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Gimme 3 bands... (1 Viewer)

kupcho1

Footballguy
that you thought should have made it big, but for whatever reason, didn't. No rules; just looking for things I might have missed over the years. The artist may have only had one release or have been plugging away for years. Critical darlings (e.g., Pavement, Television) or bubblegum pop. The world is your oyster.

(In before some joker posts something from the Beatles)

2013: Little Green Cars - Harper Lee (from Absolute Zero)

1990: The Beautiful South - Should've Kept My Eyes Shut (from Choke)

1987: Terence Trent D'Arby - If You Let Me Stay (from Introducing the Hardline According to Terence Trent D'Arby)
 
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Ghost Rider

Footballguy
XTC - were moderately popular for a while and had a few minor hits here in America, but should have been a lot bigger (not being able to tour during most of their peak due to Andy Partridge's stage fright didn't help)
*check out their albums Black Sea and English Settlement
Respectable Street: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C5gc_-VZiTk
Towers of London: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EeFlqn7Q8rY
Jason and the Argonauts: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G8yzT0LItfU
No Thugs in Our House: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PnRzV4ehSxY
Senses Working Overtime: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kjt7AdLYT2w

Porcupine Tree - awesome art rock band of the last 30 years, one that has a big underground following, but mainstream success has eluded them
*check out their albums Stupid Dream or In Absentia (great starters)
Pure Narcotic: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zRDvnR_lk7s
Stranger by the Minute: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KnD3h22SJPQ
Trains: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cjK5BATARUo
The Sound of Muzak: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ThXGrdgw9sk
Blackest Eyes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RjnYZieXSL4
 
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Manster

Footballguy
Modest Mouse is highly underrated, imo.....maybe not radio friendly I guess, but I think Brock is genius

Screaming Trees never had as much commercial success as their grunge peers for various reasons.....not least of which they were fronted by a deeply flawed Mark Lanegan...I highly recommend his memoir Sing Backward and Weep.


Floater is an Oregon band that never really gained more than regional notoriety....always blew my mind that Everclear (from same era) had more success.....Floater is a waaaay better band.
 

Leroy Hoard

Footballguy
XTC - were moderately popular for a while and had a few minor hits here in America, but should have been a lot bigger (not being able to tour during most of their peak due to Andy Partridge's stage fright didn't help)
*check out their albums Black Sea and English Settlement
In addition to XTC, I'll add The Jam and The Sugercubes.
Links:



 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
I could go on forever but I'll stick to three smaller names from the '90s.

I go on about Failure all the time in the music threads. All of their records are great, but their third album, Fantastic Planet (1996), which could be described as grunge-prog fusion, is IMO one of the best records of the 90s and didn't get the attention it deserved at the time. I was blown away when I first heard it, and not until years later when social media came around did I realize there were others who felt the same way. The band broke up about a year after Fantastic Planet came out due to drug problems and creative differences, but has drawn well on the road since reuniting in 2014. During Failure's inactivity, A Perfect Circle covered one of their songs, which helped raise their profile/enhance their cult status.
Sergeant Politeness / Segue One

Another favorite '90s record of mine is Fast Stories ... from Kid Coma by Truly. They were a Seattle band with a grunge pedigree (including Soundgarden's original bassist and Screaming Trees' original drummer) that took grunge into serious psychedelic/stoner territory. Fast Stories, released in 1995, is 71 minutes of sonic bliss that uncovers something new with every listen. Record company indifference and changing musical trends in the late '90s doomed them to a short career. I don't talk about the band a whole lot in the music threads because they're not on Spotify.
Tragic Telepathic (Soul Slasher)

Seattle's Love Battery released five albums in the '90s, the first three on Sub Pop. Just before the release of Dayglo, the second and best one, they were written up in Rolling Stone as an emerging artist to watch. Their sound is like a cross between punk rock and motorcycle engines, so sonically violent their guitars could be. Their sound also owed a lot of the garage rock and early psychedelia of the '60s, and they were a fantastic live band that I got to see twice. A falling out with Sub Pop led to the mishandling of their third album, and by the time of their fourth (and only major-label) record, tastes had shifted away from their kind of stuff.
See Your Mind
 
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Manster

Footballguy
I could go on forever but I'll stick to three smaller names from the '90s.

