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2011 MLB Amateur Draft (1 Viewer)

Eephus

Footballguy
Gerrit Cole reportedly going #1 to Pittsburgh in a draft without a consensus future superstar. It seems like a lot of RHPs among the top prospects and two college QBs.Here are Sickel's bullet summaries on main guys.

Tyler Anderson, LHP, University of Oregon: Polished lefty with a 90-93 MPH fastball and a robust secondary arsenal (slider, curve, changeup) along with sharp control. Great feel for pitching. 8-3, 2.17 ERA with 114/35 K/BB in 108 innings. Target: Mid-to-late first round.Javier Baez, SS, Arlington Country Day School, Jacksonville, Florida: Originally from Puerto Rico, Baez features explosive bat speed with plus power. Main issues are doubtful makeup and long-term defense, but has arm for third if he outgrows short. Target: Mid first round.Matt Barnes, RHP, University of Connecticut: Throws mid-90s heat along with plus curveball and solid changeup. Has size (6-4, 205), stuff, and command to anchor a major league rotation. 11-4, 1.62 ERA with 111/31 K/BB in 117 innings. Target: Early-to-mid first round.Trevor Bauer, RHP, UCLA: Advanced student of pitching with mid-90s fastball, nasty curve, and strong changeup. Outpitched teammate Gerrit Cole, draws Lincecum comparisons, and has held up under big workload. 13-2, 1.25 ERA with 203/36 K/BB in 137 innings. Target: Early first round.Tyler Beede, RHP, Lawrence Academy HS, Groton, Massachusetts: Advanced cold-weather high school pitcher with low-90s heat and potential for much more, also shows good curve and change. Strong commitment to Vanderbilt will scare some teams away. Target: Late first round.Josh Bell, OF, Dallas Jesuit HS, Dallas, Texas: Outstanding home-run potential from both sides of the plate, draws Jason Heyward comparisons due to power and patience. Extremely strong University of Texas commitment clouds draft position. Target: Mid first round if signable. Archie Bradley, RHP, Broken Arrow HS, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma: Mid-90s fastball with plus curveball and developing change, with strong athleticism. Has Univ. of Oklahoma quarterback commitment to use as bonus leverage but is expected to sign. Target: Early-to-mid first round. Jackie Bradley Jr., OF, University of South Carolina: Disappointing season (.259/.361/.468) ended early with wrist problems, but track record keeps him in the picture. Excellent defense, left-handed pop, and strong intangibles still attractive. Target: Supplemental round.Jed Bradley, LHP, Georgia Tech: Polished lefty offers three pitches (88-94 fastball, plus slider, solid change) with excellent command, though stock dropped somewhat late this spring. Allowed just one homer so far. 7-3, 3.49 ERA with 106/31 K/BB in 98 innings. Target: Mid first round.Dylan Bundy, RHP, Owasso HS, Owasso, Oklahoma: Best available prep pitcher, with 95-100 MPH fastball, strong curveball, strong cutter, solid changeup, and superior control, won't need much development time. Brother Bobby pitches in Orioles system. Target: Early first round.Andrew Chafin, LHP, Kent State University: Tommy John survivor showed no ill effects this year, with 90-95 MPH fastball, plus slider, improved change, and sharp command. Stock rising as draft approaches. 8-1, 2.02, 105/23 K/BB in 89 innings. Target: Late first round/supplemental.Gerrit Cole, RHP, UCLA: Could go No. 1 overall despite erratic season, with 95-99 MPH heat, power slider, and excellent change. Volatile personality in high school but matured into hard worker with strong makeup. 6-8, 3.31 ERA, 119/24 K/BB in 114 innings. Target: Early first round.Adam Conley, LHP, Washington State: Closed in '10 but converted to rotation this year, may revert to pen in pros. 89-92 MPH in rotation, 92-95 in relief, mixing with strong changeup. Needs better breaking ball. 6-7, 3.50 with 83/27 K/BB in 108 innings. Target: Supplemental. C.J. Cron, 1B, University of Utah: Enormous raw power mixed with polished hitting skills resulted in .434/.517/.803 mark with 15 homers, 31/21 BB/K in 198 at-bats, despite NCAA switch to less-potent bats this year. Best college power bat available. Target: Mid first round.Jose Fernandez, RHP, Alonso HS, Tampa, Florida: Cuban defector blew through prep ranks with 95 MPH sinker, solid curveball and slider, decent change. Big body should help durability if weight kept under control. Could be closer or workhorse starter. Target: Mid-to-late first round.Sean Gilmartin, LHP, Florida State: Excellent command of 88-91 MPH fastball, terrific changeup, and solid breaking ball led to 12-1, 1.83 ERA with 122/20 K/BB in 113 innings. Moving up draft boards and won't need long in minors. Target: Late first round /supplemental.Brian Goodwin, OF, Miami-Dade Junior College: Good athlete with speed, patience, and at least moderate power potential from left side. North Carolina transfer hit .382 with .492 OBP, 37 walks, eight homers and 16 steals in 157 at-bats this year. Target: Late first round/supplemental.Sonny Gray, RHP, Vanderbilt: Commodore ace stands just 5'11" but has arm strength: 90-96 MPH fastball and outstanding curve. Needs to sharpen changeup but should have the aptitude to do it. Great makeup. 11-3, 2.01 ERA, 115/39 K/BB in 108 innings. Target: Early first round.Taylor Guerrieri, RHP, Spring Valley HS, Columbia, South Carolina: Fast-riser this spring has mid-to-upper-90s fastball along with power curve, hasn't needed third pitch yet but has the aptitude to develop it. Doubts about makeup hurt stock with some clubs. Target: Mid first round.Dillon Howard, RHP, Searcy HS, Searcy, Arkansas: University of Arkansas commitment and big bonus demands make him a wild card, but 90-94 MPH sinker, decent curve and change, plus strong athleticism will make him attractive to someone. Target: Late first round/supplemental.Danny Hultzen, LHP, Virginia: Cavalier ace with 92-96 MPH fastball, strong changeup and improving slider, combine that with sharp control and you have a pitcher who will move quickly through any system. 11-3, 1.57 ERA, 148/17 K/BB in 103 innings. Target: Early first round.Taylor Jungmann, RHP, University of Texas: Longhorn ace dominates with 90-95 MPH fastball, slider, and changeup. Mechanics aren't textbook but he's been very durable and has sharp command. 13-1, 1.40 ERA, 119/29 K/BB in 128 innings. Target: Early to mid first round.Francisco Lindor, SS, Montverde Academy, Clermont, Florida: Originally from Puerto Rico, line-drive hitter with slick actions at short, can stick there and provide some hitting to go with glove. Main concern is lack of power, but still a premium talent. Target: Early first round.Mikie Mahtook, OF, LSU: The new college bats were no hindrance for Mahtook, as his .383/.496/.709 line with 14 homers, 41/32 BB/K in 196 at-bats line shows. Solid athlete stole 29 bases. Plate discipline has improved dramatically over three years. Target: Mid first round.Anthony Meo, RHP, Coastal Carolina: Another dominating college arm, 10-3, 2.16 ERA, 115/31 K/BB in 108 innings. Throws 92-96 MPH, nasty curve, control improved this year. Will need a better changeup and might close eventually. Target: Late first round/supplemental.Alex Meyer, RHP, University of Kentucky: 6-foot-9 Meyer improved rough mechanics this year, giving him a 7-5, 2.94 ERA with a 110/46 K/BB in 101 innings. Touches 100 MPH at times, has good slider and changeup, command needs more work. Target: Mid first round.Levi Michael, SS, University of North Carolina: Solid contact hitter with good baseball skills and instincts, hit .300/.446/.456 with 47/41 BB/K in 217 at-bats, 15 steals. Reliable glove, but does he have the range to stick at shortstop long-term? Target: Late first round/supplemental.Brandon Nimmo, OF, Cheyenne East HS, Cheyenne, Wyoming: Athlete with above average speed and power. Good plate discipline and surprising polish, given his state lacks high school ball. Big bonus demands to skip college ball at Arkansas. Target: Late first round/supplemental.Daniel Norris, LHP, Science Hill HS, Johnson City, Tennessee: Best high-school lefty in the class, improved command of low-to-mid-90s fastball this year along with strong curve and change. Quite athletic and made progress harnessing his stuff this spring. Target: Mid first round. Henry Owens, LHP, Edison HS, Huntington Beach, California: Fastball not a blazer at 88-92, but control is superb and he has a curve, slider, cutter, and changeup. Feel for pitching is outstanding but lack of heat hurts his stock a little. Target: Late first round/supplemental.Matthew Purke, LHP, Texas Christian: Wild card, 5-1, 1.71 ERA with 61/20 K/BB in 53 innings, but nagged by arm problems all spring and quality of stuff down from last year. Hefty price tag and sophomore status makes draft slot hard to pin down. Target: Supplemental. Anthony Rendon, 3B, Rice University: Consensus best hitter in draft hampered by shoulder problems all spring, still hit .332/.522/.531 with 79 walks, 32 strikeouts in 211 at-bats. Fine defender at third base if his arm is healthy. Target: Early first round, one or two overall.Joe Ross, RHP, Bishop O'Dowd HS, Oakland, California: Brother of Athletics pitcher Tyson Ross, Joe hits the mid-90s and has a strong curve, decent changeup, and good control. May be expensive to buy away from UCLA but someone will try. Target: Late first round/supplemental.Cory Spangenberg, 3B, Indian River Junior College: May be best pure hitter in draft. Power limited, but sprays line drives everywhere, gets on base, and is blazing fast. Long-term position will likely be second base. Hit .477 with .553 OBP and 33 steals. Target: Late first round.George Springer, OF, University of Connecticut: Best athlete of the college crop, improving skills to go with tools, could be a 20/20 player. Swing mechanics have been questioned, but few flaws in the stats: .351/.451/.632, 30/37 BB/K in 228 at-bats, 31 steals. Target: Mid-first round.Derek "Bubba" Starling, OF, Gardner-Edgerton HS, Gardner, Kansas: Five Tool player, above-average-to-excellent in all respects but lacks experience against high-level competition. Nebraska quarterback recruit won't be cheap but huge upside. Target: Early first round.Robert Stephenson, RHP, Alhambra HS, Martinez, California: Mid-90s heat with improved curve and great athleticism would make him a top ten pick some years, but he has lots of competition in 11. Could throw harder as he matures physically. Target: Mid-to-late first round.Andrew Susac, C, Oregon State University: Recovered rapidly from broken hamate; shows power bat with solid defensive skills when fully healthy. Hit .318/.451/.550 with 27/32 BB/K in 129 at-bats. Sophomore status gives him some leverage. Target: Late first round/supplemental.Blake Swihart, C, Cleveland HS, Rio Rancho, New Mexico: Strong University of Texas commitment clouds draft position, but Swihart's switch-hitting power bat and overall athleticism means someone will invest. Main question: can he stick at catcher? Target: Late first round.Kolten Wong, 2B, University of Hawaii: Pure hitter with plate discipline and plenty of pop despite 5-9 size, hit .378/.492/.560 with 42/20 BB/K in 209 at-bats. Excellent makeup, solid defender at second base but can also play the outfield if needed. Target: Late first round.
 
