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Dynasty & Redraft: WR Chase Claypool, Steelers

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Notre Dame WR Chase Claypool ran the 40-yard dash in 4.42 seconds at the NFL Scouting Combine.

Claypool measured into the combine at 6-foot-4, 238 pounds and was actually reportedly asked by one team to work out with the tight ends. All that should be kept in mind with this shining combine run at real size and strength (19 bench press reps). Senior Bowl executive director Jim Nagy actually had him hand-timed at 4.38 seconds. NFL Media's Lance Zierlein compares Claypool to his former Notre Dame teammate Miles Boykin. Boykin was a surprise combine star last spring. Claypool following just fine in those footsteps, here.

SOURCE: PFF College on Twitter

Feb 27, 2020, 7:01 PM ET

 

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Notre Dame WR Chase Claypool recorded a 40.5-inch vertical jump at the NFL Scouting Combine.

Claypool (6'4/238) came into the NFL Scouting Combine a little under the radar, but he has had as strong an overall testing show as any player to go through the gauntlet on Thursday. Beyond the 40.5-inch vertical jump, Claypool showed off nice strength with 19 bench press reps and a remarkable 40-yard dash at his size, coming in at 4.42 seconds officially with his sprint. These marks figure to send evaluators back to the tape.

SOURCE: NFL.com

Feb 27, 2020, 8:29 PM ET

 

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According to Senior Bowl scouting director Jim Nagy, three scouts at the NFL Scouting Combine told him that Notre Dame WR Chase Claypool weighed in at 238 pounds.

Claypool (6'4/238) weighed in nine pounds heavier than his number at last month's Senior Bowl in Mobile, and Nagy offered up another piece of interesting information in his tweet. "Might be embracing the TE conversion. He’s going to be a mismatch problem at the next level," Nagy tweeted. Three of the four scouts that Nagy spoke with said that Claypool, who has the size that teams look for in a red zone target, "won" the weigh-in portion of the combine. How he performs in the actual testing and on-field drills will have a greater impact on Claypool's draft prospects, but it appears as if his time in Indianapolis has gotten off to a good start.

SOURCE: Jim Nagy on Twitter

Feb 24, 2020, 11:30 AM ET

 

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NFL.com draft analyst Lance Zierlein compares Notre Dame WR Chase Claypool to Baltimore Ravens WR Miles Boykin.

Claypool gets compared to his former teammate in Boykin. Like Boykin, Claypool is a massive receiver at 6-foot-4, 229-pounds and looks more like a tight end playing wide receiver than anything. Though not the most fluid athlete, Claypool provides QBs with a wide catch radius and can be a weapon in the red zone. Expect Claypool to be a late Day 2 or early Day 3 pick.

SOURCE: NFL.com

Feb 16, 2020, 5:00 PM ET

 

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2020 NFL Draft Board: PFF's Post-Combine Risers/Fallers

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WR/TE Chase Claypool, Notre Dame

The combine can be most impactful for players trying to remake their bodies to play a different position. Claypool not only gained nearly 10 pounds (weighed in at 238), but he also kept the same explosiveness with a 4.42s 40-yard dash and a 40.5-inch vertical. My biggest pre-combine worry was his ability to get off press on the outside and run a full route tree. If he can get defenses to treat him as a tight end, those concerns with Claypool go away to a degree and his natural athleticism can be a weapon.

 

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I find it interesting to compare the hype/trajectories of Claypool and Mims. Both had fantastic combines which made the 'fantasy community' sit up and take notice, but it seems that only Mims has had that intrigue sustain in the following week or two. I thought both would be late first round rookie picks, dependent on landing spot and draft capital but Claypool doesn't appear to be in that range. Is it that no one thinks he will be drafted earlier enough to warrant that high of a pick or is it the TE conversion thing (which could conceivably make him more valuable for fantasy)?

I read a mock draft yesterday where Mims was in the first round and Claypool wasn't drafted in the first 3 rounds. I find that a bit hard to believe but maybe I'm way off.

I know teams have asked Claypool to work out at TE or possibly convert, but he hasn't (to my knowledge) said he will, and I would have thought his combine numbers poured cold water on that. Yet people are still assuming that he will play TE for some reason. I will admit that the first time I watched him play I did think he moved exactly like a 'move' TE, so I get it, but he's a WR right now.

Both of them look good to me, but it seems that most people are disregarding Claypool or highlighting his faults, whereas Mims is being pumped up for his upside and potential. Why are these two prospects viewed so differently, given that neither was highly regarded pre senior bowl and combine by fantasy players?

