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  1. Been gone for 5 months. Did I see we're about to break $3?
    10 points
  2. 20 miles this morning. Probably the first time I've ever done a 20-miler on a Tuesday before work. Solid run, ready to pace Mrs. @gianmarco to that BQ in 19 days!
    9 points
  3. Your judging is fantastic, well done! Your counting is abysmal, watch Sesame Street!
    9 points
  4. This has gotten a whole lot better at CASA Otis. In part because our puppy has gone from new awful puppy to pretty cool older puppy. In part because I made my work situation better and committed to making time for myself for work out. And in part because I came up with a secluded workspace and setup that lets me get my job done. All things humming more smoothly here. Settling into WFH life. Seems like it may be the new norm...
    9 points
  5. Alright, Part II of Legendary Directors. See Part I here. @Ocram This is a wrap for scoring purposes. 9. Billy Wilder (8 points) Representative Films: Sunset Blvd, Double Indemnity, Some Like It Hot, The Apartment, Stalag 17 I absolutely love Billy Wilder, and I wish I could rank him higher. He’s probably the best writer of all-time. While I did give him a little bit of a boost in this tier over Hawks and Wyler for the writing, I think this as far as I can before I start weighing writing too much over directing, and I am trying to keep the principal focus on directing. Like Huston, he’d be much higher on a list of writer-directors. I came across a quote where Wilder said that he became a director only by necessity, because he was tired of seeing other directors mess up his scripts; but he still became accomplished at it. He was pretty versatile across genres, writing/directing maybe the greatest film noir (Double Indemnity) and the greatest comedy (Some Like It Hot). I think his best directing job was in Sunset Boulevard; lots of great shots in that movie. 8. Charlie Chaplin (9 points) Representative Films: Modern Times, The Kid, City Lights, The Circus, Gold Rush, The Great Dictator I think it is impossible to separate Chaplin the director from his other roles in the creative process of creating his movies. Take a look at the side bar on the Wikipedia page for City Lights, for example. Directed by Charlie Chaplin. Produced by Charlie Chaplin. Written by Charlie Chaplin. Starring Charlie Chaplin. Music by Charlie Chaplin. Edited by Charlie Chaplin. Like Wilder, Chaplin would be higher on a list of writer-directors. He made so many great features that have stood the test of time, in some cases for over 100 years. While his work pre-dated some of the camera advancements in later years, even looking at him as a director alone, he was a perfectionist, known for taking hundreds of takes for some scenes to convey the right emotion/feeling. The ending of City Lights is just fantastic: avoiding close-ups the entire movie until the last scene to give it that extra impact. Tier Break A new tier here if I could where I get to the directorial masters. I’m using fewer words from here on out because I think we all know the highs/lows, and their names should mostly speak for themselves, as many are now just reduced to adjective form (e.g., Felliniesque, Wellesian, Kubrickian, Hitchockian). Plus, I’ve got to get to writing up the 1920s/30s, and 40s. 7. Federico Fellini (10 points) Representative Films: La Dolce Vita, 8-½, La Strada, The Nights of Cabiria Fellini has a pretty good 1-2 punch in 8-½ and La Dolce Vita that are commonly listed among the greatest films of all-time. While I like foreign films, I’d still be inclined to throw in a Wilder or Chaplin before one of his movies, but taking an objective look at Fellini (and my personal views out of it), I can’t deny the influence of his directorial style. 6. Orson Welles (11 points) Representative Films: Citizen Kane, A Touch of Evil; The Lady from Shanghai; The Magnificent Ambersons; The Trial While he was as good a (if not a better) director as anybody above him, his troubles with financing movies hurt him a bit here. He has a short list of great films, but he was a better director than the quantity of great films that he left behind suggests. Citizen Kane is deserving of its place as one of the greatest films of all-time. The use of deep focus with Gregg Toland expanded the movie canvas, and the use of expressionistic lighting and low camera angles were part of a change in Hollywood, as well as the non-linear story structure. I love a good tracking shot, and the opening of Touch of Evil is one of the greatest of all-time. 5. Francis Ford Coppola (12 points) Representative Films: Godfather Trilogy; Apocalypse Now; The Conversation; Rumble Fish He has the greatest 1-2 punch in Godfather Parts I and II that are both well-deserved in discussions as among the greatest movies of all-time. His directing style gave it the timeless feel of both its time, and of an earlier time. Apocalypse Now a peak third movie too. I also loved his directing job in The Conversation, using cinematography and sound to tell the story better than any spoken words could (I'm probably a bigger fan of his directing in that movie than I am of the movie itself). The strength of his filmography tailed off a bit starting in the 1980s, but his output in the 1970s stands as the greatest decade of production that any director has put together. 4. John Ford (13 points) Representative FIlms: Stagecoach; The Searchers; The Grapes of Wrath; My Darling Clementine; The Quiet Man; Mister Roberts Ford’s strength is in the depth of how many great movies he made. A record four Academy Award wins for Best Director. The Grapes of Wrath is an American classic. The Searchers was given a #4 rank here for greatest Western, but I think a pretty good argument could be made for it to be #1. He also has some other peak westerns in My Darling Clementine and Stagecoach. Ford brought landscapes to life and made them part of the picture. The images that he captured of Monument Valley in his movies are just iconic. 3. Akira Kurosawa (14 points) Representative Films: Rashomon, The Seven Samurai; Throne of Blood; Ran; Ikiru; Hidden Fortress His films influenced a generation of directors who were drafted in the modern director category. His style of interspersing quick action cuts with longer shots a master in editing and has been copied over and over. The stories themselves are timeless too. The Seven Samurai has been “re-made” in several different forms. I also love the narrative structure in Rashomon. I came across a quote from an assistant of Stanley Kubrick’s: “So, if Kubrick was cast away on a desert island and could only take a few films, what would they be? My money would be on The Battle of Algiers, Danton, Rashomon, Seven Samurai and Throne of Blood.” That’s three of five to Kurosawa. 2. Alfred Hitchcock (15 points) Representative Films: Vertigo, Rear Window, Psycho, North by Northwest, Strangers on a Train, Rebecca, Notorious The Master of Suspense. If I could take only one director's entire film catalog on a desert island (i.e., more than just the five limit referenced above), it may be Hitchcock. Hitchcock has a greater quantity, but that also led to more movies that I'm not as high on (like The Birds). He’s also every bit the technician of others on this list. The Rope, filmed as if in one long take is an underrated marvel to watch, and the inverted camera shots in Vertigo are great too. 1. Stanley Kubrick (16 Points) Representative Films: The Killing, Paths of Glory, Dr. Strangelove, 2001: A Space Odyssey, A Clockwork Orange, Barry Lyndon, The Shining, Full Metal Jacket, Eyes Wide Shut A worthy pick for the 1.1. His ability to make films considered classics across many different genres makes him stand out on this list. It is close between him and Hitchcock for #1 for me here. I think Kubrick was more consistently great than Hitchcock, and I think Kubrick was superior from a stylistic/visual perspective. Kubrick had a style all of his own that I don't think any director has ever consistently replicated, and may never do so. As I mentioned, a love a good long take and tracking shot, which are part of his hallmark. Kubrick's shots in the trenches in Paths of Glory, as well as the steadicam in The Shining are a couple of the best examples of it.
