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Top 101 Movies of the 80s (1 Viewer)

The economics and emotional investments in raising a child are so steep that losing them is an emotional and financial disaster. We don’t accept death or loss anymore so you get helicopter parents trying to prevent preventable accidents. That’s my two cents. It’s the cost of loss that causes the concern.
I don't know a single parent concerned about the risk of economic loss with losing their kids. Purely emotional.
 
The economic costs in the Westerm World prevent more children per parent and the loss is even greater to those who don’t have many, as opposed to older times when ten or eleven children was not unheard of. But your point is taken.
 
I'm not as good at the hints as @krista4, but I will try for the horror movies:

One movie is a shining example of the subgenre of horror that is the same as the title of one of my favorite horror movies of the 2010s.
One movie is based on a book
One is a cautionary tale of breaking a commandment
One had a terrible sequel, also in the 80s, starring an actor who got fired from a movie on this countdown after weeks of shooting.
Got a couple of guesses for one of them. The bolded is based on a true story.
 
#85: THE SERPENT AND THE RAINBOW

My #48 pick. This was the one based on a book/true story. It's one of my favorite Craven flicks, and I still find the ideas and movie unsettling. Having that happen and being buried alive is terrifying. Sure, it gets into full on silly horror mode at the end, but that happens with most horror movies, especially from this era and director.
 
#85: THE SERPENT AND THE RAINBOW

My #48 pick. This was the one based on a book/true story. It's one of my favorite Craven flicks, and I still find the ideas and movie unsettling. Having that happen and being buried alive is terrifying. Sure, it gets into full on silly horror mode at the end, but that happens with most horror movies, especially from this era and director.
Was this rated R or NC-17?

I remember my friends and I getting caught while trying to sneak into this when we weren't old enough. I don't remember what Movie B was that we saw instead.
 
84/83:

TERMS OF ENDEARMENT
BILL AND TED'S EXCELLENT ADVENTURE


Our #47 picks. From the clues this was his based on a book/Oscar winner, and this was my nostalgia pick about HS that my son and I watched a ton. It was a rare movie that he actually liked enough to request or rewatch from this era. I think there were 4, and all are on this list. Because of my age, I think that '85-'89 time frame will pop up a lot of these that I watched as a kid and still have a fondness for.
 
#85: THE SERPENT AND THE RAINBOW

My #48 pick. This was the one based on a book/true story. It's one of my favorite Craven flicks, and I still find the ideas and movie unsettling. Having that happen and being buried alive is terrifying. Sure, it gets into full on silly horror mode at the end, but that happens with most horror movies, especially from this era and director.
Was this rated R or NC-17?

I remember my friends and I getting caught while trying to sneak into this when we weren't old enough. I don't remember what Movie B was that we saw instead.
I am pretty sure this is R. I can't imagine anything in it was bad enough to get it the NC-17.
 
#85: THE SERPENT AND THE RAINBOW

My #48 pick. This was the one based on a book/true story. It's one of my favorite Craven flicks, and I still find the ideas and movie unsettling. Having that happen and being buried alive is terrifying. Sure, it gets into full on silly horror mode at the end, but that happens with most horror movies, especially from this era and director.
this was a first date with an ex-girlfriend... perfect first date movie to initiate physical contact (huddling together/holding hands during creepiest stuff). that's about all I remember about the movie.
 
I'm not as good at the hints as @krista4, but I will try for the horror movies:

One movie is a shining example of the subgenre of horror that is the same as the title of one of my favorite horror movies of the 2010s.
What is was going for here was Cabin in the Woods. That means the next pick is.......


(probably not the one you think.)
 
#82: EVIL DEAD

My #46 pick, and yes I prefer the first one over the 2nd one as it leans into the scares a bit more which I like. I am not quite as high on the series as a whole compared to most horror fans, but I still have a blast with all of them. Bruce also has to be one of the best interviews and people for movie commentaries out there. I alway recommend reading his books or listening to any of those for people who love movies. I recently started a re-read of If Chins Could Kill and it cracks me up.
 
I will leave the next 6 or so for after work and tonight. I will also add the first 20 picks to the OP for easier viewing and try to remember to update that every 10 picks or so.
 
