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falconeyed

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Posts posted by falconeyed

  1. Every February after Superbowl, I attempt to not drink the delicious brownest of all brown liquors JD and any other alcohol.I generally make it until the end of week 3.This is a documentation of my ascension into madness.

    Doesn't one descend into madness?
  2. The love for Blood Bowl in this thread warms my heart.

    Is there a way to play that online, seems like there's enough love here to get a blood bowl league going
    There's a couple. Play by E-Mail and fumbbl.com. The latter is more immediate and user friendly (as it uses a free Java application) but uses an outdated ruleset.
  3. Axis and Allies: While a fun game, I have a problem with any war game that takes longer to set up than the actual war it was based on.

    I don't think I ever saw the Axis win this game if the Allies weren't morons.
    What's the expertise of the player(s) you've seen?I've played this game on/off for the past 20 years. Allies definitely has more going for them, but...Germany and Japan, if played well, can definitely win the game 50% of the time, in my experience.
    Between good players I'd say the Axis has about a 20% chance to win. It basically hinges on the Axis getting really good die rolls the first two turns and then playing perfectly after that. Anything else and a decent Allied team will wipe the floor with them. Has anybody tried the new Hasbro version? They revamped the game, but it's still slanted towards the Allies, it just takes longer.
    You mean the theater specific versions? I played the Europe one once as the Germans and it basically came down to St. Petersburg falling. I couldn't crack it and the game was basically over after that battle.
    This has always been my beef with the A&A stuff. It seems like it all comes down to which way one battle falls. I haven't tried the theatre versions, but the decisive battle in the main version always happened in the first two turns, so the rest of the game was just playing out an inevitable ending. That's not fun.
    I thought it was sort of interesting given than, in my understanding, the European theater was largely decided by Germany's inability to take St. Petersburg, which was the beginning of the end for the Nazis.
    I think you may be thinking of Stalingrad. St. Petersburg is Leningrad, which was pretty much a siege situation during WWII, but not a turning point in the war. Although your statement is pretty general, you could say that the Germans inability to take Moscow was even more of a turning point. If you're thinking of it in terms of Axis and Allies, the importance of Karelia is vastlly overstated, it's abstracted for game purposes.
    :goodposting: I think you're right.
  4. I thought it was sort of interesting given than, in my understanding, the European theater was largely decided by Germany's inability to take St. Petersburg, which was the beginning of the end for the Nazis.

    Then good for them for making sure the game plays that way. But when does this battle take place? Again, my biggest beef is that if one battle decides the game, that battle shouldn't occur on the second turn of the game, like the German invasion of Karelia or the Japanese assault on Pearl Harbour in the main game.. That makes the rest of the game a waste of time.
    Good point.
  5. Game seems WAY too involved for me. Makes War of the Ring look like checkers and War of the Ring is on the extreme edge of my game sensibilities. Saw it being played in a shop awhile ago and thought it looked interesting but there's a LOT of #### going on.

    There IS a lot of #### going on. That's why I like it. There's a political agenda, fleet building, invasion combat, random action cards, a Puerto Rico-inspired role selection mechanism, multiple tiers of objectives, limited action points, fleet size restrictions, trading, bribes... #### man, it's got so much packed into it. And while you say this is why you dislike it, those are the exact reasons why I love it. So much bang for your buck. IF you're willing to sit down and play it for 6 hours. Which I am. But I can understand how others wouldn't be willing to make the same commitment.
    I've never played it, so perhaps I shouldn't rush to judgment. It was just my initial reaction based on comparing TI3 to games I know I like. When I played AA with my friends and roommates, we would play for an hour or two and then walk away. Board would be set up on the kitchen or dining room table for a month at least. Reminded me of Kramer and Newman playing Risk.
  6. Axis and Allies: While a fun game, I have a problem with any war game that takes longer to set up than the actual war it was based on.

    I don't think I ever saw the Axis win this game if the Allies weren't morons.
    What's the expertise of the player(s) you've seen?I've played this game on/off for the past 20 years. Allies definitely has more going for them, but...Germany and Japan, if played well, can definitely win the game 50% of the time, in my experience.
    Between good players I'd say the Axis has about a 20% chance to win. It basically hinges on the Axis getting really good die rolls the first two turns and then playing perfectly after that. Anything else and a decent Allied team will wipe the floor with them. Has anybody tried the new Hasbro version? They revamped the game, but it's still slanted towards the Allies, it just takes longer.
    You mean the theater specific versions? I played the Europe one once as the Germans and it basically came down to St. Petersburg falling. I couldn't crack it and the game was basically over after that battle.
    This has always been my beef with the A&A stuff. It seems like it all comes down to which way one battle falls. I haven't tried the theatre versions, but the decisive battle in the main version always happened in the first two turns, so the rest of the game was just playing out an inevitable ending. That's not fun.
    I thought it was sort of interesting given than, in my understanding, the European theater was largely decided by Germany's inability to take St. Petersburg, which was the beginning of the end for the Nazis.
  7. Well, now we're into my industry. I basically run a board game retail outlet here, so we're right in my wheelhouse now.

