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2013 Hot Stove & Capella's Fabulous Cornhole Thread (1 Viewer)

Raider Nation said:
Eephus said:
Raider Nation said:
Ruth kind of stands out
Absurd, isn't it? I thought Cobb's 9 HRs at the break were impressive. Babe almost quadrupled that.
The NYY first-baseman looks very strong and healthy. Even if he misses one game, that's no big deal. He will be right back in the lineup the next day.
If not, I have a feeling he'll become a verb.

 
The St. Louis Cardinals and Colorado Rockies are expected to discuss a potential blockbuster trade involving Rockies shortstop Troy Tulowitzki at this week’s MLB GM/owners’ meetings, Yahoo Sports’ Jeff Passan reported Sunday.

The National League champion Cardinals want to upgrade a shortstop after starting 25-year-old Pete Kozma there this season. In 404 at-bats at shortstop, Kozma batted just .220 with one homer, 35 RBI, and a .556 OPS.

ESPN.com’s Jim Bowden reported Sunday that the Cardinals are expected to dangle their surplus of young, starting pitching for a “young, controllable shortstop.” The organization’s preference, according to Passan, is Tulowitzki, who hit .312 with 25 homers, 82 RBI, and a .931 OPS in 126 games last season.

The Rockies have previously said that the 29-year-old Tulowitzki isn’t going anywhere, but their position is different privately, Passan reported:

While Rockies ownership has said publicly it has no intentions of trading Tulowitzki, privately it continues to weigh advantages of freeing itself from the final seven years and $134 million guaranteed remaining on his contract against the loss of a superstar and the public-relations hit of trading a beloved homegrown player.

Tulowitzki has a no-trade clause, meaning that he would have to approve any potential trade. Passan also reported that the Cardinals have inquired about the possibility of acquiring one of the Texas Rangers’ young shortstops — Elvis Andrus or Jurickson Profar.

 
Would the Rockies eat some of Tulos salary? Because that is a ton of $$$ to pay a SS that has shown an inability to stay healthy, if I were the Rockies, my asking price wouldn't be much if the other team would take on the entirety of his salary.

 
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How sweet would it be to have Tulo in St Louis. This deal needs to get done. Once they understand that St Louis is my favorite team and Tulo is my son's favorite player then I am sure it will seal the deal...and my son can quit rooting for the Rockies (with Helton retiring and Tulo moving to St Louis it is time for him to switch teams anyway).

 
Balco said:
Would the Rockies eat some of Tulos salary? Because that is a ton of $$$ to pay a SS that has shown an inability to stay healthy, if I were the Rockies, my asking price wouldn't be much if the other team would take on the entirety of his salary.
I doubt they're willing to eat salary on the best SS in baseball.

 
Balco said:
Would the Rockies eat some of Tulos salary? Because that is a ton of $$$ to pay a SS that has shown an inability to stay healthy, if I were the Rockies, my asking price wouldn't be much if the other team would take on the entirety of his salary.
I doubt they're willing to eat salary on the best SS in baseball.
He has 7 years left on his deal paying him 19 mil per year. He has average 109 games played the last 4 years. Players like this don't tend to get healthy all of a sudden. And I don't disagree that he is the best SS in the game.

 
Balco said:
Would the Rockies eat some of Tulos salary? Because that is a ton of $$$ to pay a SS that has shown an inability to stay healthy, if I were the Rockies, my asking price wouldn't be much if the other team would take on the entirety of his salary.
I doubt they're willing to eat salary on the best SS in baseball.
He has 7 years left on his deal paying him 19 mil per year. He has average 109 games played the last 4 years. Players like this don't tend to get healthy all of a sudden. And I don't disagree that he is the best SS in the game.
He was a 5 WAR player last year in just over 500 PAs. By current standards, he "earned" his salary last year.

There's the likelihood that the contract will be bad value towards the end but that's true of every long-term deal. He has the defensive skills to move to 3B or the OF after his SS days are over, unless he completely falls apart.

 
I would think there are quite a few teams that would be interested in Tulo. 100 games of him plus 60 games of a backup is better than just about every teams SS production.