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There are rumors that the Tigers already have a $6mm deal with Josh Bell if he falls to them in the 2nd round. With signability issues, that is possible.

 
Everyone I've read from people close to the Nationals as well as draft experts says they'll take Starling in a heartbeat if he falls to 6. It makes sense for them- there's a gaping hole at CF/leadoff in their projected contender teams in the 2013-2015 window, they've done just fine negotiating with Boras over Harper and Strasburg the last two seasons, and they can add college pitching at #23 and #34 later tonight.

 
Everyone I've read from people close to the Nationals as well as draft experts says they'll take Starling in a heartbeat if he falls to 6. It makes sense for them- there's a gaping hole at CF/leadoff in their projected contender teams in the 2013-2015 window, they've done just fine negotiating with Boras over Harper and Strasburg the last two seasons, and they can add college pitching at #23 and #34 later tonight.
A lot of mocks have Starling going at #5 to the Royals.
 
Everyone I've read from people close to the Nationals as well as draft experts says they'll take Starling in a heartbeat if he falls to 6. It makes sense for them- there's a gaping hole at CF/leadoff in their projected contender teams in the 2013-2015 window, they've done just fine negotiating with Boras over Harper and Strasburg the last two seasons, and they can add college pitching at #23 and #34 later tonight.
A lot of mocks have Starling going at #5 to the Royals.
I've seen some of that too.Next-best case for the Nats would be Hultzen, who Law had going all the way down to #7 I think. Hultzen is a local kid from the affluent Maryland suburbs who went to high school downtown and went to UVa (also Zimmerman's alma mater). He'd get a ton of love around here. Worst-case for them of the top six would probably be Bundy. I think they prefer college pitchers both as a general organizational theory and because the window for them to compete is coming up quickly. Rendon wouldn't be bad - ideally he'd be blocked at 3B in the Nats organization for the next decade, but they do have a hole at 1B at the moment.
 
Everyone I've read from people close to the Nationals as well as draft experts says they'll take Starling in a heartbeat if he falls to 6. It makes sense for them- there's a gaping hole at CF/leadoff in their projected contender teams in the 2013-2015 window, they've done just fine negotiating with Boras over Harper and Strasburg the last two seasons, and they can add college pitching at #23 and #34 later tonight.
A lot of mocks have Starling going at #5 to the Royals.
I've seen some of that too.Next-best case for the Nats would be Hultzen, who Law had going all the way down to #7 I think. Hultzen is a local kid from the affluent Maryland suburbs who went to high school downtown and went to UVa (also Zimmerman's alma mater). He'd get a ton of love around here. Worst-case for them of the top six would probably be Bundy. I think they prefer college pitchers both as a general organizational theory and because the window for them to compete is coming up quickly. Rendon wouldn't be bad - ideally he'd be blocked at 3B in the Nats organization for the next decade, but they do have a hole at 1B at the moment.
If Rendon slides that far, I'd be really concerned about his shoulder. There's always some risk aversion involved with drafting prospects but Rendon's medical report has been given to all 30 teams. If he goes past #3, there might be more to it than just groupthink.
 
I just hope the Cubs pick somebody that knows how to play baseball. That is all. A legit shortstop like Lindor wouldn't be bad. Baseball America has Starling falling to them. Otherwise it would look like a pitcher. Of course, it isn't like the Cubs have recent history of following consensus.

 
Everyone I've read from people close to the Nationals as well as draft experts says they'll take Starling in a heartbeat if he falls to 6. It makes sense for them- there's a gaping hole at CF/leadoff in their projected contender teams in the 2013-2015 window, they've done just fine negotiating with Boras over Harper and Strasburg the last two seasons, and they can add college pitching at #23 and #34 later tonight.
A lot of mocks have Starling going at #5 to the Royals.
I've seen some of that too.Next-best case for the Nats would be Hultzen, who Law had going all the way down to #7 I think. Hultzen is a local kid from the affluent Maryland suburbs who went to high school downtown and went to UVa (also Zimmerman's alma mater). He'd get a ton of love around here. Worst-case for them of the top six would probably be Bundy. I think they prefer college pitchers both as a general organizational theory and because the window for them to compete is coming up quickly. Rendon wouldn't be bad - ideally he'd be blocked at 3B in the Nats organization for the next decade, but they do have a hole at 1B at the moment.
If Rendon slides that far, I'd be really concerned about his shoulder. There's always some risk aversion involved with drafting prospects but Rendon's medical report has been given to all 30 teams. If he goes past #3, there might be more to it than just groupthink.
Great stuff. Thanks. That's just the kind of thing I like to hear about to enhance the viewing tonight. Something tells me Harold Reynolds won't be that helpful.Any other thoughts on anyone else in the virtually universally recognized top six of the two UCLA guys, Rendon, Hultzen, Bundy and Starling? I know #1 is a lock at this point.
 
