What's new
Fantasy Football - Footballguys Forums

Welcome to Our Forums. Once you've registered and logged in, you're primed to talk football, among other topics, with the sharpest and most experienced fantasy players on the internet.

Threat against my son - am I wrong to be freaking out? (1 Viewer)

bigbottom

I put on my robe and wizard hat
A disturbing story unfolding involving threats against my 10-year-old son by another kid in his fifth grade class. I'm concerned, worried and mad, but suspect that I may need a bit of a gut check. Here's the situation:

My son goes to a small private school. There are only 25 boys in fifth grade, and they're all in the same class. This year, several new students joined the class. One of them, we'll call him Greg, has had behavioral issues the entire school year. This has been reported to us, not by the school administration, but from my son, the other boys in his class, and their parents. The issues are primarily anger management and impulse control problems. Every little thing will cause him to lose his temper. Gets tagged out in dodgeball, he'll start cussing and swearing at the other kids. It's not uncommon for him to scream things like I hate this school and I hate all of you. He's instigated at least two physical confrontations: he punched another boy in the face, and he hit my son in the face. He swears regularly - not in casual conversation like some boys his age, but rather at people in anger. When he gets angry, his face gets red and he clenches his fists. And he's also physically imposing. Much taller, bigger and stronger than most of the boys in his class. The boys in the class, including my son, are afraid of him. And all indications are that this is not a situtation where the new kid is getting bullied - quite the opposite. With respect to the two incidents where he punched his classmates, the teacher was notified, but he did not receive detention or any other punishment that we're aware of. Most of the other behavior goes unreported, in part because of the intimidation factor.

Okay, these issues are a concern, but nothing too crazy. The kid's got anger issues and impulse control problems. Okay. But in the past day, I've learned that Greg has really been focusing his anger on my son. As stupid as it is, there is a girl in the fifth grade that Greg has a fixation on. He says that he is madly in love with her and can't live without her (his words). Well, this girl happens to like my son. (Seriously, these kids are freaking ten years old.) As a result, Greg has verbally expressed his hatred of my son. And not only in these uncontrolled outbursts. Last weekend, my son had a sleepover at a friend's house. They were playing XBox online and apparently Greg was on. He told my son, in a very measured tone "I may be nice to you on the outside, but inside, I deeply hate you." My son is afraid of him, and does his best to avoid him at school, which is difficult since they're in every class together.

So yesterday is when things got escalated. He stated to a couple of kids in the class: "If it were legal, I'd strangle [my son's name] and kill him." The kids he said this to were freaked out. They told a couple other kids in the class and then one of them went to the teacher to report the threatening statement. The kids said that the teacher confronted Greg, he denied it, and then turned around and dropped the F-bomb. Later that day, Greg confronted the kid who reported him and got in his face with fists clenched, threatening him for being a tattle tale. As far as we are aware, Greg did not receive detention or any other punishment for making the threat.

My son had a track meet yesterday, so he went straight from school to the meet and we didn't see him. Shortly after the school day ended, my wife received calls from multiple parents to ask her if she was aware of what happened (she wasn't). Apparently, a number of the students in my son's class had gone home and reported the day's events to their parents. Obviously my wife was freaked out, and the parents she spoke to are freaked out as well, because it is common knowledge that this kid has issues. What floors me is that we were notified of the threat against our child not by the school, but by other parents in the class.

The other piece of the puzzle that concerns me is that Greg had a birthday party a few months ago. The birthday party was held at a gun range where the boys would be firing pistols and rifles. Not BB guns, or AirSoft - actual handguns and rifles. Now I live in Texas, and pretty much everyone has a gun here. My 10-year-old has a .22 rifle that he shots when he goes to his grandpa's ranch. But a fifth grade birthday party at the gun range is a bit nuts, even for Texas. My son had no interest in going and from what I understand a number of other parents didn't let their kids go. I've never met Greg's dad. Greg's parents are divorced and he lives with his mom. His mom seems extremely nice.