    Settlers of Catan continues to be our number one selling game, and for good reason. Still a very approachable, easy to learn gateway game. Same with Carcassonne and Ticket to Ride, also top sellers. But those games all give up elegance of design for simplicity and approachability. Not that that's a bad thing, but somebody looking for more depth may come up short.

    The deeper Eurogames offer a little more for the thinking gamer. Puerto Rico (#1 on the geek still) has already been mentioned. The Alea Big Box series on the whole is generally a good place to go for this stuff. Both of the newest releases, Notre Dame and In The Year Of The Dragon, are reminiscent of the early Alea success. But these games sort of start to blur together for me after a while due to their abstract nature. There's no doubting the elegance of the designs, but at the end of the day I like me a good theme. Nowadays, when I want a Euro fix, I find myself turning to Power Grid as the most engaging of that genre. That really is a solidly-designed game top to bottom.

    I find the GMT games hard to engage in due to the relatively simple production quality. Small cardboard counters only do so much. But Twilight Struggle, mentioned a few times already here, is a very notable exception. This game does a great job at capturing and re-creating a Cold War theme. It's very engaging and very clever.

    But my current favourites are the stuff coming out of Fantasy Flight Games. These guys are specializing in exactly what I'm looking for: epic, engaging themes with high production values and quality presentation combined with a good European-inspired rule design. Top of the list there for me would be War Of The Ring, an absolutely brilliantly designed re-creation of the Lord Of The Rings epic. Those who mentioned Scotland Yard ought to give a try to Fury Of Dracula, which basically turns Mr. X into a vampire. Not only do you have to just find him, now you also have to fight him. Their adaptations of World of Warcraft and Starcraft also show very clever design concepts. Their A Game Of Thrones adaptation is also an extremely well-balanced design with an engaging theme. Arkham Horror is an excellent co-operative game for a change of pace which excellently captures the Lovecraft mythos. Warrior Knights, Dust, Tide of Iron, all decent designs. And, of course, the one that started it all for them, Twilight Imperium, continues to be an absolutely epic design and concept. Played a game of it last night, completely engaging. We all had a great time.

    Okay, enough pimping of Fantasy Flight. I should at least give a nod to Days of Wonder (of Ticket To Ride fame) who also has some good stuff out there on the market. A recent favourite is Colosseum, a neat little package revolving around putting on gladiator shows in ancient Rome. Reminiscent of Fabrik der Traum, but also borrowing a lot of neat concepts from some modern games. Shout outs also to newer games Cuba and Pillars of the Earth for some neat designs. I'm not sold on the hype around Race For The Galaxy yet, it's just San Juan re-packaged as far as I can tell.

    Okay, I could go on and on. But for those of you who think Monopoly and Scrabble are the pinnacle of the board game industry... dudes, there's a whole world of fun waiting there for you to discover. Seriously. Check out what the Germans have been up to. It will blow your mind.

    Game seems WAY too involved for me. Makes War of the Ring look like checkers and War of the Ring is on the extreme edge of my game sensibilities. Saw it being played in a shop awhile ago and thought it looked interesting but there's a LOT of #### going on.
  8. Axis and Allies: While a fun game, I have a problem with any war game that takes longer to set up than the actual war it was based on.

    I don't think I ever saw the Axis win this game if the Allies weren't morons.
    What's the expertise of the player(s) you've seen?I've played this game on/off for the past 20 years. Allies definitely has more going for them, but...Germany and Japan, if played well, can definitely win the game 50% of the time, in my experience.
    Between good players I'd say the Axis has about a 20% chance to win. It basically hinges on the Axis getting really good die rolls the first two turns and then playing perfectly after that. Anything else and a decent Allied team will wipe the floor with them. Has anybody tried the new Hasbro version? They revamped the game, but it's still slanted towards the Allies, it just takes longer.
    You mean the theater specific versions? I played the Europe one once as the Germans and it basically came down to St. Petersburg falling. I couldn't crack it and the game was basically over after that battle.
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