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Does being extremely fat help or hurt a DT? (1 Viewer)

Does being extremely fat help or hurt a DT?

  • helps

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • hurts

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • doesn't matter

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    0

Gr00vus

Footballguy
While digesting the impact of Shawne Merriman being unavailable the rest of the year to my beloved Chargers on the walk to my car from my office, and realizing that their defense will completely fall apart now if Jamal Williams can't perform like he did two years ago, I wondered:

Would Jamal be more effective if he weren't as big as he is? Would he gain some more agility, speed, endurance? Would the reduced strain on his sad little knees from carrying less fat around prolong his career, reduce the amount of injuries and surgery, and/or keep him on the field more often? Or would he be too light to play the position and have success taking on 2 guys at a time in the 3-4?

Seeing Sean Rodgers, Richard Seymour, and other big time DTs who anchor the center of the D line I wondered if they'd be better or worse at their job if they weren't carrying around all the extra fat that they do.

Do you people think there'd be a benefit to DTs being less obese? Would it avoid wear and tear on their joints (those guys in the trenches already run a high risk of joint injury due to the violence and unpredictability of the contact they encounter)? Would replacing some of the proposed missing fat mass with muscle make up for the reduced bulk? Would it be possible to have that much muscle mass and remain agile enough to play the position?

Simply put, do you have to be fat to be a top DT in today's NFL? What is the reasoning behind your opinion?

I have a hunch that you do - I think if you get too light you can be moved regardless of how strong you are - gravity is a harsh mistress.

PS. I've got nothing against fat people, sorry if this comes across as insensitive.

 
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Fat isn't enough. Assuming two players play with exactly the same hand strength and technique, base strength and leverage, quickness off the ball and football instincts, the bigger player has an advantage. A fat player who can't play with leverage won't last long regardless of his weight. Today's offensive linemen are plenty powerful enough to move 375 pounds of poor technique.

 
Assuming two players play with exactly the same hand strength and technique, base strength and leverage, quickness off the ball and football instincts, the bigger player has an advantage.
So your answer to the poll is being extremely fat helps a DT (given that they are good in all the other areas).
 
Assuming two players play with exactly the same hand strength and technique, base strength and leverage, quickness off the ball and football instincts, the bigger player has an advantage.
So your answer to the poll is being extremely fat helps a DT (given that they are good in all the other areas).
I didn't notice the poll. I'd say all of the other qualities are more important. Some of them are more likely found in those with increased size.I don't think "fat" helps any DT. Extra weight that isn't carried properly hinders explosiveness, quickness and technique more than it helps anchoring at the point of attack. Kris Jenkins and Shaun Rogers, when fatter, weren't more successful than when they were in condition. If you're really asking whether a bigger body type is more valuable than a smaller body type, that's usually scheme and technique dependent.
 
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I don't think "fat" helps any DT. Extra weight that isn't carried properly hinders explosiveness, quickness and technique more than it helps anchoring at the point of attack. Kris Jenkins and Shaun Rogers, when fatter, weren't more successful than when they were in condition.
This is what I was after with the question. So let's go back to Jamal Williams, he's had recurring knee problems throughout his career, which I think at this point have reduced his impact on games from even two years ago when he was dominant. As I mention above, some of that is attributable to the position played, but I believe plenty of it is attributable to being out of shape. Given that, and your opinion above, why then do we pretty much never see "ripped" DTs, or at least less morbidly obese ones, and especially not playing at a consistently high level? If what you say is true, given modern training and nutritional abilities utilized by pro teams, why wouldn't somebody try to take advantage of the benefits of being in shape for these guys?If being the michellin man isn't giving any benefit, why are so many DTs allowed to stay in that condition?
 
I don't think "fat" helps any DT. Extra weight that isn't carried properly hinders explosiveness, quickness and technique more than it helps anchoring at the point of attack. Kris Jenkins and Shaun Rogers, when fatter, weren't more successful than when they were in condition.
This is what I was after with the question. So let's go back to Jamal Williams, he's had recurring knee problems throughout his career, which I think at this point have reduced his impact on games from even two years ago when he was dominant. As I mention above, some of that is attributable to the position played, but I believe plenty of it is attributable to being out of shape. Given that, and your opinion above, why then do we pretty much never see "ripped" DTs, or at least less morbidly obese ones, and especially not playing at a consistently high level? If what you say is true, given modern training and nutritional abilities utilized by pro teams, why wouldn't somebody try to take advantage of the benefits of being in shape for these guys?If being the michellin man isn't giving any benefit, why are so many DTs allowed to stay in that condition?
I think we're still talking about the most athletic "fat" guys around. There are plenty of players -- guys like John Henderson, for example -- who don't look much like the traditional space-eating DT. I think the younger guys or the elite athletes (i.e. Sapp or Grady Jackson) can handle some extra weight and survive. But the Gilbert Browns of the world are going to have trouble staying healthy for an extended career and will have to be rotated to have any benefit.And I think there are a number of "ripped" DTs -- not Julius Peppers ripped -- but in shape from a height/weight perspective. I'd put guys like Haloti Ngata, Albert Haynesworth, Amobi Okoye, Darnell Dockett, Tommie Harris and La'Roi Glover in that category in recent seasons. I agree that a guy like Ngata is an unusual find -- a true two-gapping tackle who looks like he could play anywhere on the line -- but many of today's three-technique tackles aren't slobs.I think a reasonable amount of good weight helps, but (pardon the pun) there's a tipping point where more is no longer better.
 

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