So this morning we ask for a meeting with the school administration. They know nothing about any problems with Greg. Nothing has been reported to them by the fifth grade teacher. They were not aware of yesterday's threat, and were floored that they had not been made aware of it. And during the meeting, reference was made that before Greg started at the school this year, there were discussions with his mother about problems at prior schools, though the details were not disclosed to us for confidentiality reasons. So perhaps the kid has been expelled from prior schools. At the very least, it appears that there were problems. They assured us that they would take immediate steps to investigate and assess the situation. We made no demands as to what action should be taken, and are waiting to hear back.

I'm definitely in the boys will be boys camp. I blew off the prior physical confrontations because, even though hitting people in the face isn't common at our school, it wasn't all that uncommon when I was growing up. But these recent revelations have me very worried.

We have a kid with obvious anger management and impulse control issues. He apparently has a history of these issues at past schools. He verbally expresses hatred. He has focused that hatred on my son. He has verbally articulated a threat to kill my son (whether veiled, conditional, whatever). And he made that threat not in the middle of a confrontation or an outburst when someone might say stupid things. He referenced killing my son calmly, in conversation. And he's a gun nut. I think you'd have to be a gun nut to want to have your 11th birthday party at a gun range with firearms. I have no idea what access this kid has to gunds or other weapons, but I have to assume that they are in the house.

So my question to the FFA: Am I wrong to be freaking out about this?

p.s. Apologies for the length, and for any typos as I'm not proofreading this.

p.p.s. And one other odd fact. The track season is almost over. There is one more meet. My son is only one of three boys from his class on the team. Apparently, yesterday, when the season is just about over, Greg decided to join the track team. He didn't go to yesterday's meet as it was too late. But it's odd to join a sport so late in the year. Could it be that he wants to get closer to my son, particularly when they will be off campus and largely unsupervised? Probably not, but it's a nagging question.

 

Slapdash

Footballguy
You are not wrong at all. What to do is a harder question, especially since your son's teacher seems to be asleep at the wheel.

 

randall146

Footballguy
You should definitely be freaking out. Greg should have been expelled after punching kids in the face twice. Now it's 100x worse than that. You and other parents should go to the administration and demand his immediate suspension while the administration catches up on the story, followed by expulsion. If the school doesn't immediately do something you should go to the cops.

Once the kid is expelled though I wouldn't worry about it. He'll be on to a new place with new people to bully and threaten.

 

Andy Dufresne

Footballguy
You are absolutely not wrong about this. My son was bullied a bit as well and it set back his confidence in life and the classroom significantly.

This should be dealt with swiftly by the administration and if it isn't I'd run it up to the school board and anyone else who will listen.

Really though, the principal will likely deal with it. They take this stuff pretty seriously these days.

 

Angry Beavers

Footballguy
You have made the school aware. I would follow up with up daily, both in writing ( email) and verbally over the phone until they have an acceptable solution including Greg not be allowed to participate on the track team, suspended, expelled etc.. Next time Greg acts up and hits a kid, sounds like someone ought to let the school know rather than assuming they know. It also wouldn't be a bad idea for your son and his buddies to kick this kids ### - which is what it sounds like this kid needs on at least some level.

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Andy Dufresne

Footballguy
Besides, it sounds like Greg needs help. You're doing the kid a favor by running this up the flagpole. Sounds like he needs therapy and/or medication.

 

shader

Footballguy
It's a private school right? Which means you are paying for it? Tell them to expel him or you pack your bags and go to another school and convince many other parents to do the same.

 

randall146

Footballguy
Also, can people block X-Box live usernames? You should ask the friends to do that and tell your some not to play if Greg is on.

And your son shouldn't go to the track meets or practices if Greg is on the team.

And you should tell the administration that you need assurance that the teacher will DO SOMETHING next time something like this happens.

 

Jaysus

Good times!
I would follow up with up daily, both in writing ( email) and verbally over the phone until they have an acceptable solution
Me too... and I doubt that I would handle it as well as you seem to have GBBB. Kudos. Give the boy a :hifive: for me.

 

B-Deep

Footballguy
I'd freak out and would be actively in touch with the school. I'd ask them wha they have done/are doing and make sure the teacher is on the lookout as well.