    8 points
  6. Yo Mama Loves The Villains Tier 1 – The Icons The baddest of the bad, to greatest of the great. The most memorable, quotable, and visible characters in their franchises that all maintained greatness across multiple movies, outshined all heroes that tried to thwart them, and ultimately defined the term Villain. 14 points – The Joker – Completely overshadows Batman in every film format he appears in, in both depth of character and interest – notable by Oscar-worthy portrayals from Nicholson to Ledger to Phoenix (not to mention Romero of TV). No other villain in the DC movie universe comes close to this great. 15 points – Hannibal Lecter – Wow, what a character and what a villain. Another character that makes a good movie an all-time great. Who else could become an almost sympathetic person despite feeding a person his own brains and getting him to enjoy the meal? Sequel and prequel versions are equally as creepy and epic. 16 points – Darth Vader – And finally the greatest. I remember at age 7 having my first literal in-theater “oh, ####” moment when Vader first boarded Leia’s ship. I didn’t even get in trouble for saying it since my dad laughingly agreed with me. I can’t think of another character that has given me so many different goose bump moments in various movies. From the original appearance and his first force-choke in A New Hope, to seeing his helmet off in the meditation chamber and “I am your Father” in Empire, to the anti heel turn in ROTJ, to his first breath in Revenge of the Sith, to his epic dismantling of the rebels at the end of Rogue One. His theme music is also bar none. Top notch movie character of all time! Fin
    8 points
  7. Male Legends Pt 3 I looked at box office during their peak, longevity, sustained relevance/interest/mystique beyond their movie career and gave credit to them for being in important or classic movies that will be watched and taught into the future with the idea that it will preserve some status for them and I do believe great stars should make great movies. I gave no credit for acting awards. 5. (12 pts) Clark Gable: "The King of Hollywood". An incredible 69% of his movies made over $100 million adjusted box office. Higher than any other major star. His movies averaged $166 which was the highest of any of the legends by $20 million. He was ranked in the list of "Top 10 Box Office Draws" for 16 years. Only Tom Cruise, Clint Eastwood, Gary Cooper and a person to name have done it more years. Gable was half rogue, half boy. The kind of a guy who could win a fight, tell a joke, have a dozen drinks and get the girl, in any order. That's not even just in the movies. He lived the star life sleeping with his co-stars (Grace Kelly, Lana Turner, Joan Crawford, Carole Lombard to name a few) and drinking like a fish, all to the point of self destruction. During the War when he flew missions over Germany, Hitler put out a very large reward for anyone who could bring him Gable unscathed as Hitler was such a big fan.It is really splitting hairs with Cooper but The King is the star of the highest adjusted grossing movie of all time. Signature roles: Gone with the Wind, Mutiny on the Bounty and It Happened One Night but also checkout The Misfits. 4. (13 pts) Cary Grant: The idea that the most stylish and charming leading man in Hollywood was also a natural with physical humor and verbal wit seems almost impossible but that is the character Archie Leach created for himself. He made a career out of mostly playing "himself" which is the real sign of a movie star. Sure, Cary Grant could have done more complicated acting and gotten deep into another character but who wants to see that when they could have Cary Grant just being Cary Grant? Like Gable, he had an incredibly high hit rate at the box office but has left us with more first rate films than Gable. Cary Grant raises the quality of every movie he is in by a significant margin. Signature roles: His Girl Friday, North by Northwest, The Philadelphia Story but also check out The Awful Truth. 3. (14 pts) John Wayne: The Duke delivered 51 $100 million movies, most of anyone I saw and spent 25 years as a "Top 10 "Box Office Draw", the most of any actor ever. Four years more than Eastwood. His career spanned the 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s and he won an Oscar in the 70s. He is still synonymous with the western genre. At this point, it's really almost personal preference or knit picking to try and separate them. My dings on Wayne are that I disliked the triangulation of his movie roles, personal politics and actions in life. Also, he was the weakest actor of the lot and he had very little range. Signature roles: Stagecoach, The Searchers, Rio Bravo but also check out Red River. 2. (15 pts) Humphrey Bogart: The most unlikely of leading men turned himself from heavy to romantic lead with Ingrid Bergman while never losing his world weariness and rough edges. He was a small and slight man but had a gravitas that made him feel every bit as menacing and tough as the much larger John Wayne. When people think of actors from the 40's, they think of Bogart with the hat, cigarette and trench coat. He has it all. Great movies, solid career length, legendary couple status with Bogey-Bacall and great acting chops. Picking between him and Stewart was damn near impossible so I went with the only objective way I could split them: Stewart had more hits and a longer career as a leading man. Signature roles: Casablanca, The Maltese Falcon, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre but also check out The Harder They Fall. 1. (16 pts) James Stewart: 44 $100 million dollar adjusted movies, 30 consecutive years as a leading man, more timeless classics than any other movie star IMO. He's always charming and lovable across any genre. The second he begins talking on screen, you are drawn to him. It doesn't matter if he is sharing the scene with Hepburn, Grant or John Wayne. He has star power like the sun. The ability to shine and blot out every other star on the screen but also the power to fade back and let his light reflect off of the other stars on the screen. Signature roles: Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, It's a Wonderful Life, Rear Window but also check out Winchester '73. There is probably something to be said about the American male over the 20th century and how deeply they have been shaped by those last 6 men. Even if people hadn't seen their films, these icons rubbed off on the culture and the very idea of what an American male was. This was in fact the first time we had walking, talking heroes bigger than life in front of the eyes of the whole country and these male archetypes solidified in place. The quiet, unassuming, naive, lunch pail carrying, coal mining, tractor driving Coopers. The devil may care, street wise, slug of whiskey drinking, wise cracking and girlfriend stealing Gables. The dry wit, tailored fashion, not a hair out of place, delivering even his insults with manners metrosexual Grants. The big, rugged, my way or the high way, football coaching, flag waving, F-150 driving, proud SOB John Waynes. The detached cool, play by my own rules, tough guy with a heart of gold, lone wolf Bogarts. The optimistic, industrious, energetic, idealistic wholesome Midwest, make your dreams come true Stewarts.
