What's new
Fantasy Football - Footballguys Forums

Welcome to Our Forums. Once you've registered and logged in, you're primed to talk football, among other topics, with the sharpest and most experienced fantasy players on the internet.

Obesity and Ozempic and more (1 Viewer)

Joe Bryant

Guide
Staff member
Thought this was a super interesting listen.,


Yes, it's Bari Weiss and I know some hate her. There is zero politics in this one. (Where she is normally political)

She interviews Johann Hari who has a new book out on Ozempic and similar drugs.

It's an interesting discussion on lots of things.

  • Obesity. They claim the US has something like 40% of the population obese. Japan has something like 4%. They talk about (some pretty shocking) ways that happens.
  • Dealing with the bandaid? Both Weiss and Hari have lost weight with Ozempic but they have a thoughtful discussion about it being a "band aid" and how the vanity / health balance goes. Hari has been critical of overprescribing anti depressant drugs and asks if he's being hypocritical losing weight with Ozempic.
  • Importance. They talk about the potential massive effects the drugs will have. From hurting fast food restaurants to knee replacements and more.

What do you think on these?
 
Last edited:
Without even listening, of course it’s a band aid.

The American microwave society wants everything NOW. And easily as possible. Have a health problem? Here’s a pill, no need to change what you’re doing/not doing. Eat and drink away!

Yes, I don't think many would disagree it's a band-aid.

The question is, do you participate with the band-aid?

If it can cut down diabetes and a ton of other health issues connected to obesity, is it worth it?
 
Clearly it would be best if people just kept themselves in decent shape. I assume nobody disputes that.

But we know from just looking around that a lot of people can't or won't exercise or watch their diet. For those people, drugs like Ozempic seem like a pretty good option. I see this as being very similar to how it's best not to use tobacco, but if you're already addicted, it's good that vaping is an alternative.
 
Clearly it would be best if people just kept themselves in decent shape. I assume nobody disputes that.

But we know from just looking around that a lot of people can't or won't exercise or watch their diet. For those people, drugs like Ozempic seem like a pretty good option. I see this as being very similar to how it's best not to use tobacco, but if you're already addicted, it's good that vaping is an alternative.

That was sort of where they landed.

One thing too is seeing obesity as an illness.

Nobody questions taking drugs for cancer.

But taking drugs to help you lose weight when it seems like you could get a similar result from diet and exercise seem different.

But then it goes back to the practical reality of it. If someone is going to continue eating too much and poorly and won't exercise, is it better to give them Ozempic if they can't solve the problem on their own?

I think it may be.
 
One of the easiset and simplest things is just to track a day's worth of calories. Apps like myfitnesspal and others are great with this.

I know for me, it's so easy to lose track when you don't count.
This is always my key, track what you eat, move more, and weigh every day so you have a data point. There will be fluctuations but for most people "eat less, move more" works. I do know there are some people who have other issues and need things like Ozempic, but in my opinion much of the obesity crisis is controllable.
 
I’m assuming the podcast is more nuanced, but saying that some people just can’t exercise or diet and would rather take a pill is an awful take. They are designed for where tried diet and exercise and they are not enough. My wife has been trying to get her weight down for years — she goes to orange theory around 4-5 times per week, eats pretty much the same as me (though with less alcohol), but she has not been able to get her weight down despite that (by comparison, I’m a pretty slim guy at around 155). Doctor recommended Ozempic to her, but was not seeing any impact. Doctor switched her over to Monjauro to see if that could produce different results.

It’s not like taking the pill, so can lose weight while sitting around eating Cheetos all day.
 
It’s not like taking the pill, so can lose weight while sitting around eating Cheetos all day.

It's definitely worth listening to if you're interested in the topic. Hari talks about losing a ton of weight still eating the junk food he always had. Just way less of it because the drug made him feel more full.

He also interviews a lot of medical experts on the topic and relays things he found.
 
And a good illustration to your point @Don Quixote - there's still a ton we don't know about it. And it does seem to have sometimes different results for different people.

Although for most it seems to be incredibly effective.
 
Without even listening, of course it’s a band aid.

The American microwave society wants everything NOW. And easily as possible. Have a health problem? Here’s a pill, no need to change what you’re doing/not doing. Eat and drink away!

Yes, I don't think many would disagree it's a band-aid.

The question is, do you participate with the band-aid?

If it can cut down diabetes and a ton of other health issues connected to obesity, is it worth it?
The problem, as I see it, is that over time it won’t change the underlining health issues if the person doesn’t make lifestyle modifications to go with it. And I personally am doing my best to not take any daily meds. Which is way harder than just saying F it, give me the meds.
 
