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The Next 100 Songs from 1975, aka Sanbornpalooza. #1: Black Friday (1 Viewer)

Uruk-Hai

Footballguy
2. Green Grass and High Tides -- Outlaws (from Outlaws)

FREEBIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIRD! Eff that, this is better than Freebird. The guitar jams are glorious and extend the song to nearly 10 minutes. Aside from the very best Allman Brothers material, this is the pinnacle of Southern Rock for me.

Lots of folks thought the song was about weed, but that's not true. Singer/guitarist, Hughie Thomason, who wrote the song, said: "I wrote that song in Saint Augustine, Florida. We went to a cookout on the beach and everybody forgot to bring their guitars. I was standing by the ocean and there was a breeze and the words kept coming to me. It’s about all the rock stars I liked that died had come back and were playing a show just for me. Like Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin and Jim Morrison. And eventually more of course." The title is a reference to the 1966 Rolling Stones greatest hits album, Big Hits (High Tide and Green Grass).
Great song. I'm not sure I consider it better than "Free Bird" (there's a reason that song is "overplayed", even though it really hasn't been for 30 years), but it's surely a Top 5 Southern Rock guitar workout. "GG&HT" is lighter than most of the Allmans' or Skynyrd's records, which dug so deep into the bass parts, while this one rides the higher end like a lot of the 2nd tier southern bands did.

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
Great song. I'm not sure I consider it better than "Free Bird" (there's a reason that song is "overplayed", even though it really hasn't been for 30 years), but it's surely a Top 5 Southern Rock guitar workout. "GG&HT" is lighter than most of the Allmans' or Skynyrd's records, which dug so deep into the bass parts, while this one rides the higher end like a lot of the 2nd tier southern bands did.
That's the country influence coming through. Hughie Thomason and Billy Jones were much more country-influenced in their guitar styles than Duane Allman, Dickey Betts or any of the Skynyrd guitarists. Betts had a lot of country in his style but it didn't dominate to the extent that it did for the Outlaws guys. 

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
I...don’t know. Another whiff on my part. Somehow I overlooked it. Terrible error, made worse by the fact that I love this song and the genre. No excuses. 
What I found really helpful in making this list is that Wikipedia has a page called "1975 in music" and similar pages for other years. It lists every major release from that year. I noticed a ton of things on that page that I wouldn't have remembered otherwise. 

 

timschochet

Footballguy
What I found really helpful in making this list is that Wikipedia has a page called "1975 in music" and similar pages for other years. It lists every major release from that year. I noticed a ton of things on that page that I wouldn't have remembered otherwise. 
I use that too. Just a miss on my part. #1 is no doubt as well. 

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
Before #1 comes in, i wanna take the time to salute the best album of 1975, Keith Jarrett's Koln Concert and my favorite live album of the rock era, 1975's Nighthawks At The Diner, by Tom Waits, neither of which will apparently be receiving recognition in either FFA '75 100.
Tom Waits to me is like Geddy Lee to you. I prefer his songs when they are done by other people. 

I am not greatly knowledgeable about jazz, so while I am aware of the reputation of the Jarrett album, I have not heard it. 

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
And here we are. Thanks to everyone who followed along and stuck it out with me!

1. Black Friday -- Steely Dan (from Katy Lied)

This gets the top spot not just because I have loved it since I first heard it, but also because it's the song I was the most surprised wasn't on Tim's list. In fact, I was stunned there was nothing from Katy Lied on it. But I understand Steely Dan is not for everyone.

Is there such a thing as hard yacht rock? If so, this certainly qualifies. The Dan made great use of top-notch session guitarists such as Larry Carlton and Elliot Randall over the course of their career, but the raging leads on this track are played by Walter Becker, who had functioned as bassist on their first three albums. Katy Lied was the Dan's first album where they ceased pretending to be a real band, and brought in more session players than usual, including bassist Chuck Rainey. "When I met Chuck, I realized there was no reason for me to bring my bass guitar to the studio," Becker said. (After the Dan reunited, Becker handled almost all the lead guitar parts on their studio albums, and split lead guitar work in concert with John Herrington.) Future Toto members Jeff Porcaro and David Paich also play on it. 

Insomuch as you can trust any explanation about the Dan's lyrics, the song is about a sketchy financier who absconds to Australia with his money. The music is unusually forthright and driving for them, and not only are Becker's leads a standout, but so are the power chords that come after lines like "the Archbishop won't sanctify me." 

If @[scooter] was serious about doing a 201-300 countdown, he can take it from here. 

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
Here are songs considered for but cut from the list by artist appearing in the top 10 of the countdown. In spoiler text in case Scooter's going to do another list and doesn't want to see spotlighting.


Earth, Wind and Fire:


Reasons (from That's the Way of the World)

This song is a testament to Philip Bailey's vocal prowess. He adds huge doses of emotion and soul to what could have been a schlocky arrangement otherwise.