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13 hours ago, RushHour said:

I find it interesting to compare the hype/trajectories of Claypool and Mims. Both had fantastic combines which made the 'fantasy community' sit up and take notice, but it seems that only Mims has had that intrigue sustain in the following week or two. I thought both would be late first round rookie picks, dependent on landing spot and draft capital but Claypool doesn't appear to be in that range. Is it that no one thinks he will be drafted earlier enough to warrant that high of a pick or is it the TE conversion thing (which could conceivably make him more valuable for fantasy)?

I read a mock draft yesterday where Mims was in the first round and Claypool wasn't drafted in the first 3 rounds. I find that a bit hard to believe but maybe I'm way off.

I know teams have asked Claypool to work out at TE or possibly convert, but he hasn't (to my knowledge) said he will, and I would have thought his combine numbers poured cold water on that. Yet people are still assuming that he will play TE for some reason. I will admit that the first time I watched him play I did think he moved exactly like a 'move' TE, so I get it, but he's a WR right now.

Both of them look good to me, but it seems that most people are disregarding Claypool or highlighting his faults, whereas Mims is being pumped up for his upside and potential. Why are these two prospects viewed so differently, given that neither was highly regarded pre senior bowl and combine by fantasy players?

I think its because Mims was the senior bowl standout and carried that momentum through the combine, building on it even more.  

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8 hours ago, kittenmittens said:

I think its because Mims was the senior bowl standout and carried that momentum through the combine, building on it even more.  

That's possibly true, but I thought Claypool had an excellent senior bowl too. 

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17 hours ago, RushHour said:

That's possibly true, but I thought Claypool had an excellent senior bowl too. 

I think he did too, but maybe it was minimized by everyone drooling over what a Tight End specimen he would be?  I picked up on a bit of that narrative I think. 

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Bleacher Report's Brent Sobleski believes that Notre Dame WR Chase Claypool has the most "boom-or-bust" of any wideout in the 2020 NFL Draft class.

Claypool certainly wasn't an unknown name coming in the NFL Scouting Combine -- it would be tough to score 13 touchdowns and go over 1,000 yards receiving for Notre Dame and be anonymous -- but things certainly escalated in Indianapolis this February. As Sobleski notes, the 6-foot-4, 238-pound wideout was a monster in Indy; testing in the 99th percentile with a 4.42 second 40-yard dash, 40.5-inch vertical and 19 bench press reps over 225 pounds. That being said, Claypool has only one year of production that resembles those numbers, and Sobleski notes that he's not a "precise" route-runner that struggles to create separation. "How he's utilized will determine if he's worth a high-round draft pick or doesn't live up to expectations," he writes. It will be very interesting to see where Claypool goes in three-plus weeks. 

SOURCE: Bleacher Report

Apr 4, 2020, 2:26 PM ET

 

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On 3/9/2020 at 6:12 PM, RushHour said:

I find it interesting to compare the hype/trajectories of Claypool and Mims. Both had fantastic combines which made the 'fantasy community' sit up and take notice, but it seems that only Mims has had that intrigue sustain in the following week or two. I thought both would be late first round rookie picks, dependent on landing spot and draft capital but Claypool doesn't appear to be in that range. Is it that no one thinks he will be drafted earlier enough to warrant that high of a pick or is it the TE conversion thing (which could conceivably make him more valuable for fantasy)?

I read a mock draft yesterday where Mims was in the first round and Claypool wasn't drafted in the first 3 rounds. I find that a bit hard to believe but maybe I'm way off.

I know teams have asked Claypool to work out at TE or possibly convert, but he hasn't (to my knowledge) said he will, and I would have thought his combine numbers poured cold water on that. Yet people are still assuming that he will play TE for some reason. I will admit that the first time I watched him play I did think he moved exactly like a 'move' TE, so I get it, but he's a WR right now.

Both of them look good to me, but it seems that most people are disregarding Claypool or highlighting his faults, whereas Mims is being pumped up for his upside and potential. Why are these two prospects viewed so differently, given that neither was highly regarded pre senior bowl and combine by fantasy players?

Claypool didn't break out until his senior season at age 21 so that is a caution for some evaluations. Just watching him, he doesn't look as fast as he timed at the combine on the field. I think he looks rough around the edges and he rarely gets much separation. He seems to lack good footwork and agility to change direction quickly and break on his routes. He was out shined by Myles Boykin who wasn't a quality WR prospect either, but very good times at the combine. A lump of clay that needs coaching on the finer points of playing the WR position.

He wants to play WR because of $$ although he is reportedly a good blocker and seems like more of a fit at TE.

Some players in the past have been considered tweeners like Funchess have not been as successful at WR as they might of been at TE. FWIW I think Claypool is more promising than Funchess because he has good hands. 

As far as comparing him to Mimz, Mimz had more than one good season and he broke out as a 19 year old sophomore.