84/83:

TERMS OF ENDEARMENT
BILL AND TED'S EXCELLENT ADVENTURE


Our #47 picks. From the clues this was his based on a book/Oscar winner, and this was my nostalgia pick about HS that my son and I watched a ton. It was a rare movie that he actually liked enough to request or rewatch from this era. I think there were 4, and all are on this list. Because of my age, I think that '85-'89 time frame will pop up a lot of these that I watched as a kid and still have a fondness for.
Terms of Endearment is exhibit A that Jeff Daniels is very underrated as an actor.

The contrarian in me kept me from watching Bill and Ted, and to this day I haven't seen any of the series.
 
we're roughly the same age, so you probably saw Stranger than Paradise in the theater like me. I completely dug that, even if I didn't "love" it. so I was excited to go to the theater for each subsequent movie of his... especially after his sophomore effort Down By Law, which is far and away my favorite- just for the way he frames and paces his shots (something I still love).

but as his narrative scope got bigger, I felt like he lost his touch a bit, or at least I wasn't as interested in the visual + narrative approach he was using. tbh, all I really remember about Mystery Train was that it disappointed me- maybe my expectations were too high given his first real dive into a bigger cast/story and bigger name actors (especially using my at the time obsession, Screamin' Jay), but it felt posery and trying too hard to me. Night on Earth was also a miss for me for similar reasons (or maybe it was Screamin' Jay in that one...lol).

most of what I remember about Dead Man, is that I saw it with a group of grad school friends at the Angelica... and they all fell asleep. I'm talking half a dozen grad students snoring away in their seats after the first 15 minutes. I also remember thinking Johnny Dep was trying too hard... but I still liked it. I was the sole awake member of our crew throughout.

I feel like I should revisit all three of those.

After those, I was kind of hit or miss even seeing his stuff. But I genuinely enjoyed Ghost Dog and flat out loved Broken Flowers (I didn't even realize it was Jarmusch until afterwards).

I wasn't cool enough to see Stranger than Paradise in the theater. :lol: But I do love that one, too. Happy to see that you're a Down By Law fan! Probably my second favorite to Ghost Dog.

Feel like I should revisit Dead Man, which I viewed more similarly to your friends than I do to OH's take on it. Broken Flowers might have been "my Mystery Train." I couldn't have been more excited for it - not only a huge Jarmusch fan but this was coming right after what I thought was a master class in acting by Bill Murray in Lost in Translation. But it greatly disappointed me; should probably give that one a rewatch, too.

If you haven't seen it, I strongly recommend watching Paterson. Felt like Jarmusch was 100% back to form with that one, plus it doesn't hurt that it might have two of the prettiest humans alive as the leads.
 
I don't enjoy the first two Evil Dead movies as much as I admire them. The cobbling together of a decent movie with a budget of "Hey, how much money do we currently have on us?" is tremendous.

And Bruce Campbell rules. The Evil Dead TV show is ridiculously awesome.
 
84/83:

TERMS OF ENDEARMENT
BILL AND TED'S EXCELLENT ADVENTURE


Our #47 picks. From the clues this was his based on a book/Oscar winner, and this was my nostalgia pick about HS that my son and I watched a ton. It was a rare movie that he actually liked enough to request or rewatch from this era. I think there were 4, and all are on this list. Because of my age, I think that '85-'89 time frame will pop up a lot of these that I watched as a kid and still have a fondness for.
Terms of Endearment is exhibit A that Jeff Daniels is very underrated as an actor.

The contrarian in me kept me from watching Bill and Ted, and to this day I haven't seen any of the series.
I don't know how B&T would hold up on a first view as an adult... but dammit- the first one still works for me, as it did when I saw at when I was young(er).
 
#90: GREMLINS [HBOMAX, TUBI]

My #52 pick. Is there a certain time zone we need to consider for this after midnight nonsense? I still have a blast with this movie, and it's one I think of and say "wtf was wrong with the 80s?". This is one of my first memories seeing a movie in the theater. I begged my parents to let me go, then proceeded to lose my **** as gremlins got nuked and put in a blender. I didn't even get to the cheery story of daddy getting stuck in the chimney. :lol: I am one of those kids that helped get the PG-13 rating, I guess.
My only issue with this pick is how you will find 89 movies better than Gremlins.
 
I don't enjoy the first two Evil Dead movies as much as I admire them. The cobbling together of a decent movie with a budget of "Hey, how much money do we currently have on us?" is tremendous.

And Bruce Campbell rules. The Evil Dead TV show is ridiculously awesome.
My general disinterest in horror movies prevented me from getting in on the ground floor of the Bruce Campell train, but I'm definitely a fan. Long live Brisco County, Jr.
 