Funkadelic:

Baby I Owe You Something Good (from Let's Take It to the Stage) (again, not a live album)

This was a reworking of a track from George Clinton's '60s doo-*** group, The Parliaments. (Funkadelic's other half, Parliament, did the same with Testify the year before.) This version is a great mix of yearning vocals and power chords. Seriously, a metal band should cover this version. 

Better by the Pound (from Let's Take It to the Stage)

The groove on this one is instantaneously infectious and the vocal arrangement is outstanding. Lots of cowbell! 

Good to Your Earhole (from Let's Take It to the Stage)

Eddie Hazel and Bernie Worrell really shine on this one. This is a great example of how P-Funk liked to have everyone doing the same thing on the choruses, to give them more emphasis. 

The Ozark Mountain Daredevils:

If I Only Knew (from The Car Over the Lake Album)

The Car Over the Lake Album, the band's third, was released in late '75 and tasked with sustaining the success that Jackie Blue had given them earlier in the year. No tracks broke out and the commercial failure was attributed to the band's refusal to change their sound to be more like their hit. IMO that doesn't tell the whole story. With this song, Larry Lee DID give the record company a logical successor to Jackie Blue, and they biffed it, releasing it as a single but failing to convince radio to play it much. The bouncy piano and strong melody should have appealed to the masses. Bummer.

As far as the album title, the cover picture is literally a car jumping over a lake. It was from a poster promoting one of their college campus gigs. The band was so amused by it that they asked to use it as the album cover and even named the album after it. 

Steely Dan:

Any World (That I'm Welcome to) (from Katy Lied)

Both in the lyrics and in Donald Fagen's vocal, this is far more emotional -- and depressing -- a song than what we usually got from the Dan. The reason is likely that it dates from the earliest days of Fagen and Walter Becker's partnership; a stark piano-driven version appears on demos they made in 1970-ish in an effort to get a Brill Building-style steady songwriting gig (they never intended to become an actual band, in part because they had no interest in playing live after being soured on the experience as members of Jay and the Americans' touring band). 

The record company biffed by not releasing this as a single. It tells a story that any teen struggling to find their place in the world can identify with, and it's got the yachtiest harmonies from Michael McDonald. 

Neil Young:

Yeah, there was a lot on the table from him. I'm just gonna link to the writeups from my countdown.

#63 New Mama (from Tonight's the Night)

#71 World on a String (from Tonight's the Night)

#72 Drive Back (from Zuma) Would have been higher (Binky: lower) if not for the dated lyrics.

#77 Through My Sails (from Zuma)

#86 Albuquerque (from Tonight's the Night)

#101 Lookout Joe (from Tonight's the Night)

#104 Barstool Blues (from Zuma)

 

tri-man 47

Footballguy
Pip's Invitation said:
Tom Waits to me is like Geddy Lee to you. I prefer his songs when they are done by other people. 

I am not greatly knowledgeable about jazz, so while I am aware of the reputation of the Jarrett album, I have not heard it. 
Koln Concert is definitely worth a listen. I love that album.  

 

zamboni

Footballguy
And here we are. Thanks to everyone who followed along and stuck it out with me!

1. Black Friday -- Steely Dan (from Katy Lied)

This gets the top spot not just because I have loved it since I first heard it, but also because it's the song I was the most surprised wasn't on Tim's list. In fact, I was stunned there was nothing from Katy Lied on it. But I understand Steely Dan is not for everyone.

Is there such a thing as hard yacht rock? If so, this certainly qualifies. The Dan made great use of top-notch session guitarists such as Larry Carlton and Elliot Randall over the course of their career, but the raging leads on this track are played by Walter Becker, who had functioned as bassist on their first three albums. Katy Lied was the Dan's first album where they ceased pretending to be a real band, and brought in more session players than usual, including bassist Chuck Rainey. "When I met Chuck, I realized there was no reason for me to bring my bass guitar to the studio," Becker said. (After the Dan reunited, Becker handled almost all the lead guitar parts on their studio albums, and split lead guitar work in concert with John Herrington.) Future Toto members Jeff Porcaro and David Paich also play on it. 

Insomuch as you can trust any explanation about the Dan's lyrics, the song is about a sketchy financier who absconds to Australia with his money. The music is unusually forthright and driving for them, and not only are Becker's leads a standout, but so are the power chords that come after lines like "the Archbishop won't sanctify me." 

If @[scooter] was serious about doing a 201-300 countdown, he can take it from here. 
I didn't expect this to be #1, but it's fantastic and I'm not going to argue it.

Great job with the countdown :thumbup:  When I get a chance, I'm going to look over the songs that missed. I have some in mind, but they were probably mentioned by you somewhere.

 

timschochet

Footballguy
I love some Steely Dan. “Reeling’ In the Years” is one of my favorite rock songs of all time. The stuff from Katy Lied doesn’t do much for me. Nonetheless I probably should have included it; I try not to allow my own personal preferences to take charge. 
 

