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offdee

New puppy training talk

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19 hours ago, offdee said:

Tell me about using a clicker...when do you use it and what for?    I asked another poster, but tell me your successful version of crate training. What exactly needs to be done and for how long?

The clicker reinforces a behavior you want your dog to do (sit down, paw, go pee pee etc). When the dog does what you command, you click immediately and then positive reinforce with good pup and give a treat. Rinse and repeat until the are constantly doing it.

Crate training is a little different from dog to dog and owner to owner. My success story goes like this. We had the dog in the crate every minute we were not able to watch her. This included times that we could watch her, but wanted her to know this was her space and she needed to understand that. 

Dogs will not go to the bathroom where they sleep so unless they cant hold it and are sick, they wont go to the bathroom in the crate. I was very militant in the times I would take her out to the bathroom. I can not imagine training the dog with a job. I am a teacher and had the entire summer to train her. When she got done going outside, we would allow her time out of the crate for an hour or so and then back in the crate. People dont want to do this because it defeats the purpose of getting the dog, but this is a long play

We kept the crate downstairs so we didnt have to hear her whine. She did for the first few nights but got used to it. We kept her in the crate at night for her first year or so. Now she sleeps with us but that is another story

It would get to the point where I would say, OK crate time and she would go in on her own. She never liked it enough to go in when she didnt have to though. I know some people say their dogs will

ETA: We crated her for about a year when we werent home. Maybe less. But not until we were confident that she would not have any accidents or mess up the house

 

Edited by AcerFC
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On 2/10/2020 at 2:41 PM, dkp993 said:

Excellent point. My dog just got her final rounds of shots last week so this weekend was the first time we could take her for a walk in public and she was definitely nervous around other people. So now were in full socialization mode.  

@Brony originally wrote this that @dkp993 replied to above: One other thing that is tough with puppies is that you get 'conflicting' advice that you should socialize your dog with other dogs while at the same time avoiding dogs that may not have full vaccinations.  Ultimately, you have to set up playdates for your dog with known dogs and avoid going to a dog park full of randos.   I was expecting to take my puppy to a dog park and this is a no-no. 

----

Help me understand this better.     if your dog isn't fully vaccinated they can't be around other dogs at all?    Or can they be around other dogs if you know for sure the other dog(s) are fully vaccinated?    

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On 2/10/2020 at 1:44 PM, dkp993 said:

The article linked about to crate training has 5 steps.  Step 5 is to crate the dog at night.  Steps 1 through 4 should happen before that and notes that it could take several days to weeks to compete successfully.

So, let's just say for discussion purposes it take 2 wks to get to step 5 of overnight in the crate.   What are you supposed to do with the dog at night then wks 1 and 2 if it's not yet ready for the crate?

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1 minute ago, offdee said:

@Brony originally wrote this that @dkp993 replied to above: One other thing that is tough with puppies is that you get 'conflicting' advice that you should socialize your dog with other dogs while at the same time avoiding dogs that may not have full vaccinations.  Ultimately, you have to set up playdates for your dog with known dogs and avoid going to a dog park full of randos.   I was expecting to take my puppy to a dog park and this is a no-no. 

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Help me understand this better.     if your dog isn't fully vaccinated they can't be around other dogs at all?    Or can they be around other dogs if you know for sure the other dog(s) are fully vaccinated?    

Again here’s where you’ll probably get conflicting advice and I have no idea what the actual truth is. But what I was told by my breeder who is very respected in the area was to keep my puppy at home and only at home. Not even go for walks. The reason for this is primarily Parvovirus which  is deadly to unvaccinated dogs.  The way my breeder explained it to me is that parvo is very contagious and can survive in grass and other surfaces.  

She basically did a very good job of scaring the #### out of us, so we just kept the puppy in our house and backyard until all the shots were completed, which just happened last week.  

Where are the facts ate in all this I don’t know, I just trusted her that she did and played it safe.  

