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Grandma Wood's Fried Chicken recipe (1 Viewer)

BroncoFreak_2K3

sucker for Orange
Hey All and @Joe Bryant:

Sorry I'm just getting around to sending this as requested in the offdee thread. I was out of town attending my Aunt's funeral.

So anyway...I will preface the following recipe by saying, yes, to my knowledge, this is/was my Grandma's Southern Fried Chicken recipe, which I've always thought was the best I ever have had. My Mom made it also, so did my Aunt, who just passed away that I refence above, and they never had any problems feeding a gang of family members and relatives on a Sunday afternoon. There were very few leftovers. I've tried to replicate it and, like anything about a recipe that's been passed down, it's always quite difficult to nail it down exactly and not ever quite the exact same as you remember your Mom's, Aunt's and Granma's level of quality...but I've tried and I still stand by it. I think one of the keys to the flavoring is a very well-seasoned 6-qt cast-iron skillet.

So here it is...Good Luck and I hope you enjoy!

  • 6-8 pieces of chicken (or one 3-pound chicken cut into pieces)
  • 48 oz. of peanut oil, or vegetable oil
  • 2 cups of all-purpose flour, divided
  • 1 ½ teaspoon of garlic powder
  • 1 ½ teaspoon of onion powder
  • 1 ½ teaspoon of paprika
  • ¾ teaspoon of red pepper (chili pepper)
  • 1 tablespoon of poultry seasoning
  • 1 ½ teaspoon of salt
  • ¾ teaspoon of black pepper
  • 1 egg
  • ½ cup of buttermilk (½ cup of buttermilk = ½ cup of milk & ½ tablespoon of apple cider vinegar)

  • Mix the poultry seasoning, salt, and pepper in a small bowl.
  • Rub the seasoning mixture all over each piece of chicken.
  • Pour the peanut oil (preferred) or vegetable oil into a deep 6-quart skillet until the oil is 1-inch deep.
  • Heat the oil over medium heat or until it reaches 350 degrees F.
  • While you’re waiting for the oil to heat up, place 1 cup of the divided flour, garlic powder, onion powder, paprika, and red pepper in a medium-size mixing bowl or 1-gallon resealable food storage bag.
  • Shake (or mix) the sealed bag to combine the ingredients for a homemade poultry seasoning, and set the flour mixture aside.
  • Pour the second cup of flour into a second resealable bag (or medium-sized mixing bowl) and set it aside.
  • In another medium-sized bowl, whisk together the buttermilk and egg, and set that mixture aside too.
  • The chicken will go through a 3-step process from here.
  • First, place the chicken in the bag (or bowl) of seasoned flour and shake or toss to coat the chicken evenly.
  • Second, shake off the excess flour and dip the chicken into the buttermilk mixture.
  • Third, transfer the chicken to the last bag (or bowl) of flour and shake or toss until it’s very well coated.
  • Place the coated chicken into the pre-heated oil, skin-side down, and be careful not to overcrowd the chicken in the oil. You can fry a second batch if need be to avoid overcrowding by frying all the chicken at once. Just make sure the hot oil remains at 350 degrees F.
  • Cook the chicken pieces for 10 to 12 minutes, occasionally turning to prevent excessive browning.
  • As the chicken batter turns golden brown, remove it from the hot oil, and allow it to drain in a closed container (to keep the fried chicken warm) with a paper towel under the chicken
Grandma, Aunt and Mom always served this with homemade potato salad.. (I egg per potato, Hellmans Real mayo, white onion chopped, salt/pepper and topped with boiled egg slices).

I'd love to read other's recipes here as well! Thanks again! BF
 
Last edited:

Joe Bryant

Guide
Staff member
Thank you @BroncoFreak_2K3 Am I right in that when you place the chicken in the pan in the oil, the chicken piece is not completely submerged?

That's the big difference between "deep fried" where something goes into a basket in a commercial fryer and is completely submerged in oil vs "pan fried" when the oil does not completely cover the chicken. I forget the science but it's something about allowing moisture or heat or something to escape from the top that helps.