Clearly it would be best if people just kept themselves in decent shape. I assume nobody disputes that.

But we know from just looking around that a lot of people can't or won't exercise or watch their diet. For those people, drugs like Ozempic seem like a pretty good option. I see this as being very similar to how it's best not to use tobacco, but if you're already addicted, it's good that vaping is an alternative.

That was sort of where they landed.

One thing too is seeing obesity as an illness.

Nobody questions taking drugs for cancer.

But taking drugs to help you lose weight when it seems like you could get a similar result from diet and exercise seem different.

But then it goes back to the practical reality of it. If someone is going to continue eating too much and poorly and won't exercise, is it better to give them Ozempic if they can't solve the problem on their own?

I think it may be.
The obesity as an illness, is where I check out of the argument. That’s ridiculous. Sure genetics play a roll, but a disease. I don’t think so.
 
The problem, as I see it, is that over time it won’t change the underlining health issues if the person doesn’t make lifestyle modifications to go with it. And I personally am doing my best to not take any daily meds. Which is way harder than just saying F it, give me the meds.

That's a good question. I know 2 people very well and for them it's made life changing differences in them losing weight. That DOES seem to have changed the underlying health issues of the worries that were there with being overweight are gone.

And maybe that's just how we manage forever. Not sure. That's some of the discussion.

I'm with you on trying to avoid meds. My best friend is an MD and he struggles as with the way Big Pharma markets, every patient comes in asking for _________ to "fix" their problem. And lots of the side effects create issues that are managed by another drug. And then on and on.
 
I’m assuming the podcast is more nuanced, but saying that some people just can’t exercise or diet and would rather take a pill is an awful take. They are designed for where tried diet and exercise and they are not enough. My wife has been trying to get her weight down for years — she goes to orange theory around 4-5 times per week, eats pretty much the same as me (though with less alcohol), but she has not been able to get her weight down despite that (by comparison, I’m a pretty slim guy at around 155). Doctor recommended Ozempic to her, but was not seeing any impact. Doctor switched her over to Monjauro to see if that could produce different results.

It’s not like taking the pill, so can lose weight while sitting around eating Cheetos all day.
How heavy is she? Societal pressure tells women they should look skeletal. If she’s otherwise healthy and weighs, say 160, due to her genetics, that’s healthy.
 
I know 2 people who are very happy with their Ozempic experience. I think both started due to T2D.
My son just had his 1st wegovy shot last Saturday. He just weighed himself today and he's down 8lbs.
I'll be happy to share anything notable either here or via DM.
So far the worst part has been trying to understand the insurance part.
 
It’s not like taking the pill, so can lose weight while sitting around eating Cheetos all day.
They won’t say it, but for many this is exactly why they revert to daily meds. It’s easier to take BP meds than go to gym/work out/stop hammering ribeyes and whiskey, etc.
 
I’m assuming the podcast is more nuanced, but saying that some people just can’t exercise or diet and would rather take a pill is an awful take. They are designed for where tried diet and exercise and they are not enough. My wife has been trying to get her weight down for years — she goes to orange theory around 4-5 times per week, eats pretty much the same as me (though with less alcohol), but she has not been able to get her weight down despite that (by comparison, I’m a pretty slim guy at around 155). Doctor recommended Ozempic to her, but was not seeing any impact. Doctor switched her over to Monjauro to see if that could produce different results.

It’s not like taking the pill, so can lose weight while sitting around eating Cheetos all day.
How heavy is she? Societal pressure tells women they should look skeletal. If she’s otherwise healthy and weighs, say 160, due to her genetics, that’s healthy.
I’m not going to post her weight here, but she is significantly heavier than me and it has caused some medical issues.
 
I’m assuming the podcast is more nuanced, but saying that some people just can’t exercise or diet and would rather take a pill is an awful take. They are designed for where tried diet and exercise and they are not enough. My wife has been trying to get her weight down for years — she goes to orange theory around 4-5 times per week, eats pretty much the same as me (though with less alcohol), but she has not been able to get her weight down despite that (by comparison, I’m a pretty slim guy at around 155). Doctor recommended Ozempic to her, but was not seeing any impact. Doctor switched her over to Monjauro to see if that could produce different results.