The contrarian in me kept me from watching Bill and Ted, and to this day I haven't seen any of the series.
The original has some good bits/lines, but IMO got old after awhile. This wasn't one of Keanu's roles I mentioned yesterday (as part of the River's Edge discussion) in which he shows his considerable acting chops.
 
The economics and emotional investments in raising a child are so steep that losing them is an emotional and financial disaster. We don’t accept death or loss anymore so you get helicopter parents trying to prevent preventable accidents. That’s my two cents. It’s the cost of loss that causes the concern.
Dont forget there is always someone to sue, someone to blame, someone to project onto
 
I don't enjoy the first two Evil Dead movies as much as I admire them. The cobbling together of a decent movie with a budget of "Hey, how much money do we currently have on us?" is tremendous.
For some reason, Dead Alive never got the love the Evil Dead movies received. I would love to hear @Tick thoughts on it.

In college, we caught this movie one night, and didn't know what it was called. We went to our local video shop, that had some horror authority on staff (It was literally like, 'hey we are looking for this horror movie with a guy with a lawn mower strapped to his chest', and they call out Victor from the back room)

We bought the VHS, and would play it late night when we had women over. Laughing/gagging. I loved that movie.
 
#85: THE SERPENT AND THE RAINBOW

My #48 pick. This was the one based on a book/true story. It's one of my favorite Craven flicks, and I still find the ideas and movie unsettling. Having that happen and being buried alive is terrifying. Sure, it gets into full on silly horror mode at the end, but that happens with most horror movies, especially from this era and director.
Awesome flick. This and Excalibur were the first "trippy" flicks I remember as a teen
 
#85: THE SERPENT AND THE RAINBOW

My #48 pick. This was the one based on a book/true story. It's one of my favorite Craven flicks, and I still find the ideas and movie unsettling. Having that happen and being buried alive is terrifying. Sure, it gets into full on silly horror mode at the end, but that happens with most horror movies, especially from this era and director.
Was this rated R or NC-17?

I remember my friends and I getting caught while trying to sneak into this when we weren't old enough. I don't remember what Movie B was that we saw instead.
I dont think NC-17 came out until the 90s?

The NC-17 rating replaced the X rating in 1990 as the X rating was not trademarked by the MPA and had been co-opted by the pornography industry. NC-17 originally stood for "No Children Under 17 Admitted" to combat the misconception that the rating indicated a film was pornographic. In 1995, the MPA reworded the NC-17 rating to "No One 17 and Under Admitted", effectively raising the minimum age for admission from 17 to 18.[2]
 
JFC I just looked at like 4 movies to see what year they were. All from the 80's. Yall have your work cut out for you.
 
#85: THE SERPENT AND THE RAINBOW

My #48 pick. This was the one based on a book/true story. It's one of my favorite Craven flicks, and I still find the ideas and movie unsettling. Having that happen and being buried alive is terrifying. Sure, it gets into full on silly horror mode at the end, but that happens with most horror movies, especially from this era and director.
Was this rated R or NC-17?

I remember my friends and I getting caught while trying to sneak into this when we weren't old enough. I don't remember what Movie B was that we saw instead.
I dont think NC-17 came out until the 90s?

The NC-17 rating replaced the X rating in 1990 as the X rating was not trademarked by the MPA and had been co-opted by the pornography industry. NC-17 originally stood for "No Children Under 17 Admitted" to combat the misconception that the rating indicated a film was pornographic. In 1995, the MPA reworded the NC-17 rating to "No One 17 and Under Admitted", effectively raising the minimum age for admission from 17 to 18.[2]
If was around before that but it was that year the MPAA replaced X with NC-17.

Anyway, The Serpent and the Rainbow was R upon release:
"Wes Craven confirmed in interview that unlike some of his previous films, his first cut of the film got R rating without any problems by MPAA."
 
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I've never seen The Goonies.
I haven’t either.
Wait, wait, WAIT!!

We have folks participating in an 80's movie draft/ranking who HAVE NEVER SEEN GOONIES!?!?!?11!11!!

:fishing:

Wait, wait, WAIT!

one of the chaps running this never saw "True Romance", as were revealed in the similar 90s thread.

MUCH more egregious, imo

:popcorn:


OH ... HAI, KP 😁
Goonies > True Romance. And True Romance is a great movie.
 

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