 
I would think there are quite a few teams that would be interested in Tulo. 100 games of him plus 60 games of a backup is better than just about every teams SS production.
I don't disagree. The question is, what is his value? Is he worth a couple top prospects? For example, what would the cards be expected to give up for him? I wouldn't give any of the blue chip pitchers.

 
I would think there are quite a few teams that would be interested in Tulo. 100 games of him plus 60 games of a backup is better than just about every teams SS production.
I don't disagree. The question is, what is his value? Is he worth a couple top prospects? For example, what would the cards be expected to give up for him? I wouldn't give any of the blue chip pitchers.
I'm trying to gauge where you're at here. If Tulowitzki isn't worth a blue chip prospect, what players would you say are worth one? I honestly believe he's a top 3 position player in the game, so I'm having a hard time wrapping my head around the "he's not worth anything major" angle you're taking.

But to answer your question: Matt Adams is an obvious fit here. I would imagine something along the lines of Adams, Lynn/Miller and a third player whose quality is dependent upon whether the second piece is Lynn or Miller.

 
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I would think there are quite a few teams that would be interested in Tulo. 100 games of him plus 60 games of a backup is better than just about every teams SS production.
I don't disagree. The question is, what is his value? Is he worth a couple top prospects? For example, what would the cards be expected to give up for him? I wouldn't give any of the blue chip pitchers.
I'm trying to gauge where you're at here. If Tulowitzki isn't worth a blue chip prospect, what players would you say are worth one? I honestly believe he's a top 3 position player in the game, so I'm having a hard time wrapping my head around the "he's not worth anything major" angle you're taking.

But to answer your question: Matt Adams is an obvious fit here. I would imagine something along the lines of Adams, Lynn/Miller and a third player whose quality is dependent upon whether the second piece is Lynn or Miller.
We are way off on what I believe as value. This isn't David Price who has 2 years under team control. This is an awesome, extremely brittle, SS with 7 years left on his contract at 19 mil per. Adams and a minor leaguer or Lance Lynn and a minor leaguer would be where I value him. People say he might be bad at the end of the contract. I think there is a huge risk that this could be bad with 5 years left in the contract.

 
Looking at it from the Rockies angle, they have big money tied up in Carlos Gonzalez and Tulowitzki. The team is not very good as constructed. If a team gave me a solid major league player that is under team control for the next several years, and a minor leaguer considered to be a very good prospect. I would make the deal.

I am assuming, however, the Rockies are looking for pitching more than hitting.

 
I would think there are quite a few teams that would be interested in Tulo. 100 games of him plus 60 games of a backup is better than just about every teams SS production.
I don't disagree. The question is, what is his value? Is he worth a couple top prospects? For example, what would the cards be expected to give up for him? I wouldn't give any of the blue chip pitchers.
I'm trying to gauge where you're at here. If Tulowitzki isn't worth a blue chip prospect, what players would you say are worth one? I honestly believe he's a top 3 position player in the game, so I'm having a hard time wrapping my head around the "he's not worth anything major" angle you're taking.

But to answer your question: Matt Adams is an obvious fit here. I would imagine something along the lines of Adams, Lynn/Miller and a third player whose quality is dependent upon whether the second piece is Lynn or Miller.
adams and miller is too much IMO
 
Just some stuff I saw on RW with some of my comments:

Yanks have serious interest in Beltran- Im a big fan of his and the DH will help him keep healthy. Age doesnt seem to be slowing his bat down

Byrd signs 2 yr, $16m deal with Phillies- really?

# of teams have interest in Castro- gotta assume a young, cheap AS catcher is worth a lot on the open market

Cards have interest in Lowrie- obviously they need a SS

 
Well, so much for the Phillies blowing it up. It's a manageable deal but it's a curious match of player and team.

 
Just some stuff I saw on RW with some of my comments:

Yanks have serious interest in Beltran- Im a big fan of his and the DH will help him keep healthy. Age doesnt seem to be slowing his bat down

Byrd signs 2 yr, $16m deal with Phillies- really?

