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Ryan Leaf is back! (1 Viewer)

The Hank

Footballguy
NCAA | Leaf joins the coaching ranks

Tue, 14 Feb 2006 15:48:05 -0800

The Associated Press reports West Texas A&M has hired former NFL QB Ryan Leaf as their new quarterbacks coach.

link

:lmao:

 
:D

ROCK CHALK JAYHAWK!

Good to see A&M is no longer a team worth worrying about. ;)
West Texas A&M and Texas A&M are two different schools. West Texas A&M was never anything to worry about. ;)
 
:D

ROCK CHALK JAYHAWK!

Good to see A&M is no longer a team worth worrying about. ;)
West Texas A&M and Texas A&M are two different schools. West Texas A&M was never anything to worry about. ;)
:bag: Dammit. got excited there - it would be nice to win a road game once in awhile.
 
Hopefully he doesnt also teach his QBs about Public Relations and dealing with the media lol

:scared:

 
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Hopefully he doesnt also teach his QBs about Public Relations and dealing with the media lol

:scared:
:goodposting: i wonder how he would handle his press conference..

:D (ryan leaf says) "hello, my name is ryan leaf"

(after first question....)

:rant: (ryan leaf says) "you shut your mouth when your talking to me!"

 
isn't that like having aretha franklin as your dietician... steven segal as your acting coach... keith richards as an NA sponsor?

 
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Well, I hate to be the voice of reason here, but the guy deserves a shot to move on with his life. He made some critical mistakes, he paid for them, time to move on. That baby act of his was a long time ago.

He certainly knows what it takes to be an excellent college QB, and if he's good at this I imagine he'll get a chance to move up fairly quickly.

 
Well, I hate to be the voice of reason here, but the guy deserves a shot to move on with his life. He made some critical mistakes, he paid for them, time to move on. That baby act of his was a long time ago.

He certainly knows what it takes to be an excellent college QB, and if he's good at this I imagine he'll get a chance to move up fairly quickly.
Got to agree here, 29 0r 30 years old now. Money is probably not an issue, he may have matured and wants to get back to a place and time where he enjoyed football. GOOD LUCK RYAN!

PS

Don't sneak up behind VP Cheney in an orange vest down there in Texas!

 
West Texas A&M isn't exactly big time college football, but there have been great coaches who started out in nowheresville.

I still rag on a leaguemate who drafted him #5, leaving me Manning at #7.(Dynasty) I still have him.

 
All they need is Lawrence Phillips as their RB coach and Rae Carruth for the WRs.
Nate Newton as O-Line coach, Rolf Benershka handling the kickers, Marv Albert doing the play by play and Art Shleister handling commentary.
 
Well, I hate to be the voice of reason here, but the guy deserves a shot to move on with his life. He made some critical mistakes, he paid for them, time to move on. That baby act of his was a long time ago.

He certainly knows what it takes to be an excellent college QB, and if he's good at this I imagine he'll get a chance to move up fairly quickly.
Wow. Can you imagine what it must be like to be the butt of like...every...NFL draft joke.
 
isn't that like having aretha franklin as your dietician... steven segal as your acting coach... keith richards as an NA sponsor?
**** Cheney as your firearms safety instructor.
 
This makes zero sense. The whole problem with Leaf was his lack of wisdom and poor choices on and off the field. Why would anyone want him as a coach??? Is his dad a professor there or something???

 
So glad I'm not an Aggie fan... :lmao:
Once again, the Texas A&M Aggies and West Texas A&M are two different schools. Not being an Aggie fan means absolutely nothing. West Texas A&M are the Buffalo not Aggies. If he were hired at Texas A&M that would be a big story, west Texas A&M means very little. HTH.

 
Just imagine 20 years from now:

"Coach Ryan Leaf, here's the Lombardi Trophy, Congratulations"

:shock: :eek: :loco:

-QG
immediately followed by:1. "As our janitor, you get to clean it before we give it to the winning team."

