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Pip's Invitation

The Next 100 Songs from 1975, aka Sanbornpalooza. #1: Black Friday

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75. Doctor Wu -- Steely Dan (from Katy Lied)

Classification in 1975: Jazz/rock

Classification today: Yacht rock

I was shocked that Tim's AOR-heavy list included nothing from Steely Dan's Katy Lied. One of the standout tracks is Doctor Wu, which perhaps more than any other track on this record signaled their shift from a pop/rock band with intricate arrangements to a jazz/rock collective with top-of-the-line session players and no worries about making the songs playable in concert (they stopped touring in 1974). The smooth groove, distinctive piano parts and, most importantly, the sax solo by jazz great Phil Woods heralded a new way to fuse jazz and rock that would be acceptable to AM pop stations and FM AOR stations. Don't ask me for an analysis of the lyrics; making sense of the Dan's words has always been a fool's errand. 

Funny thing is, the Dan did start playing the post-1974 material in concert when they resumed touring in 1993; by that point, there was more money in touring than in session work for jazz/rock musicians. I saw Doctor Wu performed at a 2010 rarities-themed show. 

Edited by Pip's Invitation
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11 minutes ago, Pip's Invitation said:

76. Doctor Wu -- Steely Dan (from Katy Lied)

I think you could pick out just about any Steely Dan tune and claim it as your all-time fav.  This one was my fav at different points.  Katy Lied is fantastic album but again that can be said of any studio Steely Dan album.  

Luv Doctor Wu.🎵 🎹

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On 10/15/2020 at 2:50 AM, northern exposure said:

Love Is Like Oxygen

I've heard you don't want to 'get too much' and you certainly don't want to get 'not enough'.

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1 hour ago, Pip's Invitation said:

76. Doctor Wu -- Steely Dan (from Katy Lied)

Classification in 1975: Jazz/rock

Classification today: Yacht rock

I was shocked that Tim's AOR-heavy list included nothing from Steely Dan's Katy Lied. One of the standout tracks is Doctor Wu, which perhaps more than any other track on this record signaled their shift from a pop/rock band with intricate arrangements to a jazz/rock collective with top-of-the-line session players and no worries about making the songs playable in concert (they stopped touring in 1974). The smooth groove, distinctive piano parts and, most importantly, the sax solo by jazz great Phil Woods heralded a new way to fuse jazz and rock that would be acceptable to AM pop stations and FM AOR stations. Don't ask me for an analysis of the lyrics; making sense of the Dan's words has always been a fool's errand. 

Funny thing is, the Dan did start playing the post-1974 material in concert when they resumed touring in 1993; by that point, there was more money in touring than in session work for jazz/rock musicians. I saw Doctor Wu performed at a 2010 rarities-themed show. 

Love it. Could go in a lot of different directions with this album and wouldn't have a problem with any of them.

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19 minutes ago, zamboni said:

Love it. Could go in a lot of different directions with this album and wouldn't have a problem with any of them.

As you might expect, this is not the last we will hear of Katy Lied in this thread.

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74. Fallin' in Love -- Hamilton, Joe Frank and Reynolds (from Fallin' in Love)

Classification in 1975: Soft rock

Classification today: Yacht rock

There is no universally accepted definition of yacht rock -- the term did not exist until the 2005 debut of a web series by that name -- but this song qualifies however you want to parse it. (My preferred definition is "slickly produced material from 1974-82-ish that wasn't disco." My practical definition is "I know it when I hear it.") This song, which topped the charts in the summer of '75, is pretty much textbook yacht rock, with vocals and melody at the forefront, slightly funky guitar, and strings galore. Yes, it's cheesy, but the melody is fantastic and sticks in my head constantly. 

Fun fact #1: The band is named for its three founders, but Reynolds had left by this point. They kept the name anyway because branding. Reynolds was around for their previous big hit, 1971's Don't Pull Your Love. 

Fun fact #2: Hamilton is the last name of the lead singer. Reynolds is the last name of the founding keyboardist. Joe Frank is the first and middle name of the bassist. Who thought this combo of names made any sense or rolled off the tongue? MST3K even riffed on the ridiculousness of the name once. 

Fun fact #3: They were signed to Playboy Records -- yes, Hugh Hefner even dabbled in record-making -- and this was the label's only #1 hit. 

Fun fact #4: This album includes a cover of Who Do You Love? I'm going to assume it's awful. The album also produced another top 40 hit, Winners and Losers. I've never heard it. 