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On ‎2‎/‎10‎/‎2020 at 12:25 PM, offdee said:

I'm considering getting a new dog within the next year (no rush at all, just at beginning research and consideration stages).    

PLEASE let's not get into the "get from a rescue shelter!?!!" soapbox...hoping to keep this to techniques that worked for those that had new puppies, recommendations on products, general thoughts to keep in mind, links to good articles, etc.

I realize I could read books and watch videos, but have found in the past that the FFA drops great knowledge.     Some misc. thoughts from me....

- Being in Midwest weather (Milwaukee), ideal time to get a new dog to train would be June through October (want to avoid new puppy during holidays and rainy spring weather)

- Dog will be on the smaller side (15lbs), if that matters for training suggestions

- My main concerns to train away....barking, chewing on furniture/shoes, nipping at hands, jumping up on people, being overly excitable around visitors and new people

lot of easy stuff. teach "come", "drop it", etc. positively reinforce all with a small treat and dog should catch on to everything quick.

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2 minutes ago, offdee said:

The article linked about to crate training has 5 steps.  Step 5 is to crate the dog at night.  Steps 1 through 4 should happen before that and notes that it could take several days to weeks to compete successfully.

So, let's just say for discussion purposes it take 2 wks to get to step 5 of overnight in the crate.   What are you supposed to do with the dog at night then wks 1 and 2 if it's not yet ready for the crate?

We created the first night she was home. But I spent the entire day getting her used to the crate, to the point where she would go in there on her own and even took a nap in the crate with no door on it in the afternoon. I did this for the exact same reason you’re asking a question, I had no idea what we were going to do with her if she wasn’t in the crate.

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On 2/10/2020 at 4:16 PM, rustycolts said:

@offdeeI have owned dogs my whole life and I'm an old guy so there has been a lot of pups. I have always used the alarm clock and it seems to help it is supposed to remind them of there mother's heart beat. I have even warmed a towel and put it around the clock then put the pup next to the towel. Between the warmth of the towel and the ticking it sooths the pup.

Responding to the warm towel comment....would putting a heating pad on low under a blanket be helpful to soothe or more harmful long term since not going to have a heating pad running in there down the line?

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On 2/10/2020 at 5:28 PM, fissure man said:

The other tip is to only hand feed the puppy for the first 6 months but be sure to give a command each time. 

At first read, this just doesn't even seem realistic....6 months?!!?    That's not happening with me, but I can see where you would work this in when feasible.  With that, what kind of worthwhile commands are you giving to them while they are eating?

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1 minute ago, offdee said:

Responding to the warm towel comment....would putting a heating pad on low under a blanket be helpful to soothe or more harmful long term since not going to have a heating pad running in there down the line?

I really only used the warm towel for the first few days and the clock probably for a week or so. The warm towel was to simulate the warmth the puppy would get from its litter mates. I guess you could use the heating pad for an extended period but probably not needed as the warmth is just to reassure at the beginning.

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5 minutes ago, offdee said:

At first read, this just doesn't even seem realistic....6 months?!!?    That's not happening with me, but I can see where you would work this in when feasible.  With that, what kind of worthwhile commands are you giving to them while they are eating?

Hand feeding is good you really wouldn't have to hand feed whole meal. Hand feeding helps some with food aggression towards you later on really a good idea with larger dogs.

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32 minutes ago, dkp993 said:

We created the first night she was home. But I spent the entire day getting her used to the crate, to the point where she would go in there on her own and even took a nap in the crate with no door on it in the afternoon. I did this for the exact same reason you’re asking a question, I had no idea what we were going to do with her if she wasn’t in the crate.

Anybody here NOT put dog in the crate on night 1 or 2?    If so, what did you do with the dog overnight?

Only thing I can think of is pull an all-nighter with them on night 1 and try to get through steps 1-4 of that crate training link process through the first 24-48 hrs and then crate them overnight on night 2.

Any other suggestions or techniques?

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On ‎2‎/‎10‎/‎2020 at 2:01 PM, offdee said:

Right on, totally agree.

