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Kirk Gibson's HR - 25th anniversary today... (1 Viewer)

As great as Vin Scully is, that's one of his greatest calls - and one of the greatest of all time.

Think Eckersley to this day wishes he had that pitch back? They said on the broadcast that he had thrown about 20 straight fast balls, and Gibson was lucky to just keep fouling them off. Then he gives Gibson the only pitch he can drive - a meatball breaker - and Gibson bashes it. Kudos to Kurt though - what a gutty performance.

 
The whole thing was just amazing. The injured player pinch hitting against Eckersley. The foul balls, the high outside fastball that he doesn't chase, the stolen base that theoretically should have changed his thinking from homerun to contact single. Perfect baseball moment. I remember watching with my brother who is not into baseball and telling him he just witnessed one of the greatest moments in baseball history.

 
And don't forget- when Gibson steps out of the box right before the fateful pitch, he's remembering the scouting report on Eckersley liking to throw back door sliders when behind in the count in tight situations. And sure enough, he got one.

 
As great as Vin Scully is, that's one of his greatest calls - and one of the greatest of all time.

Think Eckersley to this day wishes he had that pitch back? They said on the broadcast that he had thrown about 20 straight fast balls, and Gibson was lucky to just keep fouling them off. Then he gives Gibson the only pitch he can drive - a meatball breaker - and Gibson bashes it. Kudos to Kurt though - what a gutty performance.
ESPN had an interview with the LAD scout, who told Dodger hitters to look out or the back door slider with 2 strikes. Gibson stepped away fom the plate before the last pitch...and he says the scouts tip was in his head then. Of course, Eck left it over the plate too.

 
And don't forget- when Gibson steps out of the box right before the fateful pitch, he's remembering the scouting report on Eckersley liking to throw back door sliders when behind in the count in tight situations. And sure enough, he got one.
:thumbup:

 
Surprised there were that many people left at Dodger Stadium.

As a one time resident of L.A., I can freely say that.

 
I love how it's twenty-five years later and Eckersley is still rolling with the Gallagher look. That's dedication.

 
I was there. :thumbup:
You and about 750,000 other fans by last count.
I know. I told my brother that night, "Years from now we'll tell people we were there and nobody will believe us."

But I was there. My dad shared season tickets with two of his business partners. Two of the partners flipped a coin to see who would get game 1 of the Series and my dad won, but then he got the flu, so my brother and I got to go instead. Good seats- on the club level (or is it Box level? I can't remember now) where the announcers call the game and where the Stadium Club is. We belonged to the Stadium Club. Walter O' Malley once shot a polar bear and it was stuffed right in front of the Stadium Club, before that became politically incorrect and it was quietly removed.

As to the suprise that so many people stayed, I'm not sure why. It's the World Series, and the Dodgers were down by 1 run. Why not stick around?

That was my 2nd World Series game. The first one was in 1981, game 3 against the Yankees. Fernando Valenzuela pitched, and Ron Cey hit a 3 run homer in the 1st inning. The Dodgers had been down 2-0 but went on to win that series in 6.

 
As to the suprise that so many people stayed, I'm not sure why. It's the World Series, and the Dodgers were down by 1 run. Why not stick around?
L.A. fans have a reputation of arriving late and leaving early to avoid the traffic. Sometimes an overblown criticism, but often a shred of truth to it.

 
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As to the suprise that so many people stayed, I'm not sure why. It's the World Series, and the Dodgers were down by 1 run. Why not stick around?
L.A. fans have a reputation of arriving late and leaving early to avoid the traffic. Sometimes an overblown criticism, but often a shred of truth to it.
Nobody was late arriving to Game 1 of the WS, and the only reason anyone is talking about leaving early are the infamous brake lights behind right field when Gibby's HR landed. That stadium was still packed and rocking.

I actually don't think that LA fans are any worse than other fans about arriving/leaving - I see plenty of stadiums that empty out in later innings.

 
As to the suprise that so many people stayed, I'm not sure why. It's the World Series, and the Dodgers were down by 1 run. Why not stick around?
L.A. fans have a reputation of arriving late and leaving early to avoid the traffic. Sometimes an overblown criticism, but often a shred of truth to it.
Nobody was late arriving to Game 1 of the WS, and the only reason anyone is talking about leaving early are the infamous brake lights behind right field when Gibby's HR landed. That stadium was still packed and rocking.