It’s not like taking the pill, so can lose weight while sitting around eating Cheetos all day.
How heavy is she? Societal pressure tells women they should look skeletal. If she’s otherwise healthy and weighs, say 160, due to her genetics, that’s healthy.
I’m not going to post her weight here, but she is significantly heavier than me and it has caused some medical issues.
Fair enough. And I’m not shaming her in any way. Just pointing out that the body shaming, especially for women, is disgusting. My daughter’s best friend is a big girl. 6’ curvy but not fat. She thinks she’s some sort creature from another planet. She’s pretty. She’s healthy and she thinks she should lose weight. It’s sad. Her mom is on ozempic for the sole purpose to lose weight. She’s not fat either. Maybe 5-8 165#
 
Without even listening, of course it’s a band aid.

The American microwave society wants everything NOW. And easily as possible. Have a health problem? Here’s a pill, no need to change what you’re doing/not doing. Eat and drink away!

Yes, I don't think many would disagree it's a band-aid.

The question is, do you participate with the band-aid?

If it can cut down diabetes and a ton of other health issues connected to obesity, is it worth it?
The problem, as I see it, is that over time it won’t change the underlining health issues if the person doesn’t make lifestyle modifications to go with it. And I personally am doing my best to not take any daily meds. Which is way harder than just saying F it, give me the meds.

Well, the other problem is cost. It's a rich person's drug. Obese people who can't afford it and likely need it the most are hooped.
 
I just listened to it. Interesting stuff. Did he say that 70% of the population will be on some form of this drug in 10 years? I may have misheard him but that seems crazy to me.

I do think it would be great if theses fast food companies and these companies that make "manufactured" ultra-processed foods get hammered financially because of this drug. The reason so many are obese is that we're bombarded by marketing for addictive, super crappy food. If these companies can't make money anymore by selling this stuff this maybe they'll start selling higher quality, healthy food so we don't need to take risky drugs with unknown consequences to save us from shorter, lower quality lives.

I watch a lot of those YouTube shorts and it's incredible how many channels there are of people who sit in their cars and eat/rate fast food. They describe the taste of this stuff as if they're enjoying a fine-dining meal. It's got to be even harder for young people to eat healthy than it was for us. Individualized push notifications constantly bombarding them to eat crap. And fast food today is worse than it was when we were growing up. McDonalds used to fry their stuff in beef tallow which is a heart healthy fat. Now they use a "canola oil blend" that includes hydrogenated soybean oil which is about as inflammitory as it gets.

I subscribe to the Trader Joe's subreddit and made the mistake of questioning/criticizing the ingredients of a particular product. It was awhile back and I forget what it (I think it was a dipping sauce of some kind) was but it was just loaded with crap. Seed oils, sugar, HFCS, "Natural" flavors, and about a dozen other terrible things. It had 100 comments talking about how great it was. I said something like I wished Trader Joe's used healthier ingredients in products like this and the comment was downvoted to a -60. One person told me to never post again as I should "never make others feel guilty for eating". Someone else told me to "please be normal". Last time I posted in that subreddit. People are addicted to these foods/drinks and have no desire to clean up their diet in any way until they get to a point where they have to take something like this. Even then they'll still eat garbage, like the guy in the podcast who just eats less of it.
 
Without even listening, of course it’s a band aid.

The American microwave society wants everything NOW. And easily as possible. Have a health problem? Here’s a pill, no need to change what you’re doing/not doing. Eat and drink away!

Yes, I don't think many would disagree it's a band-aid.

The question is, do you participate with the band-aid?

If it can cut down diabetes and a ton of other health issues connected to obesity, is it worth it?
The problem, as I see it, is that over time it won’t change the underlining health issues if the person doesn’t make lifestyle modifications to go with it. And I personally am doing my best to not take any daily meds. Which is way harder than just saying F it, give me the meds.

Well, the other problem is cost. It's a rich person's drug. Obese people who can't afford it and likely need it the most are hooped.
Correct. And they’re already reporting shortages. Which really hoses the people who need it/use it for what it was intended for. Type 2 Diabetes.

Big pharma is truly evil.
 
I have first-hand experience with both Ozempic and now Mounjaro. I have had Type 2 diabetes ("T2D") since probably around 2016 or so. Obesity was absolutely a driving factor. The heaviest I got was 300-lbs and I knew I had to lose weight. Maybe I just have a weak constitution, but the lowest I was able to get without any GLP-1 med was 276-lbs. Still way too heavy. And when I first was diagnosed with T2D, either GLP-1 meds were not yet out or no one knew much about them. Well, to make a long story short, in late 2022, I started reading newspaper stories about Ozempic and I can remember seeing a news interview on it... maybe while I was traveling, I saw it on one of those morning TV shows like Good Morning America.