2. "The engraving company you work for wants you to enscribe.........."

3. "Leaf!...Leaf!....Wake up! Your quarterback just threw his fourth interception!"

 
This makes zero sense. The whole problem with Leaf was his lack of wisdom and poor choices on and off the field. Why would anyone want him as a coach???
The other side of this coin is the idea the Leaf knows exactly what it takes to be successful and how to piss it all away because of lack of character weaknesses. Essentially, he has been there and done that. There and that defined as being good enough to get the opportunity but ignorant enough to blow it. He has a story and, if he has matured and is able to translate his experiences into a learning device for younger players, he would be well suited to coach. Adversity is an opportunity to learn and grow. While Leaf has nobody but himself to blame, he put himself through enough hell that, perhaps, he learned something and can now share the wealth. He has a chance to steer players down the right road. Sort of a second chance in a round about kind of way. Now, that school is not grooming blue chip prospects, but you have to start somewhere. It is far enough off the D1 path that Leaf might be able to get a fresh start, if that is possible for one of the biggest draft busts in football history. It would be very easy to pile on, as Leaf was once an extremely arrogant and self indulged SOB. Conversely, for someone that failed that badly to come back and attempt to work in the industry, knowing the absolute constant kick in the ### it is going to be for the first couple of years, it must be noted that takes a certain amount of maturity and courage. I do not feel sorry for the guy but I have to give credit where credit is due.
 
Now that Leaf is in coaching, it looks like he'll probably get a SuperBowl before Manning after all.

 
This makes zero sense. The whole problem with Leaf was his lack of wisdom and poor choices on and off the field. Why would anyone want him as a coach???
The other side of this coin is the idea the Leaf knows exactly what it takes to be successful and how to piss it all away because of lack of character weaknesses. Essentially, he has been there and done that. There and that defined as being good enough to get the opportunity but ignorant enough to blow it. He has a story and, if he has matured and is able to translate his experiences into a learning device for younger players, he would be well suited to coach. Adversity is an opportunity to learn and grow. While Leaf has nobody but himself to blame, he put himself through enough hell that, perhaps, he learned something and can now share the wealth.

He has a chance to steer players down the right road. Sort of a second chance in a round about kind of way. Now, that school is not grooming blue chip prospects, but you have to start somewhere. It is far enough off the D1 path that Leaf might be able to get a fresh start, if that is possible for one of the biggest draft busts in football history.

It would be very easy to pile on, as Leaf was once an extremely arrogant and self indulged SOB. Conversely, for someone that failed that badly to come back and attempt to work in the industry, knowing the absolute constant kick in the ### it is going to be for the first couple of years, it must be noted that takes a certain amount of maturity and courage. I do not feel sorry for the guy but I have to give credit where credit is due.
Excellent post.
 
This makes zero sense. The whole problem with Leaf was his lack of wisdom and poor choices on and off the field. Why would anyone want him as a coach???
The other side of this coin is the idea the Leaf knows exactly what it takes to be successful and how to piss it all away because of lack of character weaknesses. Essentially, he has been there and done that. There and that defined as being good enough to get the opportunity but ignorant enough to blow it. He has a story and, if he has matured and is able to translate his experiences into a learning device for younger players, he would be well suited to coach. Adversity is an opportunity to learn and grow. While Leaf has nobody but himself to blame, he put himself through enough hell that, perhaps, he learned something and can now share the wealth.

He has a chance to steer players down the right road. Sort of a second chance in a round about kind of way. Now, that school is not grooming blue chip prospects, but you have to start somewhere. It is far enough off the D1 path that Leaf might be able to get a fresh start, if that is possible for one of the biggest draft busts in football history.

