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Ignoratio Elenchi

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Posts posted by Ignoratio Elenchi

  1. You'll probably have to be less vague if you are opposed to some specific rights for homosexuals or something.Anyway, the answer is no, it wouldn't matter to me. Why would it? If someone was born homosexual, or they "became" homosexual because of some childhood experience (which I wouldn't characterize as "damage" fwiw) what difference should that make in terms of their rights and protections under the law? They're still homosexual, either way.This is like asking what percentage of handicapped people were born that way, and what percentage became handicapped because of some childhood accident. What difference would that make in terms of the rights they deserve as an adult?

    I undestand IE, not sure how old you are and I'm not talking down to you but the gay rights movement in the late 80s/early 90s was predicated on them being born that way. If you said it was a choice they attacked you. And all I'm saying is that there is a difference between a genetic gene of some kind and turning out that way because of influences both good and bad that one experinces in their lives. Forget the rights IE, I'm not against any of that really I'm not. But I am interested in the psychology of the whole thing. The part I don't want to get into in this thread is the relative newness and changing fields of psychology. That "science" is constantly changing and I am interested in the link psychologically in a person becoming homosexuality due to events as they were children. Can you understand that or no?
    Sure, if you just think it's interesting to wonder whether people are born gay or become gay, I totally understand that. But you're the one who's brought up the rights aspect twice now, which makes me believe there's more to your question. Homosexuality isn't a choice. That's a ridiculous argument invented by people with an antihomosexual agenda. The only question is whether they are born gay or become gay. I agree that's an interesting question but it has nothing to do with equal rights or anything.
  2. .I believe a good percentage but certainly not an majority of homosexuals either choose to become gay because of maybe being rejected by their first relationship with the opposite sex.

    Wasn't everyone turned down on their first try?
    Yes Moops, we all were, but it impacts everyone differently. I believe that a certain percentage and it might not be a lot but a certain percentage of folks that claim to be homosexuals, got that way by things that happened in their childhood, both good and bad. Maybe the 1st person that they could identify with happened to be the same sex and they developed true feelings of love for that person and then act on it. That seems like a very normal natural loving way to possibly enter being a homosexual, I don't think all of them were molested along the way. I'm interested in truth and to just take the word of "Born that way"...sorry but I gotta ask more questions.
    What is the point of making the distinction?
    That's a great question IE and I'lll answer itr as best i can although its hard to write it all out in here. Basically, the gay community in the late 80s/early 90s went on a tear thru this country screaming to everyone that they were born this way and wanted equal rights. I really don't have a problem with equal rights and if that encompasses hate crimes I am 100% in the gay corner(sig material) on this. But there are a lot of other avenues that this passes thru that I do have a problem with and can understand why their is opposition to some of the things that they want.I'm not gonna go too into detail right now because this thread will just become napalm and I would really llike to see it live a little. But think if it were 100% hereditary. What if someone did have a traumatic event as a child that psychologically damaged them and then they found themselves being a homosexual or turning to that for comfort. What impact would that have on many of the laws that they are trying to have passed or passed already. Would that matter to you?
    You'll probably have to be less vague if you are opposed to some specific rights for homosexuals or something.Anyway, the answer is no, it wouldn't matter to me. Why would it? If someone was born homosexual, or they "became" homosexual because of some childhood experience (which I wouldn't characterize as "damage" fwiw) what difference should that make in terms of their rights and protections under the law? They're still homosexual, either way.This is like asking what percentage of handicapped people were born that way, and what percentage became handicapped because of some childhood accident. What difference would that make in terms of the rights they deserve as an adult?
  3. .I believe a good percentage but certainly not an majority of homosexuals either choose to become gay because of maybe being rejected by their first relationship with the opposite sex.

    Wasn't everyone turned down on their first try?
    Yes Moops, we all were, but it impacts everyone differently. I believe that a certain percentage and it might not be a lot but a certain percentage of folks that claim to be homosexuals, got that way by things that happened in their childhood, both good and bad. Maybe the 1st person that they could identify with happened to be the same sex and they developed true feelings of love for that person and then act on it. That seems like a very normal natural loving way to possibly enter being a homosexual, I don't think all of them were molested along the way. I'm interested in truth and to just take the word of "Born that way"...sorry but I gotta ask more questions.
    What is the point of making the distinction?
  4. I think it's important to understand the motivation behind the question. Are you trying to compare people who were born homosexual against people who "became" homosexual due to environmental influences, or are you trying compare people who are homosexual (whether by genetics or environmental factors) against people who "choose" to be homosexual?

    If it's the latter, the "choice" argument is pretty trivially refuted and thus it's a pointless question.

    If it's the former, even if such a distinction exists, even if you could distinguish between the two, what would be the point? Would you bestow rights upon those who are born homosexual, but not those who "became" homosexual at some point in their development or something?

  5. For everyone voting 100%, you do know that lots of homosexuals(not an overwhelming majority) have gone on record and said that real life incidents have influenced their decision in being homosexual. So it can't really be 100% can it?I'm just trying to be honest about it, there is no way it's 100% is it? Saying that 100% of homosexuals are born that way seems about as dark age thinking as the folks that are agianst same sex marriage yes/no?

    Technically I should have voted 90+ I suppose, but I assumed we weren't voting to 12 significant digits so I just rounded up.
  6. Buffett obviously has little faith that the wealthy will be charitable with their wealth on their own. He seems to firmly believe they will hoard it all. I have to assume he has a lot of faith that government will distribute it to the poor if they confiscate it and not figure out a way to turn it into pork or funnel it into accounts over time.

    So this is really about what you believe about human nature, and what you have faith in, and not Warren Buffett's economic expertise.

    Well, X. One of Buffett's main points is that the superrich shouldn't be paying less in taxes (proportionately) than everyone else. You can be for tax cuts and still agree with this point. Additionally, I'm all for the true producers keeping their wealth - they earned it - but you can't say the same for kids of the superrich who basically won the genetic lottery. I have no problem taxing their winnings.
  7. What do you tell a woman with two black eyes?

    You should advise her to apply ice packs intermittently to the bruised area to reduce swelling, and vitamin K cream may help accelerate the healing process. Also, if she is in pain make sure she doesn't take aspirin, as its anticoagulant properties could make the bruise larger and result in a longer healing process.

  8. A black man walks into a bar with a parrot on his shoulder. The bartender says, "Wow, that's an amazing creature! Where did you get it?"

    The black man responds, "Thank you! I got him at Broverman's Pet Shop, down the street." The bartender then replies, "Well, that is a beautiful bird, but unfortunately you can't keep it in here."

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