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Concert Time Machine (1 Viewer)

Dan Lambskin

Footballguy
I’m not quite the music nerds most of you are, but I was watching some Black Sabbath Paris 1970 on YouTube, And while it wouldn’t be my top choice (I’d have to think about that a little bit), curious what people’s top concert at any time in time would be if they had a time machine to go back and attend it live.

 

Uruk-Hai

Footballguy
I’d probably say 1967 Monterey Pop Festival
For festivals, mine would be this one too.

Just to see Otis Redding in his prime was worth the price of admission. But you also got to see the US coming-out parties of The Who, Hendrix, Janis, and many of the California bands.

Lol at The Dead having to follow The Who and play in front of Jimi.

 

zamboni

Footballguy
For festivals, mine would be this one too.

Just to see Otis Redding in his prime was worth the price of admission. But you also got to see the US coming-out parties of The Who, Hendrix, Janis, and many of the California bands.

Lol at The Dead having to follow The Who and play in front of Jimi.
I’ll third this one.

Second choice would be Queen on their 1979 Live Killers tour.

 

zamboni

Footballguy
I’d probably say 1967 Monterey Pop Festival over Woodstock in a close call.
I came *this* close to actually being at Woodstock. My parents went but decided at the last minute not to drag their 9 month old (yours truly) there. :kicksrock:

 
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Sullie

Footballguy
Sunday June 24, 1990 - Stevie Ray Vaughn played at Riverbend (Music Center) in Cincinnati Ohio.  I was in college at the time but working as an intern for a Life Insurance company that summer.  I passed up on going to that concert because I was working the next day plus I figured he and the band would be nearby again (Kentucky, Indiana, Ohio again, etc.) so I thought and told my friends (who were begging me to go with them) "oh, I'll catch him when he swings by the area again." Seriously, it's been almost 30 years and I'm still pissed off at myself for not going.  Arrggghhh.  He died a month later. 

 
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zamboni

Footballguy
I'd probably say this one, too. The look on the girl's face when Townsend smashes up his guitar against the monitor is righteous. The sickening thud, the illest wind. 
My favorite clip at Monterey is when Janis was performing and the camera panned to Mama Cass in the audience - you could clearly see her mouthing “wow!” as she was watching in awe of Janice.

 

ProstheticRGK

Footballguy
I'd probably say this one, too. The look on the girl's face when Townsend smashes up his guitar against the monitor is righteous. The sickening thud, the illest wind. 

God bless The Who.
Just youtubed My Generation from that show. Thanks for the reminder. I grew up with a kid that acted just like Keith Moon. Not a bad kid, but, man, did he wreck anything in his path.

 

kutta

Footballguy
June 5, 1983, Red Rocks Amphitheater in Colorado. U2 War tour.  :thumbup:
I had a bunch of buddies ask me to go to opening show of the Joshua Tree tour in 1987 at Arizona State. For some reason I didn't go. I've regretted that one forever.

 

ffldrew

Footballguy
June 5, 1983, Red Rocks Amphitheater in Colorado. U2 War tour.  :thumbup:
I had already seen them at the Rainbow - which was a small theater in Denver. And on that day it was raining so hard in the city(not so hard in the foothills)and was about 45 degrees outside nearly snowing - so we decided to not go.

 

NFL2DF

Footballguy
Sullie said:
Sunday June 24, 1990 - Stevie Ray Vaughn played at Riverbend (Music Center) in Cincinnati Ohio.  I was in college at the time but working as an intern for a Life Insurance company that summer.  I passed up on going to that concert because I was working the next day plus I figured he and the band would be nearby again (Kentucky, Indiana, Ohio again, etc.) so I thought and told my friends (who were begging me to go with them) "oh, I'll catch him when he swings by the area again." Seriously, it's been almost 30 years and I'm still pissed off at myself for not going.  Arrggghhh.  He died a month later. 
Similar story.

The Dead came to my home town in spring '95 for a three night run (Wed, Thur, Fri).

I had only recently started listening to them so I didn't have the proper perspective on the event. Wed and Thur were "school nights" and Sat I was taking the SATs so I skipped the run, thinking I need to focus on school now and I'll catch them on the next tour. (Jerry died in August that year)

Everyone lost their minds when they busted out Unbroken Chain. At the time I didn't even know what that meant. Now it brings a tear to my eye knowing what I missed.

