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RedmondLonghorn

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Everything posted by RedmondLonghorn

  1. The championship game last year was a heart-breaker. I know the goalie who started for Cornell last year and I felt so bad for him. He and the defense gagged pretty badly in the last part of the 4th quarter. And it was a shame because Jake had been standing on his head for most of the tournament.I was at the game at Gillette and still have never seen a tape of the full last half-minute from when Cornell had the restart after the bad pass out of bounds.What I thought was that the Cornell defenseman ... I can't remember if it was Moyer -- seemed to have an alley for the clear up the left side from where he started, but instead threw it across to the right side. That was where Syracuse's ride forced the turnover.Still, an unbelievable heartbreaker and a shame given how great the Big Red had played for 59+ minutes.I had that on my DVR for a long time afterwards, but I've since deleted it.I remember I had to leave during the mid-3rd, and I set it to tape, making sure I put in a lot of extra time for OT. Good decision....Do you ever go to Bandits games?
  2. The championship game last year was a heart-breaker. I know the goalie who started for Cornell last year and I felt so bad for him. He and the defense gagged pretty badly in the last part of the 4th quarter. And it was a shame because Jake had been standing on his head for most of the tournament.
  3. All i know is that in a year and a half, my brother went from never playing the sport and getting cut from his middle school team to starting on the varsity, making the top summer travel team in NJ and getting letters from D1 schools (including the Ivy's). If he can do that, after being very mediocre at every other sport he tried, i gotta think a 5'11 200 lb RB that runs a 4.4 would catch on pretty quick.No doubt that great athletes can become very good lacrosse players. Great athletes can usually become very good at most sports with coaching and dedication.Your statement may have been intended as hyperbole. I hope so, because the idea that you could take a bunch of great athletes and introduce them to a completely new sport and have them be competitive with the top D-I programs in a year is just ludicrous. As for your statement about the level of pure athlete that plays the sport at the college level, there is some truth to it. The average D-I lacrosse player isn't going to be comparable to a DB or RB at a major college football program in terms of size/strength or explosiveness. But as the sport grows in popularity nationally there are more and more truly athletic kids playing the game. A few are true athletic freaks. Look at Virginia. The Bratton brothers are both elite athletes. Both Syracuse and Virginia have had players who turned down D-I football scholarships to play lacrosse over the last several years as well. Or take a look at a guy like Paul Rabil, who was an AA at JHU a couple years back. He is 6'3" 225 pounds and is one of the fastest guys on the field. He has great feet and quickness. He can also shoot the ball 110 mph. And can shoot accurately, with either hand, while on the run. Could he play in the NFL? No. But he could have been a good LB or WR in college. Maybe not a top player at a BCS school, but he definitely has the athletic ability to have been a productive D-I football player. There is a slight amount of hyperbole in my statement. Maybe a year is too short a time frame. But honestly, given world class coaching (lets say the coach from Cuse of JHU or Duke or wherever) and a decent amount of time to mold a team out of a group of very high level D1 football players, i don't think it would take them a ton of time to be competitive. And honestly, if they had 2 years of practice as a team, i think they could be pretty darn good (maybe final 4 good). I respect the guys that play the sport, but its just a different level of athlete. Size and speed are just a huge part of the game and at this point, the guys that are playing it are almost entirely white kids from the northeast. Nothing against white kids from the northeast (I'm one of them) but the guys from other parts of the country (mostly black guys) are just on another level. Yeah, they'd need time to learn stick skills, but based on what I've seen of the Lax learning curve, it wouldn't take them that much time. Well, I can't disagree totally. There aren't too many real sports where being bigger AND faster than the other players isn't an advantage. The best lacrosse players have always been good athletes. Good feet, quickness and straight line speed all factor into that...as well as hand/eye coordination. So a guy who is 5'8" and 175 pounds, but quick and fast could have historically become a top flight lacrosse player if his skills were good enough. The difference between now and 20+ years ago is the size of the players. There are more and more good athletes who also happen to be big and strong who are playing the game. Is it isn't anything like football at this stage, though. And you can take a good natural athlete and turn them into a decent lacrosse player pretty quickly. I can't deny that...I've seen it happen. However, I will say that there is a difference between having passable stick skills and truly being elite in that regard. The guys who are truly skilled got that way from years and years of practice. They can do things, and make them look easy, that just defy explanation. But as somebody else said, the fact that every player isn't an athletic freak of nature shouldn't take away from the appeal of the sport as a spectator. At least it doesn't for me...
  4. All i know is that in a year and a half, my brother went from never playing the sport and getting cut from his middle school team to starting on the varsity, making the top summer travel team in NJ and getting letters from D1 schools (including the Ivy's). If he can do that, after being very mediocre at every other sport he tried, i gotta think a 5'11 200 lb RB that runs a 4.4 would catch on pretty quick.No doubt that great athletes can become very good lacrosse players. Great athletes can usually become very good at most sports with coaching and dedication.Your statement may have been intended as hyperbole. I hope so, because the idea that you could take a bunch of great athletes and introduce them to a completely new sport and have them be competitive with the top D-I programs in a year is just ludicrous. As for your statement about the level of pure athlete that plays the sport at the college level, there is some truth to it. The average D-I lacrosse player isn't going to be comparable to a DB or RB at a major college football program in terms of size/strength or explosiveness. But as the sport grows in popularity nationally there are more and more truly athletic kids playing the game. A few are true athletic freaks. Look at Virginia. The Bratton brothers are both elite athletes. Both Syracuse and Virginia have had players who turned down D-I football scholarships to play lacrosse over the last several years as well. Or take a look at a guy like Paul Rabil, who was an AA at JHU a couple years back. He is 6'3" 225 pounds and is one of the fastest guys on the field. He has great feet and quickness. He can also shoot the ball 110 mph. And can shoot accurately, with either hand, while on the run. Could he play in the NFL? No. But he could have been a good LB or WR in college. Maybe not a top player at a BCS school, but he definitely has the athletic ability to have been a productive D-I football player.