I go on about Failure all the time in the music threads. All of their records are great, but their third album, Fantastic Planet (1996), which could be described as grunge-prog fusion, is IMO one of the best records of the 90s and didn't get the attention it deserved at the time. I was blown away when I first heard it, and not until years later when social media came around did I realize there were others who felt the same way. The band broke up about a year after Fantastic Planet came out due to drug problems and creative differences, but has drawn well on the road since reuniting in 2014. During Failure's inactivity, A Perfect Circle covered one of their songs, which helped raise their profile/enhance their cult status.
Sergeant Politeness / Segue One

Another favorite '90s record of mine is Fast Stories ... from Kid Coma by Truly. They were a Seattle band with a grunge pedigree (including Soundgarden's original bassist and Screaming Trees' original drummer) that took grunge into serious psychedelic/stoner territory. Fast Stories, released in 1995, is 71 minutes of sonic bliss that uncovers something new with every listen. Record company indifference and changing musical trends in the late '90s doomed them to a short career. I don't talk about the band a whole lot in the music threads because they're not on Spotify.
Tragic Telepathic (Soul Slasher)

Seattle's Love Battery released five albums in the '90s, the first three on Sub Pop. Just before the release of Dayglo, the second and best one, they were written up in Rolling Stone as an emerging artist to watch. Their sound is like a cross between punk rock and motorcycle engines, so sonically violent their guitars could be. Their also owed a lot of the garage rock and early psychedelia of the '60s, and they were a fantastic live band that I got to see twice. A falling out with Sub Pop led to the mishandling of their third album, and by the time of their fourth (and only major-label) record, tastes had shifted away from their kind of stuff.
See Your Mind
Dude I recently discovered Failure!! They popped up on my Amazon music one day and I was intrigued. It was a track from Wild type Droid.....good stuff! Not sure how I missed em in the 90's! I've been consuming their stuff ever since.
 

rockaction

Footballguy
I can immediately think of a ton off of my head, so I'm going to need a theme. . .and that theme is the uncoolness of hair metal and/or just uncoolness for other precious reasons.

Three bands off of the top of my head that should have made it

Vain - No Respect, their debut album, came out in 1988/9, right after hair metal had begun to wane in most people's minds. So there you had this glorious slice of everything right with the genre, but due to fading influence in the rock media, it went relatively unnoticed. As it were, it was an album full of riffs and chops and breathy vocals, if you like that sort of thing.


Hanoi Rocks - This Finnish band is one I plug a lot on these boards. Led by Mike Monroe and Andy McCoy, their nods to metal and Dolls-esque glam paved the way for most hair metal bands in the States. Their glorious riffage mixed with songwriting sloppiness will leave them a forever "What could have been. . ." band


The Interpreters - This post/pop/punk act were just starting to make a name for themselves in Philadelphia. After having released 1997's Back In The U.S.S.A, they toured a bit, were settling down from said tour, and made the fateful decision of playing the Republican National Convention in the year 2000. They'd never recover their indie cred, and their meteor shower of fame went out in a heartbeat.

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
I could go on forever but I'll stick to three smaller names from the '90s.

