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Gasland (1 Viewer)

The General

Footballguy
Anyone see this documentary on HBO called "Gasland" about the effects of capturing natural gas in the U.S.? Sounds super boring but it is really well made and is very shocking. People are literally lighting the polluted water that comes out of their home taps on fire.

Anyone heard anything about this movie?

 
I watched bits and pieces of it last night and definitely want to sit down and watch the whole thing soon. Pretty scary stuff if even a portion of what he reported on is true.

 
I watched bits and pieces of it last night and definitely want to sit down and watch the whole thing soon. Pretty scary stuff if even a portion of what he reported on is true.
The bolded part is important.I haven't watched it yet, but I plan to. Just from reading about it, there are unquestionably some very dubious claims made in the documentary. Whether there are other things of merit in there, I am unsure.

 
This is from an industry rebuttal to the film, so they are definitely advocating their side, but at least there are citations here. Fact check it if you wish, I am just passing it along as an FYI:

PENNSYLVANIA: “There has never been any evidence of fracking evercausing direct contamination of fresh groundwater in Pennsylvania oranywhere else.” (PA DEP’s Scott Perry, Scranton Times-Tribune, 4/2/10)NEW YORK: “I think is clear that when put into the propercontext and perspective, the reported information shows thatthe incidence of spills and other pollution events at modernnaturlal gas well sites is exceedingly low …” (Alexander B.“Pete” Grannis, commissioner of NY DEC, 12/30/09)TEXAS: “Though hydraulic fracturing has been used for over 50years in Texas, our records do not indicate a single documentedcontamination case associated with hydraulic fracturing.”(Texas Railroad Commission’s Victor Carrillo, 5/29/2009)OHIO: “After 25 years of investigating citizen complaints ofcontamination, [our] geologists have not documented a singleincident involving contamination of ground water attributed tohydraulic fracturing.” (Scott Kell, deputy chief of Ohio DNR, 5/27/09)NEW MEXICO: “[W]e have found no example of contamination ofusable water where the cause was claimed to be hydraulic fracturing.”(Mark Fesmire, director of NM Oil Conservation Division, 5/29/09)ALABAMA: “I can state with authority that there have been nodocumented cases of drinking water contamination causedby such hydraulic fracturing operations in our state.” (Barry H.“Nick” Tew, Jr., Oil & Gas supervisor for Alabama, 5/27/09)
 
saw some of this today. I'd like to know more about it...They find issues allegedly related to natural gas production all around the country. The most disturbing bit, IMO, is how the federal gov't does not work to represent the interest of the people, but rather help facilitate business.

 
saw some of this today. I'd like to know more about it...They find issues allegedly related to natural gas production all around the country. The most disturbing bit, IMO, is how the federal gov't does not work to represent the interest of the people, but rather help facilitate business.
:goodposting:
 
saw some of this today. I'd like to know more about it...They find issues allegedly related to natural gas production all around the country. The most disturbing bit, IMO, is how the federal gov't does not work to represent the interest of the people, but rather help facilitate business.
:no:
AKA the Halliburton exemption - natural gas hydrofracking is exempt from federal Clean Water Act requirements. How nice of Mr. Cheney to give that to his pals. State requirements, on the other hand, do not exempt this activity from regulation and DO apply. There's a VERY good reason that New York is proceeding extremely cautiously w/r/t horizontal hydrofracturing. Drinking water resources have been adversely impacted in Pennsylvania, who threw open the doors before the regs were in place. The impacts resulted from high total dissolved solids (TDS) water being discharged from treatment plants or, in some cases, released untreated into a creek. What hurt PA is that they didn't have a standard for TDS (NYS does) and therefore found it difficult to regulate the discharge; they are in the process of promulgating a standard. Stormwater runoff from the drilling sites is also a potential source of contamination, as some of the chemicals they send down the wells are frankly nasty. We don't want the same impacts to occur here, and we're working hard to assure that we have regulations and permits in place to assure that they don't.