More specifically how did you go about successfully potty training....what was/is your routine?   Did you learn anything from it that you would've done differently, or things that you figured out amidst the training that made it more efficient or effective?

You say nipping was an issue at beginning, but no longer an issue. Anything specific you did to curb it?  Just saying No?   Or saying No with a tap on the nose?   

Specific things like that are what I'm curious about.

 

On ‎2‎/‎10‎/‎2020 at 12:46 PM, dkp993 said:

Repetition and positive re-enforcement are the keys.  That and saying no a lot. Lol.  I just got a 8week old puppy  just after Thanksgiving.  She’s been fully potty trained since just prior to Christmas.  Still occasionally chews on some stuff in the yard if left unattended for to long. I have a 4 yr old daughter and the pup nipped a lot while playing in the beginning but that’s pretty much done now.  Patience and consistency pay off.  

One key thing is was told is not to name your dog anything that rhymes with NO.  Like Joe, Bo, Snow

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When we brought our puppy home we crated him right by our bed. Every few days we would move the crate further and further away until he had his own room. I read about it somewhere. It teaches them not to get anxiety when you leave.

 

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27 minutes ago, Summer Wheat said:

 

One key thing is was told is not to name your dog anything that rhymes with NO.  Like Joe, Bo, Snow

Mine is named Bo but I don't use the word no. What I use isn't a word actually it's more of long aaannnnkkkk real loud almost like a growl they know to stop whatever they are doing.

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14 hours ago, offdee said:

Anybody here NOT put dog in the crate on night 1 or 2?    If so, what did you do with the dog overnight?

Only thing I can think of is pull an all-nighter with them on night 1 and try to get through steps 1-4 of that crate training link process through the first 24-48 hrs and then crate them overnight on night 2.

Any other suggestions or techniques?

We have two dogs.  One of them is 2 and the other just turned 1.  The oldest was in the crate overnight from the start.  The younger one hated the crate.  He howled and cried when he went in at night.  It was heartbreaking.  At the same time, during the day, when he would get tired, he'd head over to his crate to take naps.  But for some reason, he did not like being in that thing at night.  By this point, the oldest was sleeping on the bed.  So we just pulled him up and let him sleep on the bed, too.  We did buy a plastic lined mattress protector just in case.  And he probably only had 1 or 2 accidents in the bed.  

My wife has had probably 8 dogs in her life and all of them except him went in the crate Night 1.  

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I’m sure not advised, but for those with small dogs (under 15-20lbs) why not train them to go in a litter box like cats do? 
 

My MIL broke her wrist so we’re watching her little Teddy Bear dog (bischon/####zu mix) this week and the thing takes small dumps. 

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8 minutes ago, offdee said:

I’m sure not advised, but for those with small dogs (under 15-20lbs) why not train them to go in a litter box like cats do? 
 

My MIL broke her wrist so we’re watching her little Teddy Bear dog (bischon/####zu mix) this week and the thing takes small dumps. 

They have pee pads and stuff like that for small dogs.  An ex of mine had a chihuahua and he went on the mat.  But cats actually like litter.  You don't even need to train them, it's just instinct.  Not sure a dog would enjoy stepping in litter. 

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22 minutes ago, TheIronSheik said:

They have pee pads and stuff like that for small dogs.  An ex of mine had a chihuahua and he went on the mat.  But cats actually like litter.  You don't even need to train them, it's just instinct.  Not sure a dog would enjoy stepping in litter. 

I remember seeing this on Shark Tank. 
https://www.brilliantpad.com

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4 minutes ago, offdee said:

I remember seeing this on Shark Tank. 
https://www.brilliantpad.com

Yeah.  It wasn't that, but it was something like that.  Very similar.  She lived on like the 6th floor of a place near downtown Houston.  It was great because it was kind of a hassle to take the dog out to just pee.  

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15 hours ago, offdee said:

At first read, this just doesn't even seem realistic....6 months?!!?    That's not happening with me, but I can see where you would work this in when feasible.  With that, what kind of worthwhile commands are you giving to them while they are eating?