Anyhow, in December of 2022, I asked my PCP about Mounjaro. The stories I read said that Mounjaro was a little more effective in helping people lose weight. After some discussion, my PCP agreed to prescribe me Mounjaro. But BC/BS would not approve me for Mounjaro until I tried two other meds.. and they gave me a list of eligible alternatives. One was Bydureon, which I was presently on at that time. Bydureon did not do anything for my weight and, actually, I don't think it did much to help my A1C, either. So that was one med. Another that BC/BS listed was Ozempic. So my PCP prescribed me Ozempic in December of 2022. But so many doctors were writing 'scripts for Ozempic for off-label use as a weight loss med I was unable to get it until March of 2023.

So I started on Ozempic in mid-March of 2023 and, over the next 6 months, I lost 60-lbs. Got my weight down to 230-lbs. Then my weight plateaued and stayed plateaued. Then, in March of 2024, I asked my PCP about Mounjaro again and he agreed to write a 'script for Mounjaro. This time, BC/BS had no problem with it, as I had already tried Bydureon and Ozempic. But Mounjaro hasn't really made a difference in my weight. I'm still plateaued at what I was in September of 2023. But at least I haven't gained it back.

As for my A1C, I was at 5.5% in November of 2023, and I was at 5.7% in May of 2024, a few weeks ago. So these meds have been fantastic at controlling my blood sugar.

Finally, it should be noted that both Ozempic and Mounjaro are FDA-Approved for T2D. If one is diagnosed with T2D, one or both of these meds should be covered by insurance. But if one does not have T2D but is still overweight, both of these meds have FDA-Approved alternatives for weight loss. I am not conversant in how insurance will cover those, but my guess is one probably has to have a BMI over some benchmark number for insurance to cover it. Ozempic's weight-loss alternative is called Wegovy and Mounjaro's weight-loss alternative is called Zepbound.
 
Clearly it would be best if people just kept themselves in decent shape. I assume nobody disputes that.

But we know from just looking around that a lot of people can't or won't exercise or watch their diet. For those people, drugs like Ozempic seem like a pretty good option. I see this as being very similar to how it's best not to use tobacco, but if you're already addicted, it's good that vaping is an alternative.

That was sort of where they landed.

One thing too is seeing obesity as an illness.

Nobody questions taking drugs for cancer.

But taking drugs to help you lose weight when it seems like you could get a similar result from diet and exercise seem different.

But then it goes back to the practical reality of it. If someone is going to continue eating too much and poorly and won't exercise, is it better to give them Ozempic if they can't solve the problem on their own?

I think it may be.
The obesity as an illness, is where I check out of the argument. That’s ridiculous. Sure genetics play a roll, but a disease. I don’t think so.

I won’t necessarily say a disease but you are way shortchanging folks with obesity and eating problems. I don’t think you would do the same to a drug or alcohol addict. Nobody tells the drug addict to just have willpower. Sugar and other things in food can be just as addicting to some people. These drugs are going to make corporations very rich so we should be somewhat skeptical but they are also going to save some lives and make quality of life better for many more.
 
Clearly it would be best if people just kept themselves in decent shape. I assume nobody disputes that.

But we know from just looking around that a lot of people can't or won't exercise or watch their diet. For those people, drugs like Ozempic seem like a pretty good option. I see this as being very similar to how it's best not to use tobacco, but if you're already addicted, it's good that vaping is an alternative.

That was sort of where they landed.

One thing too is seeing obesity as an illness.

Nobody questions taking drugs for cancer.

But taking drugs to help you lose weight when it seems like you could get a similar result from diet and exercise seem different.

But then it goes back to the practical reality of it. If someone is going to continue eating too much and poorly and won't exercise, is it better to give them Ozempic if they can't solve the problem on their own?

I think it may be.
The obesity as an illness, is where I check out of the argument. That’s ridiculous. Sure genetics play a roll, but a disease. I don’t think so.

I won’t necessarily say a disease but you are way shortchanging folks with obesity and eating problems. I don’t think you would do the same to a drug or alcohol addict. Nobody tells the drug addict to just have willpower. Sugar and other things in food can be just as addicting to some people. These drugs are going to make corporations very rich so we should be somewhat skeptical but they are also going to save some lives and make quality of life better for many more.

Coddle them more imo
 
Clearly it would be best if people just kept themselves in decent shape. I assume nobody disputes that.

But we know from just looking around that a lot of people can't or won't exercise or watch their diet. For those people, drugs like Ozempic seem like a pretty good option. I see this as being very similar to how it's best not to use tobacco, but if you're already addicted, it's good that vaping is an alternative.