    8 points
  8. Rolling out Part 1 of Legendary Directors... Legendary Director Rankings (Part 1) I’ve tried to take into account a little bit of everything in making these rankings: (i) the quality of films that they produced, (ii) the reputation of the films both in their own times and in modern times, (iii) how innovative they were; (iv) reputation in the film industry; and (v) how much I enjoy their films myself. Also, I’m interpreting “legendary” as referring more to the pre-1980 time period to distinguish from “modern” directors, and not to some kind of “film legend” status. I have, at times, given a director a little bit of “extra credit” in their rank where it is close for being a writer-director on films that they directed. I don’t think being a writer-director is necessary or a paramount factor, but, in measuring the greatest directors (whose job is to control the creative process of putting the film on the screen), that means that I’m thinking about everything that person can bring to the creative process. When I raised this point the other day, this seemed to raise some disagreement earlier about how much to take that into account, but I think it is worth some acknowledgement when directors can bring more to that creative process than just their work behind the camera. I don’t think I’m overdoing it, but it does result in some subtle changes to the rankings. I did not take into account films that they did not direct, but were otherwise involved in. For example, I have not taken into account Orson Welles’ voice-over work in The Transformers movie. Representative Films below are just some Cliff's notes in some films that stood out to me as I was thinking about the director. Obviously, taking whole career into account; just expressly mentioning a handful in for each. Also, I will mark down directors that pled guilty to drugging and raping a 13 year old because, I mean, they pled guilty to drugging and raping a 13 year old. With that said…. 16. Roman Polanski (1 point) Representative Films: Chinatown, Rosemary's Baby, The Pianist Any number of legendary directors (e.g., Frank Capra, Buster Keaton, FW Murnau, Renoir, Fritz Lang, etc.) that went undrafted in a fun movie draft, and instead I’ve got to rate a rapist, who has been accused of sexual assault by five women. Alrighty then. As someone else said, no one wants to rank anyone or any film at the bottom, and I don't really want to rank any of these directors as the bottom director of this group; except, well, I'm perfectly content ranking Polanski last. While I would like to keep the personal aspects separate and focus on the technical aspects, I think that has to weigh in, as his filmmaking career has obviously correspondingly declined since then too. I haven’t seen any of his films outside Chinatown and Rosemary's Baby (I liked Chinatown, but so-so on Rosemary’s Baby). The Pianist has a good reputation, but I’ll take folks word on that. No interest in giving him my money, and I’ll never understand why anyone still does. A number of people walked out of an event where he recently received an award: consider this my walk-out. Maybe I’m guilty of a foul here and I'll plead guilty to that, but, hey, Polanski pled guilty too. Sorry, not sorry. I’m not sure if I’d move him up much higher even if I took that entirely out of it. At best, I’d slot him around #13 here. 15. Cecil B. DeMille (2 points) Representative Films: Cleopatra, The Ten Commandments, Sign of the Cross He went pretty early in this draft, but I don't think his films hold up all that well. I've got a box set of his films, but I can’t say that I’m all that excited about watching any of them again. His films made money, but they look very dated, and are unwatchable. I love older movies, but if I was trying to encourage someone who was unfamiliar with older movies some suggestions on where to start, DeMille would be pretty low on my list. He certainly had a mass market appeal — I could see how something like Claudette Colbert's milk bath in Sign of the Cross would have been titillating in an era without porn available on the internet at demand. I don’t think they hold up today relative to movies made by directors that were his contemporaries (see the ones that I mentioned above that went undrafted). He’s got the legend in “legendary,” but, as I said upfront, I’m interpreting legend as just being temporal in nature. Even taking my own personal views out of it, his movies are hard to find on any of the AFI Top 100 lists relative to the films of other directors who were drafted (and I think only The Ten Commandments went drafted here -- even Murnau, who died at 42, had two drafted); so, I don't think I'm on an island. There’s a Howard Hawks quote that “I learned right in the beginning from Jack Ford, and I learned what not to do by watching Cecil DeMille.” I'm not trying to slam DeMille too hard, but I think Hawks had the right idea. 14. Michael Curtiz (3 points) Representative Films: Casablanca, The Adventures of Robin Hood, Yankee Doodle Dandy, Angels with Dirty Faces I like all of the representative films that I mentioned above and he was a solid director. Casablanca is enough to definitely make him worthy of a selection (and he deserves a share of credit for that, even if focus mostly goes to the cast and writing), but I think his reputation is more as a studio director and I don’t think his style of directing has had the lasting influence as others on this list ahead of him. 13. Stanley Kramer (4 points) Representative Films: The Defiant Ones; Guess Who's Coming to Dinner; Judgment at Nuremberg; Inherit the Wind; It’s A Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World He directed several socially important ones during a very turbulent era. The Defiant Ones and Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner stand out in that area to me. Three Oscar nominations for Best Director. He also produced (but did not direct) several memorable films like High Noon, The Wild One, The Caine Mutiny, but I'm judging him on the films that he directed. Great career in Hollywood whose influence went far beyond what he directed, but I don’t think he has a filmography that stands up to the ones above him on this list. 12. John Huston (5 points) Representative Films: The Maltese Falcon, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, The Asphalt Jungle, The African Queen The Maltese Falcon as a directorial debut is a pretty stand out way to start a career. Five Best Director nominations at the Academy Awards, including a win for The Treasure of Sierra Madre. A writer-director, he was on the literary end, with focus on telling the story. However, his use of light and camera angles in The Maltese Falcon became an important ingredient in all of the film noirs that followed it, so he brought some technical strengths to movies too. 11. Howard Hawks (6 points) Representative Films: Bringing Up Baby, Rio Bravo, His Girl Friday, The Big Sleep, To Have and Have Not, Red River I’d start a new tier here if I could, and I wish I could give Hawks more than 6 points, but just a lot of greats above him. This is around where things start to get to what I consider the elite, all-time greats. Hawks just put out a lot of high-quality films in a variety of contexts. He made some great Cary Grant comedies like Bringing Up Baby and His Girl Friday, some classic Bogart/Bacalls, and a classic western in Red River. He had an even straight forward way of telling a story that was pretty effective; he did not need any camera tricks and made viewers feel like they were in the picture. 10. William Wyler (7 points) Representative Films: The Best Years of Our Lives; The Little Foxes; Mrs. Miniver; Ben-Hur; Jezebel; The Heiress I've been digging a bit more into the William Wyler catalog the past few years, and I’ve really loved what I watched. The way that the camera focuses on Bette Davis at the end of The Little Foxes as her husband is struggling with a heart attack is brilliantly filmed (as the 1940s judge, The Little Foxes going undrafted left some points on the board for the 1940s). The Heiress has a similarly cold ending with Olivia de Havailland walking up the stairs with a slight smile while Montgomery Clift frantically knocks on the door. The Best Years of Our Lives was ahead of its time in its discussion of PTSD and GI's readjusting to civilian life post-war. It also features some great cinematography from Gregg Toland, who was a frequent collaborator with Wyler (Toland probably best-known for his work on Citizen Kane). Wyler also holds the record with 12 Academy Award nominations for Best Director. Incredible output over a long career, and was tempted to move him higher, but just a tough group ahead of him. [Rest to come.]
