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facook

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  1. Somewhere in this thread I ranted about the COMPLETE lack of editing of that trainwreck of a book. Pretty sure I read somewhere that he self-published...thinking he self-edited as well.
  2. How are you liking Anathem? I loved Cryptonomicon and The Baroque Cycle, and I'll be finishing Reamde this evening (highly recommended btw). But the first time I tried Anathem I gave up 50 pages in cause I got tired of looking up every other "word" in the glossary. After enjoying Reamde so much, I've been considering giving Anathem another shot. Your thoughts?
  3. Oh, also very that GRRM has delayed Dance With Dragons in paperback. Waited a year to buy that in paperback (probably seems stupid, but the wife and I both love the series and she hates hardback tomes ). Now have to wait until March of 2013 to get it. you George.
  4. Well I'm at about 50% and loving it. I wonder if the stuff that bored you was the intricacies of the online game and how to launder money through it? That made me wanna hurl the book across the room. But I'm glad I stuck with it. The action in Xiamen China is completely engrossing. Stephenson manages to convince me to suspend disbelief over unbelievable coincidences, and each new character he brings into the action is interesting and sympathetic in his/her own way. My 2 cents anyway.I was a huge Neal Stephenson fan after Cryptonomicon and The Baroque Cycle. I tried Anathem and made it about 75 pages before giving up out of fear I might yawn myself to death (also got very tired of having to flip to the glossary every other paragraph to re-learn what some nonsense word meant). Enjoying Reamde enough I might try it again though. Anyone who read Ananthem have any input?
  5. Recently finished 11/22/63. Very, very enjoyable book. Probably my favorite King book in the last 10 years or so. I agree the first half was better than the second, but I was perfectly satisfied with the conclusion. Now reading Reamde by Neal Stephenson. Some of the techno-geek stuff gets a little cumbersome, but the underlying story/adventure/intrigue is a lot of fun.
  6. Recently finished Mister Slaughter by Robert McCammon. Really like the Matthew Corbett series. 1/4 of the way through 11/22/63 and love it so far.
  7. Is The Killing worth starting? I pretty much know how season 1 ends (heard a lot about it in media last year) but does Season 2 make Season 1 worthwhile?
  8. I've recently re-read The Talisman by Stephen King and Peter Straub. Originally read this as a teenager and remember liking it much more back then. Also re-read Desperation by King. Really enjoyed it much more the second time. I'd put it in the top third of King books. Right now reading Dragonfly by John Farris. Picked it up at a used bookstore based solely on the Stephen King blurb on the cover (yeah, I've been in a King rut ). I'd give it a 2.5 out of 5 so far. I'll stick with it, but hoping for more. Waiting for 11/22/63 and Dance with Dragons to hit paperback.
  9. A couple of suggestions. If you liked The Passage, try Carrion Comfort by Dan Simmons. It's outstanding. Another good one by Simmons that's a little more "reality" based is The Terror - a British explorer ship becomes locked in the Arctic Ice. I loved it.One of my all-time favorites is Shantaram by Gregor David Roberts.Finally, I'd recommend Cryptonomicon or The Baroque Cycle (a trilogy) by Neal Stephenson. Kind of his own genre, but highly entertaining.All of these are long and feature highly entertaining characters and fantastic storylines.
  10. Thank you but WTF is season 2!?! And why only 3 episodes? Huh? Huh? :rant:More questions then answers, imo.You can watch it on PBS dot org for the next few weeks.
  11. I thought his First Law Trilogy was ok - but there were a ton of (what I considered) large plot holes and characters not acting at all logically. It was a good for a first trilogy but as far as fantasy/sci-fi he usually breaks into the 3rd-4th tier of books I recommend.Just started The Blade Itself. I've read mixed reviews here and elsewhere, but I thought I'd give it a shot. After meeting the first three central characters, I'm pretty intrigued.Recently finished The Burning Soul by John Connolly. I've mentioned him several times - Connolly is just outstanding if you like crime/PI novels - and the creepy and supernatural factor makes his writing that much better in my opinion.
  12. Enjoyed this a lot. Recommended.The deaf scene at the end of Season 1 was Every uncensored second of Will Arnett in the series is I don't quite recall the scene you are referring to, was it in the very last episode? I'll have to watch it again tonight. The peanut allergy scene from episode 3 or 4 was some of the best physical comedy I've seen Cross pull off yet. When he discovers the tour of Parliament is actually a deaf tour so he pretends to actually know how to sign and then he starts talking like deaf people do. It was the funniest scene I have have witnessed in quite some time. So awkward, and so funny.