Everyone I've read from people close to the Nationals as well as draft experts says they'll take Starling in a heartbeat if he falls to 6. It makes sense for them- there's a gaping hole at CF/leadoff in their projected contender teams in the 2013-2015 window, they've done just fine negotiating with Boras over Harper and Strasburg the last two seasons, and they can add college pitching at #23 and #34 later tonight.
quote from Sickels in post above on Starling who may be riskiest but highest upside player in the draft......Derek "Bubba" Starling, OF, Gardner-Edgerton HS, Gardner, Kansas: Five Tool player, above-average-to-excellent in all respects but lacks experience against high-level competition. Nebraska quarterback recruit won't be cheap but huge upside. Target: Early first round.

The problem for Royals and other teams is that Starling has already signed with Nebraska for a baseball AND football scholarship....so whichever team drafts him will have to buy him out of that

BUT as I wrote earlier.....imagine if he does slip to the Nationals, AND they pick him, AND they sign him

last three drafts would be Strasburg > Harper > Starling :excited:

 
Other names to watch for:Dwight Smith Jr.Shawon Dunston Jr.Dante Bichette Jr.Jack Armstrong Jr.Trevor GretzkyKyle Gaedele - distant relative of Eddie Gaedel

One current big-leaguer might see his son's name called: Washington Nationals catcher Ivan Rodriguez's son Dereck is a draft-worthy outfielder for Miami's Monsignor Pace High School.Among other sons of former big-leaguers who might get drafted: Brandon Bonilla (Bobby), a left-handed pitcher at IMG Academies, Bradenton, Fla.; Tyler Bream (Sid), a third baseman from Liberty University; and Ryan Garvey (Steve), a third baseman at Palm Desert (Calif.) High School.Some notable siblings figure to get their names called, as well. Joe Ross, a fireballing right-hander from Bishop O'Dowd (Oakland) High School with a commitment to UCLA, is the younger brother of Oakland Athletics pitcher Tyson Ross . Bryan Harper, a left-handed pitcher taken in the 26th round by the Cubs in 2010, is a pitcher at South Carolina and the brother of last year's first overall pick, Bryce Harper . Right-hander David Lucroy, who has signed to play at East Carolina, is the younger brother of Milwaukee Brewers catcher Jonathan Lucroy .Some sons of current managers might be late-round selections. Chicago White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen's son Ozney is an outfielder at Miami-Dade Junior College. Brewers manager Ron Roenicke's son Lance is an outfielder at Cal-Santa Barbara, and Angels manager Mike Scioscia's son Matt is a catcher at Notre Dame.
 
Gerrit Cole is Giants SS Brandon Crawford's sister's boyfriend.

ETA: link to picture because enquiring minds want to know

 
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Nice, Z blows up again and the Cubs draft another potential head case. Hoping for the best. He was rising fast in this draft.

 
:thumbup: to Danny Hultzen. Saw him pitch a few times. He's good, but not #2 overall good. Maybe a #3-#4 pitcher in the majors. Congrats to him.

UVa may have lost a top recruit with Kevin Matthews going #33 to Texas.

 
Boy, the Nats could be looking scary if Straz can get his S together. Who are they playing at 1b, can't rendon slot over there? If he can play 2nd, great, or you have insurance for Zimm. Or Zimm becomes trade bait to fill another need.

 
Boy, the Nats could be looking scary if Straz can get his S together. Who are they playing at 1b, can't rendon slot over there? If he can play 2nd, great, or you have insurance for Zimm. Or Zimm becomes trade bait to fill another need.
Right now 1B is Michael Morse, who's been a somewhat pleasant surprise. .302/.337/.522 for the year after a dismal April with impeccable defense. Guy scoops up everything that comes his way. He's always been a negative UZR outfielder and at this point he's in positive figures for the year and for his career at 1B. The plan has always been prospect Marrero (who they may have to give up on soon) or a 2011 free agent like Price Fielder at 1B, but if Morse keeps this up they'll be able to allocate that money they're just dying to spend elsewhere. And they are dying to spend money. Rendon at 2B has to be the plan. Espinosa's cannon arm is wasted at second and Desmond is running out of chances to learn how to hit.

My biggest concern is the fact that the Nats' medical staff has a terrible track record, which makes me worry when five teams pass on Rendon presumably for health reasons and we fall in love with him.

 
Boy, the Nats could be looking scary if Straz can get his S together. Who are they playing at 1b, can't rendon slot over there? If he can play 2nd, great, or you have insurance for Zimm. Or Zimm becomes trade bait to fill another need.
Right now 1B is Michael Morse, who's been a somewhat pleasant surprise. .302/.337/.522 for the year after a dismal April with impeccable defense. Guy scoops up everything that comes his way. He's always been a negative UZR outfielder and at this point he's in positive figures for the year and for his career at 1B. The plan has always been prospect Marrero (who they may have to give up on soon) or a 2011 free agent like Price Fielder at 1B, but if Morse keeps this up they'll be able to allocate that money they're just dying to spend elsewhere. And they are dying to spend money. Rendon at 2B has to be the plan. Espinosa's cannon arm is wasted at second and Desmond is running out of chances to learn how to hit.

My biggest concern is the fact that the Nats' medical staff has a terrible track record, which makes me worry when five teams pass on Rendon presumably for health reasons and we fall in love with him.
There is the possibility that each team before the Nats were enamored with their guy much more so them worried about Rendon.
 
Boy, the Nats could be looking scary if Straz can get his S together. Who are they playing at 1b, can't rendon slot over there? If he can play 2nd, great, or you have insurance for Zimm. Or Zimm becomes trade bait to fill another need.
Right now 1B is Michael Morse, who's been a somewhat pleasant surprise. .302/.337/.522 for the year after a dismal April with impeccable defense. Guy scoops up everything that comes his way. He's always been a negative UZR outfielder and at this point he's in positive figures for the year and for his career at 1B. The plan has always been prospect Marrero (who they may have to give up on soon) or a 2011 free agent like Price Fielder at 1B, but if Morse keeps this up they'll be able to allocate that money they're just dying to spend elsewhere. And they are dying to spend money. Rendon at 2B has to be the plan. Espinosa's cannon arm is wasted at second and Desmond is running out of chances to learn how to hit.

My biggest concern is the fact that the Nats' medical staff has a terrible track record, which makes me worry when five teams pass on Rendon presumably for health reasons and we fall in love with him.
There is the possibility that each team before the Nats were enamored with their guy much more so them worried about Rendon.
I hope you're right. I'm not the only Nats fan with concerns about our medical staff. They've blown a lot of calls in recent years, most recently missing and then completely mishandling Adam LaRoche's shoulder injury.
 
Boy, the Nats could be looking scary if Straz can get his S together. Who are they playing at 1b, can't rendon slot over there? If he can play 2nd, great, or you have insurance for Zimm. Or Zimm becomes trade bait to fill another need.
Right now 1B is Michael Morse, who's been a somewhat pleasant surprise. .302/.337/.522 for the year after a dismal April with impeccable defense. Guy scoops up everything that comes his way. He's always been a negative UZR outfielder and at this point he's in positive figures for the year and for his career at 1B. The plan has always been prospect Marrero (who they may have to give up on soon) or a 2011 free agent like Price Fielder at 1B, but if Morse keeps this up they'll be able to allocate that money they're just dying to spend elsewhere. And they are dying to spend money. Rendon at 2B has to be the plan. Espinosa's cannon arm is wasted at second and Desmond is running out of chances to learn how to hit.