    8 points
  9. So to recap: phony fear-mongering socialism is BAD and worth starting an armed conflict over. Actual FASCISM is cool, cuz lib tears. I'm old enough to remember when a conservative would have freaked the F out if (insert pretty much everything Trump does here).
    8 points
  10. 7 points
  11. TIER 2 - the trailblazers, the blockbusters, the non-writers This is by far the tier that I struggled with the most. There are some fantastic movies in the bunch here, but IMO something was holding them back from the next tier- mostly that late career wall, the consistency, and the lows are a bit lower here. Make no mistake - some of my favorite movies are in this tier, which is what made it hard for me. 4PTS - RIDLEY SCOTT Known for: making better movies than his brother. Bringing us one of the best franchises and deciding to destroy it years later Highs: Blade Runner, Alien, Blackhawk Down Lows: Exodus: Gods and Monsters, Alien: Covenant Did I say that I love some of these movies? This will be a theme, but those highs are damn good. Got knocked down on this tier because unlike another name, he didn't create this franchise and his lows are worse than the others in this tier. I did like the Martian, but most of the last 20 years has been average to poor. Damn, this tier is hard. 5PTS - JAMES CAMERON Known for: kickass ladies and directing 5 movies at a time Highs: Terminators, Aliens Lows: Avatar - besides being visually great in 3D, that movie is no beuno This tier is going to be the contentious tier. Again, I love a lot of his movies. Lost the tie breaker to the two names above for lack of specific visual style and lack of variety. Does the big blockbuster as good as anyone, but now has retreated to his home on Pandora. Got the boost over Scott for writing/creating his own work. 6PTS - ROB REINER Known for: Being a Meathead and a jack of all trades Highs: Stand By Me, When Harry Met Sally Lows: the 00s+ He gets the top of this tier for the wide variety of movies that he was good at. The two I listed, Spinal Tap, Few Good Men, Misery. He dipped his toe in a variety of genres and was able to be damn good at all of them. Pretty much ruled the 80s and early 90s, but I have to look at everything - and that include late career stuff like Rumor Has It. I kept staring at him as maybe being in the next tier, but these next guys have that style where you look at and start watching the movie and you know who is behind the camera, and I feel like Reiner is lacking there.
    7 points
  12. That’s not how it goes. It’s either: I’ll take “things I’ll never watch” for 1000, Alex. or What is “things I’ll never watch”.
    7 points
  13. Yo Mama Loves the Villains, Part Deux Tier 3 – The Crazy, The Cool, The Characters These villains brought real-life menace, making their evil easier to connect to and in turn scarier and more realistic (even in the two more fantasy worlds). Incredible performances by the actors made them the highlights to their stories, but lower impact outside of their individual movies keep them below the tiers above. 5 points – Khan – Incredible villains in both the original and reboot versions, with awesome performances by actors with top notch accents. I still remember vividly the ear bug/worm scene as I was fairly young seeing this in the theater. Unfortunately, I feel this character remains trapped only amongst trekkies in pop culture aside from another character yelling his name, hence the lower ranking. 6 points – Nurse Ratched – Ruled the psych ward with an iron hand and a capricious will. Her name became synonymous with authoritarianism within a beurocracy. The somewhat rare role of villainess was knocked out of the park by Fletcher, earning her a best actress Oscar. 7 points – Alex DeLarge – The rare villain and hero that was the protagonist for the whole film. Rapist, murderer, high-speed ménage a trois haver, avid milk drinker, victim. . . Alex is all that and more. 8 points – Hans Landa – Waltz’s Oscar winning performance combined with Tarantino’s intense dialogue led to some of the most stressful scenes without any corresponding action in modern film – the efficient professionalism he brought to hunting Jews brought new evils to the simple act of drinking milk or eating streusel. 9 points – Anton Chigurh – Another Oscar-winning role for this haunting hitman played by Bardem, but this villain was far from ordinary. He brought his own sense of ethics and justice, as well as a unique weapon to the party. This was a good movie made great by this incredible villain. 10 points – Hans Gruber – Brilliant, cunning, ruthless, sassy. Rickman brought it all to this role that redefined the action movie villain. The top “human” villain, but he couldn’t rank any higher than this due to his overall legacy outside the movie compared to the behemoths ahead.