Am I thinking right?
 

Dickies

Footballguy
Sounds good. The only part that perplexes me a little is why you would do the final dredge in unseasoned flour
 

BroncoFreak_2K3

sucker for Orange
Thank you @BroncoFreak_2K3 Am I right in that when you place the chicken in the pan in the oil, the chicken piece is not completely submerged?

That's the big difference between "deep fried" where something goes into a basket in a commercial fryer and is completely submerged in oil vs "pan fried" when the oil does not completely cover the chicken. I forget the science but it's something about allowing moisture or heat or something to escape from the top that helps.

Am I thinking right?
correct
 

Godsbrother

Footballguy
I was wondering the same thing, Binky

Anyway this sounds great but I bet makes a disaster of your stove-top
 

Joe Bryant

Guide
Staff member
Whenever I do fried chicken I use seasoned flour for both. It's the second dredge that provides most of the "breading". I even season the egg wash.

Cool. I can see that. I think it would just all depend on how much seasoning was desired in the final product and adjust accordingly.
 

Drunken knight

Footballguy
Sounds good. The only part that perplexes me a little is why you would do the final dredge in unseasoned flour

Why is that perplexing? Were you thinking using seasoned flour for both?

Sounds good. The only part that perplexes me a little is why you would do the final dredge in unseasoned flour

Why is that perplexing? Were you thinking using seasoned flour for both?
Whenever I do fried chicken I use seasoned flour for both. It's the second dredge that provides most of the "breading". I even season the egg wash.

just have to watch the salt. don't want to over season
 

Joe Bryant

Guide
Staff member
Sounds good. The only part that perplexes me a little is why you would do the final dredge in unseasoned flour

Why is that perplexing? Were you thinking using seasoned flour for both?

Sounds good. The only part that perplexes me a little is why you would do the final dredge in unseasoned flour

Why is that perplexing? Were you thinking using seasoned flour for both?
Whenever I do fried chicken I use seasoned flour for both. It's the second dredge that provides most of the "breading". I even season the egg wash.

just have to watch the salt. don't want to over season

!00%
 

Dezbelief

Footballguy
bronco - so she didn't brine it overnight or buttermilk?

Is your Grandma from Milwaukee???
Banner Springs TN. Born in a three-room dirt floor cabin. 10 total brothers and sisters. Was neighbors with a young fella named Alvin York.

This guy was my GGG Uncle
Looks like the missing part of the original recipe is that the meat was never refrigerated and might have laid the egg used in the batter.
 

dkp993

Footballguy
Any suggestions for boneless skinless chicken breasts? (I know I know cardinal sins in many fronts but it’s what the wife will eat). I’ve tried countless recipes but always seem to struggle with the crust detaching from the meat
 

dkp993

Footballguy
bronco - so she didn't brine it overnight or buttermilk?
Not that I'm aware of. I've never done that, but honestly, that sounds like a great idea to try.

pretty typical - it tenderizes, makes the meat more flavorful and juicy
I'll definitely try adding that step. So how long in the fridge then? 5-6 hours?
Brining in buttermilk overnight is a must imo. I also season the buttermilk for added flavor.
 
bronco - so she didn't brine it overnight or buttermilk?
Not that I'm aware of. I've never done that, but honestly, that sounds like a great idea to try.

pretty typical - it tenderizes, makes the meat more flavorful and juicy
I'll definitely try adding that step. So how long in the fridge then? 5-6 hours?

better overnight.

ETA: I have never been able to fry chicken anywhere close to my mom or my grandmothers. My mom's family owned the poultry house in town in Campbellsville, KY in the 30s - 40s ...so they knew chicken. My mom grew up wringing chicken necks, searing & plucking them for the "city folk" that wanted a "dressed" chicken. My grandma, who whose name was Ida, but went by "FeFe" always pan-fried it in a big black iron skillet with in about 1.5 inches of lard. It was always brined overnight in saltwater - I don't think they wanted to "waste" good buttermilk. Pretty similar process though.
 