  13. I'm in my early 40s, which means that as a precocious reader in my tween and early teen years, there just wasn't much for me to read. Girls had Judy Blume, and boys had Stephen King, which wasn't aimed at us, but was pretty much the closest thing we had to Young Adult fiction.Then one summer my aunt gave me a Ken Follett book. "Triple," about the efforts of a Mossad super-agent to steal the uranium Israel needed to build an A-bomb, without the rest of the world knowing it happened. It was great, for the action and for a couple of harder-than-soft-core-but-not-quite-pron sex scenes that blew my mind. I read all his stuff: Eye of the Needle, Key to Rebecca, and his real-life Iran story "On Wings of Eagles." So I've always had a soft spot for him, and enjoyed Pillars of the Earth when I read it a few years ago. So when I picked up "Fall of Giants," I was predisposed to find the good in it. About 800 pages later, I was still looking. It was really horrible crap. On a related note, my other favorite inadvertent Young Adult author was Clive Cussler, whose Dirk Pitt novels (like Follett's) combined action, historical references, and geopolitics with steamy sex scenes. I loved "Raise the Titanic!" as well as the less-renowned "Night Probe!" which had one sex scene I remember bringing to school to share with my seventh grade classmates. It wasn't until much later that I realized novels with exclamation points in their titles maybe weren't necessarily awesome. You know, in thinking back about these books, I just remembered the other author who completed my youthful Holy Trinity: Edgar Rice Burroughs. John Carter of Mars, Tarzan, the Pellucidar series (which started with "At the Earth's Core" and later featured an incredible crossover installment - "Tarzan at the Earth's Core"). I spent summers growing up with my grandparents in their cabin in New Hampshire, and paperback editions of Burroughs novels lined the shelves. Flash forward at least 10 years and I'm a freshman English Lit major at a snobby New England liberal arts college. I walk up to a group of classmates having a discussion about "Burroughs." Astonished that such a group of tweedy self-proclaimed literary intelligentsia are talking animatedly about my boyhood hero, I'm this close to jumping into the conversation with a comment about Tarzan when I realize they are talking about another "Burroughs," who had written some book called "Naked Lunch." I'm now 34 and still think Dirk Pitt is awesome. 37, and The_Man is dead on. Early Follett was money, especially the espionage stuff. I loved Pillars of the Earth, and like its sequel. Fall of Giants was garbage.
  14. Do you like other fantasy, or just GoT?Not much. I've liked Tolkein, CS Lewis, and GoT, though I've enjoyed King's style of fantasy (if that's what you'd call it), some of Neil Gaiman, and a couple of John Connolly books as well. I'm almost embarrassed to admit that while I'm a huge fan of Dan Simmons for much of his work, I couldn't get into his fantasy stuff at all. Just too dense of an alternate world for me. Maybe that's more sci-fi?I don't really consider myself a "fantasy" guy but I loved GoT. Curious what else is out there.Loved GOT. It was my first real foray into the fantasy genre. I have never ready any high fantasy like Tolkein or Wheel of Time but I jumped into The Kingkiller Chronicles (Name of the Wind and Wise Man's Fear) after reading GOT based on recommendations and I loved it. Can't recommend the series enough. Is more fantasy orientated than GOT because it has a lot to do with magic but also has some of the realism GOT brought to the fantasy genre. There is some world building involved and you are going to get introduced to a few "non-human" races but nothing to the extent of like legions of orcs and elves (atleast not yet). Crudely it is a mix between GOT and an adult Harry Potter (because of the magic college stuff). The magic system is more reality based (as much as one could be) than Harry Potter and has limitations. It differs from GOT in that it is from the POV of a singular character.Pretty good breakdown here. I'm not too far into Name of the Wind, but I'd agree that there are similarities with GoT. While there are spots that lag, the overall story is very compelling to me. And while it's true there is world-building, it's nothing so dense as some of the stuff I've tried (I could only stay with Tolkein because I'd previously seen the movies). Like GoT - and The Dark Tower as well - I've had no problem envisioning the world and the players, even when they're only alluded to. I guess that's the reason I love GoT and why I've really dug Name of the Wind so far: the fantasy part is enough to be interesting and intriguing, but the realism and grit and the characters are what keep me turning pages.I have yet to read Rothfuss's work so I can't offer any opinions on it yet.But a great option in fantasy that minimizes the magic is the First Law trilogy by Joe Abercrombie. Magic plays a very small role and the books focus much more on the characters. There are slightly less political machinations in Abercrombie's books, but more action and a faster moving story. He does carry the 'gray' characters that Martin is so famous for, where there is no such thing as pure evil or pure good. Plus, the series is done. And Logen is the best fantasy character I have ever read, with Glokta not all that far behind. Thanks for the rec.