    7 points
  14. 6 points
  15. Just want to say that there was finally a decent morning to run and it felt so great. Despite being pretty hurt and then lazy the last couple of weeks, today was the fastest paced run I've had over any distance since starting to run again over Memorial Day - 8:41 pace for 6 miles and I could have kept going. Just the motivator I needed after so many sweaty, swampy miles without much sign of improvement, other than the ability to handle increased milage. Already looking forward to tomorrow's run, so hopefully I'm back out of my slump
    6 points
  16. 10. Rick Blaine (7 points) How well does the pick fit category – how heroic was he/she/it? Rick Blaine wasn’t a hero in the classic sense. He’s a jaded, semi-shady business owner at the start of the film. He states on several occasions, "I stick my neck out for nobody." So why is he a hero? Because unlike most action heroes there is some depth here. At one point in flashback he’s a romantic innocent but as everyone knows love sometimes leads to heartbreak and that leads to cynicism. Once he gets to Casablanca, he’s a jaded, hard-hearted capitalist; but by the end of the film, a committed, self-sacrificing idealist. I’m not sure Rick quite rises to the level of “heroic”, but the sacrifice is there and at worst he’s a noble man who did the right thing when it really mattered. How iconic is the character? “Play it again, Sam” is an iconic line that unfortunately does not appear in the movie. The film is iconic, and Rick is a well known character but is somewhat less than iconic. How good was/were the movie(s) and portrayal(s)? One of the best movies of all-time and a great portrayal. No issues there. AFI Top 50 Hero List Ranking: 4 9. John McClane (8 points) How well does the pick fit category – how heroic was he/she/it? John McClane was a reluctant hero. The trailer for the first Die Hard film states, "The last thing McClane wants is to be a hero, but he doesn't have a choice." Later on in the series he indirectly describes himself as “the wrong guy in the wrong place at the wrong time” and that says that he’d gladly let some one else be the hero but often he has no choice. While not every element of being a hero is in place, the employees working at Nakatomi Plaza sure think he’s one. How iconic is the character? "Yippee-ki-yay, mother####er" How good was/were the movie(s) and portrayal(s)? The films surely dropped off as the series continued with the last one in Russia being absolutely awful but the first two are great action flicks and the third was entertaining enough. Bruce Willis is the perfect combination of sarcastic, tough and vulnerable (at least early in the series). AFI Top 50 Hero List Ranking: NR 8. Dirty Harry Callahan (9 points) How well does the pick fit category – how heroic was he/she/it? From wiki: In this day and age, a violent cop may not be seen as a hero – but when your wife gets kidnapped by a rogue motor-cycle gang feel free to call Rick Blaine or Atticus Finch and see what happens. How iconic is the character? Callahan is so iconic that his nickname, "Dirty Harry", has entered the lexicon as slang for ruthless police officers. He has two of the most iconic catchphrases of all time in “Go ahead, make my day” and “you've got to ask yourself one question: 'Do I feel lucky?' Well, do ya, punk?'”. How good was/were the movie(s) and portrayal(s)? Dirty Harry movies are mostly entertaining but far from great cinema. Clint is Clint. AFI Top 50 Hero List Ranking: 17
    6 points
  17. That stock is my biggest candidate for a massive drop wiping out a lot of peoples paper fortunes in it. Anyone who bought that stock in the high 20’s (yes in 2011 it was trading around 25 and change and I bought it.....and sold it in the 300’s thinking I made an amazing trade and I never got back in) and is still holding are out of their minds not selling here if they had held this long. For an old school guy like me who does not see the earnings growth needed to justify this multiple and does not buy into the entire cult like hype that they are going to be the only game in town with EV.....this price is truly insane. I can admit it. I simply don’t get it. Nor do I want to. It feels like the Hindenburg. And at some point it is going to burn to ground when true fundamental reality hits the stock if it does not do whatever the hell people who keep piling into it expect it to do. Somebody tell me.....why should I buy this stock at this price. What is going to make Tesla produce revenue like Apple. Or even Walmart for that matter. Please educate me on this one. And I get it. They are a disrupter. And they are the first. But I do not see the entire country all driving around in Tesla’s and I do not envision everyone using them for their technology. Other car makers will have their own EV models and options. Maybe I am wrong. But I would really love to know what Tesla stock holders are expecting here. Again if you even bought in the low 200’s you should be taking all those profits and not look back. fantastic trade. I can’t see it being sustained based on pure fundamentals.
    6 points
  18. Ok, now that I have a little liquid courage in me, I will stick my next out for some rankings. I think there are 2-3 on here that might be a debate, so we will see when we see. All I have to say is that I do poke fun and make digs, but I tried my best to put aside initial reactions and think about this. And unlike other people drafting and some of the the selections they had to judge I genuinely like all these guys and they put out some of my favorite movies as a collective. There are no bad picks in here, but somebody has to get 1 and 2s and I will at least TRY to verbalize my thought process a little. I will also fully admit to not seeing everything by these guys, but I feel I have seen a majority of the movies and enough to start early on the rankings. Again, what I thought about as I did these: Longevity and quality throughout their career, influence, signature style to their movies, their highs and lows(IMO), how much I like the movies, performances they got out of actors, awards, etc, etc. MODERN DIRECTORS: TIER ONE - the safe guys, the one trick ponies. 1 PT = RON HOWARD Known for: Being Opie and making solid movies Highs: Parenthood, Apollo 13, Frost/Nixon, A Beautiful Mind Lows: Solo, the Dan Brown movies. The main reason why I have him down here is as we got through this, I didn't think this his highs were as good as the others on the list. Basically he is a nice safe director that you know will put out a good safe product. BUT, I unlike some around this tier, I don't you could watch some scenes from a movie and say "ah, yes - this has to be a Ron Howard movie". Yes, he has a directing Oscar - did I mention that this was a hard exercise and that these tiers were very hard to get tiebreakers on? 2 PTS = PETER JACKSON Known for: making nerds' pants tight by bringing their favorite books to screen Highs: Dead Alive, LotR movies Lows: I still can't forgive him for King Kong - easily one of the worst movies I seen by any of the guys on the list, LotR movies Have any of you seen Meet the Feebles? Heavenly Creatures? Dead Alive? THAT dude went on to spend 2 decades on the Hobbit books? While I don't really like them, I gave Jackson the tiebreaker over Howard because I think the LOTR movies were a slightly higher high point and level of difficulty. Not sure he really has a specific style now, besides knowing that if you are watching a LOTR/Hobbit movie you are watching a Jackson movie. Lacks the variety of movies that the others above him have, among other things. 3 PTS - JOHN HUGHES Known for: bringing a voice to teens and a weird muse relationship with Molly Ringwald Highs: Breakfast Club, Planes, Trains and Automobiles Lows : Sorry - Weird Science doesn't hold up that well beside Paxton ruling every scene. Honestly, this one I struggled with. But at the end of the day, this is a director grade, not a writer grade and I felt that a lot of what he gets credit for and bumps up his influence are movies that he wrote but didn't direct - Pretty in Pink, Home Alone, Some Kind of Wonderful, Great Outdoors. Owned the 80s and brought us some iconic teen moments, but it was that reason + basically doing the same thing that kept him out of the next tier.
    6 points
  19. Then again, the Republicans apparently booked that guy who pointed his assault rifles at protesters in St. Louis. Gonna be hard for the Dems to top that.