There are definitely better shows they had over the years but if I could hop in a time machine I would go back to those three days in the spring of '95.  Listen to that beautiful music and share the experience with my friends from high school before we all went our separate ways a few months later. 

 
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Encyclopedia Brown

Footballguy
Bon Scott with AC/DC.

The Go-Go's around 1981, right when they hit it big. I have heard the concerts could be electric or a train wreck (sometimes in the same show), depending on Belinda's mood and quantity of ingested substances. 

 

kupcho1

Footballguy
It was one I attended:  Concert for the Hall of Fame, Cleveland OH, Sep 2, 1995firsthand account (Youtube)

Rock 'n' roll held its first big summit last night in Cleveland - a historic, star-studded gathering that brought together the musical generations for a special night of music, fun and celebration at the Stadium.

Younger stars such as Bruce Springsteen, Melissa Etheridge and John Mellencamp performed with their musical heroes and paid tribute to the pioneers who blazed the rock 'n' roll trail in the 1950s and '60s. The pioneers themselves - Chuck Berry, Jerry Lee Lewis, Al Green, Aretha Franklin and more - were there, too, offering up their own classics in honor of the opening of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum.

Berry, dressed in a regal white tuxedo, kicked the evening off with "Johnny B. Goode," backed by Springsteen and the E Street Band, who were performing in concert together for the first time in almost a decade.

Springsteen hung in the background, playing guitar while the duckwalking Berry, one of the fathers of rock 'n' roll, basked in the spotlight.

Theirs was one of several historic pairings and spine-tingling performances.

It was worth the price of admission just to hear soul great Al Green bring down the house with a stirring rendition of Sam Cooke's "A Change is Gonna Come." The same goes for the chance to see New Orleans boogie-woogie piano master Dr. John pay homage to Fats Domino and Ray Charles with solo renditions of "Blueberry Hill" and "What'd I Say."

Or how about Franklin, the "Queen of Soul," dressed to the nines in a sequined blue gown, burning down the house with the house band Booker T. and the MGs and the Memphis Horns on scorching renditions of Otis Redding's "I Can't Turn You Loose" and her own big hits, "(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman" and "Freeway of Love"?

And then there was Springsteen and the E Street Band in a long set, paying tribute to Big Joe Turner and Bill Haley with "Shake, Rattle and Roll," Bo Diddley with a medley of "Bo Diddley" and their own "She's the One," and rockin' with the king of rock piano, Jerry Lee Lewis, on "Great Balls of Fire" and "Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On."

Springsteen and the E Streeters treated long-starved fans to one more of their own tunes, a new live rendition of "Darkness on the Edge of Town." An overzealous young fan jumped onstage at the end of the song, grabbing Springsteen around the neck. As security guards rushed to rescue, Springsteen tried to call them off. "That's rock 'n' roll," he said.

The show, televised live around the world by the Home Box Office cable network, was mostly fast-paced and fun. The performers played on a two-sided circular stage that allowed one group to set up while the other was in the spotlight. There was also a third stage used for solo acoustic performances by Dr. John, Jackson Browne, Ann and Nancy Wilson of Heart, and others.

With a few exceptions, the action was nonstop. Video clips of past rock hall induction ceremonies and classic rock performances were used to fill the gaps, along with other historical clips and tributes.

The pre-concert grapevine had everyone from Bob Dylan and Neil Young to Paul McCartney and Eric Clapton showing up for the gig.

As of midnight, Dylan was the only surprise guest, delivering an electrifying set that included such standards as "All Along the Watchtower," "Just Like a Woman" and "Highway 61 Revisited." Springsteen teamed up with Dylan on "Forever Young."

The night also featured plenty of interesting pairings and cool performances.

Mellencamp and his band delivered a rousing rendition of "R.O.C.K. in the U.S.A.," a musical tribute to the giants of '60s soul, including a few of the performers on hand for the concert, namely Martha Reeves and James Brown. Reeves, looking and sounding like she was ready to do a little of her own dancing in the streets, joined Mellencamp for a sultry take on Van Morrison's funky "Wild Night."

