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Ford Motor Company (1 Viewer)

Keerock

Footballguy
The Ford Story

This new website launched to help inform the public about Ford Motor Company's recent restructuring efforts, the current state of our business and our Drive One message of creating Quality, Green, Safe & Smart vehicles. The website has some great information that can help answer questions and shed light on the many positive things happening at Ford, despite the tough economic times that we're currently facing.

I'm not personally a huge fan of Ford... especially the way they have operated and the product they have produced, but this is an interesting read.

 
Does it have anything in there about plans to sell the Lions and put that money back into the company?

 
Does it have anything in there about plans to sell the Lions and put that money back into the company?
They may have cornered the market on selling crappy vehicles, but I am not sure that directly translates into selling crappy football teams.
 
I think the Ford Escape Hybrid has been the best American made hybrid on the market. The Fusion hybrid looks interesting but it's too early to tell. It's easy to kick them when they are down but I hope they pull through this.

 
Does it have anything in there about plans to sell the Lions and put that money back into the company?
The owner of the Lions (WCFord Sr) has NO involvement with Ford Motor Company.That being said, both the Lions and FMC have both shown extremely poor decision making at executive levels for years.
 
Does it have anything in there about plans to sell the Lions and put that money back into the company?
The owner of the Lions (WCFord Sr) has NO involvement with Ford Motor Company.That being said, both the Lions and FMC have both shown extremely poor decision making at executive levels for years.
Way to dash that last ray of hope for all those Lions fans out there.
 
crappy cars + hybrid = crappy hybrid cars.

Let me know when they stop making POS vehicles and maybe i'll buy American again

 
The Crown Vic is a good option in the under $5k used market - especially the heavy duty police interceptor version. It gets very good mileage for an 8 cy. behemouth. For those in the younger generation who have only experienced small engine front wheel drive cars, I highly recommend the rear drive V-8 experience and the used police interceptor is a cheap and dependable introduction. Plus - its fun to cruise down the freeway and have everyone slowing down and getting out of your way.

 
crappy cars + hybrid = crappy hybrid cars.Let me know when they stop making POS vehicles and maybe i'll buy American again
It takes years for perception to change. It used to be every *** car was considered crappy or junk. Ford is making a much better product now and hopefully time will change peoples perceptions.
 
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crappy cars + hybrid = crappy hybrid cars.Let me know when they stop making POS vehicles and maybe i'll buy American again
It takes year for perception to change. It used to be every *** car was considered crappy or junk. Ford is making a much better product now and hopefully time will change peoples perceptions.
:goodposting: As a Toyota owner, I'll be taking a long look at American cars when I'm in the market for a replacement.
 
crappy cars + hybrid = crappy hybrid cars.Let me know when they stop making POS vehicles and maybe i'll buy American again
It takes year for perception to change. It used to be every *** car was considered crappy or junk. Ford is making a much better product now and hopefully time will change peoples perceptions.
I honestly don't know what he's talking about here. The Escape Hybrid has been knocked for interior(and I agree, I've been inside them) but as far as the mechanic reliability of the car I'd be curious to see if he can justify calling it "crappy". From what I've seen they have been very reliable and get better gas mileage than any of the Japanese SUV hybrids, and this coming from someone that was really looking forward to the Highlander Hybrid before it was released.
 
crappy cars + hybrid = crappy hybrid cars.Let me know when they stop making POS vehicles and maybe i'll buy American again
It takes year for perception to change. It used to be every *** car was considered crappy or junk. Ford is making a much better product now and hopefully time will change peoples perceptions.
I honestly don't know what he's talking about here. The Escape Hybrid has been knocked for interior(and I agree, I've been inside them) but as far as the mechanic reliability of the car I'd be curious to see if he can justify calling it "crappy". From what I've seen they have been very reliable and get better gas mileage than any of the Japanese SUV hybrids, and this coming from someone that was really looking forward to the Highlander Hybrid before it was released.
virtually all major automakers now produce "reliable" vehicles. Sure YMMV based on what you are doing to, or inside of your, car. But, in general, cars today do the basics very well. I'm talking design, innovation, amenities, extras, and the coherence and reliability of those things. When i sit inside my VW, my Audi, or my Acura, i like the car. I like the thought that has gone into very small details. I like that all the extras come together in a coherent product that works well. When I sit in the wife's US made car it just seems like they took a bunch of decent ideas, crammed them into the vehicle, and then put a cheap plastic casing around everything. The tolerances are despicable, details are overlooked, and components do not mesh very well.
 
The Crown Vic is a good option in the under $5k used market - especially the heavy duty police interceptor version. It gets very good mileage for an 8 cy. behemouth. For those in the younger generation who have only experienced small engine front wheel drive cars, I highly recommend the rear drive V-8 experience and the used police interceptor is a cheap and dependable introduction. Plus - its fun to cruise down the freeway and have everyone slowing down and getting out of your way.
:thumbup: as an added bonus, you get immediate street cred with all your thug, scumbag friends.
 
My Ford Escape is running great at 150,000 miles. Not much in maintenance costs either. Is it a plastic interior, not anymore than the Nissan Xterra at the time.

 
My Ford Escape is running great at 150,000 miles. Not much in maintenance costs either. Is it a plastic interior, not anymore than the Nissan Xterra at the time.
never said that the cars wouldnt go forever. Just that i wouldnt want to be in one forever (or a day for that matter)
 
crappy cars + hybrid = crappy hybrid cars.

Let me know when they stop making POS vehicles and maybe i'll buy American again
It takes year for perception to change. It used to be every *** car was considered crappy or junk. Ford is making a much better product now and hopefully time will change peoples perceptions.
:goodposting: As a Toyota owner, I'll be taking a long look at American cars when I'm in the market for a replacement.
Study: Domestic Brands Score Highest in Consumer RatingsNovember 25, 2008

SAN MATEO, Calif. — Though the Big 3 are scrambling to find support from Capitol Hill to stay afloat, results of a recent study offered a bit a good news for domestic automakers.