# of teams have interest in Castro- gotta assume a young, cheap AS catcher is worth a lot on the open market

Cards have interest in Lowrie- obviously they need a SS
The A's are waiting on super-prospect Addison Russell for SS (who did very well in A+ last year), but he's at least a year off. The A's don't have much incentive to trade him during the off-season, and they can probably get a qualifiying offer turned down next off-season and get a draft pick.

Probably not much to it, unless STL blows Oakland away.

 
Mark DeRosa retires after a nice long career. I'm sorry that the Giants paid for his two biggest salary seasons and got very little in return but that's Sabean's fault, not DeRosa's.

He'll stay in the game as a broadcaster or coach if he wants to.

 
Out of Philly :

#phillies GM Ruben Amaro deep in serious talks w #bluejays to acquire OF Jose Bautista. Can also play 3rd. Phils would deal OF Dom Brown plus

10:57pm - 12 Nov 13
:lol:
 
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Out of Philly :

#phillies GM Ruben Amaro deep in serious talks w #bluejays to acquire OF Jose Bautista. Can also play 3rd. Phils would deal OF Dom Brown plus

10:57pm - 12 Nov 13
:lol:
Nice to see a trade rumour everyone can hate.
This sounds fun. Let's do this.
Count me among the non-believers in Domonic Brown. He's basically had one torrid month in his Major League career.
...and just like that, Brown hits a walk off grand slam against me in the WIS leeg :bag:

 
There is an adage among general managers that there is no such thing as a bad one-year contract. Limiting your exposure while remaining financially nimble is prudent, even if there isn't much return on that short-term investment. So flush is the game with money that perhaps the aphorism needs to be updated to include two-year contracts as well.

Nowhere is the need to limit exposure more important than it is in the market for veteran starting pitchers. It's the very used car lot of baseball.

The Red Sox, for instance, won the winter last year with an entire philosophy -- dole out more money on an annual basis to stay away from contracts beyond three years -- based on limiting exposure on all deals. Among Boston's many signings was forking over $26.5 million to pitcher Ryan Dempster, then 35, for two years.

Was Dempster worth it? His stuff diminished as the season wore on (5.16 ERA in the second half), he was a non-factor in the postseason and today he is their sixth starter. But he did chew up 171⅓ innings and Boston did go 17-12 in his starts (though that was thanks in large measure to the best offense in baseball), meaning he had a useful role on a championship club. He wasn't a bargain on a dollar-for-dollar basis, but that was hardly rare among last year's crop of veteran free-agent starters.

Fifteen starting pitchers who were at least 30 years old signed free agent contracts of one or two years last winter. Only three of them qualified for the ERA title with an adjusted ERA above average, and none of them changed teams: Andy Pettitte and Hiroki Kuroda of the Yankees and Bartolo Colon of the Athletics.

Of course, each of the signings last winter was met with best-case scenario optimism. Recall what Indians GM Chris Antonetti said about Brett Myers ($7 million for one year): "He'll go into our rotation and log a lot of innings. He's a big, strong physical guy who when he's started has shown he'll take the ball and throw strikes." Myers threw 21⅓ innings before he broke down.

This is what Nationals GM Mike Rizzo said about Dan Haren ($13 million for one year): "To get a pitcher of Dan Haren's caliber, we feel fortunate that we could land him." They may feel fortunate to see him go. Haren went 10-14 with a 4.67 ERA.

Twins GM Terry Ryan at least tried to contain his enthusiasm for Kevin Correia ($10 million, two years): "He's won in double figures the last four years in a row, and he's certainly a competitive guy. He throws the ball over and does a lot of the little things right, like control a running game, and he handles lefthanded hitters OK. He's been durable." Ryan might have gushed a wee bit more about the new copy machine in the Twins' offices. Correia did give Minnesota 31 starts and 185⅓ innings. Alas, he fell just short of the magical "double-digit wins" threshold, finishing 9-13 with a 4.18 ERA.

And then there were the noticeably strained words of Angels GM Jerry DiPoto upon the signing of Joe Blanton: "What Joe represents to us is stability and a winning player. We need it." Well, this "winning player" did have a winning career record (83-75), but such a distinction is virtually worthless for a guy with a career 4.37 ERA who had been getting clocked regularly the previous two years in the National League. As for stability, European satellites provide more of it than Blanton. He became the first MLB pitcher in five years and the second in franchise history to lose 14 games (2-14) with an ERA worse than 6.00 (6.04), joining Jim Abbott in 1996 (2-18, 7.48).

