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What has lifting done for you? (1 Viewer)

My dad hadn't lifted since high school. He was a really good athlete in high school and college. As an adult he played basketball regularly up untill about 40 when back problems and busy life got in the way. He really hadn't exercised at all untill he in his late 60s. He had to have a hip replacement and then did PT. He liked the PT, joined Planet Fitness and goes regularly to use the eliptical and bike. Then he started using exercise machines and now even free weights. He loves it and says he feels 20 years younger. 

 
jwb said:
I know you're just being snarky, but this is exactly why some people won't even set foot in a gym. 

Yes, I lift. And use some of the machines too. I even finish up on the treadmill next to the chunky housewives.

I don't care if someone goes to a serious gym, Planet Fitness, or buys a Bowflex from an infomercial. Just start - it's really good for you. 
I want to see the LUNK ALARM go off one day.  Who controls that?

 
My dad hadn't lifted since high school. He was a really good athlete in high school and college. As an adult he played basketball regularly up untill about 40 when back problems and busy life got in the way. He really hadn't exercised at all untill he in his late 60s. He had to have a hip replacement and then did PT. He liked the PT, joined Planet Fitness and goes regularly to use the eliptical and bike. Then he started using exercise machines and now even free weights. He loves it and says he feels 20 years younger. 
I'm in my forties and want to get back into it. I think it'll help me out both physically and mentally 

 
Football Jones said:
I'd urge anyone starting out to build a base before worrying too much about isolation movements. I see these young guys coming into the gym & essentially all they do is isolation stuff (mainly curls). They could make much quicker & better gains with a different approach. Anything is better than nothing, but it's certainly not optimal. No beginner should have a program focused around isolation movements, IMO. Sure, throw in some curls every once in awhile, but your program should focus around compound movements.

Your initial linear progression will start to slow after a few months or so, but you can still make gains. I recommend a full year of a beginner-type program before looking into more advanced programming. Get your base, then you can do some isolation stuff if you want.

I ran what I'm doing (the big compound movements & all rep ranges) by Paul Carter, who is a guru in the field (& looks like he lifts unlike some "experts") & he said I literally couldn't be doing anything better as a beginner. I do have quite a bit of experience if you put all my time together, but I've never stuck with it for any length of time for one reason or another. I've always been interested in exercise science, though.

I just came to the realization I need to get busy. I'm very athletic & really never had to do anything to stay in good shape, but I'm 60. Even though I was in decent shape, especially for my age, I was starting to lose a little mass, felt more tired than usual, etc. Lifting consistently has made a huge change both physically & mentally.

I go every other day using an A/B format where you alternate 2 different workouts, but both days are essentially a push/pull/legs full-body workout (6 lifts total, 3 each workout). Anybody can do this & get great results if I can do it at 60. Consistency is the key. You're going to miss days, but just get back at it as soon as possible (ideally, the next day). You also don't have to workout every other day to get good results. There are all kinds of schedules & programs you can use. 

I'd be glad to help if you have questions about what I do. I notice some other posters are experienced lifters, as well. Maybe we can keep this thread going.
What are these compound movements you're talking about?

My most recent voyage into lifting is the first time in my life I've done deadlifts, and first time I've regularly done squats and leg press.  This was a big step for me.

Should I be moving further in this direction, away from isolated movements, and into whole body strength etc.?

TIA

 
50 years old. Lift occasionally and I love being in shape. I definitely notice the difference when I'm not lifting ...

especially in my legs. Stairs at work become a chore and my knees ache if I'm out of shape.

 My problem is finding the time.

Do any of you "5 days a week" lifters have jobs?

I wake up at 6am to get ready for work. Get home from work 630-7pm. 

By the time I make dinner and finish eating it's 730-8pm and I'm ready for the couch.

Tried the "getting up early to work out" before work. Set the alarm for 430am. That didn't last long. I was exhausted and felt like crap all day.

Now I get a quick workout in 2 or 3 times a week after work ... if I'm not needed to cut the grass or fix something house or car related that night.

It's enough to keep me in shape anyway.

I'm envious of those that can go to a gym and spend a couple hours a day, every day.  I don't want to rush retirement ... but Work sucks.  :thumbdown:

 
What are these compound movements you're talking about?

My most recent voyage into lifting is the first time in my life I've done deadlifts, and first time I've regularly done squats and leg press.  This was a big step for me.