According to Biz360, a media and market solutions provider, consumers are expressing more positive comments toward American brands than for Japanese automakers.

Basically, the company gathered roughly 300,000 online opinions about midsize cars from Ford, Chevrolet, Honda and Toyota. The data was pulled from such sites such as Auto Mall USA, Edmunds.com, IntelliChoice.com and Yahoo Autos from Oct. 31, 2007 through Nov. 1, 2008.

Interestingly enough, the company discovered that Ford and Chevrolet are ahead of their Japanese counterparts when it comes to consumer perception.

"With the national spotlight focused on the fortunes of U.S. auto makers, we were interested in looking at consumer feedback of the most popular brands in the midsize car category," said Stephen Foster, senior director of analyst services at Biz360. "The results of the analysis are encouraging for these domestic brands.

"They indicate that certain American cars brands are considered superior to equivalent Japanese brands by consumers when they discuss the key attributes of performance, comfort and exterior styling," Foster added.

More specifically, officials noted that Chevrolet (63.25), along with Ford (62.11), scored higher than Honda (58.45) and Toyota (60.02) on Biz360's "Net Advocacy" rating.

Biz360 calculated Net Advocacy scores by taking positive comments about a brand and then subtracting the negative comments. These are weighted by the impact of the comments' source.

Moreover, the company found that consumers expressed a higher percentage of negative comments about Honda and Toyota than Ford or Chevrolet.

Toyota, in particular, received 16 percent more in terms of unfavorable remarks than the overall average of all four brands, according to Biz360.

Moving on, the study also examined the 10 vehicle attributes and features that consumers were most likely to have a strong opinion about. According to the company, these included performance, comfort, exterior styling, general opinions, fuel economy, safety, interior design, value, quality and technology.

Biz360 found that discussions regarding performance, comfort, exterior styling and "general opinions" represented 75 percent of online comments. Ford and Chevrolet performed better than their foreign rivals in these key segments.

For instance, Ford was No. 1, and thus rated better the other three brands, in the categories of comfort, general comments and exterior styling. Chevrolet, meanwhile, was rated the highest in performance, followed by Ford at No. 2.

In fact, when all 10 categories are considered, Ford and Chevrolet were considered more favorably by consumers on more product attributes than Toyota and Honda, analysts highlighted.

"Technology has changed the buying landscape forever. Consumers now have the tools to be more vocal and influential than ever before. Whether satisfied or not with a product, they can reach out and communicate their opinions to a world of other consumers. And whether we like it or not, consumers are listening and are influenced by those heartfelt opinions expressed by their peers," explained Brad Brodigan, chief executive officer of Biz360.

"In order to make smart business decisions, it is essential that marketers embrace new tools to understand and interpret the new online consumer dialogue that is happening around them," he went on to indicate.

For more information, visit www.biz360.com.

LINK

 
crappy cars + hybrid = crappy hybrid cars.Let me know when they stop making POS vehicles and maybe i'll buy American again
It takes year for perception to change. It used to be every *** car was considered crappy or junk. Ford is making a much better product now and hopefully time will change peoples perceptions.
I honestly don't know what he's talking about here. The Escape Hybrid has been knocked for interior(and I agree, I've been inside them) but as far as the mechanic reliability of the car I'd be curious to see if he can justify calling it "crappy". From what I've seen they have been very reliable and get better gas mileage than any of the Japanese SUV hybrids, and this coming from someone that was really looking forward to the Highlander Hybrid before it was released.
virtually all major automakers now produce "reliable" vehicles. Sure YMMV based on what you are doing to, or inside of your, car. But, in general, cars today do the basics very well. I'm talking design, innovation, amenities, extras, and the coherence and reliability of those things. When i sit inside my VW, my Audi, or my Acura, i like the car. I like the thought that has gone into very small details. I like that all the extras come together in a coherent product that works well. When I sit in the wife's US made car it just seems like they took a bunch of decent ideas, crammed them into the vehicle, and then put a cheap plastic casing around everything. The tolerances are despicable, details are overlooked, and components do not mesh very well.
Just trying to understand your position here. Are you casting ALL US made cars based on the experiences of your wife's car? You were very stingey with the details above and did a good job of being very vague. Can you give some examples of what you are talking about?? I ask these questions because I am a Ford owner and feel the exact same way about foreign trucks that you feel about domestic cars.
 
The big three all screwed up at the initial hearings...all one of them had to do is step up and say, "We don't really need the money...we've got a plan in action, blah, blah, blah" and their stock would have skyrocketed (albeit falsely). Mulally made a good play at that sentiment today, but we'll see if it was too late or not.

 
Basically, the company gathered roughly 300,000 online opinions about midsize cars from Ford, Chevrolet, Honda and Toyota. The data was pulled from such sites such as Auto Mall USA, Edmunds.com, IntelliChoice.com and Yahoo Autos from Oct. 31, 2007 through Nov. 1, 2008.
Well, that sounds like a reliable "study". About as reliable as a car from one of the big three American automakers :lmao:
 
The big three all screwed up at the initial hearings...all one of them had to do is step up and say, "We don't really need the money...we've got a plan in action, blah, blah, blah" and their stock would have skyrocketed (albeit falsely). Mulally made a good play at that sentiment today, but we'll see if it was too late or not.
What good is sky rocketing stock when you're going to run out of cash in 3 months, as GM is going to do? :lmao:
 
Basically, the company gathered roughly 300,000 online opinions about midsize cars from Ford, Chevrolet, Honda and Toyota. The data was pulled from such sites such as Auto Mall USA, Edmunds.com, IntelliChoice.com and Yahoo Autos from Oct. 31, 2007 through Nov. 1, 2008.
Well, that sounds like a reliable "study". About as reliable as a car from one of the big three American automakers :hifive:
Well, there you have it folks. The automotive research authority, StrikeS2k has given us his opinion.
 