I go on about Failure all the time in the music threads. All of their records are great, but their third album, Fantastic Planet (1996), which could be described as grunge-prog fusion, is IMO one of the best records of the 90s and didn't get the attention it deserved at the time. I was blown away when I first heard it, and not until years later when social media came around did I realize there were others who felt the same way. The band broke up about a year after Fantastic Planet came out due to drug problems and creative differences, but has drawn well on the road since reuniting in 2014. During Failure's inactivity, A Perfect Circle covered one of their songs, which helped raise their profile/enhance their cult status.
Sergeant Politeness / Segue One

Another favorite '90s record of mine is Fast Stories ... from Kid Coma by Truly. They were a Seattle band with a grunge pedigree (including Soundgarden's original bassist and Screaming Trees' original drummer) that took grunge into serious psychedelic/stoner territory. Fast Stories, released in 1995, is 71 minutes of sonic bliss that uncovers something new with every listen. Record company indifference and changing musical trends in the late '90s doomed them to a short career. I don't talk about the band a whole lot in the music threads because they're not on Spotify.
Tragic Telepathic (Soul Slasher)

Seattle's Love Battery released five albums in the '90s, the first three on Sub Pop. Just before the release of Dayglo, the second and best one, they were written up in Rolling Stone as an emerging artist to watch. Their sound is like a cross between punk rock and motorcycle engines, so sonically violent their guitars could be. Their also owed a lot of the garage rock and early psychedelia of the '60s, and they were a fantastic live band that I got to see twice. A falling out with Sub Pop led to the mishandling of their third album, and by the time of their fourth (and only major-label) record, tastes had shifted away from their kind of stuff.
See Your Mind
Dude I recently discovered Failure!! They popped up on my Amazon music one day and I was intrigued. It was a track from Wild type Droid.....good stuff! Not sure how I missed em in the 90's! I've been consuming their stuff ever since.
Pre-broadband internet and social media, you basically had three ways to discover bands: radio, word of mouth or coverage in the music press. With Failure, I happened to find a fourth way: I saw them open for Tool in 1994 and was blown away. I bought their first two records and was primed for more when Fantastic Planet came out.

In 1996-97, radio was still by far the most important of the methods to discover a band, and there was a lot of competition for airplay among “alternative” bands. It didn’t help that the song released to radio, Stuck on You, while not bad, didn’t really reflect the amazingness of the sound of Fantastic Planet.
 

ericttspikes

Footballguy
The Dexateens are one of my favorite band’s that never made it. Tuscaloosa’s finest. Started out with punky southern rock and morphed into alt-country-ish. All good. Saw them open for the Meat Puppets and thought they blew the Puppets away that night, and I love the Meat Puppets. High energy rock n roll. Their bass player has been in The Drve By Truckers for a while.




 

DocHolliday

Footballguy
I can immediately think of a ton off of my head, so I'm going to need a theme. . .and that theme is the uncoolness of hair metal and/or just uncoolness for other precious reasons.

Three bands off of the top of my head that should have made it

Vain - No Respect, their debut album, came out in 1988/9, right after hair metal had begun to wane in most people's minds. So there you had this glorious slice of everything right with the genre, but due to fading influence in the rock media, it went relatively unnoticed. As it were, it was an album full of riffs and chops and breathy vocals, if you like that sort of thing.


Hanoi Rocks - This Finnish band is one I plug a lot on these boards. Led by Mike Monroe and Andy McCoy, their nods to metal and Dolls-esque glam paved the way for most hair metal bands in the States. Their glorious riffage mixed with songwriting sloppiness will leave them a forever "What could have been. . ." band


The Interpreters - This post/pop/punk act were just starting to make a name for themselves in Philadelphia. After having released 1997's Back In The U.S.S.A, they toured a bit, were settling down from said tour, and made the fateful decision of playing the Republican National Convention in the year 2000. They'd never recover their indie cred, and their meteor shower of fame went out in a heartbeat.

Great calls. I thought Vain was going to be a huge act but timing was not in their favor. Maybe they weren’t promoted well either or something. I still listen to the No Respect album often.

Hanoi Rocks definitely had serious misfortune hit.
 

MAC_32

Footballguy
Great call. I'll add to them Toadies. I get why they probably had a ceiling, but their record company essentially blocking a Rubberneck follow up? C'mon, one of the best records of the 90's.