  15. Do you like other fantasy, or just GoT?Not much. I've liked Tolkein, CS Lewis, and GoT, though I've enjoyed King's style of fantasy (if that's what you'd call it), some of Neil Gaiman, and a couple of John Connolly books as well. I'm almost embarrassed to admit that while I'm a huge fan of Dan Simmons for much of his work, I couldn't get into his fantasy stuff at all. Just too dense of an alternate world for me. Maybe that's more sci-fi?I don't really consider myself a "fantasy" guy but I loved GoT. Curious what else is out there.Loved GOT. It was my first real foray into the fantasy genre. I have never ready any high fantasy like Tolkein or Wheel of Time but I jumped into The Kingkiller Chronicles (Name of the Wind and Wise Man's Fear) after reading GOT based on recommendations and I loved it. Can't recommend the series enough. Is more fantasy orientated than GOT because it has a lot to do with magic but also has some of the realism GOT brought to the fantasy genre. There is some world building involved and you are going to get introduced to a few "non-human" races but nothing to the extent of like legions of orcs and elves (atleast not yet). Crudely it is a mix between GOT and an adult Harry Potter (because of the magic college stuff). The magic system is more reality based (as much as one could be) than Harry Potter and has limitations. It differs from GOT in that it is from the POV of a singular character.Pretty good breakdown here. I'm not too far into Name of the Wind, but I'd agree that there are similarities with GoT. While there are spots that lag, the overall story is very compelling to me. And while it's true there is world-building, it's nothing so dense as some of the stuff I've tried (I could only stay with Tolkein because I'd previously seen the movies). Like GoT - and The Dark Tower as well - I've had no problem envisioning the world and the players, even when they're only alluded to. I guess that's the reason I love GoT and why I've really dug Name of the Wind so far: the fantasy part is enough to be interesting and intriguing, but the realism and grit and the characters are what keep me turning pages.
  16. Thanks for the suggestion. I finally watched episode one of Sherlock last night. Awesome. Can't wait for season 2.
  17. Do you like other fantasy, or just GoT?Not much. I've liked Tolkein, CS Lewis, and GoT, though I've enjoyed King's style of fantasy (if that's what you'd call it), some of Neil Gaiman, and a couple of John Connolly books as well. I'm almost embarrassed to admit that while I'm a huge fan of Dan Simmons for much of his work, I couldn't get into his fantasy stuff at all. Just too dense of an alternate world for me. Maybe that's more sci-fi?
  18. Gave up on Fall of Giants by Ken Follett. Just too ridiculous with all the characters coincidentally meeting each other and major historical figures. Think Forrest Gump, but taking itself seriously. Flew through Moonlight Mile by Dennis Lehane. Fun, easy sequel to Gone Baby Gone. Now starting The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss, first in a fantasy trilogy. Based entirely on reviews I read on Amazon and my love of Game of Thrones. 100 pages in, and loving it so far.
  19. Taking a break from Song of Ice and Fire to read Ken Follett's Fall of Giants. About 120 pages in, and so far pretty . Does it get better? I really dug the Pillars of the Earth books, and his earlier espionage novels. But this one's just not doing it for me so far.
  20. About 10% in and, man, is this a creepy book. Not in a monster-in-the-closet kind of way (at least not yet - blurb mentions a vampire which I haven't come across to date), but more in a people-doing-bad-things-to-other-people way. And the atmosphere is unsettling in a way that the atmosphere in some Kubrick movies are - kind of sterile and alien. It's translated from Swedish, so maybe that plays into it some. In trying to compare it to someone I've read before, Peter Straub would be closest I guess.
  21. Game of Thrones Mystery by Peter Straub. Good, but my least favorite of the trilogy (I read them out of order). The Wolf's Hour by Robert McCammon. One of his earlier novels. A laughably ridiculous premise. Probably the worst McCammon book I've read, and I'd still rank it above average just because of his ability to write a compelling story. Now 100 pages into Clash of Kings. I seem to remember some people complaining that the series drags pretty badly at some point. Is that right? Well, for now I am completely enthralled.
  22. September iphone price point would be expected to be what? $299? More? And will it be available at both AT&T and Verizon?
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