Among the other veteran free agent lowlight signings were Shaun Marcum by the Mets, Jeff Francis by the Rockies, Scott Baker by the Cubs, Roberto Hernandez by the Rays and Jason Marquis by the Padres.

What kind of impact will last year's market have on this one? None. Look around your town: are used car lots going out of business? It's buyer beware, but when teams can limit their exposure to one or two years, they can justify the risk. (Of course, the way teams drop $7 million on pitchers like Brett Myers while shortchanging their research and development staffs by not paying the best coaches and instructors well is a lousy way of prioritizing a business.)

The market this year just so happens to be loaded with the baseball versions of a '61 Corvette -- only in poor condition. The pool of 30-plus starters includes four former Cy Young Award winners (Colon, Roy Halladay, Johan Santana and Barry Zito). Let's remove veteran pitchers who are in line for contracts of three or more years, including Bronson Arroyo, Ricky Nolasco, Ervin Santana and Jason Vargas. That leaves 33 veteran starters who could be had for one-or two-year deals. I asked a veteran talent evaluator with one NL team to rank the five best risks among those 33. Here are his rankings with my comments, and then my picks and comments for the next five:

1. Tim Hudson, 38:

Hudson was throwing the ball well in July (4-0, 3.10 ERA) when his season ended with an ankle injury. Scouts admire his competitiveness, his clubhouse presence, the sound health of his arm and his late-career transition to a pitcher with effective breaking stuff and changes of speed. Hudson might find such a strong market that he could price himself out of Atlanta, but at this stage of his career he should remain in the NL. Case in point: Last season he posted a 5.89 ERA in three starts against AL teams and a 3.66 ERA in 18 starts against NL teams.

Best fit: If not a return to the Braves, he would fit well with the Giants.

2. Bartolo Colon, 40:

He looked like he was finished in April 2010, but that's when he underwent a surgery in the Dominican Republic in which doctors injected fat and bone marrow stem cells in Colon's elbow and shoulder. One of the doctors was known to have used human growth hormone in such procedures, though, he said, not in this one. Colon has since tested positive for synthetic testosterone in 2012.

There is no disputing that Colon has revived his career since the surgery and in the timeframe of his PED use. In the three seasons before that operation he was 13-16 with a 5.20 ERA in only 38 games. He is 36-25 with a 3.32 ERA in 80 games in three seasons since. Colon has become one of the game's premier two-seam fastball specialists, with uncanny movement and command.

Best fit: The Athletics have interest in keeping Colon in that big ballpark, but his stuff would play well in Pittsburgh, with the Pirates' emphasis on throwing and fielding groundballs.

3. Roy Halladay, 36:

It was painful to watch Halladay tossing in the low 80s and pitching to a 4.55 ERA after he came back in August from shoulder surgery. But he was hurt by uncharacteristic wildness. In the six games after his return, he walked 19 and struck out 16 -- but batters hit .222 against him.

Shoulder surgeries remain the most ominous of procedures for a pitcher. Halladay's prospective value depends largely on a review of his medical records, perhaps an avenue best explored late in the winter after he has had a chance to continue his rehab. In any case, Halladay's pitching smarts and work ethic make him an attractive bet.

Best fit: The New York Mets. Assistant GM J.P. Ricciardi and Halladay share a history in Toronto and mutual admiration. Halladay may be worth the investment just to have him around New York's young pitchers in spring training.

4. Dan Haren, 33:

All the innings and all the cutters have caught up with Haren. One of the most durable strike-throwers in baseball is no longer a 200-inning machine. But Haren, once the Nationals gave him a midseason 15-day break last year, proved he still can be a useful option in the back end of an NL rotation if handled with care. Haren had a 6.15 ERA on June 22, but after the re-boot, he went 6-5 with a 3.29 ERA in his last 16 games.

Best fit: The California native would be more comfortable nearer his SoCal home. San Diego or San Francisco make sense.