Basically, the company gathered roughly 300,000 online opinions about midsize cars from Ford, Chevrolet, Honda and Toyota. The data was pulled from such sites such as Auto Mall USA, Edmunds.com, IntelliChoice.com and Yahoo Autos from Oct. 31, 2007 through Nov. 1, 2008.
Well, that sounds like a reliable "study". About as reliable as a car from one of the big three American automakers :hifive:
Well, there you have it folks. The automotive research authority, StrikeS2k has given us his opinion.
My opinion has more value than your linked "study".
 
The big three all screwed up at the initial hearings...all one of them had to do is step up and say, "We don't really need the money...we've got a plan in action, blah, blah, blah" and their stock would have skyrocketed (albeit falsely). Mulally made a good play at that sentiment today, but we'll see if it was too late or not.
What good is sky rocketing stock when you're going to run out of cash in 3 months, as GM is going to do? :hifive:
I'm no eggspurt but I believe the higher stock price = more $ invested in your company = higher liquid assets.
 
The big three all screwed up at the initial hearings...all one of them had to do is step up and say, "We don't really need the money...we've got a plan in action, blah, blah, blah" and their stock would have skyrocketed (albeit falsely). Mulally made a good play at that sentiment today, but we'll see if it was too late or not.
What good is sky rocketing stock when you're going to run out of cash in 3 months, as GM is going to do? :confused:
I'm no eggspurt but I believe the higher stock price = more $ invested in your company = higher liquid assets.
That might work in the short term but not for very long. Given the state of those companies (especially GM) and the fact that no one is investing much right now I don't think that plan is gonna work.
 
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I'll keep buying American cars as long as they make them. I realize this might add a few more repair bills and a couple extra cars over a lifetime but it's the least I can do.

 
Ford has been going in the right direction in a number of ways since 2006.

The Way Forward

The change of CEO to outside talent was an important signal that Ford was committed to turning the company around and "The Way Forward" Shows that they had a good idea that their previous business model was not sufficient.

My concern is that until they either break the back of the unions or get the unions to work 'intelligently' with the company (for instance, today I saw a report on tv about a plant where the union workers are 'allowed' to work more than one job. DUH!) then you really are always going to limp along and forever trail Japanese car makers.

Below is an announcement I found about Mulally coming on board... an interesting thing to note is that one of the comments on this story was:

Boeing has only one competitor (in commercial) and gets gov't subsidies. Will this guy want gov't hand outs?
Link to Story below w/interesting comments
DEARBORN, Mich., Sept. 5 – Ford Motor Company announced today that it has elected Alan Mulally as president and chief executive officer. He has also been elected to the Board of Directors.

Bill Ford will continue his duties as executive chairman of the company.

"One of the three strategic priorities that I've focused on this year is company leadership. While I knew that we were fortunate to have outstanding leaders driving our operations around the world, I also determined that our turnaround effort required the additional skills of an executive who has led a major manufacturing enterprise through such challenges before," Bill Ford wrote in an email to Ford employees today.

"That's why I'm very pleased to announce that Alan Mulally, who turned around the Commercial Airplanes division of The Boeing Company, will become our president and CEO, effective immediately. Alan has deep experience in customer satisfaction, manufacturing, supplier relations and labor relations, all of which have applications to the challenges of Ford. He also has the personality and team-building skills that will help guide our Company in the right direction."

Bill Ford, who said he would remain "extremely active" in the business, praised Mulally as "an outstanding leader and a man of great character." He noted that Mulally had applied many of the lessons from Ford's success in developing the Taurus to Boeing's creation of the revolutionary Boeing 777 airliner. That experience, chronicled in the book, "Working Together," by James P. Lewis, tells how the leadership principles Mulally learned from Ford and developed at Boeing may be applied to other businesses.

"Clearly, the challenges Boeing faced in recent years have many parallels to our own," Bill Ford said.

Mulally, 61, has spent 37 years at The Boeing Company, most recently as executive vice president. In addition, he has also been president and chief executive officer of Boeing Commercial Airplanes since 2001. In that position he was responsible for all of the company's commercial airplane programs and related services, which in 2005 generated record orders for new business and sales of more than $22.6 billion. Mulally was named president of Commercial Airplanes in September 1998. The responsibility of chief executive officer for the business unit was added in March 2001.

"I think the opportunity to work with Bill Ford and Ford Motor Company is the only thing that could have attracted me to a job other than Boeing, where I have so many great friends and memories," Mulally said. "I'm looking forward to working closely with Bill in the ongoing turnaround of this great Company. I'm also eager to begin engagement with the leadership team. I believe strongly in teamwork and I fully expect that our efforts will be a productive collaboration."

Mulally noted that many of the challenges he encountered in commercial airplane manufacturing are analogous to the issues at Ford.

"Just as I thought it was appropriate to apply lessons learned from Ford to Boeing, I believe the reverse is true as well," Mulally said. "I also recognize that Ford has a strong foundation upon which we can build. The Company's long tradition of innovation, developing new markets, and creating iconic vehicles that represent customer values is a great advantage that we can leverage for our future."

Bill Ford said he expected Mulally would assist Mark Fields and the Way Forward team as they accelerate their business plan.

"After dealing with the troubles at Boeing in the post-9/11 world, Alan knows what it's like to have your back to the wall – and fight your way out with a well-conceived plan and great execution," Bill Ford said in his note to employees. "He also knows how to deal with long product cycles, changing fuel prices and difficult decisions in a turnaround."

Prior to his current position, Mulally served as president of Boeing Information, Space & Defense Systems and senior vice president of The Boeing Company. Appointed to that role in February 1997, he was responsible for Boeing's defense, space and government business.

Beginning in 1994, he was senior vice president of Airplane Development for Boeing Commercial Airplanes Group, responsible for all airplane development activities, flight test operations, certification and government technical liaison.

Mulally serves as co-chair of the Washington Competitiveness Council, and sits on the advisory boards of NASA, the University of Washington, the University of Kansas, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. He is a member of the United States National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of England's Royal Academy of Engineering.