Struggling finding a 3rd. Maybe it's late enough in Shakey Graves career to say him though.
 

rockaction

Footballguy
The Walkmen - We've Been Had

About twenty people and I saw them on a downstairs stage in Northampton, MA for the You and Me tour (I think it was that tour). I was the guy who kept going to the bathroom, obviously intoxicated in some way. What really surprised me was how few people were actually there.
 

The Dreaded Marco

Footballguy
I could go on forever but I'll stick to three smaller names from the '90s.

I go on about Failure all the time in the music threads. All of their records are great, but their third album, Fantastic Planet (1996), which could be described as grunge-prog fusion, is IMO one of the best records of the 90s and didn't get the attention it deserved at the time. I was blown away when I first heard it, and not until years later when social media came around did I realize there were others who felt the same way. The band broke up about a year after Fantastic Planet came out due to drug problems and creative differences, but has drawn well on the road since reuniting in 2014. During Failure's inactivity, A Perfect Circle covered one of their songs, which helped raise their profile/enhance their cult status.
Sergeant Politeness / Segue One

Another favorite '90s record of mine is Fast Stories ... from Kid Coma by Truly. They were a Seattle band with a grunge pedigree (including Soundgarden's original bassist and Screaming Trees' original drummer) that took grunge into serious psychedelic/stoner territory. Fast Stories, released in 1995, is 71 minutes of sonic bliss that uncovers something new with every listen. Record company indifference and changing musical trends in the late '90s doomed them to a short career. I don't talk about the band a whole lot in the music threads because they're not on Spotify.
Tragic Telepathic (Soul Slasher)

Seattle's Love Battery released five albums in the '90s, the first three on Sub Pop. Just before the release of Dayglo, the second and best one, they were written up in Rolling Stone as an emerging artist to watch. Their sound is like a cross between punk rock and motorcycle engines, so sonically violent their guitars could be. Their sound also owed a lot of the garage rock and early psychedelia of the '60s, and they were a fantastic live band that I got to see twice. A falling out with Sub Pop led to the mishandling of their third album, and by the time of their fourth (and only major-label) record, tastes had shifted away from their kind of stuff.
See Your Mind
I love Kid Coma. Very underrated album. I went to high school with the lead singer/songwriter, Rob Roth. He was a very interesting guy.

And the Love Battery drummer was my best friend in elementary school.
 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
I could go on forever but I'll stick to three smaller names from the '90s.

I go on about Failure all the time in the music threads. All of their records are great, but their third album, Fantastic Planet (1996), which could be described as grunge-prog fusion, is IMO one of the best records of the 90s and didn't get the attention it deserved at the time. I was blown away when I first heard it, and not until years later when social media came around did I realize there were others who felt the same way. The band broke up about a year after Fantastic Planet came out due to drug problems and creative differences, but has drawn well on the road since reuniting in 2014. During Failure's inactivity, A Perfect Circle covered one of their songs, which helped raise their profile/enhance their cult status.
Sergeant Politeness / Segue One

Another favorite '90s record of mine is Fast Stories ... from Kid Coma by Truly. They were a Seattle band with a grunge pedigree (including Soundgarden's original bassist and Screaming Trees' original drummer) that took grunge into serious psychedelic/stoner territory. Fast Stories, released in 1995, is 71 minutes of sonic bliss that uncovers something new with every listen. Record company indifference and changing musical trends in the late '90s doomed them to a short career. I don't talk about the band a whole lot in the music threads because they're not on Spotify.
Tragic Telepathic (Soul Slasher)

Seattle's Love Battery released five albums in the '90s, the first three on Sub Pop. Just before the release of Dayglo, the second and best one, they were written up in Rolling Stone as an emerging artist to watch. Their sound is like a cross between punk rock and motorcycle engines, so sonically violent their guitars could be. Their sound also owed a lot of the garage rock and early psychedelia of the '60s, and they were a fantastic live band that I got to see twice. A falling out with Sub Pop led to the mishandling of their third album, and by the time of their fourth (and only major-label) record, tastes had shifted away from their kind of stuff.
See Your Mind
I love Kid Coma. Very underrated album. I went to high school with the lead singer/songwriter, Rob Roth. He was a very interesting guy.