You are absolutely right to freak out

How the mother of a kid like this can think a gun range/gun activity is a good idea is mind blowing

 

AcerFC

Footballguy
You should be concerned and a meeting with the principal was the right way to go. Looks like the teacher dropped the ball on this by not alerting anyone.

Hope it all works out

 

B-Deep

Footballguy
You are absolutely not wrong about this. My son was bullied a bit as well and it set back his confidence in life and the classroom significantly.

This should be dealt with swiftly by the administration and if it isn't I'd run it up to the school board and anyone else who will listen.

Really though, the principal will likely deal with it. They take this stuff pretty seriously these days.
I agree that schools do take this seriously these days. You are likely to see some results

 
G

Guest

Guest
I think I know this kid's dad. Went to school with a kid just like this with anger issues, but no death-type threats.

Best of luck. Stay on the school admin if the problems continue.

 

Steve Tasker

Footballguy
I would probably be very worried, and I don't think you are overreacting at all.

I don't really have any advice other than to keep on the school, though. Sounds like his teacher is oblivious.

 

AcerFC

Footballguy
I think you are a lawyer if my notebook is updated. Make sure you keep a paper trail of everything you have done in relationship to contacting the shcool (meetings, phone, email). I hate to say it, but it makes sure that you know exactly what happens if anything should come up later

 

pittstownkiller

Footballguy
Get in touch with school's headmaster, he will most likely dismiss the kid after the school year; I am surprised though, that it has escalated this far. The behavior cannot be tolerated and either your son or the other boy, has to go. A similar situation arose with another child and my son, in his private school; the boy was removed before I was even aware of it.

 

Evilgrin 72

Distributor of Pain
You had better hope that they punt this kid out of school otherwise your son is probably in for it even worse if Greg finds out you guys spoke to administration.

Your son should probably try talking to Greg and befriending him. If that doesn't work, he should fight back, whether or not Greg is bigger and stronger. Teach your son to strike first, strike hard, and no mercy, sir. Get him right on the button of his nose. No matter how big he is, that's going to put him on his ### more often than not. Usually, bullies back off once they've tasted their own medicine.

Of course, if the kid is a legit maniac, that's a whole other ball game. If things continue to escalate, threaten to pull your son from school if they don't kick Greg out. Sounds like the kid belongs in a different school anyway.

 

gmbacm

Footballguy
I dont think you are out of line at all BB. Id probably be watching the track meet Greg attends from a distance to keep an eye on things.

You are absolutely not wrong about this. My son was bullied a bit as well and it set back his confidence in life and the classroom significantly.
This sucks. Hope your son is doing OK.
 

Evilgrin 72

Distributor of Pain
Of course, if you'd prefer to frame Greg and get him thrown out of school, I can probably help you with that.

 

NCCommish

Footballguy
If anything I wouldn't have been so level headed. The meeting would have included the teacher so they could explain their total lack of response to these issues. In a time when we have kids in trouble over Hello Kitty bubble guns it is mind boggling that this kid is skating by with nothing being done despite actually assaulting other students.. And the possible access to guns makes him even scarier.

 

Fennis

Footballguy
Get in touch with school's headmaster, he will most likely dismiss the kid after the school year; I am surprised though, that it has escalated this far. The behavior cannot be tolerated and either your son or the other boy, has to go. A similar situation arose with another child and my son, in his private school; the boy was removed before I was even aware of it.
does he go to hogwarts?

 

Andy Dufresne

Footballguy
I dont think you are out of line at all BB. Id probably be watching the track meet Greg attends from a distance to keep an eye on things.

You are absolutely not wrong about this. My son was bullied a bit as well and it set back his confidence in life and the classroom significantly.
This sucks. Hope your son is doing OK.
Yes he is, thanks. It helps him now that he's a lot bigger than his older sister. :lol:

To elaborate, we had a similar thing happen last year. A kid threatened him with bodily harm, and was basically "recruiting" other kids to gang up on him and verbally pick on him too. The good thing was that the teacher noticed it too so that when we went to talk to him and the principal, they agreed immediately to shift our kid and the other kids to different classrooms so that they'd just avoid each other completely. It worked out very well and we were very pleased with their response.