Should I be moving further in this direction, away from isolated movements, and into whole body strength etc.?

TIA
You want your main compound exercises like dead lifts, squats, military, bench, pullups/chin ups as the foundation of most routines. You still want to hit more direct stuff on top of those like curls/single leg exercises/triceps etc.

 
What are these compound movements you're talking about?

My most recent voyage into lifting is the first time in my life I've done deadlifts, and first time I've regularly done squats and leg press.  This was a big step for me.

Should I be moving further in this direction, away from isolated movements, and into whole body strength etc.?

TIA
Compound movements are technically defined as more than one joint involved, but another way to look at it is more than one muscle group (squat/bench/deadlift/overhead press/rows/leg press/etc.).

If you’re just starting out, yes, I’d focus on the the big compound movements I listed. I recommend building your base for a year before trying more advanced programming. 

Lots of workout formats to try, but for the average Joe, I believe full-body workouts offer the best bang for your time as opposed to body part splits. 

Say squat/bench/deadlift for workout A & overhead press/Pendlay row/leg press for workout B (which is what I do with an every other day rotation).

 
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BTW, like I said, lots of ways to skin a cat so my way isn’t the only way.

I simply recommend what I know works well & what I believe is optimal for newbies or even people with experience, but have had a long layoff (like myself).

 
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50 years old. Lift occasionally and I love being in shape. I definitely notice the difference when I'm not lifting ...

especially in my legs. Stairs at work become a chore and my knees ache if I'm out of shape.

 My problem is finding the time.

Do any of you "5 days a week" lifters have jobs?

I wake up at 6am to get ready for work. Get home from work 630-7pm. 

By the time I make dinner and finish eating it's 730-8pm and I'm ready for the couch.

Tried the "getting up early to work out" before work. Set the alarm for 430am. That didn't last long. I was exhausted and felt like crap all day.

Now I get a quick workout in 2 or 3 times a week after work ... if I'm not needed to cut the grass or fix something house or car related that night.

It's enough to keep me in shape anyway.

I'm envious of those that can go to a gym and spend a couple hours a day, every day.  I don't want to rush retirement ... but Work sucks.  :thumbdown:
This is me.  I'm struggling just to keep my head above water between work, family, household and reffing football.  I haven't lifted weights in almost 3 months now.  I would love to lift 3-5 times per week, but I'm not even getting in a single day a week right now.  I have to find a way to do something because its killing me.

 
I'm in my forties and want to get back into it. I think it'll help me out both physically and mentally 
It will. I have always been on and off again with it. I was super hardcore about it from 2014-2016. 7 days a week I was either lifting, running or doing yoga. I felt great and was in the best shape of my life. 2017 was spotty and 2018 has been pretty bad. Luckily, I worked so hard those prior years that I'm still in good shape but it's depressing thinking about how good it could have been.

 
What are these compound movements you're talking about?

My most recent voyage into lifting is the first time in my life I've done deadlifts, and first time I've regularly done squats and leg press.  This was a big step for me.

Should I be moving further in this direction, away from isolated movements, and into whole body strength etc.?

TIA
IMO, especially as we are getting older, I wouldn't mess with anything like deadlifts or trying to max out. I would leave that to youngsters or experienced lifters. 

 
IMO, especially as we are getting older, I wouldn't mess with anything like deadlifts or trying to max out. I would leave that to youngsters or experienced lifters. 
With proper form, anyone can deadlift so I disagree with you a bit there.

I’ve seen grannies deadlift a surprising anount of weight with no ill effects.

 
It will. I have always been on and off again with it. I was super hardcore about it from 2014-2016. 7 days a week I was either lifting, running or doing yoga. I felt great and was in the best shape of my life. 2017 was spotty and 2018 has been pretty bad. Luckily, I worked so hard those prior years that I'm still in good shape but it's depressing thinking about how good it could have been.
Yeah, I hit my height back in 2012. Listening to Simon and Garfunkel right now, so feeling ambivalent about the poetry but loving the musicality.  

 
There are a lot of things in this world we have no control over. It’s why I like lifting so much. You CAN change your body.

If you’re relatively healthy (even with some issues), your body WILL undergo a radical change if you’re consistent & it doesn’t  take all that long.

You’ll be shocked at what 1 year with a solid program will do (& your hard work).

 
With proper form, anyone can deadlift so I disagree with you a bit there.