Edited by Pip's Invitation
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24 minutes ago, Pip's Invitation said:

75. Fallin' in Love -- Hamilton, Joe Frank and Reynolds (from Fallin' in Love)

Classification in 1975: Soft rock

Classification today: Yacht rock

There is no universally accepted definition of yacht rock -- the term did not exist until the 2005 debut of a web series by that name -- but this song qualifies however you want to parse it. (My preferred definition is "slickly produced material from 1974-82-ish that wasn't disco." My practical definition is "I know it when I hear it.") This song, which topped the charts in the summer of '75, is pretty much textbook yacht rock, with vocals and melody at the forefront, slightly funky guitar, and strings galore. Yes, it's cheesy, but the melody is fantastic and sticks in my head constantly. 

Fun fact #1: The band is named for its three founders, but Reynolds had left by this point. They kept the name anyway because branding. Reynolds was around for their previous big hit, 1971's Don't Pull Your Love. 

Fun fact #2: Hamilton is the last name of the lead singer. Reynolds is the last name of the founding keyboardist. Joe Frank is the first and middle name of the bassist. Who thought this combo of names made any sense or rolled off the tongue? MST3K even riffed on the ridiculousness of the name once. 

Fun fact #3: They were signed to Playboy Records -- yes, Hugh Hefner even dabbled in record-making -- and this was the label's only #1 hit. 

Fun fact #4: This album includes a cover of Who Do You Love? I'm going to assume it's awful. The album also produced another top 40 hit, Winners and Losers. I've never heard it. 

I thought, for longer than I'm willing to admit, that the group's name was accounting for 4 guys.

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7 minutes ago, Uruk-Hai said:

I thought, for longer than I'm willing to admit, that the group's name was accounting for 4 guys.

Apparently the MST3K guys argue over whether it’s 3 guys (Hamilton, Joe Frank, Reynolds), 4 (Hamilton, Joe, Frank, Reynolds) or 5 (Hamilton, Joe, Frank, Ann, Reynolds).

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1 minute ago, Pip's Invitation said:

Apparently the MST3K guys argue over whether it’s 3 guys (Hamilton, Joe Frank, Reynolds), 4 (Hamilton, Joe, Frank, Reynolds) or 5 (Hamilton, Joe, Frank, Ann, Reynolds).

:lmao:

My dumb ### never even thought about Ann.

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I talked Ann Reynolds down from a bad adrenochrome trip after a Sterno explosion on the baked Alaska cart at a Grosse Point Howard Johnson's in April '75

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46 minutes ago, Uruk-Hai said:

:lmao:

My dumb ### never even thought about Ann.

Dan Hamilton’s wife was named Ann. They wrote several of the band’s songs together, including Fallin’ in Love. 🤣

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On 10/14/2020 at 1:01 PM, Uruk-Hai said:

They really didn't. They had a few pretty big singles, but their albums were all strong - yet they got almost no AOR play. 

I think it was Lester Bangs who described them as "bubblegum with teeth"

I remember they were on the radio a lot in the 70's. They were packaged as top-40, don't really remember them on AOR until much later.

 

Ah marketing.

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73. When Will I Be Loved -- Linda Ronstadt (released as a single)

Classification in 1975: Country rock

Classification today: Yacht rock

This Everly Brothers cover is from Ronstadt's best album, 1974's Heart Like a Wheel, but wasn't released as a single until early 1975. She is in particularly strong voice, and the arrangement keeps everything moving briskly -- all instruments were played by her sideman Andrew Gold except drums (Russ Kunkel) and cowbell (producer Peter Asher). I especially like the timbre she uses, reminding us of her country roots without going over the top with it.

As for the album she actually released in 1975, its best known song, her cover of Heat Wave, is a pretty awful rendition and will not be appearing. 

Edited by Pip's Invitation
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25 minutes ago, Pip's Invitation said:

74. When Will I Be Loved -- Linda Ronstadt (released as a single)

Classification in 1975: Country rock

Classification today: Yacht rock

This Everly Brothers cover is from Ronstadt's best album, 1974's Heart Like a Wheel, but wasn't released as a single until early 1975. She is in particularly strong voice, and the arrangement keeps everything moving briskly -- all instruments were played by her sideman Andrew Gold except drums (Russ Kunkel) and cowbell (producer Peter Asher). I especially like the timbre she uses, reminding us of her country roots without going over the top with it.