All commands are worthwhile to your little buddy. When they’re super young they don’t need 2-4 cups of food a day so it isn’t as daunting a task as you might think. As they grow so does the list of commands and the rewards for being a good listener. When they’re a month or two older you can give them their bowl in the morning and evening and just adjust how much food depending on how much time you spent with them that day. 
 

You’re not running a German concentration camp but you want your dog to listen. Your dog can still have all of their personality and be obedient for the times you need them to be. How much is really all up to you. 

Most people don’t really have an idea of how much time they should be working with their pets. (Not directed at you)

Edited by fissure man

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Regarding the nipping and chewing, all pups are mouthy in the beginning. Some things we’ve done:

- when they get mouthy, put a chew toy in their mouth and praise them (good!).  This get them to think of the toy rather than your hand and they will eventually bring a toy to the playtime they are seeking  

- don’t use soft/plush toys. It’s really hard for them to differentiate between your lady’s favorite throw pillow and a soft toy. It feels the same to them. Stick to rubber types.  Antlers and medebones are great too

- bully sticks are awesome when you need them to chill out  they love them  that said, they can also be possessive with things like that  if they growl when you try to take it away, give them a treat in exchange for the bully stick, then give it right back  repeat over and over and they will not be possessive.

- they typically like to play with things that remind them of you (eg shoes - they have your scent), especially when you’re not around. Make sure to handle their rubbery toys as much as possible, so they associate them with you.  If they do get something you don’t want them to have, don’t chase them and don’t give them a treat in exchange for it. They think you’re playing, and are being reinforced that if they take that item, they get a treat/playtime

- feed them in their crate so that it becomes a happy place for them. These are great to use:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B07B3PH22D?psc=1&ref=ppx_pop_mob_b_asin_title

- make sure to train them to walk at your side by giving them nibbles and praising them when they walk at your side. Stick to the left. If they pull you to go sniff something, pull them and walk the other direction. Sniff time should be your idea. 

- in terms of jumping up, they want your attention.  Don’t give it to them. Turn your back and wait for them to calm down.  Then give them love.  After this, take it a step further and only pet them after they have sit or laid down  this will condition them that love comes to them when they are calm.  

I’ll add stuff but happy to answer questions too

Edited by -jb-

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Also, with the puppy, they have razor sharp teeth. Be ready for some possible shredded fingers the first couple of months. 

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2 minutes ago, TheIronSheik said:

Also, with the puppy, they have razor sharp teeth. Be ready for some possible shredded fingers the first couple of months. 

x bajillion

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2 hours ago, -jb- said:

 

- make sure to train them to walk at your side by giving them nibbles and praising them when they walk at your side. Stick to the left.

So why the left?  I’ve always thought mine the right side. My thinking was people usually pass each other on the left side.  

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2 hours ago, dkp993 said:

So why the left?  I’ve always thought mine the right side. My thinking was people usually pass each other on the left side.  

Yeah I questioned it too, but apparently it’s how they train show dogs, so it’s just carried on - the standard of you will. That said, I agree with your logic.  If you’re walking on a street with no sidewalks it’s probably safer to have them on the right. Forget I said anything! :bag:

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On 2/15/2020 at 3:54 PM, -jb- said:

Yeah I questioned it too, but apparently it’s how they train show dogs, so it’s just carried on - the standard of you will. That said, I agree with your logic.  If you’re walking on a street with no sidewalks it’s probably safer to have them on the right. Forget I said anything! :bag:

Just got back from a long trail hike. One thing I did notice is that it’s way easier to control the sniffing in that situation as I was walking on the right side of the trail. This put me in between him and the smelly stuff. 

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New puppy coming home on 4/3, and already have his crate and toys all setup and ready.

Tonight we're having my MIL's dog sleep over at our house....same breed as our new dog.   My question is...is it good or bad (or doesn't matter at all), if MIL's dog sleeps in our new dog's crate for the night if he ends up liking it?     Just not sure if best to keep it totally clean of any new smells or anything so our new dog makes it his own, or if smelling another dog will actually help him get more comfortable with the crate upon arrival?

