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The most basic of shortcuts: in the appropriate key for the fret, low string to high:

1-2-4

1-3-4

1-3-4

1-3

1-2-4

1-2-4

I'll let the lead players take it from here.

As for blues progressions, you can always just bar chord the I-IV-V. Blues in E or A allow for some cool open chording stuff.
Can someone explain this to me like I'm me?
Seriously dying to know what this means. Looking at my guitar and I can't figure it out.

Is it a mix between pentatonic and something else?

 
The most basic of shortcuts: in the appropriate key for the fret, low string to high:

1-2-4

1-3-4

1-3-4

1-3

1-2-4

1-2-4

I'll let the lead players take it from here.

As for blues progressions, you can always just bar chord the I-IV-V. Blues in E or A allow for some cool open chording stuff.
Can someone explain this to me like I'm me?
Seriously dying to know what this means. Looking at my guitar and I can't figure it out. Is it a mix between pentatonic and something else?
Basic major scale. Play the notes in succession from low to high starting in the first fret. You can play the same scale anywhere on the neck (substituting the fret you start in as the "1").
 
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Cheating on f and b by using power chords isn't the end of the world. Also, an f can be sold by just playing the notes on the a (c note) d (f note) g (a note) and b (c note) strings and should require only slightly more dexterity than a c chord. For B major? Well, guck that chord.

 
The most basic of shortcuts: in the appropriate key for the fret, low string to high:

1-2-4

1-3-4

1-3-4

1-3

1-2-4

1-2-4

I'll let the lead players take it from here.

As for blues progressions, you can always just bar chord the I-IV-V. Blues in E or A allow for some cool open chording stuff.
Can someone explain this to me like I'm me?
Seriously dying to know what this means. Looking at my guitar and I can't figure it out. Is it a mix between pentatonic and something else?
Basic major scale. Play the notes in succession from low to high starting in the first fret. You can play the same scale anywhere on the neck (substituting the fret you start in as the "1").
Thanks GB, I never knew the major scale in anything besides a different shape. I think I am struggling to make sense of this because the first note isn't a root note, is it?

I see that scale you have here: http://www.justinguitar.com/en/SC-001-TheMajorScale.php

 
The most basic of shortcuts: in the appropriate key for the fret, low string to high:

1-2-4

1-3-4

1-3-4

1-3

1-2-4

1-2-4

I'll let the lead players take it from here.

As for blues progressions, you can always just bar chord the I-IV-V. Blues in E or A allow for some cool open chording stuff.
Can someone explain this to me like I'm me?
Seriously dying to know what this means. Looking at my guitar and I can't figure it out. Is it a mix between pentatonic and something else?
Basic major scale. Play the notes in succession from low to high starting in the first fret. You can play the same scale anywhere on the neck (substituting the fret you start in as the "1").
Thanks GB, I never knew the major scale in anything besides a different shape. I think I am struggling to make sense of this because the first note isn't a root note, is it?I see that scale you have here: http://www.justinguitar.com/en/SC-001-TheMajorScale.php
Yeah, I think it's called the C shape, but I may be wrong. And yes, it doesn't start on the root, but you can start on the root if you want.

 
So went to guitar center today to mess around with some electric guitars. Was looking at a Mexican made Fender for 499.

Holy crap! I know I'm a novice but I was amazed about how much easier electric guitars are to play than acoustics (due to the smaller strings and neck I assume)

My fingers practically bleed are are sore for 2 days after a long session on the accoustic. Playing a F or Bm on electric, no problem. It was like holding a giant stick of butter.

I guess I'll continue to practice with the accoustic as I assume this will make electric play easier.

Next question, I'm going to buy an electric. I don't need anything too fancy but I'll need an amp, strap and case. What's the best value for a beginner around 1000-1500 bucks for the whole kit?

If I don't need to spend that much on a beginners electric, I'll take suggestions in any price range.

I would prefer something that stays in tune and looks sexy.

 
So went to guitar center today to mess around with some electric guitars. Was looking at a Mexican made Fender for 499.