Rock's reigning female superstar, Etheridge, paid tribute to the pioneer girl groups of the 1960s, offering up smoky, rocking covers of the Ronettes' "Be My Baby," the Supremes' "Love Child" and the Shangri-Las' "Leader of the Pack."

Hometown girl Chrissie Hynde of the Pretenders scored with the crowd by opening her set with "My City Was Gone," which includes references to her home state and childhood home in Cuyahoga Falls.

Bon Jovi offered up an extended, Joe Cocker-esque version of the Beatles' "With A Little Help from My Friends," backed by Booker T. and the MGs and the Memphis Horns. Bon Jovi guitarist Ritchie Sambora gave the song a metallic edge, while Booker T. Jones and company provide the soul.

The group was then joined by a gray-haired Eric Burdon, lead vocalist of the Animals, who led them through a pair of the Animals' biggest '60s hits, "It's My Life" and "We Gotta Get Outta This Place."

The crowd of 57,000 got into the spirit of the evening, dancing on their seats and in the aisles and singing along to the songs.

The "Man in Black," rock and country hall of famer Johnny Cash, offered up a ride-the-rails rendition of "Folsom Prison Blues," then teamed with Mellencamp on "Ring of Fire." Browne kicked off his set with Bob Marley's "Redemption Song" and did a duet with Etheridge on the Everly Brothers' "Wake Up Little Susie."

One of the most electrifying combinations of the evening was delivered by alternative rockers Soul Asylum and punk pioneers Lou Reed and Iggy Pop. Pop joined the band on "Back Door Man," the Willie Dixon blues tune first performed by Howlin' Wolf and later popularized by the Doors. Soul Asylum gave the tune a hard, aggressive edge, and Pop, in top punk form, pranced around the stage like a punkish Mick Jagger.

Reed and Soul Asylum delivered that same in-your-face aggression on a rendition of Reed's great "Sweet Jane."

The show lost a little steam when Los Angeles singer Sheryl Crow took the stage, performing a rather tepid tribute to the Rolling Stones. Her laid-back covers of "Let it Bleed" and "Get Off of My Cloud" lacked spark and attitude.

But George Clinton and the P-Funk All-Stars got things moving again, getting down with Sly & the Family Stone bass player Larry Graham on funky, dance machine covers of hall of famer Sly's "Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Agin)" and "I Want to Take You Higher."

Hall of famers the Kinks followed, pushing the energy level even higher with a raucous take on their 1965 hit "All Day and All of the Night." Frontman Ray Davies performed the song in a Union Jack jacket, then switched to an American flag coat for a sing-along rendition of "Lola.'

Other highlights included Ann and Nancy Wilson on an acoustic version of Led Zeppelin's "Battle of Evermore," Robbie Robertson of the Band teaming up with Crow and Dr. John on the Band's "The Weight," and Bruce Hornsby's tribute to the late Jerry Garcia. Hornsby, who toured with the Dead several years ago, performed "Scarlet Begonias" and "I Know You Rider."

The show was still going strong well past midnight, with the crowd waiting for an all-star jam to cap it off.

Former WMMS deejay Kid Leo, now an executive for Sony Records in New York, started the evening's proceedings with a pre-concert cheer, paying tribute to the Clevelanders who rallied to bring the hall of fame to the city.

"This is the home of rock 'n' roll," he said. "Bar none, above all; Cleveland is the home of rock 'n' roll."

It certainly was last night in the Stadium.
Set list (click on artist to hear what they played

8 Things You Didn't Know

 

Tbone

Shrinkage
Sullie said:
Sunday June 24, 1990 - Stevie Ray Vaughn played at Riverbend (Music Center) in Cincinnati Ohio.  I was in college at the time but working as an intern for a Life Insurance company that summer.  I passed up on going to that concert because I was working the next day plus I figured he and the band would be nearby again (Kentucky, Indiana, Ohio again, etc.) so I thought and told my friends (who were begging me to go with them) "oh, I'll catch him when he swings by the area again." Seriously, it's been almost 30 years and I'm still pissed off at myself for not going.  Arrggghhh.  He died a month later. 
Saw him a few weeks after that show in Salem, Oregon on July 20th , 1990.  He opened for Joe Cocker.  Great show.

 

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