I plan to just let MIL's dog play with all of our new dog's new toys if he wants to...assume that's all good and doesn't matter.

Appreciate the advice.

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1 minute ago, offdee said:

New puppy coming home on 4/3, and already have his crate and toys all setup and ready.

Tonight we're having my MIL's dog sleep over at our house....same breed as our new dog.   My question is...is it good or bad (or doesn't matter at all), if MIL's dog sleeps in our new dog's crate for the night if he ends up liking it?     Just not sure if best to keep it totally clean of any new smells or anything so our new dog makes it his own, or if smelling another dog will actually help him get more comfortable with the crate upon arrival?

I plan to just let MIL's dog play with all of our new dog's new toys if he wants to...assume that's all good and doesn't matter.

Appreciate the advice.

I’m no expert but I wouldn’t let your MIl dog sleep in crate or play with toys

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37 minutes ago, AcerFC said:

I’m no expert but I wouldn’t let your MIl dog sleep in crate or play with toys

I asked the breeder (who has been excellent throughout and takes great care of the dogs)….her reply:

It would actually help him if he can smell another dog. That would be a good idea!

If anybody here disagrees with that, let me know.  Just don't want to make the crate training and arrival portion any harder than it already will be.

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no disagreement, but honestly don't know.  happy to ask our trainer tomorrow. congrats offdee!

 

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looking forward to the dog rating scale, which expect to be imminent.

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24 minutes ago, -jb- said:

no disagreement, but honestly don't know.  happy to ask our trainer tomorrow. congrats offdee!

 

Thanks but the damage will already be done in about an hour! Text him stat! 

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Posted (edited)

With new puppy coming home soon, know that first couple wks is crucial to successful training and consistency is key. With wife and 3 kids know consistency will be a challenge so want to make a little sign for the fridge of important new puppy reminders.  Want it to be the most important general things.  Add or disagree with my list so far...

...

- no feeding any human food

- no major scolding or putting nose in it for going potty indoors (Say “No” and take to outdoor spot) 

- his crate is always meant to be positive, never put in there as a punishment

- no hitting on nose or mouth when nipping or being naughty. Stern “No” is all that’s needed

 

Edited by offdee

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42 minutes ago, offdee said:

With new puppy coming home soon, know that first couple wks is crucial to successful training and consistency is key. With wife and 3 kids know consistency will be a challenge so want to make a little sign for the fridge of important new puppy reminders.  Want it to be the most important general things.  Add or disagree with my list so far...

...

- no feeding any human food

- no major scolding or putting nose in it for going potty indoors (Say “No” and take to outdoor spot) 

- his crate is always meant to be positive, never put in there as a punishment

- no hitting on nose or mouth when nipping or being naughty. Stern “No” is all that’s needed

 

-Take potty every time they, wake up from a nap, drinks some water, eat some food or is sniffing around a lot

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"one of the goodest of goodbois at the dog park, but more locally amazing."

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Through one week now with new pup and he’s doing really well!  Has taken to his crate beautifully and as soon as outside goes potty on grass pretty immediately.  A few pain points hoping to get some thoughts/advice...

- just in past two days he’s gotten very nippy, to the point at times it’s not all that enjoyable to have him near you cuz constantly saying No! and “ow, that hurts!”  I realize this is just a puppy thing and it’s mainly due to teething and them trying to soothe their gums....but if any words of encouragement or advice on how to relieve a bit is appreciated.  Best trick I’ve found so far is to soak a rag in cold water and be gnaws on that for a while

- he’s going potty outside very well, once we get him out there, but he’s not yet notifying us that he has to go out so need to constantly monitor and try to get him out every 30 mins. He would have no problems going on carpets if we just let him roam and didn’t keep a close eye on him.  How do you tell when that turning point is when they are starting to get it? ...don’t go in house, hold it and let family know need to go outside.    I give treat immediately after going 1 or 2 outside with lots of praise.  Although he doesn’t seem to be a pup that overly motivated or gets excited about treats...he eats them buy very nonchalant when getting them.  So not quite sure if they are a big training reward perk for him or not  

Lots to love about this little guy otherwise!  Thanks for the thoughts and advice. 