 
Last edited by a moderator:

TxBuckeye

Footballguy
I'm not sure how that teacher still has a job. She has failed in a major way here. She has a LOT of explaining to do.

 

Softballguy

Footballguy
It's a private school right? Which means you are paying for it? Tell them to expel him or you pack your bags and go to another school and convince many other parents to do the same.
I'm not sure I'd issue an ultimatum, but letting them know the level of your concern, and that other parents share similar concerns, could result in this kid getting expelled.

My wife is a teacher, and at her school any threat made against a student or teacher results in, at the very least, a phone call to both parents. Kids have also been expelled for similar things that Greg has done. Parents are also called when any physical altercations have happened. Frankly, I'd consider the competence of a school that allows all these things to happen without informing the parents.

 

Keerock

Caveman
You have made the school aware. I would follow up with up daily, both in writing ( email) and verbally over the phone until they have an acceptable solution including Greg not be allowed to participate on the track team, suspended, expelled etc.. Next time Greg acts up and hits a kid, sounds like someone ought to let the school know rather than assuming they know. It also wouldn't be a bad idea for your son and his buddies to kick this kids ### - which is what it sounds like this kid needs on at least some level.
:goodposting:

 

Bull Dozier

Footballguy
You had better hope that they punt this kid out of school otherwise your son is probably in for it even worse if Greg finds out you guys spoke to administration.

Your son should probably try talking to Greg and befriending him. If that doesn't work, he should fight back, whether or not Greg is bigger and stronger. Teach your son to strike first, strike hard, and no mercy, sir. Get him right on the button of his nose. No matter how big he is, that's going to put him on his ### more often than not. Usually, bullies back off once they've tasted their own medicine.

Of course, if the kid is a legit maniac, that's a whole other ball game. If things continue to escalate, threaten to pull your son from school if they don't kick Greg out. Sounds like the kid belongs in a different school anyway.
Could not disagree more with this post. If Greg is bigger and stronger in 5th grade, the typical 5th graders punch to the nose is not going to phase him if he has anger issues.

BB, keep on the administration. It is fair since you've had the conversation to give them a chance to act. However, if there is another incident without consequences, you definitely should go back and clearly lay out your expectations and let them know what you intend to do if they don't meet your expectations. Once you start to show acceptance of their lack of action, its only going to continue.

 

Abraham

Footballguy
The issue is the teacher, who has lost control of the classroom. Greg's situation is so far gone that he's unlikely to ever be accepted by the other boys if they are scared of him now. Kid needs help and a change of scenery.

 

Hawks64

Footballguy
Definitely not out of line, I would be very concerned if it were my son. And to echo what a lot of other have said, I would be in daily contact with the school until this is resolved.

 

Uwe Blab

Footballguy
Completely echo what everyone else is saying. Quick and decisive action by the school to your satisfaction is the only way. They (the teacher) completely dropped the ball on this. This kid needs help and maybe this school is his "last resort" before he gets real attention. I'm not sure your kid bopping him in the nose is a great idea given the other stuff and suddenly this kid's got justification (which he seems to edging closer to with the girl fixation) in his mind to do something really stupid. I feel bad for his mom and, yes, him for sure, but this needs better attention.

 

Andy Dufresne

Footballguy
I would also let your son know that it's not his fault that Greg is acting this way.

He might be thinking "what's wrong with me that Greg treats me like this?" and that's a thought that should have it's bud nipped quickly.

This is also a great opportunity to show your kid that you've got his back and are willing to stand up for him if nobody else is.

 

(HULK)

(Smash)
Besides, it sounds like Greg needs help. You're doing the kid a favor by running this up the flagpole. Sounds like he needs therapy and/or medication.
This is my initial thought too. You need to let the school know, both to protect your son and to help Greg. No 10 year old is naturally like that. I'd bet a large sum of money Greg is suffering some sort of abuse himself and needs help.

