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TheDirtyWord

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About TheDirtyWord

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  • Birthday 04/12/1972

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  1. I think one of the reasons may be because of their ability to access it for their clients. I know my Raymond James broker was prohibited from even putting GBTC in his clients portfolios as recently as October. So an investment class where access is sketchy at best but likely taking dollars away from vehicles they do have at their disposal...it’s not unexpected they’d have a jaded view.
  2. Perhaps I can get you to see a different POV related to your concern. There have been 3 bull market in BTC’s history; 2013, 2017 and the one we’re in now. Satoshi could have sold at the 2013/2017/2021 market peaks when the value of his/her BTC was: 2013: $1.15B 2017: $21.8B 2021: $63.8B ...the stones it would take to hodl thru those 2013/2017 market peaks...and even now when hodling has become mainstream would seem unrealistic when you consider human behavior. To not sell a single one? After the 2017 bull market, a year later, Satoshi’s BTC stack decreased to a value of $3.8B
  3. If you’ve ever heard of the Lindy Effect... The Lindy effect is a theory that the future life expectancy of some non-perishable things like a technology or an idea is proportional to their current age, so that every additional period of survival implies a longer remaining life expectancy. Where the Lindy effect applies, mortality rate decreases with time. There’s a lot of FUD about crypto...but this has been true throughout history related to game changing innovation. John Rockefeller tried to thwart the adoption of electricity as it threatened demand for oil. But the longer it sur
  4. What I would tell you is those chances still exist in this space. Yes, BTC’s days as a 4-digit asset are done, but there are other opportunities. To the extent you still talk crypto with him...he may have some ideas on what he’d invest in today; which projects he likes. If he’s been in that long, I wouldn’t be surprised if his familiarity with the space was elite.
  5. What’s your POV on ETH’s high fees, clogged network and slow transition to ETH 2.0? I have ETH too, but I worry they’re leaving a door open. If there is one crypto I regret not getting into, it’s DOT. They along with ADA, seem to be reaping benefits from some of the issues ETH is experiencing.
  6. Might I suggest a movie? Cryptopia: Bitcoin, Blockchains and the Future of the Internet. It was made last year, or at least released last year and I thought did a very good job at taking you through the history of crypto and where it might lead to in the future. Being suspicious of BTC and other crypto assets is perfectly normal. And it really is an abstract concept to grasp but simply put, BTC is simply a monetary network. Other cryptos that have emerged produce and provide more utility which offer potential opportunities for humanity to transact value without the need for middlemen
  7. Ultimately, there is probably a lot of work to be done in this country (and in reality globally) to come to policy that’s more thought out not just related to tax implications, but how will digitally native assets overall get regulated. The sense I get is that what exists today was cobbled together to ‘close loopholes’ of taxation exclusion. Prior to 2020, BTC’s highest market cap was $400B (when total eventual supply is used)...and there were times in 2020 where it dipped as low as $80B. So a fully fleshed out US government and taxation code and policy likely wasn’t high on the list of
  8. I wouldn’t beat yourself up too much...quite frankly, you’re still extremely early. RIOT is largely a BTC mining operation though...what worries me about them and MARA, a very similar operation is that they are both trading at about 30x from this time last year - great performance for sure, but BTC is only up 5x during that same time. When you look at RIOT’s revenue statement from 9/30, they didn’t increase all that much YoY ($6.7M to $5.6M) when evaluating 9-month performance. But their current market cap is $2.4B. At the end of the day, the BTC mining operations are pretty capital int
  9. The trading will become expensive from a tax perspective as moving from one coin to another is seen as a realization of gains. Also, I believe the yield you earn with BlockFi is considered taxable as well. Article on taxes in Forbes from last month
  10. I don’t know of the golden tablets of Mormonism so I won’t be able to provide a frame of reference between them and BTC. Ultimately, BTC is a ledger. And the way BTC is ‘created’ is thru a mining process where incredibly complex mathematical equations are solved by high powered server farms (now). What makes BTC an attractive concept for a lot of people is that there’ll only ever be 21 million BTC at its max supply. Currently, 6.25 BTC get mined every 10 minutes. But this hasn’t always been the case, prior to May 2020, that number was 12.5 every 10 minutes. The rate of BTC produc
  11. 6+ hours after Tesla announces a $1.5B BTC purchase for their treasury and there have been but 5 posts by 3 authors (not including this one). ...and while it’s certainly progressive thinking on Tesla’s part to offer to accept BTC as payment...BTC doesn’t go down in value the moment you drive it off the lot.
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