 
I watched bits and pieces of it last night and definitely want to sit down and watch the whole thing soon. Pretty scary stuff if even a portion of what he reported on is true.
The bolded part is important.I haven't watched it yet, but I plan to. Just from reading about it, there are unquestionably some very dubious claims made in the documentary. Whether there are other things of merit in there, I am unsure.
This is the rub with these things -- you never can never feel certain unless you are personally an expert in the field or know someone closely who is.My impressions from watching (I had to leave about halfway through) was the guy seemed to explain the science of "fracking" fairly well but probably left a lot of things out to keep it interesting and keep the facts on his side of the argument.

Seemed to me that he is at the very least exposing a very shady practice of what I think is a pretty shady business.

 
I was flipping and saw a guy holding a lighter to his kitchen water faucet. Flames engulfed him. I am guessing this is one of the many that have been affected by these natural gas wells near their homes.

 
These things drive me nuts. I don't think you'll find too many people who won't agree to look for other types of energy. I'd love to be able to stop at a station and fill up my car which ran on water. Thing is, if we could run a car on water, our government would tax the crap out of water so that we'd be spending more for water than oil. Until we find some enery that we can acutally use that isn't outragously expensive or we can actually get, I'll keep our oil, coal and gas.

 
saw some of this today. I'd like to know more about it...They find issues allegedly related to natural gas production all around the country. The most disturbing bit, IMO, is how the federal gov't does not work to represent the interest of the people, but rather help facilitate business.
:goodposting:
AKA the Halliburton exemption - natural gas hydrofracking is exempt from federal Clean Water Act requirements. How nice of Mr. Cheney to give that to his pals. State requirements, on the other hand, do not exempt this activity from regulation and DO apply. There's a VERY good reason that New York is proceeding extremely cautiously w/r/t horizontal hydrofracturing. Drinking water resources have been adversely impacted in Pennsylvania, who threw open the doors before the regs were in place. The impacts resulted from high total dissolved solids (TDS) water being discharged from treatment plants or, in some cases, released untreated into a creek. What hurt PA is that they didn't have a standard for TDS (NYS does) and therefore found it difficult to regulate the discharge; they are in the process of promulgating a standard. Stormwater runoff from the drilling sites is also a potential source of contamination, as some of the chemicals they send down the wells are frankly nasty. We don't want the same impacts to occur here, and we're working hard to assure that we have regulations and permits in place to assure that they don't.
Again, this is from an industry consultant, so take it with a grain of salt, but it does present claims and citations which can be fact checked, unlike the film:
Misstating the Law

(6:05) “What I didn’t know was that the 2005 energy bill pushed through Congress by **** Cheney exempts the oil and natural gas industries from Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Superfund law, and about a dozen other environmental and Democratic regulations.”

· This assertion, every part of it, is false. The oil and natural gas industry is regulated under every single one of these laws -- under provisions of each that are relevant to its operations. See this fact sheet for a fuller explanation of that.

· The process of hydraulic fracturing, to which Fox appears to be making reference here, has never in its 60-year history been regulated under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). It has, however, been regulated ably and aggressively by the states, which have compiled an impressive record of enforcement and oversight in the many decades in which they have been engaged in the practice.

· Far from being “pushed through Congress by **** Cheney,” the Energy Policy Act of 2005 earned the support of nearly three-quarters of the U.S. Senate (74 “yea” votes), including the top Democrat on the Energy Committee; current Interior secretary Ken Salazar, then a senator from Colorado; and a former junior senator from Illinois named Barack Obama. In the U.S. House, 75 Democrats joined 200 Republicans in supporting the final bill, including the top Democratic members on both the Energy & Commerce and Resources Committees.

(6:24) “But when the 2005 energy bill cleared away all the restrictions, companies … began to lease Halliburton technology and to begin the largest and most extensive domestic gas drilling campaign in history – now occupying 34 states.”

· Once again, hydraulic fracturing has never been regulated under SDWA – not in the 60-year history of the technology, the 36-year history of the law, or the 40-year history of EPA. Given that, it’s not entirely clear which “restrictions” in the law Mr. Fox believes were “cleared away” by the 2005 energy bill. All the bill sought to do was clarify the existing and established intent of Congress as it related to the scope of SDWA.
 