Mulally holds bachelor's and master's of science degrees in aeronautical and astronautical engineering from the University of Kansas, and earned a master's in management from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as a 1982 Alfred P. Sloan fellow.

A member of the board since 1988, Bill Ford, 49, was elected chairman in September 1998, and took office on Jan. 1, 1999. He also serves as chairman of the board's Environmental and Public Policy Committee and as a member of the Finance Committee. He was named Chief Executive Officer on Oct. 30, 2001.

Bill Ford, who led the Company to three straight years of profitability through 2005, told employees in his email that he looked forward to an excellent working partnership with Mulally on global strategic issues.

"Let me assure you: I'm not going anywhere," Bill Ford wrote to Ford workers. "As executive chairman, I intend to remain extremely active in the direction of this Company. I'll be here every day and I will not rest until a prosperous future for this Company is secured."
 
crappy cars + hybrid = crappy hybrid cars.Let me know when they stop making POS vehicles and maybe i'll buy American again
It takes year for perception to change. It used to be every *** car was considered crappy or junk. Ford is making a much better product now and hopefully time will change peoples perceptions.
I honestly don't know what he's talking about here. The Escape Hybrid has been knocked for interior(and I agree, I've been inside them) but as far as the mechanic reliability of the car I'd be curious to see if he can justify calling it "crappy". From what I've seen they have been very reliable and get better gas mileage than any of the Japanese SUV hybrids, and this coming from someone that was really looking forward to the Highlander Hybrid before it was released.
virtually all major automakers now produce "reliable" vehicles. Sure YMMV based on what you are doing to, or inside of your, car. But, in general, cars today do the basics very well. I'm talking design, innovation, amenities, extras, and the coherence and reliability of those things. When i sit inside my VW, my Audi, or my Acura, i like the car. I like the thought that has gone into very small details. I like that all the extras come together in a coherent product that works well. When I sit in the wife's US made car it just seems like they took a bunch of decent ideas, crammed them into the vehicle, and then put a cheap plastic casing around everything. The tolerances are despicable, details are overlooked, and components do not mesh very well.
Just trying to understand your position here. Are you casting ALL US made cars based on the experiences of your wife's car? You were very stingey with the details above and did a good job of being very vague. Can you give some examples of what you are talking about?? I ask these questions because I am a Ford owner and feel the exact same way about foreign trucks that you feel about domestic cars.
I honestly think that the American cars from any of the big three are usually pretty much crap. Even the one's that I like, say the Mustang, seem to have a 'cheap' interior that almost seems like it will break if you look at it wrong while the foreign cars tend to be better made. Does that still apply to the mechanics of the car? I have no idea. But as for trucks, give me a Ford (well... up until they remade the F-150 and now I think it is very ugly) or Chevy over what seems like plastic toy trucks from the foreign makers. A friend got the Titan (that is the Nissan big truck, right?) and I rode in it in the few months he had it before trading it in for a different car. I would not have bought it and laughed at him for buying the Titan as I waved him off and got into my F-150. I have not seen the Toyota big size truck in person but the smaller trucks were always very 'plastic' to me. I did have a Nissan Dessert Runner before my Ranger before my F-150. The Nissan was a decent lil' truck and nothing bad about it that I remember. My Ranger did have a moronic arm rest that broke (the engineering on that was just bad) but other than that, I loved my Ranger and I have had my F-150 since 2005 and love it with nothing bad to say about it at all... well... maybe that $450 to get a mirror fixed is just stupid..... but other than that, I can not see trading my F-150 in for a Nissan or Toyota version.
 
I bought a used Datsun when I was in college, the first time I drove it in the rain the floor was all wet..I picked up the mat and it looked like the Fred Flintstone mobile. A hole about 12 inches wide had rusted right through.

 
Basically, the company gathered roughly 300,000 online opinions about midsize cars from Ford, Chevrolet, Honda and Toyota. The data was pulled from such sites such as Auto Mall USA, Edmunds.com, IntelliChoice.com and Yahoo Autos from Oct. 31, 2007 through Nov. 1, 2008.
Well, that sounds like a reliable "study". About as reliable as a car from one of the big three American automakers
Well, there you have it folks. The automotive research authority, StrikeS2k has given us his opinion.
My opinion has more value than your linked "study".
I'm with Strike. Studies where respondents "self-select" are not reliable/representative.
 
crappy cars + hybrid = crappy hybrid cars.Let me know when they stop making POS vehicles and maybe i'll buy American again
It takes year for perception to change. It used to be every *** car was considered crappy or junk. Ford is making a much better product now and hopefully time will change peoples perceptions.
I honestly don't know what he's talking about here. The Escape Hybrid has been knocked for interior(and I agree, I've been inside them) but as far as the mechanic reliability of the car I'd be curious to see if he can justify calling it "crappy". From what I've seen they have been very reliable and get better gas mileage than any of the Japanese SUV hybrids, and this coming from someone that was really looking forward to the Highlander Hybrid before it was released.
virtually all major automakers now produce "reliable" vehicles. Sure YMMV based on what you are doing to, or inside of your, car. But, in general, cars today do the basics very well. I'm talking design, innovation, amenities, extras, and the coherence and reliability of those things. When i sit inside my VW, my Audi, or my Acura, i like the car. I like the thought that has gone into very small details. I like that all the extras come together in a coherent product that works well. When I sit in the wife's US made car it just seems like they took a bunch of decent ideas, crammed them into the vehicle, and then put a cheap plastic casing around everything. The tolerances are despicable, details are overlooked, and components do not mesh very well.
Just trying to understand your position here. Are you casting ALL US made cars based on the experiences of your wife's car? You were very stingey with the details above and did a good job of being very vague. Can you give some examples of what you are talking about?? I ask these questions because I am a Ford owner and feel the exact same way about foreign trucks that you feel about domestic cars.
I honestly think that the American cars from any of the big three are usually pretty much crap. Even the one's that I like, say the Mustang, seem to have a 'cheap' interior that almost seems like it will break if you look at it wrong while the foreign cars tend to be better made. Does that still apply to the mechanics of the car? I have no idea. But as for trucks, give me a Ford (well... up until they remade the F-150 and now I think it is very ugly) or Chevy over what seems like plastic toy trucks from the foreign makers. A friend got the Titan (that is the Nissan big truck, right?) and I rode in it in the few months he had it before trading it in for a different car. I would not have bought it and laughed at him for buying the Titan as I waved him off and got into my F-150. I have not seen the Toyota big size truck in person but the smaller trucks were always very 'plastic' to me. I did have a Nissan Dessert Runner before my Ranger before my F-150. The Nissan was a decent lil' truck and nothing bad about it that I remember. My Ranger did have a moronic arm rest that broke (the engineering on that was just bad) but other than that, I loved my Ranger and I have had my F-150 since 2005 and love it with nothing bad to say about it at all... well... maybe that $450 to get a mirror fixed is just stupid..... but other than that, I can not see trading my F-150 in for a Nissan or Toyota version.
I can see this. The reality is, our cars cost more because of decisions made by the auto makers and the premium packages aren't one's typically sent to the dealerships "stock". We have to pay extra for the nicer things in a car. That's a difference I see, but it doesn't speak to the potential quality. I've been in some "limited edition" vehicles that were VERY nice. The standard edition of the same car (w/o the bells and whistles) has a completely different feel.
 
