, Grace Under Pressure said:

 

 

Indoor bars are really a tough setting to avoid other people's droplets, let alone the overall accumulation of aerosols. In many of these situations (loud music, crowded, etc.) people end up basically screaming in each other's faces. Amazing how much of a petri dish they are, even pre-COVID. 

"Ethanol kills that stuff. People just arent drinking enough."

 

/for sure somebody in WI

 

 

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1 hour ago, Grace Under Pressure said:

Indoor bars are really a tough setting to avoid other people's droplets, let alone the overall accumulation of aerosols. In many of these situations (loud music, crowded, etc.) people end up basically screaming in each other's faces. Amazing how much of a petri dish they are, even pre-COVID. 

I'm over 20 years removed from going to bars with any frequency. Restaurants, yes, but loud, gotta-scream-to-be-heard bars? Essentially never.

The particulars of one's lifestyle seem to make a difference.

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Wisconsin has a ton of stubborn, you-can't-tell-me-what-to-do types.  And they love their bars.  I got Covid because of one of those idiots.

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My county in Texas is not considering teachers and students close contacts if everyone is wearing masks. So far 2 teachers at the nearest elementary have tested positive and no students have been quarantined.

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Well.... my Brother (40) just tested positive. 

My parents were just in town all weekend for his birthday and my niece's baptism. He didn't tell them he was symptomatic (told himself it was just a cold).They live in Sourh Florida. 

They also took in a foster child 12 days ago. Kid has been coughing since they got him. Apparently didn't occur to them to get him tested for COVID, 

Dad woke up aching and was just coughing on the phone. 

If My Brother was in front of me I would lay his ### out right now for being a ####### MORON. Folks are calling around to get tested now. 
 

I'm at the crossroads of disappointed and absolutely irate.

We are collectively far too stupid to beat this. 
 

 

Edited by [icon]
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5 hours ago, Doug B said:

I'm over 20 years removed from going to bars with any frequency. Restaurants, yes, but loud, gotta-scream-to-be-heard bars? Essentially never.

The particulars of one's lifestyle seem to make a difference.

I only ever went to these on work trips. I don’t get why people go to them. 

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21 minutes ago, mr roboto said:

I only ever went to these on work trips. I don’t get why people go to them. 

I did it all for the nookie

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3 hours ago, Dezbelief said:

My county in Texas is not considering teachers and students close contacts if everyone is wearing masks. So far 2 teachers at the nearest elementary have tested positive and no students have been quarantined.

Add another staff member and a student with today's results. 

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8 hours ago, [icon] said:

Well.... my Brother (40) just tested positive. 

My parents were just in town all weekend for his birthday and my niece's baptism. He didn't tell them he was symptomatic (told himself it was just a cold).They live in Sourh Florida. 

They also took in a foster child 12 days ago. Kid has been coughing since they got him. Apparently didn't occur to them to get him tested for COVID, 

Dad woke up aching and was just coughing on the phone. 

If My Brother was in front of me I would lay his ### out right now for being a ####### MORON. Folks are calling around to get tested now. 
 

I'm at the crossroads of disappointed and absolutely irate.

We are collectively far too stupid to beat this. 
 

 

Sorry to hear.  And the last sentence is 100% true and the most frustrating thing of it all.  That, the overwhelming selfishness, and the politicizing of it drives me crazy.  At this point my faith in Murica has gone down the tubes.  All-time low.

As for your brother, what is it you're waffling about?  No offense, but are you just not capable of giving him an ### whoopin?  I mean, he's put your parent's lives at stake, no?  To what degree is up for you to decide, but the fact he was willing to even go there is inexcusable.

Edited by Rodrigo Duterte

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Yeesh.  Per Covid worldometers, over 313,000 new cases today, and 34 countries reporting over 1,000 new cases.  I believe that 34 count is a new high.  Today's deaths approaching 6,300, with the U.S. back over 1,000 new deaths.  In deaths/million, the U.S. trails only Belgium, Spain, and five South American countries.  

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8 hours ago, tri-man 47 said:

Yeesh.  Per Covid worldometers, over 313,000 new cases today, and 34 countries reporting over 1,000 new cases.  I believe that 34 count is a new high.  Today's deaths approaching 6,300, with the U.S. back over 1,000 new deaths.  In deaths/million, the U.S. trails only Belgium, Spain, and five South American countries.  

New restrictions were just put in place here in Paris. Gyms are closed again, restaurants and bars all close at 10pm now (the next step is complete closure), no gatherings of more than 10 people....We're slowly sliding backwards and the approaching cooler weather won't help.

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2 hours ago, Harris said:

New restrictions were just put in place here in Paris. Gyms are closed again, restaurants and bars all close at 10pm now (the next step is complete closure), no gatherings of more than 10 people....We're slowly sliding backwards and the approaching cooler weather won't help.