5. Ryan Vogelsong, 36:

The Giants, after doling out industry-rattling bucks to keep Hunter Pence and Tim Lincecum, oddly declined the $6.5 million option on Vogelsong after an injury-shortened season. But like Hudson, Vogelsong suffered a non-throwing injury: he broke bones in his hand while swinging a bat May 20. Upon his return, with his velocity down a tick or two after missing two months, he went 2-2 with a 4.55 ERA in 10 starts.

Best fit: Vogelsong has strong ties to San Francisco, where he revived his career, and mutual interest remains. But it is curious why the Giants would not pay Vogelsong less than what the Indians paid Myers last year, a decision that might open the door for the Phillies, his hometown team, to make a call.

The Next 5

• Hiroki Kuroda, 38, hit a wall at the end of last season, pitching to a 6.56 ERA in his final eight starts for the Yankees. He would be in the top five but for the thought he will consider a return to Japan to close out his career.

• A.J. Burnett, 36, still features strikeout stuff, especially with his oft-used breaking ball, but whether he returns to MLB is in question. Burnett will decide whether he wants to retire or keep pitching if the money is right.

• Jason Hammel, 31, has been limited by knee and forearm injuries since the second half of 2012. He might be better served to settle for a one-year deal to re-establish his health and value.

• Scott Baker, 32, threw just 15 innings for Chicago and essentially was paid $5.5 million by the Cubs to rehab his elbow. Now another club can reap the benefits of his comeback.

• Scott Feldman, 30, made 30 starts with a WHIP of 1.183 last year. Do you know how many pitchers in all of baseball did that? Just 25 -- and Feldman was one of only 11 who pitched in the AL. (He split his 30 starts equally between the Cubs and Orioles.) Hey, now that I think about it, and considering his age, maybe Feldman should get more than two guaranteed years.
 
The Bosox could end up losing four position players heading into next year. Ellsbury is going to get crazy Carl Crawford like money from someone with a suitcase full of cash that they will be handing out blindly. Drew is going to want a multi-year deal at $10M+ a year. Napoli is already meeting with Texas for a potential return engagement. And someone will likely give Saltalamacchia some good scratch as one of the few offensive catchers available. I guess Boston gives Bradley a shot in the OF and Bogaerts inherits the SS job. They have a couple of decent catching prospects that are a couple years away but I can't see a clear 1B option. Maybe they plan to go with Gomes, Bradley, and Victorino in the OF and move Nava to 1B? Seems like a lot of turnover for a Series winner.

Local sports talk has them potentially looking to move a SP (Dempster, Peavy, or Lackey) and potentially Middlebrooks. Not really sure who they would be targeting either in the trade market or in free agency, but on the surface it looks like they could have several holes to fill.

 
The Bosox could end up losing four position players heading into next year. Ellsbury is going to get crazy Carl Crawford like money from someone with a suitcase full of cash that they will be handing out blindly. Drew is going to want a multi-year deal at $10M+ a year. Napoli is already meeting with Texas for a potential return engagement. And someone will likely give Saltalamacchia some good scratch as one of the few offensive catchers available. I guess Boston gives Bradley a shot in the OF and Bogaerts inherits the SS job. They have a couple of decent catching prospects that are a couple years away but I can't see a clear 1B option. Maybe they plan to go with Gomes, Bradley, and Victorino in the OF and move Nava to 1B? Seems like a lot of turnover for a Series winner.

Local sports talk has them potentially looking to move a SP (Dempster, Peavy, or Lackey) and potentially Middlebrooks. Not really sure who they would be targeting either in the trade market or in free agency, but on the surface it looks like they could have several holes to fill.
I doubt they'll lose all four players you mentioned. Napoli is probably the most likely to stay.

Boston has plenty of money to spend and a good farm system. Pedroia is signed to a below market deal. They'll be fine.