Cliffs Notes something like this?"Natural Gas mining is bad for the environment"??
The guy who made this did a tech ticker video on Yahoo Finance a few days back. The real cliff notes version to this is simple, but I'm not even a little bit certain as to how true any of this is or isn't. In short - they drill down into the earth into shale. The shale has Nat Gas in it (or around it, or it makes it, or something). To get the gas out of the ground they shoot water down to create pressure. BEFORE they do this, they basically shoot up the shale with this "hydro fracturing" solution with >500 chemicals in it. This hydro fracturing solution makes the gas, or it breaks down the shale that creates gas.... all I can say is it does something to help get the gas out of the ground. Stating what I think it obvious, the hydro fracturing process is all types of bad for the water supply.That's what I got out of it - this is on my list of things to investigate.
 
BEFORE they do this, they basically shoot up the shale with this "hydro fracturing" solution with >500 chemicals in it. This hydro fracturing solution makes the gas, or it breaks down the shale that creates gas.... all I can say is it does something to help get the gas out of the ground. Stating what I think it obvious, the hydro fracturing process is all types of bad for the water supply.
If you've seen the documentary, you've seen one side of the story, presented dramatically but without many verified claims.

Have a look at this.

Again, it is from an industry group...so feel free to be skeptical, but it presents verified and/or verifiable facts. Decide for yourself.

I'll admit that I have some concerns about the process and remain wary, but I am going to remain skeptical of the claims on both sides and do some real research, rather than rely on claims presented by a Michael Moore wanna-be.

 
RedmondLonghorn said:
bakes said:
Proud Communist said:
moleculo said:
saw some of this today. I'd like to know more about it...They find issues allegedly related to natural gas production all around the country. The most disturbing bit, IMO, is how the federal gov't does not work to represent the interest of the people, but rather help facilitate business.
:doh:
AKA the Halliburton exemption - natural gas hydrofracking is exempt from federal Clean Water Act requirements. How nice of Mr. Cheney to give that to his pals. State requirements, on the other hand, do not exempt this activity from regulation and DO apply. There's a VERY good reason that New York is proceeding extremely cautiously w/r/t horizontal hydrofracturing. Drinking water resources have been adversely impacted in Pennsylvania, who threw open the doors before the regs were in place. The impacts resulted from high total dissolved solids (TDS) water being discharged from treatment plants or, in some cases, released untreated into a creek. What hurt PA is that they didn't have a standard for TDS (NYS does) and therefore found it difficult to regulate the discharge; they are in the process of promulgating a standard. Stormwater runoff from the drilling sites is also a potential source of contamination, as some of the chemicals they send down the wells are frankly nasty. We don't want the same impacts to occur here, and we're working hard to assure that we have regulations and permits in place to assure that they don't.
Again, this is from an industry consultant, so take it with a grain of salt, but it does present claims and citations which can be fact checked, unlike the film:
Misstating the Law

(6:05) “What I didn’t know was that the 2005 energy bill pushed through Congress by **** Cheney exempts the oil and natural gas industries from Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Superfund law, and about a dozen other environmental and Democratic regulations.”

· This assertion, every part of it, is false. The oil and natural gas industry is regulated under every single one of these laws -- under provisions of each that are relevant to its operations. See this fact sheet for a fuller explanation of that.

· The process of hydraulic fracturing, to which Fox appears to be making reference here, has never in its 60-year history been regulated under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). It has, however, been regulated ably and aggressively by the states, which have compiled an impressive record of enforcement and oversight in the many decades in which they have been engaged in the practice.

· Far from being “pushed through Congress by **** Cheney,” the Energy Policy Act of 2005 earned the support of nearly three-quarters of the U.S. Senate (74 “yea” votes), including the top Democrat on the Energy Committee; current Interior secretary Ken Salazar, then a senator from Colorado; and a former junior senator from Illinois named Barack Obama. In the U.S. House, 75 Democrats joined 200 Republicans in supporting the final bill, including the top Democratic members on both the Energy & Commerce and Resources Committees.

(6:24) “But when the 2005 energy bill cleared away all the restrictions, companies … began to lease Halliburton technology and to begin the largest and most extensive domestic gas drilling campaign in history – now occupying 34 states.”