Last edited:

Gavra Meads

Footballguy
Hey All and @Joe Bryant:

Sorry I'm just getting around to sending this as requested in the offdee thread. I was out of town attending my Aunt's funeral.

So anyway...I will preface the following recipe by saying, yes, to my knowledge, this is/was my Grandma's Southern Fried Chicken recipe, which I've always thought was the best I ever have had. My Mom made it also, so did my Aunt, who just passed away that I refence above, and they never had any problems feeding a gang of family members and relatives on a Sunday afternoon. There were very few leftovers. I've tried to replicate it and, like anything about a recipe that's been passed down, it's always quite difficult to nail it down exactly and not ever quite the exact same as you remember your Mom's, Aunt's and Granma's level of quality...but I've tried and I still stand by it. I think one of the keys to the flavoring is a very well-seasoned 6-qt cast-iron skillet.

So here it is...Good Luck and I hope you enjoy!

  • 6-8 pieces of chicken (or one 3-pound chicken cut into pieces)
  • 48 oz. of peanut oil, or vegetable oil
  • 2 cups of all-purpose flour, divided
  • 1 ½ teaspoon of garlic powder
  • 1 ½ teaspoon of onion powder
  • 1 ½ teaspoon of paprika
  • ¾ teaspoon of red pepper (chili pepper)
  • 1 tablespoon of poultry seasoning
  • 1 ½ teaspoon of salt
  • ¾ teaspoon of black pepper
  • 1 egg
  • ½ cup of buttermilk (½ cup of buttermilk = ½ cup of milk & ½ tablespoon of apple cider vinegar)

  • Mix the poultry seasoning, salt, and pepper in a small bowl.
  • Rub the seasoning mixture all over each piece of chicken.
  • Pour the peanut oil (preferred) or vegetable oil into a deep 6-quart skillet until the oil is 1-inch deep.
  • Heat the oil over medium heat or until it reaches 350 degrees F.
  • While you’re waiting for the oil to heat up, place 1 cup of the divided flour, garlic powder, onion powder, paprika, and red pepper in a medium-size mixing bowl or 1-gallon resealable food storage bag.
  • Shake (or mix) the sealed bag to combine the ingredients for a homemade poultry seasoning, and set the flour mixture aside.
  • Pour the second cup of flour into a second resealable bag (or medium-sized mixing bowl) and set it aside.
  • In another medium-sized bowl, whisk together the buttermilk and egg, and set that mixture aside too.
  • The chicken will go through a 3-step process from here.
  • First, place the chicken in the bag (or bowl) of seasoned flour and shake or toss to coat the chicken evenly.
  • Second, shake off the excess flour and dip the chicken into the buttermilk mixture.
  • Third, transfer the chicken to the last bag (or bowl) of flour and shake or toss until it’s very well coated.
  • Place the coated chicken into the pre-heated oil, skin-side down, and be careful not to overcrowd the chicken in the oil. You can fry a second batch if need be to avoid overcrowding by frying all the chicken at once. Just make sure the hot oil remains at 350 degrees F.
  • Cook the chicken pieces for 10 to 12 minutes, occasionally turning to prevent excessive browning.
  • As the chicken batter turns golden brown, remove it from the hot oil, and allow it to drain in a closed container (to keep the fried chicken warm) with a paper towel under the chicken
Grandma, Aunt and Mom always served this with homemade potato salad.. (I egg per potato, Hellmans Real mayo, white onion chopped, salt/pepper and topped with boiled egg slices).

I'd love to read other's recipes here as well! Thanks again! BF
Isn't the recipe a bit too complicated and long? Other alternatives for your recipe would be chicken casserole, breast, buffalo wings, and even roast chicken. I can't stand cooking meals that make me stay in the kitchen for more than 1 hour. Though, the classic recipe for fried chicken it's the easiest because there is no need for a long marinade in buttermilk, so you don't have to plan ahead.
 