    6 points
  20. I recently started getting into making my own pizza at home on my Akorn kamado grill, and I know in the grilling thread there are a few guys who also dabble. Since not everyone uses a grill to cook pizza, and some pizzaguys here might not know theres been some pizza discussion in that thread, I figured Id start a dedicated thread to discuss dough, cooking method/temps, recipes, etc... Im still brand new to making pizza at home, but my first attempt last week went pretty well. I decided to enter the pizza world by learning neapolitan dough first since its my favorite and seemed fairly easy when I started researching. After watching probably 50 different neapolitan dough making videos on Youtube, I settled on this one for its simplicity and the fact that its cold fermented, which I like...also, the guy making the video explains everything nice and slow, so its super easy to follow...just mix/knead (I use a Kitchen Aid mixer), put into the fridge for 1-3 days, then portion, ball, and stretch. It doesnt get much simpler than that. And it turned out great. When my girlfriend tried it, she said "Guess we dont need to go out for pizza anymore". Thats about as good of a compliment as I can think of, especially for my first time. Neapolitan dough video (recipe listed below video in link) I also made my own pizza sauce, which was also simple and better than anything youll find in a can or jar. Simple recipe: 14oz can crushed tomatoes (preferably San Marzano) 2-3 TBSP olive oil 1/2 tsp sea salt Clove or 2 of garlic, minced and sauteed for 1-2 minutes few pinches of dried oregano 2-3 leaves fresh basil chopped (or few pinches dried) Combine all ingredients and pulse in food processor until desired consistency. Done. Really bright, fresh flavor, and no sugar. Sugar doesnt belong in pizza sauce. I made a couple of mistakes my first time but overall the pizza was great. I cooked the first one on pizza stone what registered 760 degrees and my grill was 600+ degrees and it was done in less than 3 minutes. On the second pie, I let the heat drop on my grill (accidental) and didnt have enough charcoal to get the stone or grill temp back up, so the stone was only about 570 degrees, and the grill was 450ish. It took longer to cook and wasnt quite as good as the first, but it was still delicious as as good if not better than any pizza place around. First pie Crust Second pie This week Im experimenting with freezing dough. I made the above recipe, let it ferment for 48 hours, portioned and froze it. Im gonna make pizza this weekend and see how it turns out. I wanna try to master Neapolitan style dough before I branch out to other types of crust, so I'm just focusing on that for the time being. Feel free to add any tips, tricks, pics, etc of any style of pizza. LETS EAT!
    5 points
  21. With all the defending judges are having to do it may be in their best interest to dump it all at once and then go hang out in the PSF.
    5 points
  22. I realized today talking to my boss why the company doesn't bother me more discussing their hopes. I work at a 2 year old startup (200+ employees now) in an industry that's not that easy to land huge business. We've been chasing some big clients for some time now, with many deals for our company coming down to the last one or two guys in contention, but never winning the major one. Every time I get updates on the business (am on the executive team) it's all about hopes. It's about plans, putting yourself in the running, improving odds...and a ton of the time, you come up short. Until you don't. And that's where businesses are made. IF you can hold out until that happens, that's what it takes. So many startups just needed that break, and I see a scrappy Cytodyn clawing strongly at many promising opportunities. They're not happening as fast as we want, but when a company is in the position that they're in, with a promising product, they're doing what they need to do. Not fast enough for us, but if you think they've got something, and that if they're given a chance they can show what they can do, then it's tough to turn your back on that. Many startups are the same way, and folks ride them into the ground the whole time saying they're close to a deal. No idea if Cytodyn will hit or not, but I'm in it at least until the end of the year.
    5 points
  23. So what am I supposed to do with my 4 pages of pre-written complaints? Sincerely, Karen
    5 points
  24. For future drafts, another way to handle the "GOAT" category (looking at you, inevitable TV draft): do something like best in show. All the category winners compete against each other for grand champ.
    5 points
  25. I think the director rankings from you and KP so far have been good. There is always something to quibble with but all the rankings are defensible.
    5 points
  26. CONTINUING.... 8. Seven Days In May - 9 pts Written by none other than Rod Sterling during the depths of winter of the coldest part of the cold war. Directed by previously mentioned John Frankenheimer who continues his conspiratorial theme. Frankenheimer was a prolific serious intellectual film maker who was not out to make a quick buck and remarkably candid in interviews. The cast is a murders row: Burt Lancaster (Frankenheimer famously said: 'The problem with Burt Lancaster is he's always wanted to be Burt Lancaster'), Kirk Douglas, Fredrick March (One of my all-time favorite actors. Their was a nationwide poll taken in the 50s asking who Americas favorite actor was - March won more than 80% of the vote over upstart Marlin Brando). Who else to play the president in the cast of heavy hitters? "You ask for a mandate general from a ballot box. You don't steal it after midnight." Ava Gardner among others round out the tremendous cast. The president wants a peace treaty, the Joint Chiefs go off the res with a plot to kidnap the president and start hostilities in order to spring a coupe. The plot slowly gets uncovered in a sensational serpentine Sterling script. Unfortunate timing as 'Dr. Stranglove' correctly denuded the lunacy of nuclear war making the deathly suspenseful paranoiac tone of 7 Days seems slightly anachronistic. 7. Z (1969) - 10 pts French film so outside of Yves Montand I doubt most would be familiar. Yves is perfectly cast as Z the leader of an opposition to a far right leaning oppressive government. Directed by Costa-Gavras known for the US film Missing. Perfectly framed, faced-paced. I had not seen this completely absorbing thriller that never gives time to take a breath. Flows unlike most foreign films. A shocking assassination takes place, will justice be served? A 60s cultural revolution wasn't only taking place in anti-war America it was alive and thriving on the 'Rive Guache' left bank of the river Seine. -------------------------------------------------------- CONTINUING 6. Milk 11 pts Extremely political movie. Back in 91 Robin Williams was slated to play the role of Harvey Milk which would have been the first mainstream movie actor to play an openly gay part which at the time was considered a death to a movie career. Williams would eventually play an openly gay character in a comedy (The Birdcage) in an over the top camp way. The stigma was just too risky at that time when Williams was at the height of his career. Tom Hanks would step-up to the Jackie Robinson level to be the first mainstream movie actor to play an openly gay man in a sympathetic role breaking the barrier for other actors to follow. Milk was a business owner at a time when cops would harass and brutalize gay men. After witnessing one too many police violent actions Milk was called to take political action. I was oblivious to the history of gay rights for my youth and much of my early adult life and the sort of discrimination that the gay community faced. The cast is incredible, Sean Penn (won best actor for the role of Milk), Emile Hirsch, Josh Brolin, and James Franco. Great director in Gus Van Sant. Solid production/film making. Milk rose to hero status as a representative for the gay community at the time he was needed to gain desperately needed civil rights. Anita Bryant waged war against homosexuals calling them pedophiles and equating their sexuality with beastiality setting off a political brawl that would end tragically. 5. The Lives of Others 12 pts Written and directed by Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck, his debut as a director. The script is utterly brilliant in its depth and complexity. Donnersmarck's direction is brilliant. One scene stands out to me, a nude scene with a prostitute that has zero erotic appeal. It stunned me at the time how stark it was and I found an interview with von Donnersmarck where he said that was his intention but he struggled to find an actress who could provide that sort of performance so he hired a nude model who took off her clothing without the slightest hint of self consciousness. The bare emotion when he asks her to stay but she leaves for another job. If you see the movie and note that scene it is like she's changing a tire. I had no idea Donnersmarck was making his directorial debut and that he had written the script. Can't say enough about Florian and his brilliant script and how he went about directing this film. Ulrich Mühe as the lead Stazi agent Hauptmann Gerd Wiesler takes over the role. Every mannerism, movement, the feel. It seems he knows this man who is pure voyeuristically perverse but then struggles to find his humanity. The story is breathtakingly layered with turning points and trauma inspiring character transformations. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ To be Continued...