And the Love Battery drummer was my best friend in elementary school.
At my second Love Battery show, my friend and I got to hang out at the bar with Kevin (lead guitar) and Bruce (bass) before the show, because there was barely anyone there -- they never caught on in Philly. By this point, Jason Finn had left the band to join The Presidents of the United States of America. My friend said "It feels like you guys are our Velvet Underground. No one appreciates you now but they will later. But who's your Nico?" To which Bruce said: "Jason, our original drummer!"
 

The Dreaded Marco

Footballguy
I could go on forever but I'll stick to three smaller names from the '90s.

I go on about Failure all the time in the music threads. All of their records are great, but their third album, Fantastic Planet (1996), which could be described as grunge-prog fusion, is IMO one of the best records of the 90s and didn't get the attention it deserved at the time. I was blown away when I first heard it, and not until years later when social media came around did I realize there were others who felt the same way. The band broke up about a year after Fantastic Planet came out due to drug problems and creative differences, but has drawn well on the road since reuniting in 2014. During Failure's inactivity, A Perfect Circle covered one of their songs, which helped raise their profile/enhance their cult status.
Sergeant Politeness / Segue One

Another favorite '90s record of mine is Fast Stories ... from Kid Coma by Truly. They were a Seattle band with a grunge pedigree (including Soundgarden's original bassist and Screaming Trees' original drummer) that took grunge into serious psychedelic/stoner territory. Fast Stories, released in 1995, is 71 minutes of sonic bliss that uncovers something new with every listen. Record company indifference and changing musical trends in the late '90s doomed them to a short career. I don't talk about the band a whole lot in the music threads because they're not on Spotify.
Tragic Telepathic (Soul Slasher)

Seattle's Love Battery released five albums in the '90s, the first three on Sub Pop. Just before the release of Dayglo, the second and best one, they were written up in Rolling Stone as an emerging artist to watch. Their sound is like a cross between punk rock and motorcycle engines, so sonically violent their guitars could be. Their sound also owed a lot of the garage rock and early psychedelia of the '60s, and they were a fantastic live band that I got to see twice. A falling out with Sub Pop led to the mishandling of their third album, and by the time of their fourth (and only major-label) record, tastes had shifted away from their kind of stuff.
See Your Mind
I love Kid Coma. Very underrated album. I went to high school with the lead singer/songwriter, Rob Roth. He was a very interesting guy.

And the Love Battery drummer was my best friend in elementary school.
At my second Love Battery show, my friend and I got to hang out at the bar with Kevin (lead guitar) and Bruce (bass) before the show, because there was barely anyone there -- they never caught on in Philly. By this point, Jason Finn had left the band to join The Presidents of the United States of America. My friend said "It feels like you guys are our Velvet Underground. No one appreciates you now but they will later. But who's your Nico?" To which Bruce said: "Jason, our original drummer!"
Yeah, by many accounts, Jason became a major jerk.

Ten-year-old Jason was a super nice kid, though.
 

Zow

Footballguy
Aztek Trip. I know about them because I grew up in the area they did. Was shocked they didn't strike it big in the emo area. They're kind of like a Sum 41. I thought their song "Beautiful" was the perfect balance of rock and emo (and younger emotional me dug it).

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
I could go on forever but I'll stick to three smaller names from the '90s.