It would be very easy to pile on, as Leaf was once an extremely arrogant and self indulged SOB. Conversely, for someone that failed that badly to come back and attempt to work in the industry, knowing the absolute constant kick in the ### it is going to be for the first couple of years, it must be noted that takes a certain amount of maturity and courage. I do not feel sorry for the guy but I have to give credit where credit is due.
Excellent post.
Sorry but I'm not buying it. What qualifications does he have to be a coach? To have young minds listening to him, relying on him, learning how to be good football players and people from him. Would you want Leaf coaching your son???Your point about Leaf coming back to coaching and him attempting to work in the industry doesn't resonate with me. The guy is looking for work. That's not noble, that's what everyone does.

I agree with your quote about giving credit where credit is due, and there's not due here.

 
QUOTE(BoulderBob @ Feb 15 2006, 04:13 PM)QUOTE(WhoDat @ Feb 15 2006, 01:03 PM)QUOTEThis makes zero sense. The whole problem with Leaf was his lack of wisdom and poor choices on and off the field. Why would anyone want him as a coach??? The other side of this coin is the idea the Leaf knows exactly what it takes to be successful and how to piss it all away because of lack of character weaknesses. Essentially, he has been there and done that. There and that defined as being good enough to get the opportunity but ignorant enough to blow it. He has a story and, if he has matured and is able to translate his experiences into a learning device for younger players, he would be well suited to coach. Adversity is an opportunity to learn and grow. While Leaf has nobody but himself to blame, he put himself through enough hell that, perhaps, he learned something and can now share the wealth. He has a chance to steer players down the right road. Sort of a second chance in a round about kind of way. Now, that school is not grooming blue chip prospects, but you have to start somewhere. It is far enough off the D1 path that Leaf might be able to get a fresh start, if that is possible for one of the biggest draft busts in football history. It would be very easy to pile on, as Leaf was once an extremely arrogant and self indulged SOB. Conversely, for someone that failed that badly to come back and attempt to work in the industry, knowing the absolute constant kick in the ### it is going to be for the first couple of years, it must be noted that takes a certain amount of maturity and courage. I do not feel sorry for the guy but I have to give credit where credit is due.Excellent post.Sorry but I'm not buying it. What qualifications does he have to be a coach? To have young minds listening to him, relying on him, learning how to be good football players and people from him. Would you want Leaf coaching your son???Your point about Leaf coming back to coaching and him attempting to work in the industry doesn't resonate with me. The guy is looking for work. That's not noble, that's what everyone does. I agree with your quote about giving credit where credit is due, and there's not due here.
First, let me state I am speaking as someone with a grandfather that played D1/NFL and had a brief coaching career; have a father that is a life-long coach with D1 playing resume and several brother-n-laws that all played and currently coach at the D1 or high school level. Me...I just played and worked as an agent for some time, while sticking to coaching pee wees, but I feel I know a little bit about the industry and profession. Most coaches do not start out in a HC position. Normally, you get a grad assistant gig at your alma mater (Applewhite) or take the high school job. Then, you work your way up. For example, Holmgren started as a high school coordinator. Leaf's got a damn solid playing resume, which many coaches do not have. Go check out your NFL and college rosters. Plenty...PLENTY...of guys coaching played at Middle of the Road Tech; D3 program and never sniffed an NFL Combine invite much less got drafted. Leaf has the general aptitude to take on that specific coaching position he has been offered at that particular program. It is a general starting point and not much higher than a grad assistant. He is qualified. Great players do not make great coaches. There are exceptions. Ditka comes to mind. Jury is out on Singletary. Great players had the God given talent and drive to succeed. The level of adversity they faced as a player, as compared to someone constantly struggling to make a roster, is completely different. Their common reference point with the average player is almost not even there. So overdone but those who can do and those who cannot teach. Little bit of truth to that. My experience has shown good, average or bad players make great coaches. Cowher, Marty Ball, Dungy, Edwards, etc... Again, there are exceptions. Guys that had to constantly fight for playing time; lacked an abundance of natural ability or had serious maturity issues in college and or the pros that finally grow up; get a little wiser; a few more grey hairs tend to have a better technique and ability to relay concepts to kids. More importantly, they know from first hand experience the brutal realities of making it and not making and how fine a line that can be and what it takes to succeed and or fail. Like I said earlier, it is possible to learn from your mistakes and struggles. A coach that had that type of playing career, opinion, has more empathy for players and can easier relate to their struggles. If...BIG IF...Leaf has grown up and turned the corner he has a hell of a lot he could offer to a kid...a hell of a lot. He pissed away a career opportunity about 1% of all guys that ever put on pads get. Not too many people walking around that have walked a mile in those shoes or better yet walking around willing to talk about it He was good enough to get that chance. Thus, he knows how to get there. He was also bad enough to blow it. Thus, he knows what not to do. That is some priceless experience worth sharing and a story that needs to be told. Knowing the industry like I do, it takes giant brass balls for Leaf to make this step. You can disagree all you want but that is fact. He is one of the biggest failures in the history of the sport yet is seeking employment and redemption in the same public medium he flammed out of not so long ago. Either he is a a masochist or he has learned some humility and done a whole lot of soul searching. Look at this thread and what has been said about him in such a short period of time. Trust it is going to be that much worse when Leaf hits an opposing team's field. Fans are going to crush that guy, as are most people in his peer group (to include his own coaching staff), until he proves himself. It will be a daily kick in the ### until he shows he has changed. I don't know too many people that fail that badly at their chosen profession yet attempt to keep finding work in that field. Most change careers, as they see the writing on the wall and discover no one in their field will hire them all things considered. Would I let Leaf coach my son? If Leaf has made the transformation from kid to man that often happens between the ages of 21-30; has learned from his trespasses and could relay to me the experiences of his downfall and what/how he learned from that, while detailing how that willl be tailored into his daily moments of truths with his players, and I believed him...I woud let him coach my son. I would not let Leaf teach my son public speaking or the finer points of handling a presser...little joke... but I would let him develop him as a player.
 