    5 points
  27. Teen Movies I'll be doing two-four today. These are fresh in my mind and the runners-up, sadly. 35.16 - One Point - Mrs. Rannous @Mrs. Rannous To Sir, With Love - Metacritic (5.5) + Rotten Tomatoes (8.9) + Mine (8.5) + Teen Movie (0) = 22.9 If you wanted the sky, I would write across the sky in letters... This was an unforiunate sixeenth-place finisher, this choice, as it was decent movie. It suffers the fate of not being contemporary and being written as if it were intended to ease the minds of society about our impending doom at the hands of troubled youth. Surely this will be stemmed by the tide of immigrant teachers willing to forego other jobs in order to educate the youth that is being neglected in the East End of London (East Ham, says the bus). It is not a teen movie due to the overall bourgeois moralizing and that the central protagonist is a soon-to-be middle-aged man, however youthful in appearance. It came close to being a teen movie given the use of a constantly contemporary soundtrack and museum montage to its theme song (a theme song featured several times in the movie, thankfully, as it is rather a good song), but it's still not enough to overcome viewpoint or the material provided. 35.15 - Two Points - Dr. Octopus - @Dr. Octopus The Outsiders - Rotten (6.4) + Ebert (6.25) + Mine (9) + Teen Movie (2.5) = 24.15 Nothing gold can stay Another unfortunate finish in a tough category. One of my personal favorities. A star-studded cast. The evocative nicknames. Soda Pop. Pony Boy. Two Bit. Patrick Swayze as Daryl. Matt Dillon as...who cares, it's Matt Dillon? This one got panned by critics but I loved it enough to make it a boyhood staple. Bonus points for Robert Frost being used by S.E. Hinton as thematic device. Forget them dirty Soshes (Socials) and that group fight we're having, let's get Dally while he's still alive! A tragic look at class in young adult America with a studded cast. C. Thomas Howell. Ralph Macchio. Go see this movie!
    5 points
  28. cool - just in time for everyone to have guessed the order and robbed the announcement of all impact
    5 points
  29. Shut up democrats...demmies...but you want intelligent debate? Please.
    5 points
  30. LOL...they literally laughed at him. https://twitter.com/atrupar/status/1295717052662124546?s=20
    5 points
  31. There was once a farmer in ancient China who owned a horse. “You are so lucky!” his neighbours told him, “to have a horse to pull the cart for you.” “Maybe,” the farmer replied. One day he didn’t latch the gate properly and the horse ran off. “Oh no! This is terrible news!” his neighbours cried. “Such terrible misfortune!” “Maybe,” the farmer replied. A few days later the horse returned, bringing with it six wild horses. “How fantastic! You are so lucky,” his neighbours told him. “Now you are rich!” “Maybe,” the farmer replied. The following week the farmer’s son was breaking-in one of the wild horses when it kicked out and broke his leg. “Oh no!” the neighbours cried, “such bad luck, all over again!” “Maybe,” the farmer replied. The next day soldiers came and took away all the young men to fight in the war. The farmer’s son was left behind. “You are so lucky!” his neighbours cried. “Maybe,” the farmer replied. Things that happen to us are what they are and whether we see them as an opportunity or a disaster largely depends on us and how we respond. This type of story shows us that we don't ever TRULY know how things will all turn out and I use it as a way to keep things in moderation in my life and not get too reactionary or stressed to environmental things. -Maybe this period is a time to draw closer to your family, spend time with them and make memories that you never would have in the "everyday rat race" world where you got stuck in that same old routine. -Maybe this period is a time that you are extremely lucky to actually be at home when your puppy is needing the most training and bonding. If the world were "normal" would you guys be coming home to all kinds of puppy messes, torn up things, a puppy learning that his life is being crated for 12 hours a day vs. having all his family around him for you and the kids to bond with? Maybe this experience becomes one where you will look back some day and see that this is how your "best" boy" became your "goodest boy". -Maybe this period is a time when it helps take stock of your job or lifestyle (mental, exercise, spiritual, etc) and compared to is this how you enjoy living life. Otis is a smart cookie and only he walks in his own shoes but the message is "maybe" see the opportunities here as much as the very real challenges (those are all legit) and "maybe" the stress won't seem so stressful. Best of luck.
    5 points
  32. After 9 category rankings I'm setting at +17 for draft points of where I drafted verses what I scored. Biggest "get" was Glenn Close and Gary Cooper with +8. Biggest "bust" was Wag the Dog at -6. I'm liking my draft quite a bit so far. Thanks to all the judges for your hard work!