Holy crap! I know I'm a novice but I was amazed about how much easier electric guitars are to play than acoustics (due to the smaller strings and neck I assume)

My fingers practically bleed are are sore for 2 days after a long session on the accoustic. Playing a F or Bm on electric, no problem. It was like holding a giant stick of butter.

I guess I'll continue to practice with the accoustic as I assume this will make electric play easier.

Next question, I'm going to buy an electric. I don't need anything too fancy but I'll need an amp, strap and case. What's the best value for a beginner around 1000-1500 bucks for the whole kit?

If I don't need to spend that much on a beginners electric, I'll take suggestions in any price range.

I would prefer something that stays in tune and looks sexy.
Exciting! First, you've got to figure out what kind of tone you need for your rhythm sound in the band. And given that you'll be strapping up on stage, you don't want to go entry level, IMO. Given the tunes you play, in my opinion, I think solid options at that price point for your first guitar are: Fender American Special Strat ($950), Fender American Special Tele ($950), Gibson Les Paul Studio ($1100) or Gibson Les Paul Studio VG Flametop ($1000). The Strat, Tele and Les Paul all have distinctive tones so you should play them all and figure out which complements the sound of your band most appropriately. In my opinion, these three are all standard, high quality options right at 4 figures that should fit well at the rhythm guitar position in a rock and roll cover band. Use the remaining $500 for your rig.P.S. I'm assuming the long term plan is to add rhythm guitar to your keyboard playing in the band.

 
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So went to guitar center today to mess around with some electric guitars. Was looking at a Mexican made Fender for 499.

Holy crap! I know I'm a novice but I was amazed about how much easier electric guitars are to play than acoustics (due to the smaller strings and neck I assume)

My fingers practically bleed are are sore for 2 days after a long session on the accoustic. Playing a F or Bm on electric, no problem. It was like holding a giant stick of butter.

I guess I'll continue to practice with the accoustic as I assume this will make electric play easier.

Next question, I'm going to buy an electric. I don't need anything too fancy but I'll need an amp, strap and case. What's the best value for a beginner around 1000-1500 bucks for the whole kit?

If I don't need to spend that much on a beginners electric, I'll take suggestions in any price range.

I would prefer something that stays in tune and looks sexy.
Exciting! First, you've got to figure out what kind of tone you need for your rhythm sound in the band. And given that you'll be strapping up on stage, you don't want to go entry level, IMO. Given the tunes you play, in my opinion, I think solid options at that price point for your first guitar are: Fender American Special Strat ($950), Fender American Special Tele ($950), Gibson Les Paul Studio ($1100) or Gibson Les Paul Studio VG Flametop ($1000). The Strat, Tele and Les Paul all have distinctive tones so you should play them all and figure out which complements the sound of your band most appropriately. In my opinion, these three are all standard, high quality options right at 4 figures that should fit well at the rhythm guitar position in a rock and roll cover band. Use the remaining $500 for your rig.
Thanks BB. Speaking of the rig...I need to hire a personal roadie. This is getting ridiculous. I have to tote my microphone, 90 pound Roland piano, 60 pound Korg synth work station, my double piano stand, seat, boom mic stand, regular mic stand for the songs I sing leads on, guitar, piano amp (used as a monitor since I usually sit behind the PA), guitar and guitar amp.This is getting ####### ridiculous. The only place i can cut is perhaps switching to a wireless in-ear headphone monitor. This really sucks. We have gigs booked through the spring and summer and my back is not feeling good lugging this crap every week

 
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By the way, on my strats, I put humbuckers at the bridge position so that I have a bit more versatility on the tone. If you're trying out strats, be sure to play an HSS (humbucker in the bridge position) model and check out the tone with distortion through the bridge pick-up. It will give you a completely different tone.

 
By the way, on my strats, I put humbuckers at the bridge position so that I have a bit more versatility on the tone. If you're trying out strats, be sure to play an HSS (humbucker in the bridge position) model and check out the tone with distortion through the bridge pick-up. It will give you a completely different tone.
I'm leaning the Les Paul just based on what I know and what my lead guitarist touts.