That was sort of where they landed.

One thing too is seeing obesity as an illness.

Nobody questions taking drugs for cancer.

But taking drugs to help you lose weight when it seems like you could get a similar result from diet and exercise seem different.

But then it goes back to the practical reality of it. If someone is going to continue eating too much and poorly and won't exercise, is it better to give them Ozempic if they can't solve the problem on their own?

I think it may be.
The obesity as an illness, is where I check out of the argument. That’s ridiculous. Sure genetics play a roll, but a disease. I don’t think so.

I won’t necessarily say a disease but you are way shortchanging folks with obesity and eating problems. I don’t think you would do the same to a drug or alcohol addict. Nobody tells the drug addict to just have willpower. Sugar and other things in food can be just as addicting to some people. These drugs are going to make corporations very rich so we should be somewhat skeptical but they are also going to save some lives and make quality of life better for many more.

Coddle them more imo

This is exactly the mentality that people have used for decades for all kinds of illnesses and diseases until it becomes accepted. We all know people shouldn’t become addicted to alcohol and we have an age limit on it. Nobody does much of anything about sugar and we pump it in to people starting at toddler age (for many). And then 20-30 years later we tell them to suck it up and don’t be addicted. I doubt seriously you would think it was coddling for other addictions.
 
Hey, I’ve got this drug that will make it easier to not drink alcohol.

Stop coddling them and tell them to grow a pair.

Stop drinking alcohol.

Plenty of drunks in my family. Theyre losers. Not deseased.

My brother died of an opioid overdose. He didn’t die of a disease. He made a stupid decision and it cost him his life.

Maybe I can feel a certain way and you can too. Difference is your opinion doesn’t upset me.
 
Hey, I’ve got this drug that will make it easier to not drink alcohol.

Stop coddling them and tell them to grow a pair.

Stop drinking alcohol.

Plenty of drunks in my family. Theyre losers. Not deseased.

My brother died of an opioid overdose. He didn’t die of a disease. He made a stupid decision and it cost him his life.

Maybe I can feel a certain way and you can too. Difference is your opinion doesn’t upset me.

I’m not upset - I don’t take these drugs. But I think thinking alcohol addiction and sugar addiction isn’t a disease doesn’t do it service. I think just like we are finding out more about mental disease and issues we are finding out about things like food and sugar addiction.
 
To talk about the drug. Sorry to Steady and Joe from arguing a tangent.

I would be worried for those who take it. The unknown of longterm but I think we all know the longterm of obesity, high BP and diabetes. If I was in the position many of these folks are in then I would consider it.
 
It's been discussed in a few other threads.

I used to be against pharmacologic weight management, but have come around to see these drugs as probably the most practical strategy for harm reduction from obesity.

Behavior modification has clearly failed, and I think I'd prefer a pill to a knife, or maintaining the status quo.
 
Last edited:
Ozempic for sure fires up a bunch of people that think being overweight is a moral failing. With much of our identity tied up in looks the thought someone could change that with a shot is just too much.
 
Clearly it would be best if people just kept themselves in decent shape. I assume nobody disputes that.

But we know from just looking around that a lot of people can't or won't exercise or watch their diet. For those people, drugs like Ozempic seem like a pretty good option. I see this as being very similar to how it's best not to use tobacco, but if you're already addicted, it's good that vaping is an alternative.

That was sort of where they landed.

One thing too is seeing obesity as an illness.

Nobody questions taking drugs for cancer.

But taking drugs to help you lose weight when it seems like you could get a similar result from diet and exercise seem different.

But then it goes back to the practical reality of it. If someone is going to continue eating too much and poorly and won't exercise, is it better to give them Ozempic if they can't solve the problem on their own?

I think it may be.
The obesity as an illness, is where I check out of the argument. That’s ridiculous. Sure genetics play a roll, but a disease. I don’t think so.

I won’t necessarily say a disease but you are way shortchanging folks with obesity and eating problems. I don’t think you would do the same to a drug or alcohol addict. Nobody tells the drug addict to just have willpower. Sugar and other things in food can be just as addicting to some people. These drugs are going to make corporations very rich so we should be somewhat skeptical but they are also going to save some lives and make quality of life better for many more.
I see your point. HFCS is the devil. But it makes a LOT of people a LOT of money. It also makes a lot of people really fat Other countries in the world don’t use it and are trying to ban it. so is it a disease or is it a corporate disease? because it’s possible to eat well. But it takes work, which a lot of people don’t want to do.
 