Fantastic list, @Pip's Invitation. I invite you to do this again! I’m currently working on 1969, and my initial list of must haves has over 200 songs on it! 

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
I love some Steely Dan. “Reeling’ In the Years” is one of my favorite rock songs of all time. The stuff from Katy Lied doesn’t do much for me. Nonetheless I probably should have included it; I try not to allow my own personal preferences to take charge. 
 

Fantastic list, @Pip's Invitation. I invite you to do this again! I’m currently working on 1969, and my initial list of must haves has over 200 songs on it! 
Thanks! 1969 is so deep that I could take 201-300 with no problem if Bracie wanted to take another crack at 101-200.

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
I love some Steely Dan. “Reeling’ In the Years” is one of my favorite rock songs of all time. The stuff from Katy Lied doesn’t do much for me. Nonetheless I probably should have included it; I try not to allow my own personal preferences to take charge. 
 

Fantastic list, @Pip's Invitation. I invite you to do this again! I’m currently working on 1969, and my initial list of must haves has over 200 songs on it! 
Interestingly, Becker and Fagen didn’t really care for Katy Lied either, because there was a malfunction with the noise reduction system during mastering. Once they started touring again, they didn’t play much from it. Only Black Friday showed up in their setlists with any regularity.

 

Gr00vus

Footballguy
And here we are. Thanks to everyone who followed along and stuck it out with me!

1. Black Friday -- Steely Dan (from Katy Lied)

This gets the top spot not just because I have loved it since I first heard it, but also because it's the song I was the most surprised wasn't on Tim's list. In fact, I was stunned there was nothing from Katy Lied on it. But I understand Steely Dan is not for everyone.

Is there such a thing as hard yacht rock? If so, this certainly qualifies. The Dan made great use of top-notch session guitarists such as Larry Carlton and Elliot Randall over the course of their career, but the raging leads on this track are played by Walter Becker, who had functioned as bassist on their first three albums. Katy Lied was the Dan's first album where they ceased pretending to be a real band, and brought in more session players than usual, including bassist Chuck Rainey. "When I met Chuck, I realized there was no reason for me to bring my bass guitar to the studio," Becker said. (After the Dan reunited, Becker handled almost all the lead guitar parts on their studio albums, and split lead guitar work in concert with John Herrington.) Future Toto members Jeff Porcaro and David Paich also play on it. 

Insomuch as you can trust any explanation about the Dan's lyrics, the song is about a sketchy financier who absconds to Australia with his money. The music is unusually forthright and driving for them, and not only are Becker's leads a standout, but so are the power chords that come after lines like "the Archbishop won't sanctify me." 

If @[scooter] was serious about doing a 201-300 countdown, he can take it from here. 
Great tune. I favor Dr. Wu over it from this album, but it's not a big margin. I think Katy Lied is also the beginning of Michael McDonald's association with Steely Dan. He's on the backing tracks for Black Friday.

 

Binky The Doormat

Footballguy
Interestingly, Becker and Fagen didn’t really care for Katy Lied either, because there was a malfunction with the noise reduction system during mastering. Once they started touring again, they didn’t play much from it. Only Black Friday showed up in their setlists with any regularity.
I would have never thought of "Black Friday" for this list ...and it wouldn't be 1st, but man, I love it.

So much of Steely Dan stuff I need to get back to - just great "album" music where you just need to go through the whole album.  

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
Great tune. I favor Dr. Wu over it from this album, but it's not a big margin. I think Katy Lied is also the beginning of Michael McDonald's association with Steely Dan. He's on the backing tracks for Black Friday.
McDonald actually began working with Steely Dan on their 1974 tour (their last until 1993). You can hear him prominently on bootlegs of that tour, particularly on the title track of Pretzel Logic. Donald Fagen later said he spent many of those shows wondering why McDonald wasn't the band's frontman instead of him. 

At my first Dan show, in 2006, McDonald opened for them and came out for a few songs at the end of the Dan's regular set and its encore. 

 

Gr00vus

Footballguy
McDonald actually began working with Steely Dan on their 1974 tour (their last until 1993). You can hear him prominently on bootlegs of that tour, particularly on the title track of Pretzel Logic. Donald Fagen later said he spent many of those shows wondering why McDonald wasn't the band's frontman instead of him. 

At my first Dan show, in 2006, McDonald opened for them and came out for a few songs at the end of the Dan's regular set and its encore. 
:lol:  at the bolded - definitely a contrast in vocal "capabilities" between the two.

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
:lol:  at the bolded - definitely a contrast in vocal "capabilities" between the two.
It was compounded by Fagen never wanting to be a frontman in the first place. He just wanted to be a songwriter. But he and Becker were encouraged to put a band together because their versions of their songs came out better than others’ attempts at them. And then he ended up singing most of the songs on the first album because nobody liked the results when other people sang them. Their songs were just suited for his voice, as odd and limited as it was. Once the first album was a success and yielded two hits sung by Fagen, he had no choice but to continue as frontman despite not wanting that role.

 

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