I’ve seen grannies deadlift a surprising anount of weight with no ill effects.
Sure with proper form, but they are intense and I would think could be dangerous to a middle aged man with no experience and potentially improper form. But I am not a trainer or anything so maybe I am wrong. It's not the direction I would recomend someone new to lifting to start. Espcially someone middle aged who is probably looking more for a better looking body, good exercise and maintaining/improving general strength. I could be wrong though.

 
There are a lot of things in this world we have no control over. It’s why I like lifting so much. You CAN change your body.

If you’re relatively healthy (even with some issues), your body WILL undergo a radical change if you’re consistent & it doesn’t  take all that long.

You’ll be shocked at what 1 year with a solid program will do (& your hard work).
Absolute truth. And I have found the effects have stayed even as my workouts have fizzled a bit. I went from skinny to lean/fit. 

 
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Sure with proper form, but they are intense and I would think could be dangerous to a middle aged man with no experience and potentially improper form. But I am not a trainer or anything so maybe I am wrong. It's not the direction I would recomend someone new to lifting to start. Espcially someone middle aged who is probably looking more for a better looking body, good exercise and maintaining/improving general strength. I could be wrong though.
Well, it’s good that you’re cautious. You don’t necessarily need a trainer, but doing research is a good idea.

Lots of instruction on the net.

 
Well, it’s good that you’re cautious. You don’t necessarily need a trainer, but doing research is a good idea.

Lots of instruction on the net.
Not cautios enough maybe- I did do deadlifts just based on internet videos/instruction. Although never at a weight anywhere near max- it was moderate weight and higher reps. Although it was an exercise I never felt like I got much progress out of. Not sure why.

 
Not cautios enough maybe- I did do deadlifts just based on internet videos/instruction. Although never at a weight anywhere near max- it was moderate weight and higher reps. Although it was an exercise I never felt like I got much progress out of. Not sure why.
To be fair, it’s a full-body lift so the effects aren’t as noticeable by themselves, but I’m a huge believer in the deadlift as a base-builder for overall strength/size gains.

It seems to have a snowball effect for a lot of lifters incuding myself, but like with any one lift, it takes some time.

 
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To be fair, it’s a full-body lift so the effects aren’t as noticeable by themselves, but I’m a huge believer in the deadlift as a base-builder for overall strength/size gains.

It seems to have a snowball effect for a lot of lifters incuding myself, but like with any one lift, it takes some time.
It's a great lift, but an advanced one. That's all I'll say about that. 

 
glvsav37 said:
Where are you guys working out? 

Big chain Gym? Local Average Joe place? Home-based Gym? 

Chain gyms are popping up all over by me, but I am always hesitant to even walk into one of them. 
I work at a college one building from the weight room - I'm fortunate to just walk over at lunch like I will in a few minutes.  I just do free weights, kettlebells, and body weight exercises.

I used to have a greater attention to detail about my routine, but over the last few years my focus has shifted to running/racing.  Now that I just use lifting to supplement running I'm usually just in maintenance mode, so I do exercises my body is familiar with - save the 'out of your comfort zone' energy for priority running workouts.  I am more regimented the couple times per year I go into strength building though.

 
Deadlifts are somewhat optional if you want to program around it.  Layne Norton who does the PHAT/PHUL programs around deadlifts using Romanian Deadlifts and Rackpulls with front squats for reps.  I think a decent argument could be made that deadlifts are a little too taxing to the central nervous system to perform for max, and they are sub optimal from a volume perspective.  

I program around deadlifts about half the year with RDLS and cable pull thrus.  

I would also say that doing traditional deadlifts on leg days is a great way to build up a lot of fatigue and put yourself in a really bad situation for recovery.  Deadlifts should be thought of as a back day movement or a pull movement.  I would say imo, but this is probably backed by enough research now to go with it.

 
Spike said:
Lotta heavy lifting with all of those acronyms. 
I posed a link that explains it all in the next post, fyi. Couldn't find a way to edit the post on mobile.  neat board. 

 
jwb said:
I know you're just being snarky, but this is exactly why some people won't even set foot in a gym. 

Yes, I lift. And use some of the machines too. I even finish up on the treadmill next to the chunky housewives.

I don't care if someone goes to a serious gym, Planet Fitness, or buys a Bowflex from an infomercial. Just start - it's really good for you. 
I was joking, but Planet Fitness is not a great place to be long term.  They are tough on barbell lifters and really want to push you to do 30 min of cardio and GTFO.  If it's all you have, fine.  