To talk about the drug. Sorry to Steady and Joe from arguing a tangent.

I would be worried for those who take it. The unknown of longterm but I think we all know the longterm of obesity, high BP and diabetes. If I was in the position many of these folks are in then I would consider it.

Sorry for my tangent too.


Agree. I worry about everyone who takes it. I just think there is a (unknown) trade off that people are taking but the lure of being thin and “pretty” is too intoxicating to resist.
 
Last edited:
It's been discussed in a few other threads.

I used to be against pharmacologic weight management, but have come around to see them as probably the most practical strategy for harm reduction from obesity.

Behavior modification has clearly failed, and I think I'd prefer a pill to a knife, or maintaining the status quo.

I think if we wanted to get serious about it we need to figure out how to change how we feed our kids. I’m not sure I’m in favor of anything remotely like a ban but I would be ok with taxing the crap out of sugar, soft drinks and processed foods (just examples).
 
Hey, I’ve got this drug that will make it easier to not drink alcohol.

Stop coddling them and tell them to grow a pair.

Stop drinking alcohol.

Plenty of drunks in my family. Theyre losers. Not deseased.

My brother died of an opioid overdose. He didn’t die of a disease. He made a stupid decision and it cost him his life.

Maybe I can feel a certain way and you can too. Difference is your opinion doesn’t upset me.
Your opinion doesn’t upset me bc I don’t know you but I do feel for the people in your family who have to deal with your unnecessary cruelty. Lifting people up costs nothing bro.
 
To talk about the drug. Sorry to Steady and Joe from arguing a tangent.

I would be worried for those who take it. The unknown of longterm but I think we all know the longterm of obesity, high BP and diabetes. If I was in the position many of these folks are in then I would consider it.

Sorry for my tangent too.


Agree. I worry about everyone who takes it. I just just think there is a (unknown) trade off that people are making but the lure of being thin and “pretty” is too intoxicating to resist.

There’s another discussion to be had for folks taking it that really don’t need to. I’m not talking about those people - I’m looking at those who are obese.
 
I have first-hand experience with both Ozempic and now Mounjaro. I have had Type 2 diabetes ("T2D") since probably around 2016 or so. Obesity was absolutely a driving factor. The heaviest I got was 300-lbs and I knew I had to lose weight. Maybe I just have a weak constitution, but the lowest I was able to get without any GLP-1 med was 276-lbs. Still way too heavy. And when I first was diagnosed with T2D, either GLP-1 meds were not yet out or no one knew much about them. Well, to make a long story short, in late 2022, I started reading newspaper stories about Ozempic and I can remember seeing a news interview on it... maybe while I was traveling, I saw it on one of those morning TV shows like Good Morning America.

Anyhow, in December of 2022, I asked my PCP about Mounjaro. The stories I read said that Mounjaro was a little more effective in helping people lose weight. After some discussion, my PCP agreed to prescribe me Mounjaro. But BC/BS would not approve me for Mounjaro until I tried two other meds.. and they gave me a list of eligible alternatives. One was Bydureon, which I was presently on at that time. Bydureon did not do anything for my weight and, actually, I don't think it did much to help my A1C, either. So that was one med. Another that BC/BS listed was Ozempic. So my PCP prescribed me Ozempic in December of 2022. But so many doctors were writing 'scripts for Ozempic for off-label use as a weight loss med I was unable to get it until March of 2023.

So I started on Ozempic in mid-March of 2023 and, over the next 6 months, I lost 60-lbs. Got my weight down to 230-lbs. Then my weight plateaued and stayed plateaued. Then, in March of 2024, I asked my PCP about Mounjaro again and he agreed to write a 'script for Mounjaro. This time, BC/BS had no problem with it, as I had already tried Bydureon and Ozempic. But Mounjaro hasn't really made a difference in my weight. I'm still plateaued at what I was in September of 2023. But at least I haven't gained it back.

As for my A1C, I was at 5.5% in November of 2023, and I was at 5.7% in May of 2024, a few weeks ago. So these meds have been fantastic at controlling my blood sugar.

Finally, it should be noted that both Ozempic and Mounjaro are FDA-Approved for T2D. If one is diagnosed with T2D, one or both of these meds should be covered by insurance. But if one does not have T2D but is still overweight, both of these meds have FDA-Approved alternatives for weight loss. I am not conversant in how insurance will cover those, but my guess is one probably has to have a BMI over some benchmark number for insurance to cover it. Ozempic's weight-loss alternative is called Wegovy and Mounjaro's weight-loss alternative is called Zepbound.
Did you change your eating habits and/or exercise or was the 60lbs purely down to ozempic?
Do you have to keep taking it to maintain your current weight? What would happen if you stopped?
 