Curious, is COVID a political football there too or are people just stubborn and not adhering to protocol?

Edited by beer 30
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Went to the liquor store to buy a gift for a friend that lost their home in the fires in Oregon. Half the people didn't have their masks covering their noses and also gave zero ####s about standing right next to me 🤦‍♂️

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2 hours ago, beer 30 said:

Curious, is COVID a political football there too or are people just stubborn and not adhering to protocol?

I would say less so than in the States. There is a lot of spread lately as people return from their summer vacations in August. I would say the feeling here generally is that people respect the virus and mask compliance is good. However, people do also want to get on with their lives and are trying to find the best way to live with it.

I would also say the government response has been good to date. We're no New Zealand but we're also no America. Firm nation-wide rules are in place in most situations and are generally adhered to.

All of that said, stupid people exist everywhere in the world.

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This is a good article that gives a near-term look at how ongoing vaccine trials should wrap up, what's involved in FDA fast-track approvals, and how the early rounds of the vaccines will be distributed. I write "vaccines" because the author posits that more than one will be approved -- perhaps as many as five.

Quote

 

How, and when, will we know that a COVID-19 vaccine safe and effective? (Dr. William Petri, University of Virginia, UVa Today, 9/23/2020)

With COVID-19 vaccines currently in the final phase of study, you’ve probably been wondering how the FDA will decide if a vaccine is safe and effective.

Based on the status of the Phase 3 trials currently underway, it is unlikely that the results of these trials will be available before November. But it is likely that not just one, but several of the competing COVID-19 vaccines will be shown to be safe and effective by the end of 2020.

I am a scientist and infectious diseases specialist at the University of Virginia, where I care for patients with COVID-19 and conduct research on the pandemic. I am also a member of the World Health Organization Expert Group on COVID-19 Vaccine Prioritization.

What is the status of COVID-19 vaccines in human clinical trials?

Phase 3 studies are underway for the Moderna and BioNTech/Pfizer vaccines and the Oxford/AstraZeneca viral vector vaccine.

Each of these vaccines uses the SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein, which the virus uses to infect cells, to trigger the immune system to generate protective antibodies and a cellular immune response to the virus. Protective antibodies act by preventing the spike glycoprotein from attaching the virus to human cells, thereby neutralizing the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19.

In the case of Moderna’s nucleic acid vaccine, the messenger RNA encoding the spike glycoprotein is encased in a fat droplet – called a liposome – to protect the mRNA from degradation and enable it to enter cells. Once these instructions are inside the cells, the mRNA is read by the human cell machinery and made into many spike proteins so that the immune system can respond and begin producing antibodies against this coronavirus.

The Oxford/AstraZeneca uses a different strategy to activate an immune response. Here an adenovirus found in chimpanzees shuttles the instructions for manufacturing the spike glycoprotein into cells.

Phase 1 and 2 studies by pharmaceutical companies Janssen and Merck also use viral vectors similar to the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine, while vaccines by Novavax and GSK-Sanofi use the actual spike protein itself.

That's just the opening paragraphs. The article is simultaneously packed with information AND is a short read. Dr. Petri does get into the technical weeds here and there, but it's worth working through that to get an educated view of what's to come in the near term.

Edited by Doug B

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2 hours ago, Harris said:

I would say less so than in the States. There is a lot of spread lately as people return from their summer vacations in August. I would say the feeling here generally is that people respect the virus and mask compliance is good. However, people do also want to get on with their lives and are trying to find the best way to live with it.

I would also say the government response has been good to date. We're no New Zealand but we're also no America. Firm nation-wide rules are in place in most situations and are generally adhered to.

All of that said, stupid people exist everywhere in the world.

On the big rides you were just on, were masks/face coverings mandated? Buddy here just did a trail race last weekend. They had to have face coverings on at the start and at the 2 rest stops, other than that it was up to the individual. 

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Zlatan tested positive, so I suspect we’ll be rid of this virus within a matter of weeks 

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17 hours ago, beer 30 said:

On the big rides you were just on, were masks/face coverings mandated? Buddy here just did a trail race last weekend. They had to have face coverings on at the start and at the 2 rest stops, other than that it was up to the individual. 

Nah, everything I was doing was on my own so it was all up to me. I always carried a mask with me though in case I needed to stop and pop in a store or stop at a town restaurant for lunch. The basic rule in most cities in France is that masks are required when you are in the city walking around except when exercising. And once you're outside of a city it's all an individual choice. When watching at the Tour de France it was required (but hard to enforce) to wear a mask when spectating.

I have had a couple of friends do some running races in small towns in France this summer and they also had to have face coverings at the start and finish and needed to put their masks in pockets while racing. Seems reasonable to me. 