I bought a used Datsun when I was in college, the first time I drove it in the rain the floor was all wet..I picked up the mat and it looked like the Fred Flintstone mobile. A hole about 12 inches wide had rusted right through.
That settles it.
 
crappy cars + hybrid = crappy hybrid cars.Let me know when they stop making POS vehicles and maybe i'll buy American again
It takes year for perception to change. It used to be every *** car was considered crappy or junk. Ford is making a much better product now and hopefully time will change peoples perceptions.
I honestly don't know what he's talking about here. The Escape Hybrid has been knocked for interior(and I agree, I've been inside them) but as far as the mechanic reliability of the car I'd be curious to see if he can justify calling it "crappy". From what I've seen they have been very reliable and get better gas mileage than any of the Japanese SUV hybrids, and this coming from someone that was really looking forward to the Highlander Hybrid before it was released.
virtually all major automakers now produce "reliable" vehicles. Sure YMMV based on what you are doing to, or inside of your, car. But, in general, cars today do the basics very well. I'm talking design, innovation, amenities, extras, and the coherence and reliability of those things. When i sit inside my VW, my Audi, or my Acura, i like the car. I like the thought that has gone into very small details. I like that all the extras come together in a coherent product that works well. When I sit in the wife's US made car it just seems like they took a bunch of decent ideas, crammed them into the vehicle, and then put a cheap plastic casing around everything. The tolerances are despicable, details are overlooked, and components do not mesh very well.
Just trying to understand your position here. Are you casting ALL US made cars based on the experiences of your wife's car? You were very stingey with the details above and did a good job of being very vague. Can you give some examples of what you are talking about?? I ask these questions because I am a Ford owner and feel the exact same way about foreign trucks that you feel about domestic cars.
I honestly think that the American cars from any of the big three are usually pretty much crap. Even the one's that I like, say the Mustang, seem to have a 'cheap' interior that almost seems like it will break if you look at it wrong while the foreign cars tend to be better made. Does that still apply to the mechanics of the car? I have no idea. But as for trucks, give me a Ford (well... up until they remade the F-150 and now I think it is very ugly) or Chevy over what seems like plastic toy trucks from the foreign makers. A friend got the Titan (that is the Nissan big truck, right?) and I rode in it in the few months he had it before trading it in for a different car. I would not have bought it and laughed at him for buying the Titan as I waved him off and got into my F-150. I have not seen the Toyota big size truck in person but the smaller trucks were always very 'plastic' to me. I did have a Nissan Dessert Runner before my Ranger before my F-150. The Nissan was a decent lil' truck and nothing bad about it that I remember. My Ranger did have a moronic arm rest that broke (the engineering on that was just bad) but other than that, I loved my Ranger and I have had my F-150 since 2005 and love it with nothing bad to say about it at all... well... maybe that $450 to get a mirror fixed is just stupid..... but other than that, I can not see trading my F-150 in for a Nissan or Toyota version.
I can see this. The reality is, our cars cost more because of decisions made by the auto makers and the premium packages aren't one's typically sent to the dealerships "stock". We have to pay extra for the nicer things in a car. That's a difference I see, but it doesn't speak to the potential quality. I've been in some "limited edition" vehicles that were VERY nice. The standard edition of the same car (w/o the bells and whistles) has a completely different feel.
That makes sense... going back to the Mustang... a buddy of mine had one and it just felt so very cheap. Then again, it was basically a base model. I test drove a Mustang Mach 3 and besides loving the power and handeling I remember the inside being pretty solid or at least having that feel. But I think this is a failure in branding. A smart thing to do would be to seperate your brands. Yes, there is a place for base 'cheaper' cars but the problem is that those cars leave impressions about your whole brand. It would be smart to have Ford models be solid cars... the nicer things so to speak while having your cheaper cars the Mercury brand. So instead of using Fiesta's as a Ford brand you make it a Mercury brand and then protect the major brand but still provide some cars to a market. Then with a Mustang type of car, don't water it down to the point that one model is a Fiesta's cousin while the other seems to be a whole different car. Further, I have heard it a million times and even comments on shows like Top Gear, where the plastic feel of some cars... Top Gear was talking about the Jag's obvious Ford contributions of some plastic bean counter type additions... makes the entire feel cheap and hence possibly mechanically unreliable- be it real or not. Perception of the consumer is all important.
 