My biggest concern is the fact that the Nats' medical staff has a terrible track record, which makes me worry when five teams pass on Rendon presumably for health reasons and we fall in love with him.
There is the possibility that each team before the Nats were enamored with their guy much more so them worried about Rendon.
I hope you're right. I'm not the only Nats fan with concerns about our medical staff. They've blown a lot of calls in recent years, most recently missing and then completely mishandling Adam LaRoche's shoulder injury.
I get it. You are talking to a Cubs fan. I assume they will take Baez's character concerns and transform him into a clubhouse cancer by the time he gets to Chicago.
 
God what a horrible telecast. Unwatchable.
The production values were not major league
Which is semi-surprising, because the MLB Network usually produces top-notch stuff. I guess when it gets down to it, they don't have a Kiper or McShay type of guy that you can look to for a sure fire analysis after every pick.Callis is way too much of a :bowtie: , Selig is a drag, and Harold Reynolds has no idea who any of these guys are. Maybe throw Jonathan Mayo on the big stage with John Hart and you have a start to a group that knows a little something about the talent pool. Don't really have a problem with Greg Amsinger as a host. Need some charisma in the fourth chair though, I love Gammons but he's just too old.
 
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'TobiasFunke said:
'boubucarow said:
'TobiasFunke said:
'Smack Tripper said:
Boy, the Nats could be looking scary if Straz can get his S together. Who are they playing at 1b, can't rendon slot over there? If he can play 2nd, great, or you have insurance for Zimm. Or Zimm becomes trade bait to fill another need.
Right now 1B is Michael Morse, who's been a somewhat pleasant surprise. .302/.337/.522 for the year after a dismal April with impeccable defense. Guy scoops up everything that comes his way. He's always been a negative UZR outfielder and at this point he's in positive figures for the year and for his career at 1B. The plan has always been prospect Marrero (who they may have to give up on soon) or a 2011 free agent like Price Fielder at 1B, but if Morse keeps this up they'll be able to allocate that money they're just dying to spend elsewhere. And they are dying to spend money. Rendon at 2B has to be the plan. Espinosa's cannon arm is wasted at second and Desmond is running out of chances to learn how to hit.

My biggest concern is the fact that the Nats' medical staff has a terrible track record, which makes me worry when five teams pass on Rendon presumably for health reasons and we fall in love with him.
There is the possibility that each team before the Nats were enamored with their guy much more so them worried about Rendon.
I hope you're right. I'm not the only Nats fan with concerns about our medical staff. They've blown a lot of calls in recent years, most recently missing and then completely mishandling Adam LaRoche's shoulder injury.
I hear Chien-Ming Wang's been dead for three months. Big cover-up.
 
Thoughts on Josh Bell in the 2nd to the Pirates?
Depends if he signs or not :shrug:
He was considered a mid round 1st based on talent alone. But it seems like he is going to Texas. Not sure what the Pirates will have to offer.
Bell's price is $6.5 million to keep him from going to Texas - I really doubt the Pirates put that on the table
Scott Boras has been advising Bell. Boras is also Gerrit Cole's agent. I can't see the Pirates tying up that much money in futures.
 
Thoughts on Josh Bell in the 2nd to the Pirates?
Depends if he signs or not :shrug:
He was considered a mid round 1st based on talent alone. But it seems like he is going to Texas. Not sure what the Pirates will have to offer.
Bell's price is $6.5 million to keep him from going to Texas - I really doubt the Pirates put that on the table
Scott Boras has been advising Bell. Boras is also Gerrit Cole's agent. I can't see the Pirates tying up that much money in futures.
If they do, there is hope for the Bucs. I believe they spent alot of $$$ on the draft last year, and it looks like they want to continue with that plan. Looks like they are finally starting to get it.
 
'RnR said:
'Eephus said:
'Premier said:
God what a horrible telecast. Unwatchable.
The production values were not major league
Which is semi-surprising, because the MLB Network usually produces top-notch stuff. I guess when it gets down to it, they don't have a Kiper or McShay type of guy that you can look to for a sure fire analysis after every pick.
BWAHAHAHAHAAA!
 
ESPN Insider Keith Law on Day 1:

Day 1 of the 2011 MLB draft was full of surprises, with the Mariners shocking everyone by going pitcher (surprise No. 1) and making that pick Virginia lefty Danny Hultzen (surprise No. 2), probably scorching the Royals' long-held plan to grab a college pitcher with the No. 5 pick. But there were plenty of intriguing moves through the remainder of the evening, some I loved, some that had me scratching my head. I've also listed my top remaining players as the draft moves to Day 2.Moves I likedTampa Bay RaysThe picks: Taylor Guerrieri (24), Mikie Mahtook (31), Jake Hager (32), Brandon Martin (38), Tyler Goeddel (41), Jeff Ames (42), Blake Snell (52), Kes Carter (56), Grayson Garvin (59), James Harris (60)Summary: When you pick as often as Tampa Bay did, you're bound to do something I can praise. And I did like the majority of the Rays' picks. Their first pick, Taylor Guerrieri, has top-half-of-the-round stuff but fell on some signability and makeup questions -- however, the Rays did their homework on the latter and are satisfied with what they learned. Mikie Mahtook fell because ... well, I have no idea why he fell, maybe "profit-taking." He's a balanced player who'll contribute on offense and defense and move quickly through the system, and he plays like his hair is on fire. Tyler Goeddel is an athletic, projectable bat who should end up in left field and provide average and power. Brandon Martin is a shortstop who should stay at the position and has a short swing to produce line-drive contact. Grayson Garvin is a polished left-handed starter whose velocity ticked up at year's end, and he comes from Vanderbilt, one of the country's best college programs for developing arms. The Rays took probability, they took ceiling, they took tough signs, they took quick signs. They built a portfolio among their picks, taking advantage of the control they had with all of those selections in a short period of the draft. By August, if they sign most of these guys, that farm system likely will be the best in baseball.Minnesota TwinsThe picks: Levi Michael (30), Travis Harrison (50), Hudson Boyd (55)Summary: Levi Michael is a 20-year-old switch-hitting shortstop who can run; unless the ankle is somehow worse than I've heard, it makes no sense to me that he fell out of the top 20, and the Twins are very fortunate that they could grab him. Travis Harrison was in play in the late first/early sandwich as one of the better pure bats in the high school class but might have fallen on signability and concerns he will end up at first base, where I still think the bat will profile. The Twins also got a personal favorite of mine in Hudson Boyd, a big kid with two above-average pitches and outstanding makeup.Arizona DiamondbacksThe picks: Trevor Bauer (3), Archie Bradley (7), Andrew Chafin (43),Summary: I mean, is this cheating, since the Diamondbacks picked twice in the top 10? They sure didn't go cheap with Archie Bradley at No. 7 -- I liked him more than their first pick, Trevor Bauer. And they added Andrew Chafin in the sandwich round, a reliever-turned-starter on the way back from Tommy John surgery who was apparently "disgusting" (that's good) in his last outing prior to the draft.San Diego PadresThe picks: Cory Spangenberg (10), Joe Ross (25), Michael Kelly (48), Brett Austin (54)Summary: The pick at No. 10 was unprotected, and the Padres did what they had to do, taking a signable player there in Cory Spangenberg. But they still got some upside because the kid can fly and has a great left-handed swing; if he had a set position, he might have been projected to go there even without the signability. They also added a high-upside arm in Joe Ross, a guy who adds athleticism to their system.Boston Red SoxThe picks: Matt Barnes (19), Blake Swihart (26), Henry Owens (36), Jackie Bradley (40)Summary: I hinted at this on Twitter, but some of the credit for Boston's draft is just that the right guys fell to the team. However, the Red Sox do deserve the rest of the credit for actually taking them (and, presumably, paying them). They got Blake Swihart, who I think will be an impact hitter and has a chance to do it as a catcher, with their second pick after preseason top-10 guy Matt Barnes -- whose velocity was fine but didn't show great command this year -- fell to them at No. 19. Henry Owens was spot on in the sandwich round as a projectable lefty who already hits 93 mph and has great deception, and they took a flier on Jackie Bradley's recovery from injury much as they did last year with Anthony Ranaudo.Moves I questionAtlanta BravesThe picks: Sean Gilmartin (28)Summary: Sean Gilmartin as your lone pick of the day? I like Gilmartin for what he is, an athletic, competitive, back-end starter, but there were a number of higher-upside guys on the board, and the last thing Atlanta needs is a low-ceiling starter.Colorado RockiesThe picks: Tyler Anderson (20), Trevor Story (45)Summary: Tyler Anderson was going in the first round, so it wasn't a reach by comparative standards, but I see no out pitch here, just a lefty with some command who'll probably be a pitch-to-contact guy at higher levels, not a great fit for the Rockies' park. Trevor Story can pick it at short with a plus arm, but I don't buy the bat and the consensus from scouts I talked to down there was the same.Los Angeles DodgersThe picks: Chris Reed (16)Summary: I actually don't mind the Chris Reed pick as much as some of my sources -- it's a reach, but put him back in the rotation and it could look very shrewd in a year or so. I'm more concerned about what it means for the club, as my pre-draft report that the Dodgers couldn't go over slot looks like it's probably accurate. That's too bad, especially in a year in which it looks like two dozen clubs might throw the commissioner's slot recommendations out the window.Texas RangersThe picks: Kevin Matthews (33), Zach Cone (37),Summary: Zach Cone has big tools, but they just don't play, exacerbated by a bad leak out front at the plate, and he was wildly overmatched in the Team USA trials last summer and on the Cape the year before (his only real experience hitting with wood). Kevin Matthews is a tough-sign high school lefty who projects as a reliever because of his frame. That seems the opposite of what you'd expect from a nascent, big-market club such as the Rangers, especially since they were linked to several big-ticket, high-ceiling high school kids.Seattle MarinersThe picks: Danny Hultzen (2)Summary: I'm not criticizing Hultzen in the least here, but I think drafting at No. 2 overall is a rare chance to go for ceiling, and the Mariners didn't do that. They took a very safe, very good college pitcher who will move quickly but doesn't have No. 1 starter upside. And I admit I like my left-handers to have better breaking balls than Hultzen, whose best off-speed pitch is a changeup.Best players remainingThe number denotes the player's ranking in my final Top 100 ranking.1. Josh Bell, OF (ranked No. 15 overall)2. Dillon Howard, RHP (18)3. Anthony Meo, RHP (25)4. Andrew Susac, C (27)5. Austin Hedges, C (31)6. Daniel Norris, LHP (35)7. Alex Dickerson, OF (37)8. Charles Tilson, OF (38)9. Nick Delmonico, C/1B (39)10. Johnny Eierman, SS (44)
 