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In a poll of 17 NFL executives by The Athletic's Bob McGinn, scouts were torn on whether Notre Dame's Chase Claypool will be a wide receiver or tight end at the next level.

As McGinn notes, some teams are vehement that Claypool can succeed at wideout in the NFL after starting 33 games at the position in college, but other clubs are viewing the 6'4/238 Claypool as a tight end.  Landing spot will be massive for Claypool when it comes to his future success.  Many in the draftnik community believe Claypool can absolutely succeed as a wideout after he blazed a 4.42 forty at the Combine.  He joined Calvin Johnson as the only player bigger than 6'4/235 to run a sub-4.45 forty in Combine history.  Claypool is Rotoworld's Hayden Winks' No. 8 wideout and a fringe first-round talent.

SOURCE: The Athletic

Apr 15, 2020, 12:14 PM ET

 

 

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According to Pro Football Network's Tony Pauline, some teams are projected Notre Dame WR Chase Claypool as a tight end at the next level. 

Claypool (6'4/238) tested extremely well at the NFL Scouting Combine, but the question some teams are asking is what position will best suit him at the next level. "Can he hold 238 pounds? And can he play at the speed that he timed at (during the Combine at that weight)?" Pauline asked when discussing Claypool's future during a recent podcast. "Obviously if he's going to move to tight end, it's going to be more of a "move" tight end as opposed to a traditional tight end." Pauline also noted that Claypool will need to improve as a route runner if he were to remain at wide receiver. Some teams project the Notre Dame product as the top tight end in this class, which may say more about the perceived weakness of the position (and a very strong wide receiver class) than Claypool. 

SOURCE: Pro Football Network

Apr 16, 2020, 12:43 PM ET

 

 

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Claypool can be a weapon at WR for sure. If he is used tbe right way. He doesn't have that quick twitch speed but straight inline speed. His size and strength along with that will make him am automatic target in the red zone. His speed and size can threaten defenses for the rest of the field. I would love for him to fall to the third round and my Raiders take him as the second WR of the draft for us.

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Steelers selected Notre Dame WR Chase Claypool with the No. 49 overall pick in the 2020 NFL Draft.

A three-year starter for The Fighting Irish, Claypool (6’4/238) played nearly every position en route to finishing top-10 in school history with 19 touchdown receptions. Unpolished at the position due to his start in basketball, Claypool didn't turn heads until posting career-highs in receptions (66), yards (1,037), and touchdowns (13) on a 28 percent target share as a senior, further flying up draft boards with a sterling showing of elite speed (99th-percentile 4.42 40) and hops (40.5-inch vertical) at Indy's Combine. On tape, he was a difficult tackle on underneath targets — PFF charted him with 27 broken tackles on 151 career catches — and buoyed his elite body control and size into 16 catches 20-plus yards downfield in '19. Claypool will provide a mismatch on offense at the next level, sticking on any roster across the league given his play on coverage teams in all four years at Notre Dame. Few prospects among this year's class sniff his upside. 

Apr 24, 2020, 8:23 PM ET

 

 

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I would not anticipate him being an inline guy. Despite the 40 indicating otherwise he's a slot and sideline guy. I think he pushes Washington for snaps year one with potential for replacing JuJu year two. 

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Plaxico Burress, Martavis bryant. Chase Claypool- Ben is going to love this guy from 30-in.

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1 hour ago, MAC_32 said:

I would not anticipate him being an inline guy. Despite the 40 indicating otherwise he's a slot and sideline guy. I think he pushes Washington for snaps year one with potential for replacing JuJu year two. 

:goodposting:

“word” is Juju will not be a Steelers in 2021

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45 minutes ago, Snorkelson said:

Plaxico Burress, Martavis bryant. Chase Claypool- Ben is going to love this guy from 30-in.

:goodposting:

He loves tall, big WR and that played a big role in this pick 

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Steelers OC Randy Fichtner "anticipates" second-round rookie WR Chase Claypool playing primarily out wide.

Claypool (6'4/238) hauled in 16 catches 20-plus yards downfield in his breakout senior season but was pigeonholed as a tight end at the next level due to his massive frame. Fichtner squashed that sentiment quickly, confirming Claypool would play wideout with some slot sprinkled in. The 21-year-old logged just 106 snaps (a three-year low) from the middle of the field in his final season with the Fighting Irish but could still be shifted there in the red zone to leverage his size. In the meantime, his 4.42 40 and 40.5-inch vertical give him a leg up on James Washington as a downfield boundary threat. This is also a terrific development for JuJu Smith-Schuster, who is just one season removed from averaging 1.93 yards per route run from the slot before disappointing in his injury-riddled third year with below-average play under center.

RELATED: 

James Washington

SOURCE: Brooke Pryor on Twitter

Apr 28, 2020, 11:51 AM ET

 

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