I actually don't think that LA fans are any worse than other fans about arriving/leaving - I see plenty of stadiums that empty out in later innings.
Nowadays they go out to the parking lot early to find the best potential stabbing victim.

 
As to the suprise that so many people stayed, I'm not sure why. It's the World Series, and the Dodgers were down by 1 run. Why not stick around?
L.A. fans have a reputation of arriving late and leaving early to avoid the traffic. Sometimes an overblown criticism, but often a shred of truth to it.
Nobody was late arriving to Game 1 of the WS, and the only reason anyone is talking about leaving early are the infamous brake lights behind right field when Gibby's HR landed. That stadium was still packed and rocking.

I actually don't think that LA fans are any worse than other fans about arriving/leaving - I see plenty of stadiums that empty out in later innings.
Nowadays they go out to the parking lot early to find the best potential stabbing victim.
Well yeah, but that still counts as being there. They aren't technically leaving yet.

 
I was 10 years old. Family had season tickets to the Dodgers but my parents sold the Game 1 tickets because they were going to be in Hong Kong. I'm not sure what was worse, that decision or the one year they decided we wouldn't go to Fan Appreciation Day and our seats won a car. They said we could go to Game 6. So I was at my grandparents' place. I was on my knees praying during Gibson's at bat, and went hysterically crazy for about half an hour after he homered, calling everyone I knew. Strangely, I still grew up to be an atheist.

 
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I vividly remember this. I remember Gibson hobbling to the plate and thinking Eck was going to destroy him. As a Mets fan, I had a healthy hate for Gibson, but I LOATHED Oakland. All the bandwagon Bash Brother fans (my brother included) were shut up that day.

 
I remember I was over at my best friend's house. I honestly recall very little in detail about sports at that age, and I was an Oriole's fan, so cared even less about that moment, but for some reason, I think even without knowing I grasped the magnitude of it and still remember where I was at that moment today.

 
zamboni said:
As great as Vin Scully is, that's one of his greatest calls - and one of the greatest of all time.
I'm pretty sure it's been said on these boards before but it's his absence of words that make the call so great. He let you absorb the magnitude of the moment for yourself.

 
zamboni said:
As great as Vin Scully is, that's one of his greatest calls - and one of the greatest of all time.
I'm pretty sure it's been said on these boards before but it's his absence of words that make the call so great. He let you absorb the magnitude of the moment for yourself.
One of the many things that makes Scully the best. His stories are great but he's never tried to be bigger than the game.

 
zamboni said:
As great as Vin Scully is, that's one of his greatest calls - and one of the greatest of all time.
I'm pretty sure it's been said on these boards before but it's his absence of words that make the call so great. He let you absorb the magnitude of the moment for yourself.
One of the many things that makes Scully the best. His stories are great but he's never tried to be bigger than the game.
You also can't tell that he's a lifelong Dodger announcer, even listening to that moment. He called it neutrally, just capturing the people in the moment and nothing else, and showing plenty of respect for Eckersley, for example.

Another great Scully call was

.
 
Just looked at Gibsons career stats and was suprised at how mediocre they are. Career .268 hitter, never had 30 HRs in a season, never had 100 RBIs,

284 HRs and 840 RBIs in 17 seasons and was rated as a below average OF on defense. For some reason I thought they were better than that.

Gibby did have a couple of big moments though.

 
Just looked at Gibsons career stats and was suprised at how mediocre they are. Career .268 hitter, never had 30 HRs in a season, never had 100 RBIs,

284 HRs and 840 RBIs in 17 seasons and was rated as a below average OF on defense. For some reason I thought they were better than that.

Gibby did have a couple of big moments though.
He was dinged up a lot and missed time almost every season. He only had 3 years with more than 600 PAs out of a 17 year career.

He was productive when healthy but not in the three traditional counting stats. He walked a lot and was a very high percentage base stealer even into his mid 30s. He played football at Michigan State so he didn't establish himself as a Major League regular until he was 26 so he career stats aren't anything special.

Plus he was grittier than a bushel of sand.

 

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