Hey, I’ve got this drug that will make it easier to not drink alcohol.

Stop coddling them and tell them to grow a pair.

Stop drinking alcohol.

Plenty of drunks in my family. Theyre losers. Not deseased.

My brother died of an opioid overdose. He didn’t die of a disease. He made a stupid decision and it cost him his life.

Maybe I can feel a certain way and you can too. Difference is your opinion doesn’t upset me.
Your opinion doesn’t upset me bc I don’t know you but I do feel for the people in your family who have to deal with your unnecessary cruelty. Lifting people up costs nothing bro.

We’re getting off topic again but….

Just because we disagree on what methods “lift people up”, that doesn’t make me less empathetic or compassionate. I just think your philosophy hurts people in the long run.

You think I’m cruel, I think you’re soft.

Realistically we should probably meet somewhere in the middle.
 
Every individual should certainly try behavioral modification in earnest, before subjecting themselves to a (potentially lifelong) medication.

But how long should they attempt diet/exercise alone, and not achieve their desired weight loss, before we consider alternative strategies?

What if your obesity makes exercise intolerable, from joint pain, trouble breathing, chest discomfort, etc.?

I understand the reluctance to take meds, but at the same time, it's highly unlikely these medications are more harmful than unmitigated obesity.
Hopefully, this doesn’t end up like covid vaccination, where people fear extremely unlikely side effects more than the more harmful diseases it prevents/treats.
 
Every individual should certainly try behavioral modification in earnest, before subjecting themselves to a (potentially lifelong) medication.

But how long should they attempt diet/exercise alone, and not achieve their desired weight loss, before we consider alternative strategies?

What if your obesity makes exercise intolerable, from joint pain, trouble breathing, chest discomfort, etc.?

I understand the reluctance to take meds, but at the same time, it's highly unlikely these medications are more harmful than unmitigated obesity.
Hopefully, this doesn’t end up like covid vaccination, where people fear extremely unlikely side effects more than the more harmful diseases it prevents/treats.
Diet and exercise when done consistently will work almost all the time.

There is no magic bullet.

Eat less….move more.

The drugs are a band aid and if the behavior change does not happen your doomed. There is no cure except diet and exercise. It’s a serious commitment to yourself to change your lifestyle and unwind your sugar addiction, fast food addiction…..it takes a commitment.

Those who are so morbidly obese should start with simple walking and get into a pool and move…..move your muscles in a non impact pool. And you gotta
really commit to strict diet.
 
Every individual should certainly try behavioral modification in earnest, before subjecting themselves to a (potentially lifelong) medication.

But how long should they try diet/exercise alone, and not achieve their desired weight loss, before we consider alternative strategies?

What if your obesity makes exercise intolerable, from joint pain, trouble breathing, chest discomfort, etc.?

I understand the reluctance to take meds, but at the same time, it's highly unlikely these medications are more harmful than unmitigated obesity.
Hopefully, this doesn’t end up like covid vaccination, where people fear extremely unlikely side effects more than the more harmful diseases it prevents/treats.

I strongly agree with this if the goal is to get the weight to a “exercisable” level and then coming off of it but I think that will be unlikely.
 
Every individual should certainly try behavioral modification in earnest, before subjecting themselves to a (potentially lifelong) medication.

But how long should they try diet/exercise alone, and not achieve their desired weight loss, before we consider alternative strategies?

What if your obesity makes exercise intolerable, from joint pain, trouble breathing, chest discomfort, etc.?

I understand the reluctance to take meds, but at the same time, it's highly unlikely these medications are more harmful than unmitigated obesity.
Hopefully, this doesn’t end up like covid vaccination, where people fear extremely unlikely side effects more than the more harmful diseases it prevents/treats.

I strongly agree with this if the goal is to get the weight to a “exercisable” level and then coming off of it but I think that will be unlikely.
Yeah the shots give people the false impression that they can just do this without changing their lifestyle.

Anyway good luck to people that are strictly using the shots to lose weight.

I certainly would never use this not knowing the long term side effects just to lose weight vs diet and exercise.

But to each his/her own.
 