I'll keep buying American cars as long as they make them. I realize this might add a few more repair bills and a couple extra cars over a lifetime but it's the least I can do.
I appreciate your support!Sincerely,UAW retiree living lavishly off your generosity
 
crappy cars + hybrid = crappy hybrid cars.Let me know when they stop making POS vehicles and maybe i'll buy American again
It takes year for perception to change. It used to be every *** car was considered crappy or junk. Ford is making a much better product now and hopefully time will change peoples perceptions.
I honestly don't know what he's talking about here. The Escape Hybrid has been knocked for interior(and I agree, I've been inside them) but as far as the mechanic reliability of the car I'd be curious to see if he can justify calling it "crappy". From what I've seen they have been very reliable and get better gas mileage than any of the Japanese SUV hybrids, and this coming from someone that was really looking forward to the Highlander Hybrid before it was released.
virtually all major automakers now produce "reliable" vehicles. Sure YMMV based on what you are doing to, or inside of your, car. But, in general, cars today do the basics very well. I'm talking design, innovation, amenities, extras, and the coherence and reliability of those things. When i sit inside my VW, my Audi, or my Acura, i like the car. I like the thought that has gone into very small details. I like that all the extras come together in a coherent product that works well. When I sit in the wife's US made car it just seems like they took a bunch of decent ideas, crammed them into the vehicle, and then put a cheap plastic casing around everything. The tolerances are despicable, details are overlooked, and components do not mesh very well.
Just trying to understand your position here. Are you casting ALL US made cars based on the experiences of your wife's car? You were very stingey with the details above and did a good job of being very vague. Can you give some examples of what you are talking about?? I ask these questions because I am a Ford owner and feel the exact same way about foreign trucks that you feel about domestic cars.
I honestly think that the American cars from any of the big three are usually pretty much crap. Even the one's that I like, say the Mustang, seem to have a 'cheap' interior that almost seems like it will break if you look at it wrong while the foreign cars tend to be better made. Does that still apply to the mechanics of the car? I have no idea. But as for trucks, give me a Ford (well... up until they remade the F-150 and now I think it is very ugly) or Chevy over what seems like plastic toy trucks from the foreign makers. A friend got the Titan (that is the Nissan big truck, right?) and I rode in it in the few months he had it before trading it in for a different car. I would not have bought it and laughed at him for buying the Titan as I waved him off and got into my F-150. I have not seen the Toyota big size truck in person but the smaller trucks were always very 'plastic' to me. I did have a Nissan Dessert Runner before my Ranger before my F-150. The Nissan was a decent lil' truck and nothing bad about it that I remember. My Ranger did have a moronic arm rest that broke (the engineering on that was just bad) but other than that, I loved my Ranger and I have had my F-150 since 2005 and love it with nothing bad to say about it at all... well... maybe that $450 to get a mirror fixed is just stupid..... but other than that, I can not see trading my F-150 in for a Nissan or Toyota version.
Just bought a 4wd Titan SE Crew Cab for $22k and it blew away the competition I tried. Already had the bedliner, cargo tie downs, towing package, power everything inc. rear window, back-up radar, mp3 jack, cig lighter jacks everywhere inc. the bed. It will haul/tow 9500 lbs. I had the bed filled with firewood and it accelerated up the 10%+ mountain grades like I was carrying nothing. Best thing is that it's very comfortable. Center console is my office desk at times. Rear seats fold up and I can fit my bike and large dog kennel.
 
Previous vechicle of 14 years was a Mazda (rebranded Ford ranger) B4000. The difference at the time was 6 parts and $500 for the Ranger that had 14K mile less warranty coverage that came out of the same plant. Ford prayed on the buy american mentality with that model.

 
crappy cars + hybrid = crappy hybrid cars.Let me know when they stop making POS vehicles and maybe i'll buy American again
It takes year for perception to change. It used to be every *** car was considered crappy or junk. Ford is making a much better product now and hopefully time will change peoples perceptions.
I honestly don't know what he's talking about here. The Escape Hybrid has been knocked for interior(and I agree, I've been inside them) but as far as the mechanic reliability of the car I'd be curious to see if he can justify calling it "crappy". From what I've seen they have been very reliable and get better gas mileage than any of the Japanese SUV hybrids, and this coming from someone that was really looking forward to the Highlander Hybrid before it was released.
virtually all major automakers now produce "reliable" vehicles. Sure YMMV based on what you are doing to, or inside of your, car. But, in general, cars today do the basics very well. I'm talking design, innovation, amenities, extras, and the coherence and reliability of those things. When i sit inside my VW, my Audi, or my Acura, i like the car. I like the thought that has gone into very small details. I like that all the extras come together in a coherent product that works well. When I sit in the wife's US made car it just seems like they took a bunch of decent ideas, crammed them into the vehicle, and then put a cheap plastic casing around everything. The tolerances are despicable, details are overlooked, and components do not mesh very well.
Just trying to understand your position here. Are you casting ALL US made cars based on the experiences of your wife's car? You were very stingey with the details above and did a good job of being very vague. Can you give some examples of what you are talking about?? I ask these questions because I am a Ford owner and feel the exact same way about foreign trucks that you feel about domestic cars.
I honestly think that the American cars from any of the big three are usually pretty much crap. Even the one's that I like, say the Mustang, seem to have a 'cheap' interior that almost seems like it will break if you look at it wrong while the foreign cars tend to be better made. Does that still apply to the mechanics of the car? I have no idea. But as for trucks, give me a Ford (well... up until they remade the F-150 and now I think it is very ugly) or Chevy over what seems like plastic toy trucks from the foreign makers. A friend got the Titan (that is the Nissan big truck, right?) and I rode in it in the few months he had it before trading it in for a different car. I would not have bought it and laughed at him for buying the Titan as I waved him off and got into my F-150. I have not seen the Toyota big size truck in person but the smaller trucks were always very 'plastic' to me. I did have a Nissan Dessert Runner before my Ranger before my F-150. The Nissan was a decent lil' truck and nothing bad about it that I remember. My Ranger did have a moronic arm rest that broke (the engineering on that was just bad) but other than that, I loved my Ranger and I have had my F-150 since 2005 and love it with nothing bad to say about it at all... well... maybe that $450 to get a mirror fixed is just stupid..... but other than that, I can not see trading my F-150 in for a Nissan or Toyota version.
Just bought a 4wd Titan SE Crew Cab for $22k and it blew away the competition I tried. Already had the bedliner, cargo tie downs, towing package, power everything inc. rear window, back-up radar, mp3 jack, cig lighter jacks everywhere inc. the bed. It will haul/tow 9500 lbs. I had the bed filled with firewood and it accelerated up the 10%+ mountain grades like I was carrying nothing. Best thing is that it's very comfortable. Center console is my office desk at times. Rear seats fold up and I can fit my bike and large dog kennel.
:banned: My buddy had his Titan crew cab (do not remember if it was SE or what) for about 4 months and hated it. When he first bought it he was trying to convince me that it was so much better than my F-150. I rode in it and the ride was hideous. There was nothing he could point out on the Titan that was really 'better' than my F-150 from what I can tell. Like I said, 4 months later he traded it in for a car because it was so bad and he hated it so much. Maybe they are different years?
 