Thanks again for all the tips BB

 
By the way, on my strats, I put humbuckers at the bridge position so that I have a bit more versatility on the tone. If you're trying out strats, be sure to play an HSS (humbucker in the bridge position) model and check out the tone with distortion through the bridge pick-up. It will give you a completely different tone.
I'm leaning the Les Paul just based on what I know and what my lead guitarist touts.Thanks again for all the tips BB
The VG Flametop in Caramel Burst is SEXY.
 
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By the way, on my strats, I put humbuckers at the bridge position so that I have a bit more versatility on the tone. If you're trying out strats, be sure to play an HSS (humbucker in the bridge position) model and check out the tone with distortion through the bridge pick-up. It will give you a completely different tone.
I'm leaning the Les Paul just based on what I know and what my lead guitarist touts.Thanks again for all the tips BB
The VG Flametop in Caramel Burst is SEXY.
Just ordered this.

Arrives in 2 days :excited:

 
By the way, on my strats, I put humbuckers at the bridge position so that I have a bit more versatility on the tone. If you're trying out strats, be sure to play an HSS (humbucker in the bridge position) model and check out the tone with distortion through the bridge pick-up. It will give you a completely different tone.
I'm leaning the Les Paul just based on what I know and what my lead guitarist touts.Thanks again for all the tips BB
The VG Flametop in Caramel Burst is SEXY.
Just ordered this.Arrives in 2 days :excited:
:boing: So jealous.

 
So went to guitar center today to mess around with some electric guitars. Was looking at a Mexican made Fender for 499.

Holy crap! I know I'm a novice but I was amazed about how much easier electric guitars are to play than acoustics (due to the smaller strings and neck I assume)

My fingers practically bleed are are sore for 2 days after a long session on the accoustic. Playing a F or Bm on electric, no problem. It was like holding a giant stick of butter.

I guess I'll continue to practice with the accoustic as I assume this will make electric play easier.

Next question, I'm going to buy an electric. I don't need anything too fancy but I'll need an amp, strap and case. What's the best value for a beginner around 1000-1500 bucks for the whole kit?

If I don't need to spend that much on a beginners electric, I'll take suggestions in any price range.

I would prefer something that stays in tune and looks sexy.
bought mine for $150 :shrug: . Budddy of mine said buy the ####tiest guitar there. then any other guitar i ever play will be easier to pay then that

 
Fender Strat... what is your preference based purely on looks: Maple or Rosewood neck?

Red (w/ white pick guard) I think the rosewood looks nice. Link

Black strat I think I prefer the maple neck. Link

Brown sunburst I'm not sure yet.. you?

1. Maple

2. Rosewood

Rosewood - Better pic of the rosewood neck. Though this one is a Squier. But just looking at aesthetics.

 
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I prefer playing on rosewood necks, but I think maple necks look better. Based purely on looks, I think Fenders look kinda weird when the headstock is maple and the fretboard is rosewood. That said, three of my four Strats have rosewood fretboards.

 
I hadn't really thought about it until I recently started looking at getting a strat. I hear that there isn't much difference in sound/tone with all things equal (i.e. pups). I've never played a maple fingerboard so I can't compare. Could go to GC I suppose and try it.

 
I hadn't really thought about it until I recently started looking at getting a strat. I hear that there isn't much difference in sound/tone with all things equal (i.e. pups). I've never played a maple fingerboard so I can't compare. Could go to GC I suppose and try it.
You should try it out and make your own determination. It's a debate as old as the ages.

 
I hadn't really thought about it until I recently started looking at getting a strat. I hear that there isn't much difference in sound/tone with all things equal (i.e. pups). I've never played a maple fingerboard so I can't compare. Could go to GC I suppose and try it.
You should try it out and make your own determination. It's a debate as old as the ages.
yep. Thanks.

 
I have a maple sunburst Tele and it looks good IMO. By far it's the most comfortable guitar for me to play.

Just based on color, I like the contrast. If I had a white strat (want one someday) I would look at a rosewood fretboard.

 
In an effort to not buy a nice guitar and only use it for playing basic chords I've been working on some tab reading.