The problem is that I have a hard time believeing that Leaf has made the transformation from kid to man that often happens between the ages of 21-30. Know one will truly know until he's given a chance. West Texas A&M believes in him. It would take a lot to convince me.

 
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This makes zero sense. The whole problem with Leaf was his lack of wisdom and poor choices on and off the field. Why would anyone want him as a coach???
The other side of this coin is the idea the Leaf knows exactly what it takes to be successful and how to piss it all away because of lack of character weaknesses. Essentially, he has been there and done that. There and that defined as being good enough to get the opportunity but ignorant enough to blow it. He has a story and, if he has matured and is able to translate his experiences into a learning device for younger players, he would be well suited to coach. Adversity is an opportunity to learn and grow. While Leaf has nobody but himself to blame, he put himself through enough hell that, perhaps, he learned something and can now share the wealth.

He has a chance to steer players down the right road. Sort of a second chance in a round about kind of way. Now, that school is not grooming blue chip prospects, but you have to start somewhere. It is far enough off the D1 path that Leaf might be able to get a fresh start, if that is possible for one of the biggest draft busts in football history.

It would be very easy to pile on, as Leaf was once an extremely arrogant and self indulged SOB. Conversely, for someone that failed that badly to come back and attempt to work in the industry, knowing the absolute constant kick in the ### it is going to be for the first couple of years, it must be noted that takes a certain amount of maturity and courage. I do not feel sorry for the guy but I have to give credit where credit is due.
Excellent post.
Sorry but I'm not buying it. What qualifications does he have to be a coach? To have young minds listening to him, relying on him, learning how to be good football players and people from him. Would you want Leaf coaching your son???Your point about Leaf coming back to coaching and him attempting to work in the industry doesn't resonate with me. The guy is looking for work. That's not noble, that's what everyone does.

I agree with your quote about giving credit where credit is due, and there's not due here.
What qualifications? What qualifications did any coach have before they became a coach? He was a 1st round draft pick in the NFL.
 