Road in an 08 Camry few weeks ago and everything seemed really cheap. I agree with who ever said the inside of Fords look cheap too. My last two cars have been Chevy's and have had 0 complaints.

 
Please stop by a Ford dealership and checkout the new vehicles. I think most will be pleasantly surprised. The new product is outstanding. I'm OK with whatever you choose to buy, but I think you owe it to yourself to kick some tires at your local Ford store.

Also check out Ford Drive One for how Ford is making better, safer, and environmentally friendly vehicles.

 
MikeMan said:
I'll keep buying American cars as long as they make them. I realize this might add a few more repair bills and a couple extra cars over a lifetime but it's the least I can do.
You do realize that Toyota and Honda are way more American built that any of the Big 3 right?I can't stand the perception of Japanese cars and American cars. That is so outdated thinking.Toyota, Honda, and now even Hyundai are all made right here in the grand ole USA.Meanwhile the Big 3 keep moving to Mexico and other 3rd world countries.It's America so we're all free to buy whatever we like, but at least you should know what "American" cars means before doing so.
 
MikeMan said:
I'll keep buying American cars as long as they make them. I realize this might add a few more repair bills and a couple extra cars over a lifetime but it's the least I can do.
You do realize that Toyota and Honda are way more American built that any of the Big 3 right?I can't stand the perception of Japanese cars and American cars. That is so outdated thinking.Toyota, Honda, and now even Hyundai are all made right here in the grand ole USA.Meanwhile the Big 3 keep moving to Mexico and other 3rd world countries.It's America so we're all free to buy whatever we like, but at least you should know what "American" cars means before doing so.
Maybe he just cares about American based companies?
 
crappy cars + hybrid = crappy hybrid cars.Let me know when they stop making POS vehicles and maybe i'll buy American again
It takes year for perception to change. It used to be every *** car was considered crappy or junk. Ford is making a much better product now and hopefully time will change peoples perceptions.
I honestly don't know what he's talking about here. The Escape Hybrid has been knocked for interior(and I agree, I've been inside them) but as far as the mechanic reliability of the car I'd be curious to see if he can justify calling it "crappy". From what I've seen they have been very reliable and get better gas mileage than any of the Japanese SUV hybrids, and this coming from someone that was really looking forward to the Highlander Hybrid before it was released.
virtually all major automakers now produce "reliable" vehicles. Sure YMMV based on what you are doing to, or inside of your, car. But, in general, cars today do the basics very well. I'm talking design, innovation, amenities, extras, and the coherence and reliability of those things. When i sit inside my VW, my Audi, or my Acura, i like the car. I like the thought that has gone into very small details. I like that all the extras come together in a coherent product that works well. When I sit in the wife's US made car it just seems like they took a bunch of decent ideas, crammed them into the vehicle, and then put a cheap plastic casing around everything. The tolerances are despicable, details are overlooked, and components do not mesh very well.
Just trying to understand your position here. Are you casting ALL US made cars based on the experiences of your wife's car? You were very stingey with the details above and did a good job of being very vague. Can you give some examples of what you are talking about?? I ask these questions because I am a Ford owner and feel the exact same way about foreign trucks that you feel about domestic cars.
I honestly think that the American cars from any of the big three are usually pretty much crap. Even the one's that I like, say the Mustang, seem to have a 'cheap' interior that almost seems like it will break if you look at it wrong while the foreign cars tend to be better made. Does that still apply to the mechanics of the car? I have no idea. But as for trucks, give me a Ford (well... up until they remade the F-150 and now I think it is very ugly) or Chevy over what seems like plastic toy trucks from the foreign makers. A friend got the Titan (that is the Nissan big truck, right?) and I rode in it in the few months he had it before trading it in for a different car. I would not have bought it and laughed at him for buying the Titan as I waved him off and got into my F-150. I have not seen the Toyota big size truck in person but the smaller trucks were always very 'plastic' to me. I did have a Nissan Dessert Runner before my Ranger before my F-150. The Nissan was a decent lil' truck and nothing bad about it that I remember. My Ranger did have a moronic arm rest that broke (the engineering on that was just bad) but other than that, I loved my Ranger and I have had my F-150 since 2005 and love it with nothing bad to say about it at all... well... maybe that $450 to get a mirror fixed is just stupid..... but other than that, I can not see trading my F-150 in for a Nissan or Toyota version.
I can see this. The reality is, our cars cost more because of decisions made by the auto makers and the premium packages aren't one's typically sent to the dealerships "stock". We have to pay extra for the nicer things in a car. That's a difference I see, but it doesn't speak to the potential quality. I've been in some "limited edition" vehicles that were VERY nice. The standard edition of the same car (w/o the bells and whistles) has a completely different feel.
That makes sense... going back to the Mustang... a buddy of mine had one and it just felt so very cheap. Then again, it was basically a base model. I test drove a Mustang Mach 3 and besides loving the power and handeling I remember the inside being pretty solid or at least having that feel. But I think this is a failure in branding. A smart thing to do would be to seperate your brands. Yes, there is a place for base 'cheaper' cars but the problem is that those cars leave impressions about your whole brand. It would be smart to have Ford models be solid cars... the nicer things so to speak while having your cheaper cars the Mercury brand. So instead of using Fiesta's as a Ford brand you make it a Mercury brand and then protect the major brand but still provide some cars to a market. Then with a Mustang type of car, don't water it down to the point that one model is a Fiesta's cousin while the other seems to be a whole different car. Further, I have heard it a million times and even comments on shows like Top Gear, where the plastic feel of some cars... Top Gear was talking about the Jag's obvious Ford contributions of some plastic bean counter type additions... makes the entire feel cheap and hence possibly mechanically unreliable- be it real or not. Perception of the consumer is all important.
I couldn't agree more on the branding. I've never undersood why they do this. They have the different makes, but they put various quality cars in each make rather than all the average in one make and all the good in another.
 