I go on about Failure all the time in the music threads. All of their records are great, but their third album, Fantastic Planet (1996), which could be described as grunge-prog fusion, is IMO one of the best records of the 90s and didn't get the attention it deserved at the time. I was blown away when I first heard it, and not until years later when social media came around did I realize there were others who felt the same way. The band broke up about a year after Fantastic Planet came out due to drug problems and creative differences, but has drawn well on the road since reuniting in 2014. During Failure's inactivity, A Perfect Circle covered one of their songs, which helped raise their profile/enhance their cult status.
Sergeant Politeness / Segue One

Another favorite '90s record of mine is Fast Stories ... from Kid Coma by Truly. They were a Seattle band with a grunge pedigree (including Soundgarden's original bassist and Screaming Trees' original drummer) that took grunge into serious psychedelic/stoner territory. Fast Stories, released in 1995, is 71 minutes of sonic bliss that uncovers something new with every listen. Record company indifference and changing musical trends in the late '90s doomed them to a short career. I don't talk about the band a whole lot in the music threads because they're not on Spotify.
Tragic Telepathic (Soul Slasher)

Seattle's Love Battery released five albums in the '90s, the first three on Sub Pop. Just before the release of Dayglo, the second and best one, they were written up in Rolling Stone as an emerging artist to watch. Their sound is like a cross between punk rock and motorcycle engines, so sonically violent their guitars could be. Their sound also owed a lot of the garage rock and early psychedelia of the '60s, and they were a fantastic live band that I got to see twice. A falling out with Sub Pop led to the mishandling of their third album, and by the time of their fourth (and only major-label) record, tastes had shifted away from their kind of stuff.
See Your Mind
I love Kid Coma. Very underrated album. I went to high school with the lead singer/songwriter, Rob Roth. He was a very interesting guy.

And the Love Battery drummer was my best friend in elementary school.
At my second Love Battery show, my friend and I got to hang out at the bar with Kevin (lead guitar) and Bruce (bass) before the show, because there was barely anyone there -- they never caught on in Philly. By this point, Jason Finn had left the band to join The Presidents of the United States of America. My friend said "It feels like you guys are our Velvet Underground. No one appreciates you now but they will later. But who's your Nico?" To which Bruce said: "Jason, our original drummer!"
Yeah, by many accounts, Jason became a major jerk.

Ten-year-old Jason was a super nice kid, though.
My best friend from elementary school is married to Megyn Kelly. No idea if he's a major jerk, but I'm guessing she's not attracted to modest guys.
 

Van Dyman

Footballguy
I still have two of those cassettes (Curve and Throwing Muses) somewhere in the attic. Played those hundreds of times back in the day. I revisit Curve every 2-3 years but just don't feel it anymore. Not sure why. I can listen to Lush but not Curve. 🤷‍♂️

It wasn't hard to guess which song that last link was (since it charted) but I was hoping for this one. That album had probably 4-5 really, really good songs. Of course, like some of the other bands in this thread several band members did go on to work on more well-known projects.
 

Bogart

Footballguy
Great call. I'll add to them Toadies. I get why they probably had a ceiling, but their record company essentially blocking a Rubberneck follow up? C'mon, one of the best records of the 90's.

Another vote for the Toadies, and not just because I'm wearing my "Toadies For Texas" t-shirt as I type this. The fiasco with their second album was the worst. They still tour, still put out new music, but what could have been.

My obligatory link of Toadies covering LCD Soundsystem.
Something more recent plus roadies having fun on stage.

I'll add Best Kissers In The World. 1993 they put out an EP called Puddin, and I thought it was the perfect Power Pop album. Then for whatever reason, their full length debut wasn't great, and they were gone soon after.
Laughable
Pickin' Flowers For
my favorite track, Melanie, all off Puddin.

I'll throw Cowboy Mouth or Jellyfish as my third, but too lazy to link anything for them.
 