Edited by offdee

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One thing I’m curious about is playing tug of war with his toys. He likes to do that and it gets him riled up a bit. Am I making the nipping issue worse by encouraging this, or is playing this with him getting his puppy chewing energy out and a positive activity? 

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55 minutes ago, offdee said:

Through one week now with new pup and he’s doing really well!  Has taken to his crate beautifully and as soon as outside goes potty on grass pretty immediately.  A few pain points hoping to get some thoughts/advice...

- just in past two days he’s gotten very nippy, to the point at times it’s not all that enjoyable to have him near you cuz constantly saying No! and “ow, that hurts!”  I realize this is just a puppy thing and it’s mainly due to teething and them trying to soothe their gums....but if any words of encouragement or advice on how to relieve a bit is appreciated.  Best trick I’ve found so far is to soak a rag in cold water and be gnaws on that for a while

- he’s going potty outside very well, once we get him out there, but he’s not yet notifying us that he has to go out so need to constantly monitor and try to get him out every 30 mins. He would have no problems going on carpets if we just let him roam and didn’t keep a close eye on him.  How do you tell when that turning point is when they are starting to get it? ...don’t go in house, hold it and let family know need to go outside.    I give treat immediately after going 1 or 2 outside with lots of praise.  Although he doesn’t seem to be a pup that overly motivated or gets excited about treats...he eats them buy very nonchalant when getting them.  So not quite sure if they are a big training reward perk for him or not  

Lots to love about this little guy otherwise!  Thanks for the thoughts and advice. 

 

On 2/10/2020 at 11:32 AM, dkp993 said:

With the nipping, and ours did it a lot, it was constantly saying “no biting” and a pat on the nose. That was the hardest one for us because my daughter constantly wanted to play with the pup and the pup didn’t know how to play without nipping, so it was non-stop “no biting, no biting”.  That’s the thing that took her the longest to get over and still happens maybe twice a day but it is significantly better. 

Congrats on a successful first week!  That’s awesome.  

For the nipping I’ll refer back to an earlier post above.  Though I will add ours got over it with time and our consistency, she’s 6 months now and doesn’t nip at all not matter how hard my daughter plays with her.  

For the potty it sounds like you’re tracking nicely.  Treats are nice but love is the best reward, treat them like they found the cure for Covid-19 every time they go.  You’ll know when he starts to sit by the door (or ring the bell), until then just keep a sharp eye out like it sounds like you have.  It shouldn’t be much longer.  

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35 minutes ago, dkp993 said:

 

Congrats on a successful first week!  That’s awesome.  

For the nipping I’ll refer back to an earlier post above.  Though I will add ours got over it with time and our consistency, she’s 6 months now and doesn’t nip at all not matter how hard my daughter plays with her.  

For the potty it sounds like you’re tracking nicely.  Treats are nice but love is the best reward, treat them like they found the cure for Covid-19 every time they go.  You’ll know when he starts to sit by the door (or ring the bell), until then just keep a sharp eye out like it sounds like you have.  It shouldn’t be much longer.  

Thanks much!   
For the nipping, I’ve read to try and avoid all negative contact including pats on the nose. But that seems increasingly hard and unrealistic in real life. I’ve also read that me rough housing, playing tug of war, etc can get him fired up and probably making things worse

Appreciate the encouragement on the potty training progress   I definitely give lots of praise. So sounds like one day it just clicks for them?  Interesting. I assume it also coincides a bit with the older they get the bigger their bladder gets and able to hold it longer. 