Please stop by a Ford dealership and checkout the new vehicles. I think most will be pleasantly surprised. The new product is outstanding. I'm OK with whatever you choose to buy, but I think you owe it to yourself to kick some tires at your local Ford store.

Also check out Ford Drive One for how Ford is making better, safer, and environmentally friendly vehicles.
"It's tiiiiiiime to drive a Ford again.... drive a Ford again!"
 
The Crown Vic is a good option in the under $5k used market - especially the heavy duty police interceptor version. It gets very good mileage for an 8 cy. behemouth. For those in the younger generation who have only experienced small engine front wheel drive cars, I highly recommend the rear drive V-8 experience and the used police interceptor is a cheap and dependable introduction. Plus - its fun to cruise down the freeway and have everyone slowing down and getting out of your way.
Had one of these issued to me as a company car at an old job. Still had the spotlight on the side. :unsure:
 
crappy cars + hybrid = crappy hybrid cars.Let me know when they stop making POS vehicles and maybe i'll buy American again
It takes year for perception to change. It used to be every *** car was considered crappy or junk. Ford is making a much better product now and hopefully time will change peoples perceptions.
I honestly don't know what he's talking about here. The Escape Hybrid has been knocked for interior(and I agree, I've been inside them) but as far as the mechanic reliability of the car I'd be curious to see if he can justify calling it "crappy". From what I've seen they have been very reliable and get better gas mileage than any of the Japanese SUV hybrids, and this coming from someone that was really looking forward to the Highlander Hybrid before it was released.
virtually all major automakers now produce "reliable" vehicles. Sure YMMV based on what you are doing to, or inside of your, car. But, in general, cars today do the basics very well. I'm talking design, innovation, amenities, extras, and the coherence and reliability of those things. When i sit inside my VW, my Audi, or my Acura, i like the car. I like the thought that has gone into very small details. I like that all the extras come together in a coherent product that works well. When I sit in the wife's US made car it just seems like they took a bunch of decent ideas, crammed them into the vehicle, and then put a cheap plastic casing around everything. The tolerances are despicable, details are overlooked, and components do not mesh very well.
Just trying to understand your position here. Are you casting ALL US made cars based on the experiences of your wife's car? You were very stingey with the details above and did a good job of being very vague. Can you give some examples of what you are talking about?? I ask these questions because I am a Ford owner and feel the exact same way about foreign trucks that you feel about domestic cars.
I honestly think that the American cars from any of the big three are usually pretty much crap. Even the one's that I like, say the Mustang, seem to have a 'cheap' interior that almost seems like it will break if you look at it wrong while the foreign cars tend to be better made. Does that still apply to the mechanics of the car? I have no idea. But as for trucks, give me a Ford (well... up until they remade the F-150 and now I think it is very ugly) or Chevy over what seems like plastic toy trucks from the foreign makers. A friend got the Titan (that is the Nissan big truck, right?) and I rode in it in the few months he had it before trading it in for a different car. I would not have bought it and laughed at him for buying the Titan as I waved him off and got into my F-150. I have not seen the Toyota big size truck in person but the smaller trucks were always very 'plastic' to me. I did have a Nissan Dessert Runner before my Ranger before my F-150. The Nissan was a decent lil' truck and nothing bad about it that I remember. My Ranger did have a moronic arm rest that broke (the engineering on that was just bad) but other than that, I loved my Ranger and I have had my F-150 since 2005 and love it with nothing bad to say about it at all... well... maybe that $450 to get a mirror fixed is just stupid..... but other than that, I can not see trading my F-150 in for a Nissan or Toyota version.
I can see this. The reality is, our cars cost more because of decisions made by the auto makers and the premium packages aren't one's typically sent to the dealerships "stock". We have to pay extra for the nicer things in a car. That's a difference I see, but it doesn't speak to the potential quality. I've been in some "limited edition" vehicles that were VERY nice. The standard edition of the same car (w/o the bells and whistles) has a completely different feel.
That makes sense... going back to the Mustang... a buddy of mine had one and it just felt so very cheap. Then again, it was basically a base model. I test drove a Mustang Mach 3 and besides loving the power and handeling I remember the inside being pretty solid or at least having that feel. But I think this is a failure in branding. A smart thing to do would be to seperate your brands. Yes, there is a place for base 'cheaper' cars but the problem is that those cars leave impressions about your whole brand. It would be smart to have Ford models be solid cars... the nicer things so to speak while having your cheaper cars the Mercury brand. So instead of using Fiesta's as a Ford brand you make it a Mercury brand and then protect the major brand but still provide some cars to a market. Then with a Mustang type of car, don't water it down to the point that one model is a Fiesta's cousin while the other seems to be a whole different car. Further, I have heard it a million times and even comments on shows like Top Gear, where the plastic feel of some cars... Top Gear was talking about the Jag's obvious Ford contributions of some plastic bean counter type additions... makes the entire feel cheap and hence possibly mechanically unreliable- be it real or not. Perception of the consumer is all important.
Wow, you must have one type of in at ford by getting to test drive a Mach 3, considering there were only 2 of that concept car built.
 

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