 

Pick

Footballguy
It's a private school right? Which means you are paying for it? Tell them to expel him or you pack your bags and go to another school and convince many other parents to do the same.
I'm not sure I'd issue an ultimatum, but letting them know the level of your concern, and that other parents share similar concerns, could result in this kid getting expelled.

My wife is a teacher, and at her school any threat made against a student or teacher results in, at the very least, a phone call to both parents. Kids have also been expelled for similar things that Greg has done. Parents are also called when any physical altercations have happened. Frankly, I'd consider the competence of a school that allows all these things to happen without informing the parents.
I'd also question even being at that school. I know people love private schools but sometimes smaller classes and kids being with the same kids for several hours a day isn't necessarily a good thing.

 

Jobber

Footballguy
If anything, I think you're under-reacting. I would be at that school at this very moment. I would not leave until either the kid is permanently removed from the school, or I'm walking my kid out of there TODAY. And or course, the police would be involved as well.

 

Evilgrin 72

Distributor of Pain
You had better hope that they punt this kid out of school otherwise your son is probably in for it even worse if Greg finds out you guys spoke to administration.

Your son should probably try talking to Greg and befriending him. If that doesn't work, he should fight back, whether or not Greg is bigger and stronger. Teach your son to strike first, strike hard, and no mercy, sir. Get him right on the button of his nose. No matter how big he is, that's going to put him on his ### more often than not. Usually, bullies back off once they've tasted their own medicine.

Of course, if the kid is a legit maniac, that's a whole other ball game. If things continue to escalate, threaten to pull your son from school if they don't kick Greg out. Sounds like the kid belongs in a different school anyway.
Could not disagree more with this post. If Greg is bigger and stronger in 5th grade, the typical 5th graders punch to the nose is not going to phase him if he has anger issues.

BB, keep on the administration. It is fair since you've had the conversation to give them a chance to act. However, if there is another incident without consequences, you definitely should go back and clearly lay out your expectations and let them know what you intend to do if they don't meet your expectations. Once you start to show acceptance of their lack of action, its only going to continue.
If no one else is going to do anything, sometimes you have to do for yourself. It's not a bad lesson to learn early on that there's not always a white knight to ride in and save you. I was bullied by a bigger, stronger kid when I was that age until I realized no one was coming to my rescue and I was forced to fight back. I blew up his nose after getting off the bus one day and the kid never bothered me again in his life.

I'm not saying send him off today to fight, but if no one seems to be anxious to solve the problem, sometimes you have to stand up for yourself.

 

(HULK)

(Smash)
You have made the school aware. I would follow up with up daily, both in writing ( email) and verbally over the phone until they have an acceptable solution including Greg not be allowed to participate on the track team, suspended, expelled etc.. Next time Greg acts up and hits a kid, sounds like someone ought to let the school know rather than assuming they know. It also wouldn't be a bad idea for your son and his buddies to kick this kids ### - which is what it sounds like this kid needs on at least some level.
:goodposting:
Terrible idea. They'd be better off playing football with a hornets nest.

The kid is an outsider with anger issues that tell me, something is going drastically wrong in his life. He is lashing out on his classmates to feel power, something he probably has the opposite of (helplessness) at home. It seems to be escalating, meaning he is becoming more desperate. Getting a gang together to beat him up would potentially push him over the edge. That is how school shootings happen imo.

 

AcerFC

Footballguy
You had better hope that they punt this kid out of school otherwise your son is probably in for it even worse if Greg finds out you guys spoke to administration.

Your son should probably try talking to Greg and befriending him. If that doesn't work, he should fight back, whether or not Greg is bigger and stronger. Teach your son to strike first, strike hard, and no mercy, sir. Get him right on the button of his nose. No matter how big he is, that's going to put him on his ### more often than not. Usually, bullies back off once they've tasted their own medicine.

Of course, if the kid is a legit maniac, that's a whole other ball game. If things continue to escalate, threaten to pull your son from school if they don't kick Greg out. Sounds like the kid belongs in a different school anyway.
Could not disagree more with this post. If Greg is bigger and stronger in 5th grade, the typical 5th graders punch to the nose is not going to phase him if he has anger issues.