· Once again, hydraulic fracturing has never been regulated under SDWA – not in the 60-year history of the technology, the 36-year history of the law, or the 40-year history of EPA. Given that, it’s not entirely clear which “restrictions” in the law Mr. Fox believes were “cleared away” by the 2005 energy bill. All the bill sought to do was clarify the existing and established intent of Congress as it related to the scope of SDWA.
Correct - They weren't "cleared away" but they were specifically exempted from regulation under the SDWA. As an engineer, I look at the chemistry of what they are sending down the hole and I have concerns, given that they are using (in some cases) diesel fuel and other hydrocarbons. The real concerns are with what comes back out of the hole - in addition to residual fracking chemicals, the TDS levels can increase to levels that are well above the threshhold of toxicity for most biological wastewater treatment systems, and radium ay be present in excess of drinking water standards. It's a reguilatory management challenge, no question.

Makes me wonder why other technologies, such as gas fracking where they use propane as opposed to water to frack a well, aren't in greater demand.

 
Watched about 20 minutes of this the other night. What I learned is that you would be crazy to live in the Fort Worth area or those small towns in Louisiana.

 
Proud Communist said:
moleculo said:
saw some of this today. I'd like to know more about it...They find issues allegedly related to natural gas production all around the country. The most disturbing bit, IMO, is how the federal gov't does not work to represent the interest of the people, but rather help facilitate business.
:eek:
Sometimes helping business interests helps the interest of the people.
 
Watched about 20 minutes of this the other night. What I learned is that you would be crazy to live in the Fort Worth area or those small towns in Louisiana.
I live about 30 minutes NE of Ft Worth and all of this has become a very real issue in my community. The people who live in the western part of the town (lots of land, sparsely populated) are in favor of drilling so they can make money off of their mineral rights and people in the central and eastern parts of the town (densely populated) are against it. It was THE issue in the recent town elections and it was downright nasty, especially for a local election.
 
Missed this thread earlier this summer.

Gasland will be opening at the IFC Theater on Sixth Ave in Greenwich Village September 15.

Filmmakers in person Wed 9/15 & Thu 9/16 at 7:00 & 9:30pm
I've known Josh Fox since 2004. I used to have an admin that was in his theater troupe, International Wow Company. Saw a coupe avant garde pieces back then called THE COMFORT & SAFETY OF YOUR OWN HOME and EXPENSE OF SPIRIT. Pretty far left to be sure, but worthwhile. Lost track of him over the years until this hit Sundance FF earlier this year.Anyway, if you haven't seen it, make a point of checking it out. Thought provoking stuff.

 
I don't remember if Pavillion was the WY town that the film crew went to or not...

Pavillion, Wyoming-area residents told not to drink water

By DUSTIN BLEIZEFFER Star-Tribune energy reporter trib.com | Posted: Wednesday, September 1, 2010 11:35 am | (11) Comments

PAVILLION -- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has recommended that several Pavillion-area residents with private water wells find alternate sources of water for drinking and cooking.

The recommendation applies to at least 20 water wells, and that number could increase, according to the EPA.

EnCana Oil and Gas USA, which operates oil and gas wells interspersed throughout the farm and ranch community, has agreed to provide funding to a third party which will provide treatment or an alternate source of drinking water. However, details are not yet worked out.

The health concern is based on high sodium and sulfates that EPA officials believe are naturally occurring in the groundwater, and on the detection of petroleum compounds that officials believe shouldn't be in the groundwater.

EPA officials have not yet determined the source of the petroleum hydrocarbons, but they plan to make that determination in the agency's ongoing investigation.

The EPA and other federal officials have spent the past few days with Pavillion-area residents explaining their analysis of what's in the water and the potential health implications of continued consumption of the water. Officials highlighted their findings during a community forum in Pavillion on Tuesday evening.

"Last week it became clear to us that based on the information we gathered ... that you not continue to drink your water. We understand the gravity of that statement. We understand what it means to families of this community," said Martin Hestmark, assistant regional administrator at the EPA's Region 8 office in Denver.

Unsatisfied with responses from the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality and local operator EnCana Oil & Gas USA, several Pavillion-area residents convinced the EPA to conduct its own investigation of possible drinking water contamination beginning in 2009. A second round of water sampling was conducted in January, and the EPA asked the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry to provide a health risk analysis based on the sampling.

Those results were revealed for the first time this week.

"In spite of the fact we may or may not know about the source of this contamination ... the citizens of this community need answers and they need it tonight," said Hestmark.