Last edited:

Grahamburn

Footballguy
Hey All and @Joe Bryant:

Sorry I'm just getting around to sending this as requested in the offdee thread. I was out of town attending my Aunt's funeral.

So anyway...I will preface the following recipe by saying, yes, to my knowledge, this is/was my Grandma's Southern Fried Chicken recipe, which I've always thought was the best I ever have had. My Mom made it also, so did my Aunt, who just passed away that I refence above, and they never had any problems feeding a gang of family members and relatives on a Sunday afternoon. There were very few leftovers. I've tried to replicate it and, like anything about a recipe that's been passed down, it's always quite difficult to nail it down exactly and not ever quite the exact same as you remember your Mom's, Aunt's and Granma's level of quality...but I've tried and I still stand by it. I think one of the keys to the flavoring is a very well-seasoned 6-qt cast-iron skillet.

So here it is...Good Luck and I hope you enjoy!

  • 6-8 pieces of chicken (or one 3-pound chicken cut into pieces)
  • 48 oz. of peanut oil, or vegetable oil
  • 2 cups of all-purpose flour, divided
  • 1 ½ teaspoon of garlic powder
  • 1 ½ teaspoon of onion powder
  • 1 ½ teaspoon of paprika
  • ¾ teaspoon of red pepper (chili pepper)
  • 1 tablespoon of poultry seasoning
  • 1 ½ teaspoon of salt
  • ¾ teaspoon of black pepper
  • 1 egg
  • ½ cup of buttermilk (½ cup of buttermilk = ½ cup of milk & ½ tablespoon of apple cider vinegar)

  • Mix the poultry seasoning, salt, and pepper in a small bowl.
  • Rub the seasoning mixture all over each piece of chicken.
  • Pour the peanut oil (preferred) or vegetable oil into a deep 6-quart skillet until the oil is 1-inch deep.
  • Heat the oil over medium heat or until it reaches 350 degrees F.
  • While you’re waiting for the oil to heat up, place 1 cup of the divided flour, garlic powder, onion powder, paprika, and red pepper in a medium-size mixing bowl or 1-gallon resealable food storage bag.
  • Shake (or mix) the sealed bag to combine the ingredients for a homemade poultry seasoning, and set the flour mixture aside.
  • Pour the second cup of flour into a second resealable bag (or medium-sized mixing bowl) and set it aside.
  • In another medium-sized bowl, whisk together the buttermilk and egg, and set that mixture aside too.
  • The chicken will go through a 3-step process from here.
  • First, place the chicken in the bag (or bowl) of seasoned flour and shake or toss to coat the chicken evenly.
  • Second, shake off the excess flour and dip the chicken into the buttermilk mixture.
  • Third, transfer the chicken to the last bag (or bowl) of flour and shake or toss until it’s very well coated.
  • Place the coated chicken into the pre-heated oil, skin-side down, and be careful not to overcrowd the chicken in the oil. You can fry a second batch if need be to avoid overcrowding by frying all the chicken at once. Just make sure the hot oil remains at 350 degrees F.
  • Cook the chicken pieces for 10 to 12 minutes, occasionally turning to prevent excessive browning.
  • As the chicken batter turns golden brown, remove it from the hot oil, and allow it to drain in a closed container (to keep the fried chicken warm) with a paper towel under the chicken
Grandma, Aunt and Mom always served this with homemade potato salad.. (I egg per potato, Hellmans Real mayo, white onion chopped, salt/pepper and topped with boiled egg slices).

I'd love to read other's recipes here as well! Thanks again! BF
Isn't the recipe a bit too complicated and long?

Too much of a good thing is wonderful.
 

Dezbelief

Footballguy
Hey All and @Joe Bryant:

Sorry I'm just getting around to sending this as requested in the offdee thread. I was out of town attending my Aunt's funeral.

