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Zoomanji

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Posts posted by Zoomanji

  1. The fish we inherited are:2 tangs of some kind1 4-stripe damsel2 tomato clownfish

    Hermits snails and blenny should be good and helpful. The fish you inherited are somewhat aggressive. Hard to say about the tangs, got any pics? So you may be limited to dottyback/pseduochromis (and only 1 as they will fight). If its a FOWLR and not a reef there are some other choices like triggers, some wrasses and a few othersReefcentral.com is one of the best resources out there for help. You should get a handle on what kind of filtration you have and lighting. Do you plan on keeping coral? Because they will bump up the filtration and lighting requirements and limit new fish choices.If the tank is established it may be ok to add a mandarin, hard to say but you do not need a grassbed.
    Thanks for the insight. Yeah, the kid mentioned that the clownfish in particular are pretty territorial. I'll try to grab some pics of the whole setup sometime this weekend and get information on the filtration and lighting (the best I can tell you is that there are two purple lights and one regular light and the kid suggested that at some point we switch out the purple for a couple of blues which are a higher number of some sort). I promise I will be consulting the local aquarium place around the corner before making any major moves, so don't get freaked out by my sentence above about the lighting. :thumbup:
    ehhh,I'd skip the LFS (local fish store). Too many try to sell people crap they don't need. Really check out the website I listed. No one is selling anything and they can really help. Like the FBG of fishYou really gonna need to figure out what kind of lights you have. Do you know if they are T5s or Power Compacts (PC)/
  2. The fish we inherited are:2 tangs of some kind1 4-stripe damsel2 tomato clownfish

    Hermits snails and blenny should be good and helpful. The fish you inherited are somewhat aggressive. Hard to say about the tangs, got any pics? So you may be limited to dottyback/pseduochromis (and only 1 as they will fight). If its a FOWLR and not a reef there are some other choices like triggers, some wrasses and a few othersReefcentral.com is one of the best resources out there for help. You should get a handle on what kind of filtration you have and lighting. Do you plan on keeping coral? Because they will bump up the filtration and lighting requirements and limit new fish choices.If the tank is established it may be ok to add a mandarin, hard to say but you do not need a grassbed.
  3. I've just inherited a ~140 gallon marine aquarium and am trying to get up to speed on all of this. It's at an office we just bought and the former owner had some guys come out once a month to clean, do the water changes, etc. My partner and I would like to be able to do this ourselves. I had the son of one of our patients come by yesterday and he and I drove to the local aquarium store for supplies. After spending 45 minutes in there, I can already feel the addiction setting in.The fish we inherited are:2 tangs of some kind1 4-stripe damsel2 tomato clownfishAnd yesterday, along with some hermit crabs and snails, we picked up a lawnmower blenny for maintenance purposes.I want to get another couple of fish to add some good color in there but have ZERO knowledge of compatibility, etc. While I think something like a mandarinfish would be cool for our patients to watch, this goofy teenager told me yesterday I would need to get a certain type of grass in the tank and then wait another year before bringing in a mandarinfish.Any suggestions on fish that might get along well with those listed above?

    PM meI can help you out :confused:
  4. Any advice on how to get rid of algae on the glass? I've got several patches of green spots that just won't come off. Scrubber can't get 'em, I've got a couple of otos in the tank (a 30) but they don't seem to do much. Put the whole tank under a black canvas tent for two weeks with zero light and it didn't even weaken the grip this stuff has on the sides. Anyone have a trick that works without killing the fish?

    Razor bladeCheck your LFS for metal scrappers
  5. I've been thinking about selling my paintball gear or skiis to get enough cash to start a 110 tank or a salt water nano. I think my son would love either. I'd probably keep the nano at work though... Had a 55 growing up and enjoyed it. Maybe I'll scrape the cash together to get started soon.

    You can get a 29 gallonn Oceanic Nanocube plus protein skimmer for pretty cheap now, I think 300 or less? The lights are still fluorescent, but you can grow some softies. Throw in a smallish, static fish that likes to nest like a blue spotted jawfish and you have a great tank! Salt is so much more interesting than fresh.
    I meant to address this. Buddy of mine got the 24 gallon nano plus the Halogen light (which were like $250 for just the light) for about $500. Then he threw in about 40 pounds of live rock at about $8/pound. Then he had to buy tons of small crabs, shrimps, and snails to act as a cleaning crew for the tank. That was a couple hun. After adding corals (some costing as much as $90) a red banded shrimp and a couple small static fish he has dropped more than $1500 and getting closer to $2K every day. Looks pretty sweet, but not $2K sweet...He talked about converting his 125 to salt and then he did the math and decided sending his kids to college was more important....
    I guess he could always buy a $2 beta and keep him in a plastic cup. You are inflating the costs on nearly eveything you listed anyway. Please be honest next time.
    Uh, no. I didn't inflate the cost of anything. The 24 gallon cube with the Halogen light was close to $500. 1-1.5 pounds of live rock per gallon is recommended. He put in 40 of the top of the line stuff. Fiji rock maybe. Or was it Fuji. Dunno. I'll dig up the costs and post them later from the emails he sent me...
    I set-up a 75 gallon saltwater for under $2000. Either way not sure what your point is. Fish are expensive unless you want a betta or goldfish.
  6. Well after doing a lot of reading I am going to let the little tank cycle for 3-4 weeks. After that I will start with a clown fish and one other. Once they cycle for a couple of weeks I will then start with the invertebrates.