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20 minutes ago, offdee said:

Thanks much!   
For the nipping, I’ve read to try and avoid all negative contact including pats on the nose. But that seems increasingly hard and unrealistic in real life. I’ve also read that me rough housing, playing tug of war, etc can get him fired up and probably making things worse

Appreciate the encouragement on the potty training progress   I definitely give lots of praise. So sounds like one day it just clicks for them?  Interesting. I assume it also coincides a bit with the older they get the bigger their bladder gets and able to hold it longer. 

Yeah I’m sure there are many that disagree with me but having had big dogs my whole life I’ve found they respond better with a little physical-ness.  Now to be EXTREMELY clear I’m not talking about being aggressive and hurting the dog in any way at all, but sometime you need to get their attention, like a pat on the nose or grabbing hold of them to calm down.  

Tug a war is only good if you first teach them the let go command, otherwise any time you try to take something away they are holding on too they think you’re trying to play.  

I’m not a fan of avoiding the fired up thing when teaching them, I think the opposite makes more sense (and has worked better for me).  I want them to still focus on my commands regardless of their state of mind, my voice needs to cut through that.  For example soon after they learn to walk on a leash and they’re all hyper, wanting to smell everything around everywhere, that’s the time I take the opportunity to make sure we practice sitting or laying down.  The walks take longer in the beginning but they learn to hear my voice through the chaos in their head.  Make sense?

You’re thoughts on the potty training are spot on.  

Edited by dkp993
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11 hours ago, offdee said:

Through one week now with new pup and he’s doing really well!  Has taken to his crate beautifully and as soon as outside goes potty on grass pretty immediately.  A few pain points hoping to get some thoughts/advice...

- just in past two days he’s gotten very nippy, to the point at times it’s not all that enjoyable to have him near you cuz constantly saying No! and “ow, that hurts!”  I realize this is just a puppy thing and it’s mainly due to teething and them trying to soothe their gums....but if any words of encouragement or advice on how to relieve a bit is appreciated.  Best trick I’ve found so far is to soak a rag in cold water and be gnaws on that for a while

- he’s going potty outside very well, once we get him out there, but he’s not yet notifying us that he has to go out so need to constantly monitor and try to get him out every 30 mins. He would have no problems going on carpets if we just let him roam and didn’t keep a close eye on him.  How do you tell when that turning point is when they are starting to get it? ...don’t go in house, hold it and let family know need to go outside.    I give treat immediately after going 1 or 2 outside with lots of praise.  Although he doesn’t seem to be a pup that overly motivated or gets excited about treats...he eats them buy very nonchalant when getting them.  So not quite sure if they are a big training reward perk for him or not  

Lots to love about this little guy otherwise!  Thanks for the thoughts and advice. 

May get some blowback for this but I have had both big and small dogs all my life. I have found when they start nipping if you immediately grab their top lip and press it against their teeth just enough to cause discomfort and say no sternly seems to help break them of it.

Edited by rustycolts

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1 hour ago, rustycolts said:

May get some blowback for this but I have had both big and small dogs all my life. I have found when they start nipping if you immediately grab their top lip and press it against their teeth just enough to cause discomfort and say no sternly seems to help break them of it.

I have read this...also wrapping top lip under teeth so they bite down and hurt themself (basically feel the pain it causes and stops). My guy is so little he doesn’t have much lips to play with...pressing down against teeth is prob only option for me

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So our pup is now a little over 6 months.  When he was getting nippy we would give him ice cubes.  Seemed to help, your pups teeth probably hurt as they are teething.

Here are a couple videos of our pup. Try to play games with him to make training fun.  Also training/thinking can tire them out as much as physical exercise.  He's so cute but gets on my nerves plenty of times, so hard not to get mad at him...but remember they are toddlers, how long does it take for a child to get potty trained?  Keep that in mind when you get mad if they have an accident.  Also they go thru growth and fear stages, look it up.  We are right at another fear stage around 7 months - try to avoid stressful situations.

https://youtu.be/VbZbroL_w_U

https://youtu.be/Z06dpVzF39w

 

Edited by yak651

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