BB, keep on the administration. It is fair since you've had the conversation to give them a chance to act. However, if there is another incident without consequences, you definitely should go back and clearly lay out your expectations and let them know what you intend to do if they don't meet your expectations. Once you start to show acceptance of their lack of action, its only going to continue.
If no one else is going to do anything, sometimes you have to do for yourself. It's not a bad lesson to learn early on that there's not always a white knight to ride in and save you. I was bullied by a bigger, stronger kid when I was that age until I realized no one was coming to my rescue and I was forced to fight back. I blew up his nose after getting off the bus one day and the kid never bothered me again in his life.

I'm not saying send him off today to fight, but if no one seems to be anxious to solve the problem, sometimes you have to stand up for yourself.
And what happens when Greg gets so mad that he got his nose busted that he gets one of his many guns and starts shooting. Doesnt seem like a smart move in this case. Its not a simple bully incident. Kid has issues

 

NCCommish

Footballguy
You had better hope that they punt this kid out of school otherwise your son is probably in for it even worse if Greg finds out you guys spoke to administration.

Your son should probably try talking to Greg and befriending him. If that doesn't work, he should fight back, whether or not Greg is bigger and stronger. Teach your son to strike first, strike hard, and no mercy, sir. Get him right on the button of his nose. No matter how big he is, that's going to put him on his ### more often than not. Usually, bullies back off once they've tasted their own medicine.

Of course, if the kid is a legit maniac, that's a whole other ball game. If things continue to escalate, threaten to pull your son from school if they don't kick Greg out. Sounds like the kid belongs in a different school anyway.
Could not disagree more with this post. If Greg is bigger and stronger in 5th grade, the typical 5th graders punch to the nose is not going to phase him if he has anger issues.

BB, keep on the administration. It is fair since you've had the conversation to give them a chance to act. However, if there is another incident without consequences, you definitely should go back and clearly lay out your expectations and let them know what you intend to do if they don't meet your expectations. Once you start to show acceptance of their lack of action, its only going to continue.
If no one else is going to do anything, sometimes you have to do for yourself. It's not a bad lesson to learn early on that there's not always a white knight to ride in and save you. I was bullied by a bigger, stronger kid when I was that age until I realized no one was coming to my rescue and I was forced to fight back. I blew up his nose after getting off the bus one day and the kid never bothered me again in his life.

I'm not saying send him off today to fight, but if no one seems to be anxious to solve the problem, sometimes you have to stand up for yourself.
Kids like this are shooting other kids. There is no way it is in any way prudent to get into a physical altercation with this kid given the anger issues and the possible gun angle.

 

Evilgrin 72

Distributor of Pain
You had better hope that they punt this kid out of school otherwise your son is probably in for it even worse if Greg finds out you guys spoke to administration.

Your son should probably try talking to Greg and befriending him. If that doesn't work, he should fight back, whether or not Greg is bigger and stronger. Teach your son to strike first, strike hard, and no mercy, sir. Get him right on the button of his nose. No matter how big he is, that's going to put him on his ### more often than not. Usually, bullies back off once they've tasted their own medicine.

Of course, if the kid is a legit maniac, that's a whole other ball game. If things continue to escalate, threaten to pull your son from school if they don't kick Greg out. Sounds like the kid belongs in a different school anyway.
Could not disagree more with this post. If Greg is bigger and stronger in 5th grade, the typical 5th graders punch to the nose is not going to phase him if he has anger issues.

BB, keep on the administration. It is fair since you've had the conversation to give them a chance to act. However, if there is another incident without consequences, you definitely should go back and clearly lay out your expectations and let them know what you intend to do if they don't meet your expectations. Once you start to show acceptance of their lack of action, its only going to continue.
If no one else is going to do anything, sometimes you have to do for yourself. It's not a bad lesson to learn early on that there's not always a white knight to ride in and save you. I was bullied by a bigger, stronger kid when I was that age until I realized no one was coming to my rescue and I was forced to fight back. I blew up his nose after getting off the bus one day and the kid never bothered me again in his life.