    Sounds like a good idea. Wish I had seen your post sooner. That Fish Place is awesome BTW.Clowns sound like a good idea, Definitely let it cycle for a couple weeks. If you got test kits, wait till ammonia and nitrite are down to 0 (not close to 0 but actually 0).Did the nano come with a light or did you buy it? You need strong lighting for most corals but with a nano you can have too much. Clams need very clean water, it could be tough. Shrimp are very easy, a cleaner would be good. Don't get a damsel they can get nasty. Besides the clown, I would look at gobies, basslets and dottybacks.Once they cycle is over add a couple snails and maybe hermit crabs.Good luck!!
  7. Good news on the horizon????

    Nearly four years after their break-up, the four members of Phish may have some unfinished business together. In an interview with Rolling Stone last week, Trey Anastasio didn’t exactly say the band has talked about a reunion, but he did drop some heavy hints. “When Phish broke up, I made some comment about how I’m not gonna go around playing ‘You Enjoy Myself’ for the rest of my life,” Anastasio said with a laugh. “And it’s so funny because Fish and Mike and Page have been talking to each other a lot lately and now — it’s not that I can’t believe that I said that, but its symbolic of how much I lost my mind or how much I lost my bearings or something. Because at this point in time I would give my left nut to play that song five times in a row every day until I die. I certainly thought about that while I was in jail.”

    :shrug::wall::clap:
    I didnt want to post it until things sorted themselves out, but around Christmas a good friend who is close to a relation of Trey's said the band was going to get back together if everything went well with his sentence and charges getting reduced - they did very recently, which is why these suggestions are coming out now.Needless to say, I will be beyond :wall: if I get a chance to be awash in the bliss that is a Phish show again.
    :2cents:
  8. OK, so I gutted my 110 last night. Poured water into five 5 gallon gas cans and a couple of coolers. Dumped the fish into a cooler and the plants in the other. Then I drained the rest of the tank. Dumped some gravel into the 75 and the rest I just dumped. Completely cleaned out the tank.

    Ummm, I'm sure you never had gas in them........ :thumbup:
  9. top dog - I don't know if it's been mentioned but please try to remember if you treated that tank with any chemicals while it was a freshwater tank. Many medicines and chemical treatments used for freshwater use copper and other metals that leach into the glass or acrylic and will be toxic to saltwater life, especially corals and shrimp. I don't know if there is a solution to your issue, but talk to the LFS you go to and see what they think about it. If this leads to you aborting the saltwater endeavor, at least it will save you some heartbreak and frustration when/if your stuff dies inexplicably.

    AgreeMost of what I have read recommends not converting salt to fresh and vise versa. The link I posted does have some discussion from people who have done it successfully.One of the biggest problems is that all the equipment other than the tank is different and saltwater lights especially for corals are very $$$$
  10. Ok... I want to convert my 55 gallon fresh to a saltwater tank. I am more than confident in my ability to handle freshwater, but have never set up a marine tank. What do I need to know as far as important differences between marine and fresh setups? I do know one example. A freshwater tank (community, semi-agressive) works best with a PH close to 7.0. A marine tank thrives better at around 8.0-8.4. My African Cichlids like a PH around 8 as well....

    So here is what I have.

    Tank, ample filtration, aeration, heating, protein skimmer.

    I need to pick up some Instant Ocean salt, and some type of substrate. I'm assuming sand of course, but does it matter WHAT type of sand to get? I know that Africans like the substrate that has argonite in it and it helps to maintain a higher PH as well. I wish I knew that before I setup the tank with river rock.

    So. Some tips for someone who knows fresh, but is looking to make the switch to marine?

    PM me if you want I have a 75 and 140 saltwater tank.

    The salt pretty much stabilizes the pH so you shouldn't have an issue.

    Salt water filtration is totally different than freshwater filtration. No need for aeration either. The skimmer though is key, make sure it is rated for a larger tank than the tank you actually have. An underneath sump is also very helpful and a good place for the skimmer unless you have one that hangs on.

    Bottom substrate is also crucial. I would recomend either bare bottom (but it does eliminate some fish that need a sand bed) or sand bed (4-6 inches deep, buy "live sand"). Do not use crushed coral. Looks bad, fish don't like it and it traps too much debris.

    This website is awesome Reef Central and Main Page

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