Perhaps I mispoke, it's not qualifications because anyone with the right pedigree can get a job, it's more his track record is in his last job that makes me question the hire. He practically stole money from his last team and acted with the intelligence and wisdom of a 12 year old. Perhaps he's matured, but perhaps not. We will see. Okay, we have all spent way too much of our lives discussing Ryan Leaf. I'm moving on.

 
Interview on Dan Patrick (credit to tahirjon on the Chargers board for the transcript):

Did they approach them, or did they approach you?"Well I promised my mother I'd get my degree, and after I retired from pro-football, I really wanted to get back into what I loved the most: College footbal. Don Carcel, the coach of West Texas A&M gave me call, we hit it off. It seems like a very laid back sort of town, and they wanted me. And it really felt good for someone to want me, after everything I've been through it felt good for someone to want me. And I'm happy at my desicion."Was it hard to retire from the NFL?"Well I never really suceeded. It was so hard, the NFL. It was so hard. You know, I never really learned how to deal with the media, and when I did, I had wrist problems. I never helped San Diego, but they never helped me either. They gave me that much money, and they never protected or trained their investment. When I went to Tampa, I learned so much from Tony Dungy, but I just didn't have the talent anymore. So I had to leave. I was so full of myslef, but leaving San Diego was something I had to do."How do you feel about Peyton Manning?"I'm so happy for him. We were friends in college, I think the world of Peyton Manning. I talk to him, I've talked to him since I retired, and I'm glad he could accomplish what he has."How does it feel to be a punchline?"There's a quote from a song 'I think the world of myself, the world just doesn't think much for me.' I feel so glad to be back in college football. Dallas was my favorite team that I trained with. I think Texas will work with me."Did you fool us about your talent coming out of college?"No. I don't think so, I would never have had the success I'd have had without those 4 wide-recievers, without that runningback. I worked my butt off. I tried hard, I worked hard. I just couldn't do it, maybe I wasn't good enough."You seem humble now, did you ever think someone would consider you that way?"Well, I felt that I had to be ****y. I was gung-ho in college, I was a real renegade but in reality I wanted to work hard. I accept that people say I was awful, I accept that I was indeed awful, but the one thing I absolutely hate is when people say I was lazy. Jim Johnson called me the hardest working rookie in the NFL, and I always wonder where that went, where that reputation went. I didn't do what was expected of me, but I did try."Biggest Regret?"Yelling at that reporter. That destoryed my personality, my persona, my reputation. Everything went downhill from there. At first we were winning, but after that I was viewed as a maniac. The whole idea that no one wants to draft a 'Ryan Leaf' stems from that incident. I want to teach these kids at this school to be humble, to go about their business and work hard."The phone-lines are lighting up and judging by these comments people believe you've changed, your a new person. Would you like to join us again around draft time to discuss the mentality of college quarterbacks?"Well Dan, I really appreciate the way we went about this interview and I'd be happy to join you again. Thanks a lot. Oh and I saw the Longest Yard last night, that was quite a great moustache."Well, Ryan Leaf everybody. Judging from these phonecalls a lot of people want to talk about him.
 
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Like I said, it's in the past -- people just need to get over it already. He didn't kill anybody, didn't commit a felony, was just a spoiled athlete who got too much too quick.

I bet he really does well with this.

 
Interview on Dan Patrick (credit to tahirjon on the Chargers board for the transcript):
Wow.I'm willing to give Ryan a chance after reading the quotes from that interview.It sounds like he has matured a ton.Boot. :popcorn:
 
Interview on Dan Patrick (credit to tahirjon on the Chargers board for the transcript):
Wow.I'm willing to give Ryan a chance after reading the quotes from that interview.

It sounds like he has matured a ton.

Boot.

:popcorn:
I was listening to the interview yesterday afternoon. I came away very impressed with Leaf. He seems to have long since put his immature past behind him, I think he's hoping others will follow suite.Leaf answered everthing that Patrick requested, never dodging questions about his prior actions or attitude.

A good interview.

:thumbup:

 

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