So anyway...I will preface the following recipe by saying, yes, to my knowledge, this is/was my Grandma's Southern Fried Chicken recipe, which I've always thought was the best I ever have had. My Mom made it also, so did my Aunt, who just passed away that I refence above, and they never had any problems feeding a gang of family members and relatives on a Sunday afternoon. There were very few leftovers. I've tried to replicate it and, like anything about a recipe that's been passed down, it's always quite difficult to nail it down exactly and not ever quite the exact same as you remember your Mom's, Aunt's and Granma's level of quality...but I've tried and I still stand by it. I think one of the keys to the flavoring is a very well-seasoned 6-qt cast-iron skillet.

So here it is...Good Luck and I hope you enjoy!

  • 6-8 pieces of chicken (or one 3-pound chicken cut into pieces)
  • 48 oz. of peanut oil, or vegetable oil
  • 2 cups of all-purpose flour, divided
  • 1 ½ teaspoon of garlic powder
  • 1 ½ teaspoon of onion powder
  • 1 ½ teaspoon of paprika
  • ¾ teaspoon of red pepper (chili pepper)
  • 1 tablespoon of poultry seasoning
  • 1 ½ teaspoon of salt
  • ¾ teaspoon of black pepper
  • 1 egg
  • ½ cup of buttermilk (½ cup of buttermilk = ½ cup of milk & ½ tablespoon of apple cider vinegar)

  • Mix the poultry seasoning, salt, and pepper in a small bowl.
  • Rub the seasoning mixture all over each piece of chicken.
  • Pour the peanut oil (preferred) or vegetable oil into a deep 6-quart skillet until the oil is 1-inch deep.
  • Heat the oil over medium heat or until it reaches 350 degrees F.
  • While you’re waiting for the oil to heat up, place 1 cup of the divided flour, garlic powder, onion powder, paprika, and red pepper in a medium-size mixing bowl or 1-gallon resealable food storage bag.
  • Shake (or mix) the sealed bag to combine the ingredients for a homemade poultry seasoning, and set the flour mixture aside.
  • Pour the second cup of flour into a second resealable bag (or medium-sized mixing bowl) and set it aside.
  • In another medium-sized bowl, whisk together the buttermilk and egg, and set that mixture aside too.
  • The chicken will go through a 3-step process from here.
  • First, place the chicken in the bag (or bowl) of seasoned flour and shake or toss to coat the chicken evenly.
  • Second, shake off the excess flour and dip the chicken into the buttermilk mixture.
  • Third, transfer the chicken to the last bag (or bowl) of flour and shake or toss until it’s very well coated.
  • Place the coated chicken into the pre-heated oil, skin-side down, and be careful not to overcrowd the chicken in the oil. You can fry a second batch if need be to avoid overcrowding by frying all the chicken at once. Just make sure the hot oil remains at 350 degrees F.
  • Cook the chicken pieces for 10 to 12 minutes, occasionally turning to prevent excessive browning.
  • As the chicken batter turns golden brown, remove it from the hot oil, and allow it to drain in a closed container (to keep the fried chicken warm) with a paper towel under the chicken
Grandma, Aunt and Mom always served this with homemade potato salad.. (I egg per potato, Hellmans Real mayo, white onion chopped, salt/pepper and topped with boiled egg slices).

I'd love to read other's recipes here as well! Thanks again! BF
Isn't the recipe a bit too complicated and long?
Do you have a less complicated recipe? Here's my list of shorter recipes.

Go to store
Buy fried chicken
Enjoy

Go to Grandma's house
Eat fried chicken
 

Nigel

Footballguy
Hey All and @Joe Bryant:

Sorry I'm just getting around to sending this as requested in the offdee thread. I was out of town attending my Aunt's funeral.

So anyway...I will preface the following recipe by saying, yes, to my knowledge, this is/was my Grandma's Southern Fried Chicken recipe, which I've always thought was the best I ever have had. My Mom made it also, so did my Aunt, who just passed away that I refence above, and they never had any problems feeding a gang of family members and relatives on a Sunday afternoon. There were very few leftovers. I've tried to replicate it and, like anything about a recipe that's been passed down, it's always quite difficult to nail it down exactly and not ever quite the exact same as you remember your Mom's, Aunt's and Granma's level of quality...but I've tried and I still stand by it. I think one of the keys to the flavoring is a very well-seasoned 6-qt cast-iron skillet.