As for the album she actually released in 1975, its best known song, her cover of Heat Wave, is a pretty awful rendition and will not be appearing. 

big crush on her back in the day ...loved those cut-offs and tube tops she would wear

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Just now, Binky The Doormat said:

big crush on her back in the day ...loved those cut-offs and tube tops she would wear

She was <chef's kiss>

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13 hours ago, Uruk-Hai said:

Bad Company was in my wheelhouse, as I was 13 years old at the time this record came out. But, even then, they pissed me off. They had talented folks in the band (there may be no more wasted talent in rock history than Paul Rodgers' voice), but they just never got above.......boring.......... to me (among 70s rock bands, only Steve Miller would put me to sleep faster). They plodded, man - like wading through knee-high sludge.

That said, I like some of their songs - like this one - if I don't have to listen to too many in a row.

And I will never forgive them for their God-awful cover of "Young Blood".

Their first album is genuinely great. Took the strengths of Free and smoothed them out a bit. Seriously diminishing returns after that. 

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13 hours ago, Pip's Invitation said:

77. Good Lovin' Gone Bad -- Bad Company (from Straight Shooter)

This was about as gruff as AOR got. Paul Rodgers' vocal virtually growls, and Mick Ralphs' guitar riffs are equally gritty. The lyrics explain why they appear to be so pissed off. Believe it or not, this was the first single from Straight Shooter (Feel Like Makin' Love was second). 

The next four entries are songs that would all have been categorized differently when they came out, but we now call yacht rock. 

High quality problem but this album was bound to disappoint simply because the eponymous debut for the supergroup was so widely beloved. Side A was solid but it just didn't have the same all killer no filler as the iconic first album. Fun song to rock out to back in the day. As mentioned elsewhere, Bad Co. was my first concert (Running with the Pack tour) so they'll always have a special place for me. Rodgers stood out because he sounded so different but he was also a singer's singer.

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On 10/13/2020 at 10:41 AM, Bracie Smathers said:

Emmylou and Bonnie in their prime were five alarm hotties.  

You turned your nose up at seeing this because it had a country funk?

Little Feat - Dixie Chicken (with Emmylou Harris & Bonnie Raitt) Live 1977. HQ Video.

I saw Emmylou perform at a music festival in the mid-90s and she was still incredibly hot. #greyhairdon'tcare

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On 10/13/2020 at 5:59 AM, Pip's Invitation said:

Most of the songs in the 80s are what we now call classic rock. Starting with one not normally associated with this year.

89. Show Me the Way -- Peter Frampton (from Frampton)

This is not the version from Frampton Comes Alive that became a huge hit a year later, but it's very similar. The bass and drums are less forceful than the live version, as might be expected, but Frampton's vocal is the same, the harmonies are better, and the talkbox guitar is still doing its thing. 

I don't think I have heard this version of the song. Much like "I Want You To Want Me" by Cheap Trick, the live version is much better known.

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11 hours ago, Bracie Smathers said:

I've heard you don't want to 'get too much' and you certainly don't want to get 'not enough'.

True and I've also heard 'love gets you high'.

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3 hours ago, Pip's Invitation said:

74. When Will I Be Loved -- Linda Ronstadt (released as a single)

Classification in 1975: Country rock

Classification today: Yacht rock

This Everly Brothers cover is from Ronstadt's best album, 1974's Heart Like a Wheel, but wasn't released as a single until early 1975. She is in particularly strong voice, and the arrangement keeps everything moving briskly -- all instruments were played by her sideman Andrew Gold except drums (Russ Kunkel) and cowbell (producer Peter Asher). I especially like the timbre she uses, reminding us of her country roots without going over the top with it.

As for the album she actually released in 1975, its best known song, her cover of Heat Wave, is a pretty awful rendition and will not be appearing. 

Linda Ronstadt was everywhere on the radio in the 70s. There were songs she covered that I heard long before I heard the original, like "Tumbling Dice" by The Stones.

She had a great way with Warren Zevon songs too.

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8 hours ago, northern exposure said:
On 10/13/2020 at 12:41 PM, Bracie Smathers said:

Emmylou and Bonnie in their prime were five alarm hotties.  

You turned your nose up at seeing this because it had a country funk?

Little Feat - Dixie Chicken (with Emmylou Harris & Bonnie Raitt) Live 1977. HQ Video.

I saw Emmylou perform at a music festival in the mid-90s and she was still incredibly hot. #greyhairdon'tcare

Emmylou's grey is awesome. 👉 PIC   👈

Bonnie always seemed to have that 'shock patch' of grey hair even back in the day. 👉  PIC  👈

It separated Raitt and became her sig look.