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Attended a visitation at a church yesterday for the father of one of my son's best friends. Wasn't sure what to expect. As we walked up, lots of people gathered outside, ok no biggie. We walk in, sign the guest book and enter the chapel. There were probably 200-300 people in there, in a not-socially-distanced line wrapped around the room. People of all ages. Several people had masks in their hand, but I saw zero masks being worn. Was a little unsettling to me. My son and I turned around and walked back outside. We are to attend the funeral service today and I am hoping they will be asking people to mask up, but am prepared to be disappointed. 

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1 minute ago, Nathan R. Jessep said:

Attended a visitation at a church yesterday for the father of one of my son's best friends. Wasn't sure what to expect. As we walked up, lots of people gathered outside, ok no biggie. We walk in, sign the guest book and enter the chapel. There were probably 200-300 people in there, in a not-socially-distanced line wrapped around the room. People of all ages. Several people had masks in their hand, but I saw zero masks being worn. Was a little unsettling to me. My son and I turned around and walked back outside. We are to attend the funeral service today and I am hoping they will be asking people to mask up, but am prepared to be disappointed. 

Frustrating. Had a similar experience when we went to check out the youth group at our church (7th grade daughter wanted to go back). 200 kids in a large sanctuary (which is plenty big enough to space out) but all the kids were sitting close together and less than half had masks. And they were singing. Shocked us. 

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On 9/23/2020 at 3:50 PM, [icon] said:

Well.... my Brother (40) just tested positive. 

My parents were just in town all weekend for his birthday and my niece's baptism. He didn't tell them he was symptomatic (told himself it was just a cold).They live in Sourh Florida. 

They also took in a foster child 12 days ago. Kid has been coughing since they got him. Apparently didn't occur to them to get him tested for COVID, 

Dad woke up aching and was just coughing on the phone. 

If My Brother was in front of me I would lay his ### out right now for being a ####### MORON. Folks are calling around to get tested now. 
 

I'm at the crossroads of disappointed and absolutely irate.

We are collectively far too stupid to beat this. 
 

 

Dad (70 - fit) tested positive this morning. Dad tested positive this morning.Aches, head cold, cough, chest tightening starting. O2 @ 97. He was told if it hits 92 to go to the emergency room.

Mom (70 - lung and heart issues) Tested negative for now, but presuming she has it and just isn't far enough along. They are attempting to isolate from each other.

no bueno 
 

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1 hour ago, [icon] said:

Dad (70 - fit) tested positive this morning. Dad tested positive this morning.Aches, head cold, cough, chest tightening starting. O2 @ 97. He was told if it hits 92 to go to the emergency room.

Mom (70 - lung and heart issues) Tested negative for now, but presuming she has it and just isn't far enough along. They are attempting to isolate from each other.

no bueno 
 

Damn. T&P

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5 hours ago, Nathan R. Jessep said:

Attended a visitation at a church yesterday for the father of one of my son's best friends. Wasn't sure what to expect. As we walked up, lots of people gathered outside, ok no biggie. We walk in, sign the guest book and enter the chapel. There were probably 200-300 people in there, in a not-socially-distanced line wrapped around the room. People of all ages. Several people had masks in their hand, but I saw zero masks being worn. Was a little unsettling to me. My son and I turned around and walked back outside. We are to attend the funeral service today and I am hoping they will be asking people to mask up, but am prepared to be disappointed. 

People have some fantasy they live in they if they know the people then they are safe.  

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4 hours ago, [icon] said:

Dad (70 - fit) tested positive this morning. Dad tested positive this morning.Aches, head cold, cough, chest tightening starting. O2 @ 97. He was told if it hits 92 to go to the emergency room.

Mom (70 - lung and heart issues) Tested negative for now, but presuming she has it and just isn't far enough along. They are attempting to isolate from each other.

no bueno 
 

Sorry man

Best of luck to your folks 

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Gave blood a couple days ago. Just saw I'm antibody positive. Not surprised at all.

I'm 99.9% sure I got it very early on in mid March when I had a complete loss of taste and smell unlike anything I've had before. No other symptoms except one day of feeling a little off during that time and just a weird sensation when I would breathe, almost like I could breathe better than usual for whatever reason.

Since then, aside from my normal risk at work, I've neither been ill nor have I been out and about without precautions. It'll be interesting to see if I hear anything else back from the blood bank.

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Just picked up take-out... Both plazas nearby were filled as if "COVID times" were behind us.  People in a bar next to the restaurant - looked full and obviously no masks as they drank.

We ARE collectively too stupid.

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3 minutes ago, DropKick said:

Just picked up take-out... Both plazas nearby were filled as if "COVID times" were behind us.  People in a bar next to the restaurant - looked full and obviously no masks as they drank.

We ARE collectively too stupid.

Location?

In my neighborhood, lots of people walking around outside with masks on.  Just walking their dog, not planning on going anywhere... mask on. 

But the concentration of epidemiologists, infectious disease docs, and physicians (mostly residents), and related students, is very high compared to the general population. 

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