    5 points
  33. Hero Rankings A movie hero is a fictional character who, in the face of danger, combats adversity through feats of ingenuity, courage or strength – stolen from somewhere on the internet. First of all let’s make this clear that this is not the “great character” category it’s for Heroes only. My criteria for rankings: How well does the pick fit category – how heroic was he/she/it? How iconic is the character? How good was/were the movie(s) and portrayal(s)? AFI Top 50 Hero List Ranking I awarded each character points from 1-10 for each of my four criteria and also gave them points based @Yo Mama ‘s rankings. I then added those points together to form the final rankings. I did look over the list after it was sorted by numerical score and perhaps gave some small tweaks up or down based on "gut". Rocky Balboa and Han Solo received the biggest bumps up and Rick Blaine and Ethan Hunt received the biggest bumps down after combining @Yo Mama ‘s ranks with my original scores – but none were major shifts in the ranks. 13. Sara Connor (4 points) How well does the pick fit category – how heroic was he/she/it? I wouldn’t necessarily call Sara a hero in the original Terminator, but she also wasn’t the typical damsel in distress. In T2:Judgment Day, she surely was heroic and a bad ###. Ultimately Skynet was not stopped, just postponed a bit. How iconic is the character? Not very. The Terminator androids are the real stars in this franchise. How good was/were the movie(s) and portrayal(s)? The films are also iconic and are way more than the sum of their parts. Linda Hamilton played the role well and looked so buffed in T2. I did not see Genisys but I doubt that portrayal would make or break this pick. AFI Top 50 Hero List Ranking: NR 12. Wolverine (5 points) How well does the pick fit category – how heroic was he/she/it? Wolverine also known as “Logan” is a mutant born with retractable forearm claws and a powerful healing factor and who did not age. A government experiment where adamantium steel was merged with his skeletal makeup, including his claws made him all the more powerful. He was more a reluctant hero who acted more out of a sense of loyalty than inherent “goodness” but a hero nonetheless. How iconic is the character? X-Men were one of the biggest selling comic book series in the Marvel catalogue with Wolverine being the most popular of the X-Men. The movies have all been blockbusters. How good was/were the movie(s) and portrayal(s)? While his solo films were pretty poor, the X-Men films were mostly very good, with a few exceptions. Outside of Robert Downey Jr., as Iron Man, Hugh Jackman as Logan ended up being the most perfectly cast Super Hero. AFI Top 50 Hero List Ranking: NR 11. Superman (6 points) How well does the pick fit category – how heroic was he/she/it? Superman is a fictional superhero who first appeared in the comic book Action Comics #1 (published April 18, 1938). I don’t think I need to explain the mythos behind the former Kryptonian as his story is well known. Superman stands for truth, justice and the American way (despite being an immigrant). He is a hero of the upmost degree. The one drawback that I can come up with is that it’s a lot easier to be heroic when you are the most powerful man on the planet and those silly bullets just bounce off of you. How iconic is the character? The character of Superman is very iconic but that was the case long before his first appearance in a feature film in the 1950s. Despite his notoriety coming from many different media sources, the Man of Steel scores well with this part of the criteria. How good was/were the movie(s) and portrayal(s)? This is where the character takes a beating. The Christopher Reeve movies were ground-breaking and he was well cast, particularly in the role of Clark Kent but they were pretty goofy and did not age all that well. Man of Steel had some serious potential but just couldn’t tie it all together and overall most of the big screen portrayals of Kal El have been poor efforts. Superman is a great hero, but not necessarily a great movie hero. AFI Top 50 Hero List Ranking: 26
    5 points
  34. They are fun, and I'll take my 2. There's no need to re-rank. We've never thrown out judges decisions, and we won't start now. I'm sorry I said you ruined a category - that's really poor on my part. Most of these drafts do not have criteria set out. In the case of this movie draft, I personally assumed the criteria is generally great all time films. So like for action, assuming it's an "action movie" overall, I would take that as film quality first - it's why things like Die Hard (not my pick) get drafted so high, because it's just a great movie, despite not being the "most action-y". I don't see any reason your son should give up his categories. Let him judge as he wishes, whether he agrees with what I wrote above or not - it's up to him (and yes, there will always be some heat - we all take heat as judges (whoever took Tom Seaver in the sports draft is probably still mad at me for ranking him second to last, and in retrospect, they have a legit beef.) Again, I apologize to you. I don't want to make you feel bad about this. You were a super enthusiastic drafter, and you made this draft better.
    5 points
  35. What’s he supposed to do after 10am?
    5 points
  36. There's something about your avatar and Norman Bates together that just creeps me out!
    5 points
  37. It was in the specs for the last upgrade, but we had to allocate an abnormal amount of storage to @shuke’s inbox to keep the place running properly.
    5 points
  38. Yo Mama Loves the Villains Tier 4 – The Menacing Monoliths They’re big and bad; seemingly unbeatable forces of evil that our heroes must band together to defeat. What brings them down in the rankings is a collective lack of depth of character and development. 1 point – Thanos – Wipes out half of the living universe with the snap of his fingers, and in turn spawns waves of online debates about “What if Thanos was right?” Bonus points for smashing Hulk into a cowardly mess, but I never really felt the “oh crap” menace with Thanos that I did with other legendary villains. 2 points – Agent Smith – The first Matrix is where Smith is at his realest – in terms of both his emotions / motivation as well as his physical representation. Unfortunately, he wasn’t a factor throughout the full first movie, while his importance grew in the sequels at the same rate that he became more of a cgi caricature. 3 points – The Terminator (T-1000) – Well, I originally had the Arnold version ranked as a 10 pointer until @Dr. Octopus mentioned the selection was the liquid metal version from T2. It gets bumped way down due to lack of character and legacy, but still isn’t last due to its huge initial impact and previously-unseen insane special effects technology. 4 points – Godzilla – Rates at the top of this group due to the overall “wow” factor and impact on popular culture. The lack of any personality as well as being penalized for future weaker iterations keeps it from getting near the other all-timers.
    5 points
  39. ***PROGRAMMING ALERT*** To drive up anticipation and since there are lots of other rankings being released right now, the official rollout of Yo Mama’s Villains rankings will delayed until after I eat dinner.
    5 points
  40. Well, as many of you know, I was an employment litigator (defense side) for many years before going in house almost four years ago. It’s been a huge learning experience and I’ve been able to work on a ton of interesting things. Because of the nature of my job, however, I haven’t been able to really talk about most of what I do, which is why I rarely contribute to this thread. However, a deal I’ve been working on day and night for a long time just closed this morning. I think I can finally call myself a deal lawyer after this one. It’s public in the press so I can mention it generally (though I don’t plan on linking it in this post directly out of an abundance of caution). My employer just bought a sports franchise. It’s been an incredibly exciting deal to work on and I’m super excited that the team is now part of our business enterprise. But I really need some sleep now.
    5 points
  41. I can’t help but wonder.... What would Susan B. Anthony think?
    4 points
  42. Loading up the top shelf bottles and packing them up.... https://imgur.com/a/CQ7HYo1
    4 points
  43. This is :Coordination: - The Senate Intel Committee also found that WL had coordinated with Russian intelligence. Also:
    4 points
  44. My main thought watching Michelle Obama was the idea of the need for decency and humanity in our government. It was moving and admirable in the sense it recalled what our country is or should be about. The earnestness shown through. Great speech.
    4 points
  45. @Joe Bryant posted something on Twitter that I wholly agree with yesterday: Pre Covid, College was already a questionable financial decision for many. But the idea we're supposed to smile and accept the assertion online classes deliver a value remotely close to the in-person experience could be the wake-up call for lots of people. UNC probably had good intentions and the kids just did what I think we all think kids are gonna do but the above statement rings true. Paying full bhote for a college education is enough of a drain, paying full bhote for Zoom meetings is highway robbery. Add in that a good portion of students have to secure housing and sign year long leases well in advance to secure a spot and you're compounding the problem. Just all looks like a disingenuous money grab from institutions that are already questionable when it comes to fees. I say this as a father who just dropped his daughter off at USC (SC not CA) for 1 in person lab and 4 online courses.
    4 points
  46. I’ve seen enough of your work to realize that any further exchanges between us would be fruitless. Your flag is clearly planted. I’ve tried explaining things with my first hand knowledge, hoping you would take a step back and breathe instead of regurgitating right wing links and pretending that you know about things that are clearly outside of your lane. Have a great evening.
    4 points
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