I'm not saying send him off today to fight, but if no one seems to be anxious to solve the problem, sometimes you have to stand up for yourself.
And what happens when Greg gets so mad that he got his nose busted that he gets one of his many guns and starts shooting. Doesnt seem like a smart move in this case. Its not a simple bully incident. Kid has issues
Again, if this is a potential threat, then the object is to have him removed from school. But if that doesn't work, and if the kid simply will not listen to reason or embrace friendship, I'd rather my son hit the peckerhead back than stand around like a wuss getting threatened and punched in the face on a daily basis.

Everyone is so worried these days about a kid grabbing a gun and lighting up the school, but if you'll notice, pretty much all these mass shootings are being committed by the bullied, not the bullies.

 

Evilgrin 72

Distributor of Pain
Yeah, not a fan of the fighting suggestion. Your kid runs track, you should teach him to run the #### away if this kid gets violent.
Man. I didn't grow up in a "tough" neighborhood, but I did go to a racially mixed HS and dealt with my fair share of confrontation, and doing this would have labeled you as a complete doughnut for the rest of your childhood. The world has truly changed.

 

The_Man

Footballguy
If this kind of stuff was ever tolerated, it certainly isn't in contemporary private school culture. Paying customers are too hard to find to let one problem kid run off a bunch of good kids, and nobody wants the reputation of being the school where bullying is tolerated.

The principal will take this very, very seriously.

Did they give you a time frame for when they would report back to you? Because if you don't hear something from them today, call again tomorrow, and call every day until you get an adequate response. Also tell them about the track thing (if you didn't) and let them know you're worried about the supervision there and what might happen.

If you don't get an adequate response, talk to other parents and tell them to call the principal and express concerns of their own. The school can, should, and probably will, take care of this.

 

jamny

Footballguy
You have made the school aware. I would follow up with up daily, both in writing ( email) and verbally over the phone until they have an acceptable solution including Greg not be allowed to participate on the track team, suspended, expelled etc.. Next time Greg acts up and hits a kid, sounds like someone ought to let the school know rather than assuming they know. It also wouldn't be a bad idea for your son and his buddies to kick this kids ### - which is what it sounds like this kid needs on at least some level.
:goodposting:
Terrible idea. They'd be better off playing football with a hornets nest.

The kid is an outsider with anger issues that tell me, something is going drastically wrong in his life. He is lashing out on his classmates to feel power, something he probably has the opposite of (helplessness) at home. It seems to be escalating, meaning he is becoming more desperate. Getting a gang together to beat him up would potentially push him over the edge. That is how school shootings happen imo.
Yeah, I can't imagine how this could be a good idea. Maybe back when I was a kid but nowadays it seems like only a matter of time before the kid retaliates in an extremely violent way.

Sorry to hear about your dilemna BB. I don't have kids but it seems like you are handling it the right way, if not a little too calmly. GL

 

Fat Nick

Footballguy
It amazes me that things like this don't draw immediate attention in schools, but they'll instantly form a committee if their choice of music for the holiday assembly is deemed offensive by some random group.

Best of luck bigbottom...my mother works in a public school system, and the red tape involved with actually DOING things is quite astounding. Hopefully it's different in private schools.

 

NCCommish

Footballguy
Yeah, not a fan of the fighting suggestion. Your kid runs track, you should teach him to run the #### away if this kid gets violent.
Man. I didn't grow up in a "tough" neighborhood, but I did go to a racially mixed HS and dealt with my fair share of confrontation, and doing this would have labeled you as a complete doughnut for the rest of your childhood. The world has truly changed.
I was a white kid who was the minority in my schools until tenth grade. And I never backed down from a fight. But today is not 40 years ago. What we used to settle in a few minutes of scuffling after school or when we got off the bus does escalate today into something way more violent all too often. And we have had several kid killers lately who were just mad at someone so they shot them. It isn't always the bullied.

 
Greg is a sociopath. He may be beyond help, but at the very least he needs some form of intervention pronto. Possibly a short committment. You're not overreacting.

 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top