 
The Bosox could end up losing four position players heading into next year. Ellsbury is going to get crazy Carl Crawford like money from someone with a suitcase full of cash that they will be handing out blindly. Drew is going to want a multi-year deal at $10M+ a year. Napoli is already meeting with Texas for a potential return engagement. And someone will likely give Saltalamacchia some good scratch as one of the few offensive catchers available. I guess Boston gives Bradley a shot in the OF and Bogaerts inherits the SS job. They have a couple of decent catching prospects that are a couple years away but I can't see a clear 1B option. Maybe they plan to go with Gomes, Bradley, and Victorino in the OF and move Nava to 1B? Seems like a lot of turnover for a Series winner.

Local sports talk has them potentially looking to move a SP (Dempster, Peavy, or Lackey) and potentially Middlebrooks. Not really sure who they would be targeting either in the trade market or in free agency, but on the surface it looks like they could have several holes to fill.
I doubt they'll lose all four players you mentioned. Napoli is probably the most likely to stay.

Boston has plenty of money to spend and a good farm system. Pedroia is signed to a below market deal. They'll be fine.
While Napoli may be the most likely to stay, Boston has yet to contact him about signing a new deal. They made a qualifying offer and that was it. Other teams have contacted him, and they may want to give him more years and more per year than the Red Sox would. IMO, Boston was not as bad as their 2012 record and not as good as their 2013 record. A lot of things went their way this year. I would slot them as a 90-92 win team that had some late game heroics to pull out some unlikely wins throughout the season. They should be a solid team again next year . . . but they may once again have several new faces in the lineup.

 
The Bosox could end up losing four position players heading into next year. Ellsbury is going to get crazy Carl Crawford like money from someone with a suitcase full of cash that they will be handing out blindly. Drew is going to want a multi-year deal at $10M+ a year. Napoli is already meeting with Texas for a potential return engagement. And someone will likely give Saltalamacchia some good scratch as one of the few offensive catchers available. I guess Boston gives Bradley a shot in the OF and Bogaerts inherits the SS job. They have a couple of decent catching prospects that are a couple years away but I can't see a clear 1B option. Maybe they plan to go with Gomes, Bradley, and Victorino in the OF and move Nava to 1B? Seems like a lot of turnover for a Series winner.

Local sports talk has them potentially looking to move a SP (Dempster, Peavy, or Lackey) and potentially Middlebrooks. Not really sure who they would be targeting either in the trade market or in free agency, but on the surface it looks like they could have several holes to fill.
I doubt they'll lose all four players you mentioned. Napoli is probably the most likely to stay.

Boston has plenty of money to spend and a good farm system. Pedroia is signed to a below market deal. They'll be fine.
While Napoli may be the most likely to stay, Boston has yet to contact him about signing a new deal. They made a qualifying offer and that was it. Other teams have contacted him, and they may want to give him more years and more per year than the Red Sox would. IMO, Boston was not as bad as their 2012 record and not as good as their 2013 record. A lot of things went their way this year. I would slot them as a 90-92 win team that had some late game heroics to pull out some unlikely wins throughout the season. They should be a solid team again next year . . . but they may once again have several new faces in the lineup.
I dunno about that. Their pythagorean W-L was 100-62. They were only .500 in one-run games, which is surprising considering how good their closer was once they decided he was their closer. They had their fair share of injuries. Seems like a legit 95+ win team to me.

 
Sox will lose a few players, sure. Drew is no big loss, especially with Bogaerts ready. No reason to pay silly money to him. Ellsbury will get paid, and it will suck to lose him, but you can't keep everyone. Bradley will be the logical choice to fill in, but the Sox do have quite a few outfielders on their roster and in the minors.

Napoli should be kept if possible, but again, if someone is going to overpay, you can't keep everyone. Salty is a guy I wouldn't mind keeping, wouldn't hate to see him go.

Red Sox will also figure to bring new players in. I think the only impact loss will be Ellsbury, gotta figure they'll be able to make at least one or two impact signings.

And it looks like Tulo isn't going anywhere.

 
Boston is rumored to be the front-runner to sign Carlos Ruiz for 2/$20M. That's an overpay but they can afford it. Chooch could be a decent stopgap unless his bat falls apart. He'll be 35 on opening day and has caught over 1200 games as a professional.

Some combination of Ruiz/Ross/Lavarnway wouldn't be terrible. Christian Vazquez and former #1 pick Blake Swihart are further away.

 

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