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Before diving into the analysis, here are some key resources related to the 2011 MLB draft: • Law's final mock draft (June 6) • A collection of player scouting reports • The top 100 prospects (June 4)And now, on to the picks.Pittsburgh Pirates1. Gerrit Cole, RHP, UCLAChurchill: We expected this and Keith Law has been projecting this pick for weeks. I saw him twice and he was so-so both times, but with a plus changeup, big-time velocity up to 100 mph and a promising breaking ball, it's difficult to pass on Cole. The Pirates do not have such a player in their system and the UCLA product could see the big leagues after very little time in the minors. Seattle is looking at Rice third baseman Anthony Rendon here and prep center fielder Bubba Starling is still an outside possibility. I have been told shortstop Francisco Lindor is not the pick for the M'sSeattle Mariners2. Danny Hultzen, LHP, VirginiaChurchill: Hultzen is a surprise pick here, as the expectation was Rice third baseman Anthony Rendon or prep center fielder Bubba Starling. Hultzen is expected to move quickly and reach the majors within two years, but he does lack the upside of other college pitchers in the class. He did perform well and has above-average stuff including a 90-94 mph fastball and two above-average off-speed pitches. The rumored asking price was high, but perhaps there was a pre-draft deal in place here or strong indications that Hultzen would sign for what Seattle was willing to spend on the pick. Arizona is likely to tab UCLA right-hander Trevor Bauer at No. 3, but with Rendon still on the board, anything goes from this point forward.Arizona Diamondbacks3. Trevor Bauer, RHP, UCLAChurchill: Bauer, also a potential quick-mover like Hultzen, is not a surprise here as the D-backs have been linked to the right-hander for some time. The plus curveball, consistency and 91-95 mph velocity overrule the concerns on workload -- he averaged around 130 pitches per start this season -- and the unconventional throwing program he follows diligently. Rendon may not be strongly considered by Baltimore at No. 4, and the O's are said to be considering righty Dylan Bundy from Owasso HS in Oklahoma.Baltimore Orioles4. Dylan Bundy, RHP, Owasso (Okla.) HSChurchill: Bundy is a tremendous talent, and despite the lack of ideal size at 6-foot-1 and 190 pounds, he profiles as a No. 1 starter and could hit the big leagues as quickly as many of the college arms in the class. The big fastball -- up to 98 mph -- is just the beginning as he also offers a plus curveball, a potentially useful changeup and a cutter that may be his best secondary offering. He's a workout freak and breaks the mold that scouting director Joe Jordan generally sticks to, but he stays on top of his pitches and is a great competitor. Kansas City has the next pick and it could be Starling or a college arm such as Matt Barnes or Alex Meyer.Kansas City Royals5. Bubba Starling, OF, Garner-Edgerton (Kans.) HSChurchill: Starling may be the best talent in the class, starting with his plus raw power and tremendous all-around tools. Despite standing 6-foot-4 he profiles well in center thanks to good instincts and perhaps 60 speed on the 20-80 scouting scale. He's drawn comparisons to Josh Hamilton, but may be more like 2009 first-round pick and top prospect Mike Trout. The Royals farm system just added another high-ceiling talent with superstar potential. Plus, he gives Kansas City the one thing its farm system lacks: an impact up-the-middle player.Washington Nationals6. Anthony Rendon, 3B, RiceChurchill: This was the next spot for Rendon to go after Seattle passed on him at No. 2, and it's clear the Nationals went for best player available, ignoring the fact Ryan Zimmerman is one of the best third baseman in baseball and under contract long term. Rendon's injury concerns may or may not have had something to do with the fall, but the Nationals get a hitter here who could join them on the 25-man roster as early as next season. Where he plays in D.C. remains to be seen, but there has been some chatter about him moving to second base. The Nationals' next pick is at 23 and since they were linked to a lot of college players at No. 6, getting Rendon instead may change their efforts later this round.Arizona Diamondbacks7. Archie Bradley, RHP, Broken Arrow (Okla.) HSChurchill: The Diamondbacks ignored the fact this pick is unprotected after failing to sign Texas A&M's Barret Loux a year ago (he failed a post-draft physical) and took the best player on their board in Bradley. With velocity into the mid-90s and the best curveball among prep arms in the class, the upside is huge for Bradley, and he could end up at the top of the rotation. His college commitment may cost the D-backs here, but it's a gutsy pick and a great move if they get him signed. If they don't sign him, they don't get a compensation pick next year, hence the phrase "unprotected."Cleveland Indians8. Francisco Lindor, SS, Montverde (Fla.) AcademyChurchill: Lindor was considered by Seattle and Arizona, and the Indians get a potential five-tool player who won't turn 18 until November. He's a switch-hitter with pop -- he won the home run derby at the Aflac All-American game last year at age 16 -- and scares opposing coaches from all angles. He's a wizard on defense and projects to not only stick at shortstop but thrive there. The Indians could be in a position to have to trade budding star Asdrubal Cabrera in a few years as he gets more expensive, and now Lindor is set as the successor. The question on Lindor is how real the power is, but scouts generally agree it's above-average relative to the position. Lindor isn't going to be a cheap sign so it appears the Indians are not looking for a slot signing with this pick, which should make Tribe fans happy.Chicago Cubs9. Javier Baez, SS, Arlington Country Day (Jacksonville, Fla.)Churchill: Baez is one of the best prep bats in the class, with power and a chance to hit for average as well. He played shortstop in high school but is believed to be headed for third base as a pro. The swing is a bit long but there's bat speed to spare and the Cubs are big on upside talent.San Diego Padres10. Cory Spangenberg, 3B, Indian River State CollegeChurchill: Spangenberg, who player third in college, can run and has a plus hit tool with a chance for some power. This pick is unprotected so the Padres needed a signable player, but if Spangenberg can play up the middle somewhere he's a potential All-Star. He's not expected to play shortstop, his natural position, and doesn't profile to hit for the power generally reserved for third basemen but his athleticism suggests center field is a legitimate option. The Padres called him as a second baseman when they made the pick, so we can assume that's where he will begin his pro career.Houston Astros11. George Springer, OF, UConnChurchill: Springer came into the season as a potential top-5 pick, but showed some mechanical flaws that have scouts concerned that his swing is not sound and will delay his path to the big leagues. There's plus power and speed and he throws well. There is a chance he plays some center field but he has the arm to move to right, and the bat will play there if he fixes the swing.Milwaukee Brewers12. Taylor Jungmann, RHP, TexasChurchill: Jungmann has good stuff, sitting 91-95 mph with the fastball and offering two breaking balls of which the slider is the better pitch. He has some delivery concerns -- he throws across his body -- but he's been as consistent as any arm in the country this season and may not need much time in the minors to help the Brewers, and their farm system lacks just about everything. He's big and physical, and could pitch behind Yovani Gallardo and Zack Greinke with No. 2 upside.New York Mets13. Brandon Nimmo, OF, East HS (Cheyenne, Wyo.)Churchill: Nimmo is a high-upside play here and a refreshing pick for the Mets. He's a good athlete and could hit for plus power down the road, but his left-handed bat profiles to play in a corner outfield spot, where his arm fits, too. Nimmo brings a good work ethic to the table and he squares up fastballs regularly. His lack of competition -- his high school does not have a team -- made it difficult for him to get seen by scouts, but he's found a way to get noticed, including an impressive display on the showcase circuit last summer.Florida Marlins14. Jose Fernandez, RHP, Alonso HS (Tampa, Fla.)Churchill: The Marlins continue to go upside and get Fernandez, a Cuban defector, who offers a plus fastball into the mid-90s. He's 19 years old but fits the profile of the kind of pitcher The Fish like to work. However, the lack of a polished breaking ball could keep him in the minors for four or five years. It's no shock that the Marlins took a kid from Florida, as they were linked to just about every prep player in the state. Fernandez joins 2009 first-rounder Chad James (a southpaw) in a farm system that has produced pitchers Josh Johnson and Ricky Nolasco in recent years.Milwaukee Brewers15. Jed Bradley, LHP, Georgia TechChurchill: This is a protected pick but the Brewers get another college arm that could hit the big leagues inside of three years. He's a tall southpaw that has touched 97 mph but generally sits 91-94. His breaking ball needs work and his changeup often goes unused, which suggests he could land in the bullpen. He does throw strikes and he has an uncanny ability to avoid the sweet spot of the bat, but his inconsistencies kept him out of the top 10. The Brewers now have two legit rotation candidates out of this draft.Los Angeles Dodgers16. Chris Reed, LHP, StanfordChurchill: We knew this was going to be a slot pick with the current financial situation in L.A. and Reed was mentioned as a possibility by Law on Sunday and as the favorite here earlier today. There's big league ability here and his changeup and slider are his two best pitches, but this was a pick to make sure they landed a player with probability and signability, rather than upside.Los Angeles Angels17. C.J. Cron, 1B, UtahChurchill: Cron possesses perhaps the best power tool among college bats in the entire class. A natural catcher, Cron played first base this season due to a shoulder injury, but that is likely where he ends up as a pro. He makes a lot of contact, too, but doesn't generally work the count all that much. He generates leverage and loft consistently and is believed to have a strong enough ability to hit for average that he'll skate through the minors in a couple of seasons. The Halos need bats, and Cron gives them one.Oakland Athletics18. Sonny Gray, RHP, VanderbiltChurchill: Gray has terrific stuff and could have gone in the top 10. Because he's 5-foot-11 or maybe 6 feet tall, there are concerns about his durability, but his command and delivery became bigger concerns late this spring. The velocity is firm in the 92-96 mph range and his curveball is already a plus pitch. With Oakland's present starting rotation, the rich project to get richer, though Gray could end up in the bullpen down the line.Boston Red Sox19. Matt Barnes, RHP, UConnChurchill: The Red Sox getting Barnes here is a coup. He's a potential No. 1 or 2 starter and already possesses a 93-97 mph fastball and potentially plus curveball. He holds his velocity late into games and could get to the majors quickly, especially if he gets his feet wet out of the bullpen. Boston has more picks coming on later this evening, but this is a tremendous start as most didn't believe Barnes would get this far.Colorado Rockies20. Tyler Anderson, LHP, OregonChurchill: Anderson lacks the stuff and upside of other available college arms, including Kentucky's Alex Meyer, but he's athletic and polished and could be in the majors by the end of 2012 or early in 2013. He has a funky delivery but also a loose arm and when he commands his fastball he's tough to square up. He has two breaking balls, though both are inconsistent and he generally induced swings and misses from the change in speed more than a sharp, late break. If he can add to one of them -- more likely the curveball since he likes to pitch up in the zone a bit -- and find a better feel for a changeup, he could be a mid-rotation starter. More likely he's a back-end arm or a reliever, but one that helps the Rockies sooner than later.Toronto Blue Jays21. Tyler Beede, RHP, Lawrence Academy (Groton, Mass.)Churchill: The Blue Jays have extra picks but went with some upside with Beede, who could be a tough sign due to a strong commitment to Vanderbilt. He sits in the low-90s and improved his breaking ball this season, which now profiles as an above-average pitch in time. Toronto took righty Aaron Sanchez last year and now add Beede to its crop of young pitchers. It appears Toronto drafted for value here as many of the top college arms are already off the board, except for Kentucky's Alex Meyer.St. Louis Cardinals22. Kolten Wong, 2B, HawaiiChurchill: The Cardinals passed on Alex Meyer (the best available college pitcher) and prep arms Taylor Guerrieri and Dillon Howard to take Wong, a second baseman with an above-average hit tool. He lacks power, however, so he comes with limited upside. He's an average runner and an average defender but has good hands and could develop into a plus glove. St. Louis went for probability here rather than best player available.Washington Nationals23. Alex Meyer, RHP, KentuckyChurchill: They tabbed Rendon at No. 6 and went pitching here with the best available college starter in Meyer. He brings big upside with a plus fastball-slider combo. He's 6-foot-9 and when he keeps his delivery together is dominant and uses the slider to put batters away. There's a chance he's a closer in the future but he holds his velocity well despite some inconsistencies with his command. The Nationals, if we dream for a second, could have four perennial All-Stars out of the past three first rounds in Stephen Strasburg, Bryce Harper, Rendon and Meyer, with an above-average closer in Drew Storen.24. Tampa Bay RaysTaylor Guerrieri, RHP, Spring Valley HS (Columbia, S.C.)Churchill: The Rays have 10 of the next 37 picks and certainly didn't go signability here with Guerrieri, who has a commitment to South Carolina. Keith Law ranks him as the No. 3 prep arm in the class, and a scout I spoke to early this season called him a prototypical starter in today's game thanks to a 92-95 mph fastball that has reached 97. His curveball is plus and he's got some athleticism. Tampa got the best player available here, a good start to its busy day.San Diego Padres25. Joe Ross, RHP, Bishop O'Dowd HS (Oakland, Calif.)Churchill: Ross may have been the best player on the board. He's not as projectable as his brother Tyson -- who pitches for the A's -- was at the same age, but comes with better command and mechanics. Scouts rave about his delivery and arm action, which suggests he's a safe bet to develop his pitches and progress through the minors. San Diego, having tabbed Spangenberg at No. 10, lands a potential No. 2 starter in Ross.Boston Red Sox26. Blake Swihart, C, Cleveland HS (Rio Rancho, N.M.)Churchill: The Red Sox get perhaps the top catcher in the class in Swihart, though there are some questions about his defense. The tools are there and his bat may play in a corner outfield spot if he can't cut it behind the plate. The Red Sox farm system now has a little bit of everything by adding Swihart, a switch-hitting catcher.Cincinnati Reds27. Robert Stephenson, RHP, Alhambra (Calif.) HSChurchill: With many of the college arms off the board, the Reds dug into the prep ranks for Stephenson, who touches 94 mph and complements his heater with a promising curveball. There's some effort in his delivery but he's a good athlete and a smart kid on and off the field. His commitment to Washington is strong, but he's considered signable and gives the Reds a young arm with upside.Atlanta Braves28. Sean Gilmartin, LHP, Florida StateChurchill: Gilmartin gets by with average velocity touching the low 90s by relying on an advanced feel for pitching. His changeup is a plus offering but his curveball is soft, prompting some scouts to compare him to Mariners lefty Jason Vargas. In other words, a No. 4 starter. The Braves have Mike Minor, Julio Teheran and Arodys Vizcaino nearing the big leagues, so their pick of Gilmartin was all about drafting a player that would sign for MLB's recommended bonus for this slot.San Francisco29. Joe Panik, SS, St. John'sChurchill: Panik may have to move to second base due to a below-average arm, but projects to hit for some average as he works counts and shows good pitch recognition. There's not much future power in the bat, however, which could make it difficult for him to crack the starting lineup in San Francisco. The Giants appear to have gone for a slot signing here and several players rank ahead of Panik on Law's Top 100.Minnesota Twins30. Levi Michael, SS, North CarolinaChurchill: Michael is the top college shortstop in the class and the Twins may be pairing him with import Tsuyoshi Nishioka in the middle of the infield in a few years. Michael runs well and handles shortstop, but his bat is his best tool and he projects to hit for average and get on base thanks to an ability to use the whole field. The Twins passed on some prep arms but didn't reach for the college pitcher as some expected.Tampa Bay Rays31. Mikie Mahtook, OF, LSUChurchill: Mahtook's "slide" ends with the Rays, who now have two strong picks with eight remaining tonight. Mahtook can play center field and has a good arm and his power ticked up this season in a strong conference despite the change in bats at the college level. He was generally projected to go in the top 20 and Law had him as high as No. 14 to the Marlins and No. 9 to the Cubs in previous mock drafts. The Rays may have drafted B.J. Upton's replacement, depending on the future status of Desmond Jennings.Tampa Bay Rays32. Jake Hager, SS, Sierra Vista (Nev.) HSChurchill: The Rays reached here for Hager, a shortstop that most scouts believe needs to go to school and make another run at it in a few years. He's a shortstop with a chance to stay there, but the bat lacks polish and he's merely an adequate overall athlete for the position.Texas Rangers33. Kevin Matthews, LHP, Richmond Hill (Ga.) HSChurchill: The Rangers dig for Matthews, a left-hander committed to the University of Virginia who may very well choose school, despite a seven-figure bonus in the offing. He's likely a reliever in the future, but he has athleticism and above-average velocity. The Rangers have a pick in the compensation round and may choose to go over slot for the right talent with that selection.
 