So here it is...Good Luck and I hope you enjoy!

  • 6-8 pieces of chicken (or one 3-pound chicken cut into pieces)
  • 48 oz. of peanut oil, or vegetable oil
  • 2 cups of all-purpose flour, divided
  • 1 ½ teaspoon of garlic powder
  • 1 ½ teaspoon of onion powder
  • 1 ½ teaspoon of paprika
  • ¾ teaspoon of red pepper (chili pepper)
  • 1 tablespoon of poultry seasoning
  • 1 ½ teaspoon of salt
  • ¾ teaspoon of black pepper
  • 1 egg
  • ½ cup of buttermilk (½ cup of buttermilk = ½ cup of milk & ½ tablespoon of apple cider vinegar)

  • Mix the poultry seasoning, salt, and pepper in a small bowl.
  • Rub the seasoning mixture all over each piece of chicken.
  • Pour the peanut oil (preferred) or vegetable oil into a deep 6-quart skillet until the oil is 1-inch deep.
  • Heat the oil over medium heat or until it reaches 350 degrees F.
  • While you’re waiting for the oil to heat up, place 1 cup of the divided flour, garlic powder, onion powder, paprika, and red pepper in a medium-size mixing bowl or 1-gallon resealable food storage bag.
  • Shake (or mix) the sealed bag to combine the ingredients for a homemade poultry seasoning, and set the flour mixture aside.
  • Pour the second cup of flour into a second resealable bag (or medium-sized mixing bowl) and set it aside.
  • In another medium-sized bowl, whisk together the buttermilk and egg, and set that mixture aside too.
  • The chicken will go through a 3-step process from here.
  • First, place the chicken in the bag (or bowl) of seasoned flour and shake or toss to coat the chicken evenly.
  • Second, shake off the excess flour and dip the chicken into the buttermilk mixture.
  • Third, transfer the chicken to the last bag (or bowl) of flour and shake or toss until it’s very well coated.
  • Place the coated chicken into the pre-heated oil, skin-side down, and be careful not to overcrowd the chicken in the oil. You can fry a second batch if need be to avoid overcrowding by frying all the chicken at once. Just make sure the hot oil remains at 350 degrees F.
  • Cook the chicken pieces for 10 to 12 minutes, occasionally turning to prevent excessive browning.
  • As the chicken batter turns golden brown, remove it from the hot oil, and allow it to drain in a closed container (to keep the fried chicken warm) with a paper towel under the chicken
Grandma, Aunt and Mom always served this with homemade potato salad.. (I egg per potato, Hellmans Real mayo, white onion chopped, salt/pepper and topped with boiled egg slices).

I'd love to read other's recipes here as well! Thanks again! BF
Isn't the recipe a bit too complicated and long?
Allow me to answer for BroncoFreak: no
 

cosjobs

Footballguy
bronco - so she didn't brine it overnight or buttermilk?
Not that I'm aware of. I've never done that, but honestly, that sounds like a great idea to try.

pretty typical - it tenderizes, makes the meat more flavorful and juicy
I'll definitely try adding that step. So how long in the fridge then? 5-6 hours?

better overnight.

ETA: I have never been able to fry chicken anywhere close to my mom or my grandmothers. My mom's family owned the poultry house in town in Campbellsville, KY in the 30s - 40s ...so they knew chicken. My mom grew up wringing chicken necks, searing & plucking them for the "city folk" that wanted a "dressed" chicken. My grandma, who whose name was Ida, but went by "FeFe" always pan-fried it in a big black iron skillet with in about 1.5 inches of lard. It was always brined overnight in saltwater - I don't think they wanted to "waste" good buttermilk. Pretty similar process though.
I am blessed that I have always been able to afford buttermilk. And not that low-fat wannabe stuff.
 

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