Findings

The EPA collected samples from 41 locations in January and sent them to four different laboratories that analyzed for more than 300 different constituents. Results suggested that two drinking water wells had compounds above the EPA's primary drinking water standard, one well for lead and phthalate and the other for nitrate.

The agency found petroleum hydrocarbons in at least 17 drinking water wells. But the EPA's primary focus for the no drinking and no cooking recommendation is within an area that includes more than 20 drinking water wells.

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) officials said high levels of sodium are concerns for people with high blood pressure and other existing health conditions. Sulfates are a laxative, and the high sulfates concentration could cause digestive discomfort. The detection of methane in the drinking water is a concern in terms of the gas building up in enclosed areas such as laundry rooms and bathrooms, according to the ATSDR.

While some small traces of pesticides were detected in four private water wells, the concentrations are low enough to not warrant a health concern, according to the ATSDR. Both EPA and ATSDR officials stressed that that their findings are based on only two sampling dates, and that water quality can change drastically in a short amount of time.

Source

For about the past five years, several rural landowners in the area have suspected their private drinking water wells were contaminated by oil and natural gas development. In 2005, EnCana Oil & Gas USA enrolled several contaminated drilling pits into state-level "voluntary remediation" programs.

The Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality confirmed that pollution from at least three of those pits has entered the same water zone in which several residents tap for drinking water. But EnCana and a pair of state regulatory agencies claim they know the extent of the pollution plume in the groundwater based on their ongoing monitoring and say that pollution has not entered nearby drinking water wells.

EPA officials, however, have not made their own judgment on the matter.

"We found groundwater associated with inactive oil and gas pits is in fact highly contaminated, which confirmed the fact that people already knew to be the case," said Ayn Schmit of the EPA Region 8 office.

She said the EPA has yet to complete an assessment of the sources of contaminants found in the drinking water wells, but the contaminated pits are a focus. Many people outside the regulatory regime have speculated that hydraulic fracturing performed on oil and gas wells in the area might have introduced the contaminants. However, Schmit reiterated that so far there's been no evidence to support such speculation.

Pavillion-area resident Louis Meeks said he believes the quality of his drinking water has continued to worsen over time.

"What I believe is we need to find the source. We need to get this shut down now before it just keeps spreading," Meeks said.

EnCana officials have promised to continue to cooperate with state and regulatory officials in the Pavillion investigation.

"While there's been a full year of additional testing, the science remains inconclusive," EnCana spokesman Randy Teeuwen said after the public forum. He said the EPA's findings "further confirms there is bad water in the area. But we've known that for a long time. It still does not point to oil and gas operations."

Contact energy reporter Dustin Bleizeffer at (307) 577-6069 or dustin.bleizeffer@trib.com. Go to http://tribtown.trib.com/DustinBleizeffer/blog to read Dustin's energy blog
 
These things drive me nuts. I don't think you'll find too many people who won't agree to look for other types of energy. I'd love to be able to stop at a station and fill up my car which ran on water. Thing is, if we could run a car on water, our government would tax the crap out of water so that we'd be spending more for water than oil. Until we find some enery that we can acutally use that isn't outragously expensive or we can actually get, I'll keep our oil, coal and gas.
What the heck is this? The government will tax WATER until it is more expensive then oil, so you'll happily keep our oil, coal and gas. How does that make any sense? If the government will tax water so that it was as expensive as oil, what makes you think that "we [ever] find some energy that we can acutally use that isn't outragously expensive?" Something less expensive than water?!That's basically the equivalent of saying "until aliens from planet 239fnsv1e come down to Earth in their space ship and land in my back yard to shake my hand, I'll continue to believe that Barack HUSSEIN Obama was not born in Hawai'i!" What does that even mean?! Exactly. It basically means that if you could catch a ride on the Space Shuttle and fly into outer space, you'd continue to believe that the Earth is flat, and that you're high on some Federally-injected super-drug that is giving you one MONSTER hallucination. :shrug:

 
KGB said:
searched gasland on dtv and no shows come up
Very much worth tracking down online to download or view it. Watched it online last night and was blown away. VERY well shot, moves quickly for a 2hr documentary. Extremely disturbing information brought forward. Let's put it this way... I'd put it well ahead of "SuperSize me" as the best documentary of this kind I've ever seen. I'll be watching it again soon. :shrug:
 
searched gasland on dtv and no shows come up
Very much worth tracking down online to download or view it. Watched it online last night and was blown away. VERY well shot, moves quickly for a 2hr documentary. Extremely disturbing information brought forward. Let's put it this way... I'd put it well ahead of "SuperSize me" as the best documentary of this kind I've ever seen. I'll be watching it again soon. :lmao:
did u torrent or stream? link if steam?
 