The first round is complete, but the first night of the draft is not. Here's some more analysis of picks 34 through 60, aka the supplemental first round. (If you missed our pick-by-pick analysis of the first round, click here.)Picks 34 through 38The Nationals, at No. 34, get Brian Goodwin, an athletic outfielder with plus speed and the ability to square up line drives and even hit for some power. ... The Red Sox's pick of prep lefty Henry Owens is another strong selection for the club. Owens is projectable and might have front-line upside. ... The Rangers get the toolsy Zach Cone, who has yet to turn his physical skills into baseball performance. ... Tampa's selection of Brandon Martin adds another potential future shortstop to its system along with Tim Beckham and first-round pick Jake Hager. ... Toronto, at No. 35, reached for Jacob Anderson, but the team has several picks Monday and there is some upside in the outfielder's right-handed bat.Picks 39 through 43The Phillies love toolsy players but their top pick two years in a row has been off that trend. Larry Greene has plus power and should be adequate in a corner outfield spot. He's considered an easy sign. ... Jackie Bradley could be the next All-Star center fielder in Boston, and might have gone in the top 20 had it not been for an injury and some stuggles at the plate this spring. ... The Rays get Tyler Goeddel, who profiles better in the outfield than at third base, but there's some upside at the plate, including the potential for above-average power. ... Jeff Ames is a junior college kid with some upside, and at 6-foot-4 and 225 pounds, he has the size to profile in the rotation for the Rays. ... Andrew Chafin, who returned from Tommy John surgery to have a strong season, could be a mid-rotation starter and adds to the crop of legitimate pitching prospects the D-backs have added on Day 1.Picks 44 through 48Michael Fulmer gives the Mets another prep kid, but his fastball velocity -- up to 96 mph -- might make him a difficult sign with his commitment to Arkansas. Daniel Norris is still available at this point but might want more than the Mets want to spend, despite the belief that they'd be willing to go over slot at 44. ... Trevor Story, who has a commitment to LSU, could be a tough sign for the Rockies, but he is a solid defender at shortstop and has some strength to offer at the plate, although the questions about the hit tool remain. ... Joe Musgrove gives the Jays a big right-hander with a heavy sinker and a solid delivery, but he currently lacks a breaking ball. ... Keenyn Walker is an upside play for the White Sox and can switch hit with some raw pop. ... Michael Kelly is a projectable right-hander the Padres can pair with first-rounder Joe Ross down the line.Picks 49 through 53The Giants go back to the prep ranks after adding a college infielder in the first round. Kyle Crick is a solid, mid-rotation candidate with a plus fastball, but his secondary stuff needs work and he might be a long-term project. ... The Twins get a solid bat in Travis Harrison. He has power and had a chance to go in Round 1, but fell likely because his future is at first base. ... The Yankees added Dante Bichette, whose father of the same name played in the big leagues. He has good makeup and is a future outfielder with a strong arm and some power potential. The hit tool is a question, however. ... Blake Snell is a projectable lefty who touched 94 mph late this spring and is considered a signable player, hence his selection a little higher than his grades suggest. The Rays, however, love the Pacific Northwest, having taken Josh Sale and Drew Vettleson out of the area last spring. ... Dwight Smith, the son of former Cubs outfielder Dwight Smith Sr., is stronger than his father and might have more natural power. He profiles as a left fielder.Picks 54 through 60Brett Austin has a solid swing from both sides and a decent chance to stick at catcher for San Diego. He's athletic, so the outfield is also a possibility. ... The Twins get Hudson Boyd, who has touched the mid-90s with his fastball, and he's shown a feel for a slurvy breaking ball that is above average when he stays on top of it. Many believe he's a reliever in the end. ... Kes Carter is among the top smaller-college talents in the country, has some tools and profiles well defensively in a corner outfield spot. The Rays could afford to take a chance on his upside with their plethora of picks. ... The Jays snagged Kevin Comer, a Vanderbilt commit who might be tough to sign. He sits in the 90-93 mph range with his fastball and throws both a slider and curveball, but his command is below average. ... The Padres went for a college shortstop in Jace Peterson, but scouts worry about his ability to hit for average going forward, and the power grades below average. ... At No. 59, the Rays get Grayson Garvin, a 6-foot-6 left-hander with some projection left and a strong recent track record of progress and performance. ... With their 10th pick of the day, the Rays complete the sandwich round by selecting James Harris, an athletic outfielder from the Bay Area. He has all the tools, including above-average bat speed, but is considered raw at the plate. The Rays, considering they couldn't come in and spend $30 million on their first-day picks, have done well to spread out their selections among upside talent in filling gaps in their farm system.
 