 

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12 hours ago, Pip's Invitation said:

74. When Will I Be Loved -- Linda Ronstadt (released as a single)

Classification in 1975: Country rock

Classification today: Yacht rock

This Everly Brothers cover is from Ronstadt's best album, 1974's Heart Like a Wheel, but wasn't released as a single until early 1975. She is in particularly strong voice, and the arrangement keeps everything moving briskly -- all instruments were played by her sideman Andrew Gold except drums (Russ Kunkel) and cowbell (producer Peter Asher). I especially like the timbre she uses, reminding us of her country roots without going over the top with it.

As for the album she actually released in 1975, its best known song, her cover of Heat Wave, is a pretty awful rendition and will not be appearing. 

Sadly, I always think of the end of Cocktail (original Everly version) when I hear this song.

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72. Wildfire -- Michael Martin Murphey (from Blue Sky-Night Thunder)

Classification in 1975: Cowboy music

Classification now: Yacht rock

Murphey had been around since the '60s and played what he called "cowboy music", very much on the "western" side of country and western. This song was his breakthrough into the mainstream, hitting #3 on the Hot 100 and topping the adult contemporary charts. He most likely would not have wanted to be lumped in with the soft rockers and Helen Reddy types who dominated the AC charts, but sonically, this fits right in, from the piano intro and outro to the strings, the keening lead guitar, and (especially) the sweeping harmonies on the chorus. Anything that did well on the AC charts between 1974 and 1982 is a candidate to be retro-tagged as yacht rock, and this certainly fits the bill. The emotion in Murphey's vocal elevates this for me, as do the lyrics -- a third-person account of a woman who died looking for her lost pony (named Wildfire), and how it relates to the narrator's situation -- and especially the way Murphey and his band sing "Wiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiild-fiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiire" on the chorus. 

He claimed to have dreamed the story from this song and has said it was loosely based on a tale his grandfather told him. He said the dream occurred when he was working long hours assisting on a Kenny Rogers album. 

The next entry is about as far from yacht rock as one can get. 

Edited by Pip's Invitation
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49 minutes ago, Pip's Invitation said:

73. Wildfire -- Michael Martin Murphey (from Blue Sky-Night Thunder)

Classification in 1975: Cowboy music

Classification now: Yacht rock

Murphey had been around since the '60s and played what he called "cowboy music", very much on the "western" side of country and western. This song was his breakthrough into the mainstream, hitting #3 on the Hot 100 and topping the adult contemporary charts. He most likely would not have wanted to be lumped in with the soft rockers and Helen Reddy types who dominated the AC charts, but sonically, this fits right in, from the piano intro and outro to the strings, the keening lead guitar, and (especially) the sweeping harmonies on the chorus. Anything that did well on the AC charts between 1974 and 1982 is a candidate to be retro-tagged as yacht rock, and this certainly fits the bill. The emotion in Murphey's vocal elevates this for me, as do the lyrics -- a third-person account of a woman who died looking for her lost pony (named Wildfire), and how it relates to the narrator's situation -- and especially the way Murphey and his band sing "Wiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiild-fiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiire" on the chorus. 

 

Hmm - guess I never listened to or read the lyrics that well. All these years I thought it was Wildfire the horse that died. 

Makes me feel a bit better in a twisted way.

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49 minutes ago, Pip's Invitation said:

73. Wildfire -- Michael Martin Murphey (from Blue Sky-Night Thunder)

Classification in 1975: Cowboy music

Classification now: Yacht rock

Murphey had been around since the '60s and played what he called "cowboy music", very much on the "western" side of country and western. This song was his breakthrough into the mainstream, hitting #3 on the Hot 100 and topping the adult contemporary charts. He most likely would not have wanted to be lumped in with the soft rockers and Helen Reddy types who dominated the AC charts, but sonically, this fits right in, from the piano intro and outro to the strings, the keening lead guitar, and (especially) the sweeping harmonies on the chorus. Anything that did well on the AC charts between 1974 and 1982 is a candidate to be retro-tagged as yacht rock, and this certainly fits the bill. The emotion in Murphey's vocal elevates this for me, as do the lyrics -- a third-person account of a woman who died looking for her lost pony (named Wildfire), and how it relates to the narrator's situation -- and especially the way Murphey and his band sing "Wiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiild-fiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiire" on the chorus. 

He claimed to have dreamed the story from this song and has said it was loosely based on a tale his grandfather told him. He said the dream occurred when he was working long hours assisting on a Kenny Rogers album. 