Terrible. Just terrible how safety regulations can be squashed with a signature. Cheney and Halliburton can go to hell.

 
I feel so bad for these people that are able to light their tap water on fire, but at what point do you move? I mean you have to take care of your children and your families health. I know that some of these people might not want to move, and they shouldn't have to move if these companies would clean up their mess (this is not going to happen), but beating your head against the wall doesn't seem like a great plan.

 
Director Josh Fox was on Talk of the Nation today.

backup link

So I still haven't seen Josh since he won the special jury prize at Sundance last year; dude is constantly traveling to screenings or giving lectures. Keeping track of him through Facebook, though. It has been off the hook since he got nominated for an Oscar. He flies out to L.A. tomorrow, and I'm going to an Oscar party in Greenpoint/Williamsburg Sunday being thrown by his theater company.

Its a cliche, but it truly is a helluva deal being one of the five nominees for an Academy Award. Regardless of outcome, hoping this is the launchpad for a talented young director.

 
The topic doesn't seem to interesting to me personally, but I'm a sucker for most documentaries and with all the love this film is getting in this thread and from critics I'll probably end up seeing it pretty soon.

 
The topic doesn't seem to interesting to me personally, but I'm a sucker for most documentaries and with all the love this film is getting in this thread and from critics I'll probably end up seeing it pretty soon.
What is amazing is Josh is not a documentarian. He stumbled into this story. One day his dad, who lives in PA, showed him a letter offering the family $100,000 to drill using fracking under their 20 acres. From there, the story grew organically.He is known as an Off Off Broadway playwright and directs an avant-garde production company named International Wow. One of his anti-war films was bankrolled into a film, but it lost money. The entire time I have known him (8-10 years), he has lived hand to mouth with a couple actors, sharing an illegal industrial loft in a seedy, grimy section of Brooklyn. Now he's on a whole new level.Super nice guy, very down to earth. I have every confidence this will not change him one bit if he wins. Either way its opened up a lot of new doors for him.
 
Fracking

:titter:

Best of luck to your friend, BL- amazing story. :confused:
We're in a preschool that is made up of mostly SAG members and theater technicians. Every year they have an Academy Awards contest - 24 categories - and last year I got my butt kicked big time. So I've made an effort to study up on the films I missed, and this week I've been researching a ton of newspaper articles and blogs with Oscars picks.I've come to the conclusion Gasland has NO SHOT. It was the only one of the five the NYT blog didn't even mention in their discussion. I haven't come across a single critic who is picking it to win. It has the longest odds on all the bookmaker sites.

Which would make it really, really sweet if they pulled off a huge upset.

 
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Fracking

:titter:

Best of luck to your friend, BL- amazing story. :thumbup:
We're in a preschool that is made up of mostly SAG members and theater technicians. Every year they have an Academy Awards contest - 24 categories - and last year I got my butt kicked big time. So I've made an effort to study up on the films I missed, and this week I've been researching a ton of newspaper articles and blogs with Oscars picks.I've come to the conclusion Gasland has NO SHOT. It was the only one of the five the NYT blog didn't even mention in their discussion. I haven't come across a single critic who is picking it to win. It has the longest odds on all the bookmaker sites.

Which would make it really, really sweet if they pulled off a huge upset.
Which one? (edit- you can pm me if you don't want to share your kid's whereabouts with the ffa)and fwiw- I meant "best of luck" in the broadest sense... that he can keep doing what he wants and make some kind of living at.

 
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Watching this right now. :eek: :cry: I'm pretty ashamed of humanity right now...
Yep. Pretty sure anyone making snide comments in the thread hasn't actually seen this film. Very very well shot to boot. One of the most visually appealing documentaries I've seen.
 
I'm always suspicious of TV documentaries. Especially when I know that most hydrofracturing takes place at depths orders of magnitudes deeper than water wells reach.

 

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