Are there any songs of the top of your collective heads that have pretty easy tablature to help with coordination/picking notes?

I've been working on Babe, I'm Gonna Leave You but bit off way more than I could chew with that.

 
In an effort to not buy a nice guitar and only use it for playing basic chords I've been working on some tab reading.

Are there any songs of the top of your collective heads that have pretty easy tablature to help with coordination/picking notes?

I've been working on Babe, I'm Gonna Leave You but bit off way more than I could chew with that.
Stairway to Heaven.

 
By the way, on my strats, I put humbuckers at the bridge position so that I have a bit more versatility on the tone. If you're trying out strats, be sure to play an HSS (humbucker in the bridge position) model and check out the tone with distortion through the bridge pick-up. It will give you a completely different tone.
I'm leaning the Les Paul just based on what I know and what my lead guitarist touts.Thanks again for all the tips BB
The VG Flametop in Caramel Burst is SEXY.
Just ordered this.Arrives in 2 days :excited:
:popcorn:

 
By the way, on my strats, I put humbuckers at the bridge position so that I have a bit more versatility on the tone. If you're trying out strats, be sure to play an HSS (humbucker in the bridge position) model and check out the tone with distortion through the bridge pick-up. It will give you a completely different tone.
I'm leaning the Les Paul just based on what I know and what my lead guitarist touts.Thanks again for all the tips BB
The VG Flametop in Caramel Burst is SEXY.
Just ordered this.Arrives in 2 days :excited:
:popcorn:
Tomorrow now apparently GB. Whenever amazon let's you order through a 3rd party, this always happens. Will be sure to upload some pics though. Been working hard on the accoustic in the mean time!
 
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John Bender said:
bigbottom said:
By the way, on my strats, I put humbuckers at the bridge position so that I have a bit more versatility on the tone. If you're trying out strats, be sure to play an HSS (humbucker in the bridge position) model and check out the tone with distortion through the bridge pick-up. It will give you a completely different tone.
I'm leaning the Les Paul just based on what I know and what my lead guitarist touts.Thanks again for all the tips BB
The VG Flametop in Caramel Burst is SEXY.
Just ordered this.Arrives in 2 days :excited:
:popcorn:
Tomorrow now apparently GB. Whenever amazon let's you order through a 3rd party, this always happens. Will be sure to upload some pics though. Been working hard on the accoustic in the mean time!
So . . .

 
In an effort to not buy a nice guitar and only use it for playing basic chords I've been working on some tab reading.

Are there any songs of the top of your collective heads that have pretty easy tablature to help with coordination/picking notes?

I've been working on Babe, I'm Gonna Leave You but bit off way more than I could chew with that.
First song I ever learned was "Crazy Train." I obviously played it slowly to start, and couldn't do the solo/passing notes in the beginning, but I got the majority of it up to speed pretty quickly. Van Halen's "Aint Talkin' 'Bout Love" and AC/DC's "Back In Black" are also great entry-level tunes that work on picking coordination, are relatively simple, but sound awesome when you get 'em down.

No kidding: Whitesnake's "Crying In the Rain" and "Still of the Night" are both loaded with phenomenal-but-not-overly-difficult riffs and guitar phrases that you can mine, steal, reinterpret, and repurpose into lots of stuff down the road. I learned those songs 25 years ago, but still find myself playing phrases stolen from those in my original tunes. And, because it's Whitesnake, few people know that it's ripped off! Hooray!

 
I started off on Megadeth "Tornado of Souls". Pretty simple for most. I then learned most of the 80's band Badlands with Jake E. Lee stuff. Now I'm in to more complex stuff like Bad Co, "Smoke on the Water", and Sabbath's "Iron Man".

 
There are some beautiful classical pieces that aren't hard I'm terms of progression and picking that will make everyone think you are the best guitar player ever. Otherwise try...

Metallica ballads: one, sanitarium, nothing else matters.

Stairway is easy.

This old porch is a good one. Lyle version

Don't cry by gnr.

 
There are some beautiful classical pieces that aren't hard I'm terms of progression and picking that will make everyone think you are the best guitar player ever. Otherwise try...