The next entry is about as far from yacht rock as one can get. 

This record is pure schlock and I love it.

"Been a hoot owl howling outside my window now

About six nights in a row"

still sends chills down my spine

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2 minutes ago, zamboni said:

Hmm - guess I never listened to or read the lyrics that well. All these years I thought it was Wildfire the horse that died. 

Makes me feel a bit better in a twisted way.

She died first, then Wildfire (maybe) did:

Oh, they say she died one winter
When there came a killing frost
And the pony she named Wildfire
Busted down its stall
In a blizzard, he was lost

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1 minute ago, Uruk-Hai said:

She died first, then Wildfire (maybe) did:

Oh, they say she died one winter
When there came a killing frost
And the pony she named Wildfire
Busted down its stall
In a blizzard, he was lost

Thanks for clarifying - back to remorse. :( 

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1 minute ago, zamboni said:

Thanks for clarifying - back to remorse. :( 

You could also read it as neither died

 "they say she died...... in a blizzard he was lost" I

t was the 70s, zam

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I hadn’t thought about Wildfire since I was young until a few years ago when (traumatic?) memories of the song was a key plot point in an episode of a web series an actor friend was in.

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1 hour ago, Pip's Invitation said:

73. Wildfire -- Michael Martin Murphey (from Blue Sky-Night Thunder)

Classification in 1975: Cowboy music

Classification now: Yacht rock

Murphey had been around since the '60s and played what he called "cowboy music", very much on the "western" side of country and western. This song was his breakthrough into the mainstream, hitting #3 on the Hot 100 and topping the adult contemporary charts. He most likely would not have wanted to be lumped in with the soft rockers and Helen Reddy types who dominated the AC charts, but sonically, this fits right in, from the piano intro and outro to the strings, the keening lead guitar, and (especially) the sweeping harmonies on the chorus. Anything that did well on the AC charts between 1974 and 1982 is a candidate to be retro-tagged as yacht rock, and this certainly fits the bill. The emotion in Murphey's vocal elevates this for me, as do the lyrics -- a third-person account of a woman who died looking for her lost pony (named Wildfire), and how it relates to the narrator's situation -- and especially the way Murphey and his band sing "Wiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiild-fiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiire" on the chorus. 

He claimed to have dreamed the story from this song and has said it was loosely based on a tale his grandfather told him. He said the dream occurred when he was working long hours assisting on a Kenny Rogers album. 

The next entry is about as far from yacht rock as one can get. 

I was good friends with the person who hates Wildfire more than any other human. I met Chick Rains in the 70s at northern NM's greatest country roadhouse, the Line Camp, and found out we both lived in nearby Tesuque. He was anxious to get to know the folks at our commune better (there was a reeeeDIKulous # of hot chicks in it) and i made him an introduction and he got me intros to the local poker circuit.

About a decade later i'm walking thru a Reno poker room and who do i see but me ol pal Chick. He was bandleader for Michael Martin Murphey now that he had sunk to the lounge phase of his career. Nashville had picked up a coupla songs Chick had written so he was about on his way out, which made him freer to elucidate on the holy glow which overtakes MMM when he sings the song which he truly believes God delivered unto him for the strict & express purpose of gittin him all famouslike. Chick invited me to the show and the inside scoop gave extra Rocky Mountain spirit to the experience for me. He was indeed imbued with wildfire. good times -

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3 minutes ago, wikkidpissah said:

I was good friends with the person who hates Wildfire more than any other human. I met Chick Rains in the 70s at northern NM's greatest country roadhouse, the Line Camp, and found out we both lived in nearby Tesuque. He was anxious to get to know the folks at our commune better (there was a reeeeDIKulous # of hot chicks in it) and i made him an introduction and he got me intros to the local poker circuit.

About a decade later i'm walking thru a Reno poker room and who do i see but me ol pal Chick. He was bandleader for Michael Martin Murphey now that he had sunk to the lounge phase of his career. Nashville had picked up a coupla songs Chick had written so he was about on his way out, which made him freer to elucidate on the holy glow which overtakes MMM when he sings the song which he truly believes God delivered unto him for the strict & express purpose of gittin him all famouslike. Chick invited me to the show and the inside scoop gave extra Rocky Mountain spirit to the experience for me. He was indeed imbued with wildfire. good times -

I had “hot chicks from communes” on my Wikkid bingo card! Woot!