  5. Huge fan. I still play club lacrosse, when I don't have a devastating knee injury that I am recovering from. I have season tickets for the Washington Stealth, our local NLL franchise, and I also go up to BC from time to time to catch some WLA games.
  6. A Demon of Our Own Design By Richard Bookstabber Best book I have read on systematic financial risk and related topics.
  7. Bodie was one of my favorite characters.
  8. great word. I like saying it on occasion.I think Red disagrees with the spelling. Tertiary
  9. Not only do you NOT get 3G, the 3G version won't be out until later this month and those device are $800, not $400 like you paid. So now you're going to have to shell out another $800 for the new 3G device (and sell your $400 version - or give it to charity), you'll have to buy the $30/month 3G data plan as well.And no multitasking..And no USB...And no tabbed browsing...And apps are 2-5x more expensive.Again, Fanboy prices. You could have bought a laptop or netbook for less than that and got ALL of that functionality. So, you've been suckered again by Apple and like JB said earlier, it looks like you've actually taken a step backwards.And just to clarify, my beef is not that Apple doesn't make great products, because they do and they are all awesome, but the prices they charge are ridiculous and for Fanboys only.Some people are willing to pay up for products that are better designed and more enjoyable to use. Sure, I guess - and for so much less functionality.Well...you made a blanket statement about Apple products. In general, their usable functionality is extremely high. I am still not sure what the exact point of the iPad is though.
  10. Not only do you NOT get 3G, the 3G version won't be out until later this month and those device are $800, not $400 like you paid. So now you're going to have to shell out another $800 for the new 3G device (and sell your $400 version - or give it to charity), you'll have to buy the $30/month 3G data plan as well.And no multitasking..And no USB...And no tabbed browsing...And apps are 2-5x more expensive.Again, Fanboy prices. You could have bought a laptop or netbook for less than that and got ALL of that functionality. So, you've been suckered again by Apple and like JB said earlier, it looks like you've actually taken a step backwards.And just to clarify, my beef is not that Apple doesn't make great products, because they do and they are all awesome, but the prices they charge are ridiculous and for Fanboys only.Some people are willing to pay up for products that are better designed and more enjoyable to use.
  11. I'm not sure I'd have it ranked quite that high, but it was a very enjoyable book. GB "Snack Daddy" There is something about the humor that really appeals to me.
  12. Just about to finish Aburdistan by Gary Shteyngart. It is going to rank pretty high on my list of favorite books of all time.
  13. I'm pretty drunk and it is 9 PM here. Started at 3:30 PM and have been home an hour.
  14. I just finished the Men Who Stare at Goats. I thought it was just a little better than okay. I definitely enjoyed it, but it also rambled on and it's semi-serious tone left me wondering what it was trying to be.
  15. I have made this recipe a couple of times. It is awesome. It is from Robb Walsh's book on Tex-Mex.
  16. "we're like those little #####es on the chess board."--Bodie
  17. I agree with the bolded.I like Gladwell a lot, even though I recognize that he is basically the High Priest of the Narrative Fallacy.
  18. Agreed. I like Gladwell a lot. Outliers and Tipping Point were both easy, interesting reads and there's no better way to waste 15 minutes than to read one of his articles from here: http://www.gladwell.com/archive.htmlI have a friend who disagrees with me though and brought up a good point that I've had a hard time refuting...I say "old ideas from a new angle" and he replies with "so what?" Gladwell doesn't come up with any solutions or ideas to change anything. Just looks at things differently. I say that I don't care...that I'm entertained and interested in the stories and am not looking to change the world. He says that Gladwell's tone is that all of his "findings" are significant and worthwhile even though they are really just good stories and nothing more. It irks him...but doesn't bother me in the least. Interested to hear the thoughts of others... I'm gonna go out on a limb and say that there may be some intellectual elitism at play in your friend's opinion. He is probably a guy that is analytical and has no problem looking at situations and problems from many angles for himself. Sadly, this isn't true for most people. I would say that Gladwell's writing (like Leavitt's Freakonomics) is incredibly valuable if it can serve to get just a few readers to eschew the obvious (and often wrong) conclusions and think a little harder about the world around them.
  19. That is the truth. I was so excited when I saw it listed. But...I thought that No Country For Old Men made an excellent movie. Almost as good as the novel which, when compared to McCarthy at his best, is just okay.I thought that All The Pretty Horses--though one of McCarthy's weakest books--was an awful, contrived piece of crap. Matt Damon. What the jesus. I am looking forward to The Road, which is certainly simple and lucid enough to make for an excellent, if bleak, film. There should be little corruption to the novel. IMDB is telling me that somebody named Todd Field is ballsy/stupid enough to make a movie out of Blood Meridian, which among the 20th Century's great novels. Good luck, pinhead. I hope you save all the footage once the uneditable, incoherent mess you make is never released. Perhaps Werner Herzog will edit it into an "obsessive fruitcake attempts near-impossible task, goes crazy, fails beautifully" documentary. The Road has been released in Australia, to generally strong reviews. I don't know if I want to see it. I mean Viggo Mortensen is great and will probably be great in the Father role, but I don't know if I need to see the stuff in the book. It was hard enough to read.
  20. I took classes in Wing Chun (or wing tsun) kung fu for a while when I lived in Chicago. It is pretty much pure striking, not flashy and very effective. I really enjoyed it (except when I came to work with fat lips and facial bruising), but there is no place that teaches it near where I live now.
  21. It is a very good book and you should read it, but be prepared to probably not enjoy it much, in a conventional sense anyway.
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