I have first-hand experience with both Ozempic and now Mounjaro. I have had Type 2 diabetes ("T2D") since probably around 2016 or so. Obesity was absolutely a driving factor. The heaviest I got was 300-lbs and I knew I had to lose weight. Maybe I just have a weak constitution, but the lowest I was able to get without any GLP-1 med was 276-lbs. Still way too heavy. And when I first was diagnosed with T2D, either GLP-1 meds were not yet out or no one knew much about them. Well, to make a long story short, in late 2022, I started reading newspaper stories about Ozempic and I can remember seeing a news interview on it... maybe while I was traveling, I saw it on one of those morning TV shows like Good Morning America.

Anyhow, in December of 2022, I asked my PCP about Mounjaro. The stories I read said that Mounjaro was a little more effective in helping people lose weight. After some discussion, my PCP agreed to prescribe me Mounjaro. But BC/BS would not approve me for Mounjaro until I tried two other meds.. and they gave me a list of eligible alternatives. One was Bydureon, which I was presently on at that time. Bydureon did not do anything for my weight and, actually, I don't think it did much to help my A1C, either. So that was one med. Another that BC/BS listed was Ozempic. So my PCP prescribed me Ozempic in December of 2022. But so many doctors were writing 'scripts for Ozempic for off-label use as a weight loss med I was unable to get it until March of 2023.

So I started on Ozempic in mid-March of 2023 and, over the next 6 months, I lost 60-lbs. Got my weight down to 230-lbs. Then my weight plateaued and stayed plateaued. Then, in March of 2024, I asked my PCP about Mounjaro again and he agreed to write a 'script for Mounjaro. This time, BC/BS had no problem with it, as I had already tried Bydureon and Ozempic. But Mounjaro hasn't really made a difference in my weight. I'm still plateaued at what I was in September of 2023. But at least I haven't gained it back.

As for my A1C, I was at 5.5% in November of 2023, and I was at 5.7% in May of 2024, a few weeks ago. So these meds have been fantastic at controlling my blood sugar.

Finally, it should be noted that both Ozempic and Mounjaro are FDA-Approved for T2D. If one is diagnosed with T2D, one or both of these meds should be covered by insurance. But if one does not have T2D but is still overweight, both of these meds have FDA-Approved alternatives for weight loss. I am not conversant in how insurance will cover those, but my guess is one probably has to have a BMI over some benchmark number for insurance to cover it. Ozempic's weight-loss alternative is called Wegovy and Mounjaro's weight-loss alternative is called Zepbound.
Did you change your eating habits and/or exercise or was the 60lbs purely down to ozempic?
Do you have to keep taking it to maintain your current weight? What would happen if you stopped?
What happens with both Ozempic and Mounjaro is the messages sent from your gut to your brain are changed to transmit a feeling of fullness. In addition, the meds actually slow down how slowly the stomach empties. So much so that when I went for a colonoscopy under general anesthesia about ten days ago, I had to skip a dose of Mounjaro to ensure my stomach would be totally empty. As a result, what happens is eating habits do indeed change. I ate a helluva lot less than before and, better yet, I never missed the food or otherwise felt deprived.

And I do expect to be on Mounjaro, or its future replacement, for the rest of my life. But I am diabetic, so insurance will pay for it, less a $30 copayment. As for what happens when one discontinues... I have no first-hand experience with that. But I give you this recent WSJ article: https://www.wsj.com/health/pharma/w...4lln25kx6kv&reflink=desktopwebshare_permalink
 
Every individual should certainly try behavioral modification in earnest, before subjecting themselves to a (potentially lifelong) medication.

But how long should they try diet/exercise alone, and not achieve their desired weight loss, before we consider alternative strategies?

What if your obesity makes exercise intolerable, from joint pain, trouble breathing, chest discomfort, etc.?

I understand the reluctance to take meds, but at the same time, it's highly unlikely these medications are more harmful than unmitigated obesity.
Hopefully, this doesn’t end up like covid vaccination, where people fear extremely unlikely side effects more than the more harmful diseases it prevents/treats.

I strongly agree with this if the goal is to get the weight to a “exercisable” level and then coming off of it but I think that will be unlikely.
Yeah the shots give people the false impression that they can just do this without changing their lifestyle.

Anyway good luck to people that are strictly using the shots to lose weight.

I certainly would never use this not knowing the long term side effects just to lose weight vs diet and exercise.

But to each his/her own.
I don’t think anyone should be prescribed these meds without thorough counseling on lifestyle modification. So no one should be under the impression they’re a short-cut to weight loss, or should be used in a vacuum.

Just like heroin addicts shouldn’t think clean needle programs are a ticket to unmitigated IV drug abuse.

And we have long term data on drugs like semaglutide already, but is a couple decades of obesity-related disease worth waiting longer?
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top