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71. Hang Up Your Hang Ups -- Herbie Hancock (from Man-Child)

Miles Davis invented jazz-rock fusion, but Hancock took it a step further with 1973's Headhunters, adding heavy doses of elements from contemporary funk. Two years later with Man-Child, Hancock evolved the sound further by adding electric guitar to the mix. The first track, Hang Up Your Hang Ups, is the most successful, building up incredible momentum despite keeping a rock-solid pocket. The guitar and bass groove HARD, allowing space for Hancock and Wayne Shorter to soar. 

Edited by Pip's Invitation

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I always lumped Wildfire along with with another one from the year, but will wait to see if it shows up.

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41 minutes ago, zamboni said:

I always lumped Wildfire along with with another one from the year, but will wait to see if it shows up.

Looking at the rest of my list, there’s nothing that strikes me as a very close match, but we’ll see.

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1 hour ago, zamboni said:

I always lumped Wildfire along with with another one from the year, but will wait to see if it shows up.

Would it be gross?

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7 minutes ago, Uruk-Hai said:

Would it be gross?

No, but you want to run from it.

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6 hours ago, Pip's Invitation said:

73. Wildfire -- Michael Martin Murphey (from Blue Sky-Night Thunder)

Classification in 1975: Cowboy music

Classification now: Yacht rock

Murphey had been around since the '60s and played what he called "cowboy music", very much on the "western" side of country and western. This song was his breakthrough into the mainstream, hitting #3 on the Hot 100 and topping the adult contemporary charts. He most likely would not have wanted to be lumped in with the soft rockers and Helen Reddy types who dominated the AC charts, but sonically, this fits right in, from the piano intro and outro to the strings, the keening lead guitar, and (especially) the sweeping harmonies on the chorus. Anything that did well on the AC charts between 1974 and 1982 is a candidate to be retro-tagged as yacht rock, and this certainly fits the bill. The emotion in Murphey's vocal elevates this for me, as do the lyrics -- a third-person account of a woman who died looking for her lost pony (named Wildfire), and how it relates to the narrator's situation -- and especially the way Murphey and his band sing "Wiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiild-fiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiire" on the chorus. 

He claimed to have dreamed the story from this song and has said it was loosely based on a tale his grandfather told him. He said the dream occurred when he was working long hours assisting on a Kenny Rogers album. 

The next entry is about as far from yacht rock as one can get. 

This is what I love about these countdowns. I look at the artist's name/song title and I'm sure I have never heard the song before. I click the link and within 30 seconds, I'm saying "I remember this one!".

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49 minutes ago, northern exposure said:

This is what I love about these countdowns. I look at the artist's name/song title and I'm sure I have never heard the song before. I click the link and within 30 seconds, I'm saying "I remember this one!".

I had a similar moment in the Van Halen countdown yesterday.

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2 hours ago, zamboni said:

No, but you want to run from it.

If it's that song

that was used in Glee, then no

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5 minutes ago, Pip's Invitation said:

If it's that song

  Reveal hidden contents

that was used in Glee, then no

 

I have sons, so don’t know anything about Glee, but Googled it and that’s it. As bad as the song is, the video is worse:

https://youtu.be/yYFKS3xxF3M

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15 minutes ago, zamboni said:

 

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I have sons, so don’t know anything about Glee, but Googled it and that’s it. As bad as the song is, the video is worse:

https://youtu.be/yYFKS3xxF3M

 

@zamboni 

I had never heard that song before today. Doesn't remind me of Wildfire at all.

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5 minutes ago, northern exposure said:

Which song?

Little Guitars. I figured it was called "Senorita." 

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8 minutes ago, Pip's Invitation said:

@zamboni 

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I had never heard that song before today. Doesn't remind me of Wildfire at all.

 

Yeah, they’re different songs - I just associate them together because I think they were on the same 8-track I had when I was a little kid.

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70. Walking in Rhythm -- The Blackbyrds (released as a single)

This appeared on a late 1974 album but wasn't released as a single until early '75. It's a breezy soul song with vocal arrangements I find really compelling and a flute solo! The electric piano and the vocal treatments on the "get back hooooome" part hint toward disco, but don't really cross the line. 

The Blackbyrds consisted of guys who met in a class taught by jazz trumpeter Donald Byrd at Howard University. Byrd played on some of their records; this song has a trumpet part but I don't know for sure if it's him. They had several R&B hits, but this was by far their biggest success on the pop charts, hitting #6 on the Hot 100. 

Edited by Pip's Invitation
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