The best player on the board went off the board with the first pick of the second round as the Pittsburgh Pirates tabbed outfielder Josh Bell, a Texas commit who sent a letter to the MLB Scouting Bureau requesting that clubs not draft him because he wants to go to college. With Bell and Gerrit Cole, the Pirates have selected two of the top 20 talents in this year's draft. The San Diego Padres were similarly aggressive, and the San Francisco Giants might have selected Buster Posey's replacement.Second-round highlights:• Arizona continued its dive into pitching, landing Coastal Carolina right-hander Anthony Meo, another potential first-rounder who fell some, possibly thanks to the belief that he'll end up in the bullpen. But he has a chance to start, and the Diamondbacks' crop of pitching in this class -- Trevor Bauer, Archie Bradley, Andrew Chafin and now Meo -- is stellar.• The Baltimore Orioles' selection of Vanderbilt's Jason Esposito is a good fit, as the club lacks a future third-base prospect with any momentum and the kid can hit despite some questions arising this spring about his ability to hit better pitching.• Kansas City's selection of prep catcher Cameron Gallagher was similarly shrewd. He was the best signable player available and fills a need in the Royals farm system.• Cleveland, at No. 67 overall, took the best player on the board regardless of position or signability in prep righty Dillon Howard. The Indians' first two picks are top drawer as they called the name of prep shortstop Francisco Lindor at No. 8 overall.• The Chicago Cubs' selection of Florida prep first baseman Dan Vogelbach is a gutsy one, as he's a bat only and isn't a good athlete. But his power is plus and he might be able to hit for enough average to be the club's first baseman of the future. Conditioning might always be a concern for Vogelbach, whose teammate Hudson Boyd was selected in the sandwich round by the Minnesota Twins.• The Milwaukee Brewers (Jorge Lopez) and Toronto Blue Jays (Daniel Norris) remained focus on pitching. The Brewers selected Taylor Jungmann and Jed Bradley in the first round and now get a projectable right-hander to develop. The Blue Jays have taken three pitchers in their first five picks, all of them from the prep level.• The Detroit Tigers might have been hoping Bell, Howard or Norris would fall to them, but that didn't happen, and the club instead filled an organizational need with James McCann, a solid college catcher from Arkansas.• The St. Louis Cardinals greatly strengthened their class by selecting Charlie Tilson, a toolsy prep outfielder. However, he's expected to require first-round money to forgo his commitment to Illinois.• If the Padres get Austin Hedges signed, it would be the best pick in Round 2, outside of Bell. He's a legit defender behind the dish and has the tools to learn to hit. San Francisco's selection of Oregon State catcher Andrew Susac is a great fit, but Susac won't come cheap as he's a draft-eligible sophomore and has more leverage to go back to school for another year. Susac, however, could move fairly quickly and give the Giants the chance to move Posey off the catcher's position if they have any inclination to do so.• Philadelphia had two choices in the round and tabbed prep shortstop Roman Quinn and Miami third baseman Harold Martinez. Quinn's future is likely at second base, and Martinez had a tough year at the plate until late in the spring after heading into the season as a potential top-50 selection. The power is there and he can handle third base defensively, but he had trouble squaring it up with the new bats mandated by the NCAA this season. The Phillies appear to have changed their trend in the draft after years of going with upside athletes.• The Boston Red Sox, who selected three of the top 35 talents Monday, tabbed William Jerez at No. 81 overall. Jerez is a projectable outfielder who likely will move to a corner spot, but his left-handed swing and athleticism induce dreams of an everyday player down the road.Of the 30 players taken in the round, 15 came out of college and 15 out of high school. There were 17 position players, and four of those were catchers. Stay tuned for more coverage.
 
Rounds 3-5 highlights• Seattle followed the Pirates' pick of Dickerson by tabbing prep first baseman Kevin Cron with the No. 92 overall pick. Cron is the younger brother of C.J. Cron, who went No. 17 to the Los Angeles Angels. The Mariners took Mount Olive College right-hander Carter Capps in compensation Round B. Capps throws hard and could be a late-inning relief option within a few years.• The Washington Nationals added to their unbelievable haul by tabbing Purke in the third round after tabbing Anthony Rendon, Alex Meyer and Brian Goodwin on Day 1. It may cost them $15 million to sign all four, but if they get all four under contract, the Nationals will have one of the strongest classes of the draft.• The Brewers again went with pitching, selecting another college starter in Andrew Gagnon from Long Beach State, a trend the Mets followed by taking Baylor's Logan Verrett. Verrett had a shot at the first round when the spring started based on a strong showing this past summer on the Cape.• The Los Angeles Angels took reliever Nick Maronde, a left-hander out of the University of Florida, who could help the club down the stretch if it stays in contention out West.• The Blue Jays took a shot at Stilson, who may end up in the bullpen if he returns strong enough from the shoulder problem that ended his season. The Rays added to their strong class by adding Johnny Eierman, a potential top-50 pick coming in. He's a shortstop now but may land in the outfield, where his speed and arm could play well in center.• Atlanta's selection of J.R. Graham, a right-hander out of Santa Clara who has touched 100 mph on the radar gun, could be the best pick of the fourth round. Graham often hits 97 and may fit well in the bullpen.• The Red Sox may have gotten another steal in right-hander Noe Ramirez out of Cal State Fullerton. Ramirez possesses a plus change and fringe fastball velocity, and he could be a fast mover who fits in the back of a rotation or in the bullpen.• Detroit's selection of Texas shortstop Brandon Loy in the fifth round is garnering solid reviews from area scouts, as some believe that there is more bat in his game than he's shown and he's already considered a plus defender. Colorado's selection of TCU shortstop Taylor Featherston was similarly shrewd, as was the Reds' pick of Louisville second baseman Ryan Wright and Minnesota's pick of Wichita State shortstop Tyler Grimes. Wright has some pop, but he might be a left fielder. Grimes has a polished approach and could be the best pick in the round.
 
'RnR said:
'Eephus said:
'Premier said:
God what a horrible telecast. Unwatchable.
The production values were not major league
Which is semi-surprising, because the MLB Network usually produces top-notch stuff. I guess when it gets down to it, they don't have a Kiper or McShay type of guy that you can look to for a sure fire analysis after every pick.
BWAHAHAHAHAAA!
Glad someone appreciated that. Sometimes my humor goes unnoticed. ;)
 

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