Dr. Octopus

Footballguy
ERIC GALES BAND - Resurrection
ARC ANGELS - Too Many Ways To Fall
FOUR HORSEMAN - Tired Wings

I like my rock with a heavy dose of guitar. Those were the first three songs I thought of. They were each moderately popular for a week and a half in the early nineties. All right . . . let's push it to two weeks.
Arc Angels should have got more of a bump with Charlie Sexton having already made a name for himself- albeit with a much different sound . Their album is great.
 

Anarchy99

Footballguy
ERIC GALES BAND - Resurrection
ARC ANGELS - Too Many Ways To Fall
FOUR HORSEMAN - Tired Wings

I like my rock with a heavy dose of guitar. Those were the first three songs I thought of. They were each moderately popular for a week and a half in the early nineties. All right . . . let's push it to two weeks.
Arc Angels should have got more of a bump with Charlie Sexton having already made a name for himself- albeit with a much different sound . Their album is great.
After Stevie Ray Vaughan died, you would have thought that his remaining band mates and a couple of virtuoso guitar players who were his friends would have been primed for success. The last SRV album (In Step) was his best-selling album and went double platinum. Arc Angels came out a year and a half later. As you said, the album is awesome, but it didn't sell all that well. They could only muster a 40-date club tour. They actually got back together this year. They played Hendrix's Angel when I saw them back in the day.
 

Dr. Octopus

Footballguy
ERIC GALES BAND - Resurrection
ARC ANGELS - Too Many Ways To Fall
FOUR HORSEMAN - Tired Wings

I like my rock with a heavy dose of guitar. Those were the first three songs I thought of. They were each moderately popular for a week and a half in the early nineties. All right . . . let's push it to two weeks.
Arc Angels should have got more of a bump with Charlie Sexton having already made a name for himself- albeit with a much different sound . Their album is great.
After Stevie Ray Vaughan died, you would have thought that his remaining band mates and a couple of virtuoso guitar players who were his friends would have been primed for success. The last SRV album (In Step) was his best-selling album and went double platinum. Arc Angels came out a year and a half later. As you said, the album is awesome, but it didn't sell all that well. They could only muster a 40-date club tour. They actually got back together this year. They played Hendrix's Angel when I saw them back in the day.
When I saw Clapton, Derek Trucks and Doyal Bramwell III were his other two guitarist. Bramwell was great but he did seem like Guitar3 in that group.
 

Major

Footballguy
The Walkmen - We've Been Had

About twenty people and I saw them on a downstairs stage in Northampton, MA for the You and Me tour (I think it was that tour). I was the guy who kept going to the bathroom, obviously intoxicated in some way. What really surprised me was how few people were actually there.

That's crazy. The time I saw them 2010ish it was sold out (1000 capacity). Not sure if you've heard Hamilton's solo project with the Vampire Weekend dude but it's equally awesome.

Hamilton + Rostam - 1000 Times
 

Leroy Hoard

Footballguy
3 bands I always liked.



 

Anarchy99

Footballguy
Three tunes by three bands
----------------------------------------

BoDeans - Dreams - The Ballad of Jenny Rae - Someday

Spirit - I Got A Line On You 1969 - MR SKIN - Nature's Way

The Be Good Tanyas - Littlest Birds - Oh Susanna - In My Time Of Dying
Good call on BoDeans. I was into them during their peak years (late 80's / early 90's) (if they had such a thing). Good Work is still one of my regular songs to work out to. Caught a few of their live shows back in the day and really enjoyed them.
 

rockaction

Footballguy
That's crazy. The time I saw them 2010ish it was sold out (1000 capacity). Not sure if you've heard Hamilton's solo project with the Vampire Weekend dude but it's equally awesome.

Hamilton + Rostam - 1000 Times

Yeah, I saw them in New York and they were sold out a different time. A group called The Muslims (now the Soft Pack) opened for them. Really good show. Both of them were. I went to both shows because I lived in CT.

I have indeed heard the album and it is great. I own it on vinyl, even. It was inexpensive.
 

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