Metallica ballads: one, sanitarium, nothing else matters.

Stairway is easy.

This old porch is a good one. Lyle version

Don't cry by gnr.
I will agree with most of your post but parts of the solo in One are not for beginners. Kirk flies.

 
There are some beautiful classical pieces that aren't hard I'm terms of progression and picking that will make everyone think you are the best guitar player ever. Otherwise try...

Metallica ballads: one, sanitarium, nothing else matters.

Stairway is easy.

This old porch is a good one. Lyle version

Don't cry by gnr.
I will agree with most of your post but parts of the solo in One are not for beginners. Kirk flies.
Not the solos on any of those.

 
The Les Paul VG Flame has arrived....

Couple notes.

It's really good looking and hefty. Enjoying the look of it, although the photos make it seem as if it was shinier or glazed. It's not - it's very wooden looking for lack of a better term.

Some things I've found when transitioning from acoustic.

I actually have to mute strings manually now when moving to different chords or they continue to ring through my amp. This was something I wasn't expecting and definitely something I'll learn as I go.

When playing it with a strap over my shoulder/standing up I have much more trouble seeing the fret board which is troublesome to a beginner still looking for where to place his fingers. It lays parallel to my line of vision. I'm also having trouble playing the F Chord without the same angle that sitting down provides where the guitar is closer to "looking" up at me.

the FIRST fret only has strings that are raised even higher than my accoustic which was surprising. I thought the metal fret plates (or whatever the f they're called) would actually be shorter based on the axes I practiced on. It's actually very difficult to compress the small e string all the way down with just a pinky.

The different sounds are going to drive me crazy. My amp is a cheap Fender with like 8 built in sounds, plus there are 4 dials on the guitar itself that do various things. Very confusing and intimidating at first.

I live in a townhome so I can really only play through headphones. they are really nice headphones, but man it still sounds like #### with so much distortion.

I've had a lot of trouble picking and playing individual notes...this is where I may need to cave and take lessons. It's got to be easier. I think the most effective method is going to be to memorize the tabs without having them open and look at them the entire time so I can just look at the guitar itself.

Oy - just when I thought things were getting easier.

speaking of that - electric guitar, hands down easier itself to play. F Chords are no longer a problem because the strings compress so much easier.

 
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Adjust the strap up for a while. Will sit on your chest more like the acoustic. Drop it down later.

 
BTw: Thanks all for the feedback and allowing my stream of consciousness complaining and questions. I'm a dyed in the wool newbie to guitar and it's a nice outlook to be able to talk shop with people about how much I suck, have to learn, yet how great a hobby this can be. Being a musician already lends itself to a lot of frustration when you can't just pick up another instrument and play it like you can the piano.

 
Sitting down is easier until you get comfortable with your left hand techniques, then standing up is much easier and you won't have to keep looking at your left hand (at least for rhythm playing). I remember for me I started out more with finger picking than using a pick. While it helped with techniques such as alternate thumb and other right hand picking patterns, it took me a while to get used to using a pick. I didn't like the sound at first and I got annoyed with myself, but now I prefer playing with a pick as it got much easier as I played. Before long it becomes natural.

 
the FIRST fret only has strings that are raised even higher than my accoustic which was surprising. I thought the metal fret plates (or whatever the f they're called) would actually be shorter based on the axes I practiced on. It's actually very difficult to compress the small e string all the way down with just a pinky.

I live in a townhome so I can really only play through headphones. they are really nice headphones, but man it still sounds like #### with so much distortion.

I've had a lot of trouble picking and playing individual notes...this is where I may need to cave and take lessons. It's got to be easier. I think the most effective method is going to be to memorize the tabs without having them open and look at them the entire time so I can just look at the guitar itself.
Maybe the guitar needs set up properly. The first fret action should be pretty low.

Turn down the distortion when you are practicing. Distortion can cover up slop but also create noise when you hit extra strings and such.

Picking the appropriate string is the trick. I have to memorize everything that I am playing before I can play it well. I cannot read tab and play at a decent speed.

 

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