 
50 years old. Lift occasionally and I love being in shape. I definitely notice the difference when I'm not lifting ...

especially in my legs. Stairs at work become a chore and my knees ache if I'm out of shape.

 My problem is finding the time.

Do any of you "5 days a week" lifters have jobs?

I wake up at 6am to get ready for work. Get home from work 630-7pm. 

By the time I make dinner and finish eating it's 730-8pm and I'm ready for the couch.

Tried the "getting up early to work out" before work. Set the alarm for 430am. That didn't last long. I was exhausted and felt like crap all day.

Now I get a quick workout in 2 or 3 times a week after work ... if I'm not needed to cut the grass or fix something house or car related that night.

It's enough to keep me in shape anyway.

I'm envious of those that can go to a gym and spend a couple hours a day, every day.  I don't want to rush retirement ... but Work sucks.  :thumbdown:
Short version - again, I'm very fortunate to work at a place in which I can feasibly exercise over lunch that is also only 3 miles from my house.

I exercise 6-7 days per week, have a day job, at least 1 side hustle at any given time (rotates between 3 - some overlap at times), and also have 3 kids age 3-8 at home.  But I think clearer and faster when I exercise frequently, so I get things done quicker without trying harder.  Now I'm not going to be full throttle all day every day - all that #### catches up to you at times.  Like clock work I start to struggle at some point on Thursday every week.  I build my schedule every week with that in mind though. 

My biggest issues are when I'm out of structure - i.e. a long weekend away.  When I'm in structure I usually have more than enough energy to go 7-8 M-W, 7-6 Th, 7-"5" F, then a busy Saturday.  Ensuring the Sunday reset day is very important though.  It isn't always possible, but how my week goes is usually a function of my Sunday.  

 
I was joking, but Planet Fitness is not a great place to be long term.  They are tough on barbell lifters and really want to push you to do 30 min of cardio and GTFO.  If it's all you have, fine.  
I know you're just kidding. Yea, it's prettymuch all I have unless I want to drive 20 min each way (I don't). But I like it - it's cheap, 5 minutes away, and has enough for me. 

To the larger issue I mentioned in my post, this is kind of the stigma that gyms get. That if you're not dropping barbells, you're not really doing it. I see older guys at PF spending 30 minutes on just the machines, and you know what, great for them. They run circles around their peers in a  "not needing a walker at 70" aspect. Not everyone has to go up up up and have constantly increasing goals.  It's all good. The biggest thing in working out is just doing it in the first place. There are lots of directions to go after you start - your way is just one way. Granted, it may be *the* way if you want to look like your avatar, but a lot of people don't care about that. 

 
Deadlifts are somewhat optional if you want to program around it.  Layne Norton who does the PHAT/PHUL programs around deadlifts using Romanian Deadlifts and Rackpulls with front squats for reps.  I think a decent argument could be made that deadlifts are a little too taxing to the central nervous system to perform for max, and they are sub optimal from a volume perspective.  

I program around deadlifts about half the year with RDLS and cable pull thrus.  

I would also say that doing traditional deadlifts on leg days is a great way to build up a lot of fatigue and put yourself in a really bad situation for recovery.  Deadlifts should be thought of as a back day movement or a pull movement.  I would say imo, but this is probably backed by enough research now to go with it.
I squat & deadlift on the same day, but my volume isn’t as high as many people.

I experimented with different ways & came back to squat/bench/deadlift for “A” & overhead press/Pendlay row/leg press for “B” because I prefer to have a harder day (A) & an easier day (B) which automatically happens due to the very nature of the individual lifts.

At 60, I’d be a good candidate to see CNS fatigue if it was too much, but no problems thus far & I’ve been doing it for months.

 
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I believe I’m in the majority of the age demographic of this board. Lolz. I’ll be 50 this month. 

SICK, MAD GAINZ BRO, are a thing of the past. I don’t max out anything. Tom Brady has it right imho. Long and lean and flexible is the way to go.  I do a grip of push and pull exercises with an emphasis on keeping an elevated heart rate. I do some sort of core exercise in between every 2/3 excercise set. I can plank forever.  I do 2 or 3 days of full body and 2/3 days of isolation  ie: legs. Throw in at least 15 minutes of cardio and a 10 minute sauna stretch session, and I feel and look great. 

5-10 185# 15-17% body fat and I drink too many beers.  

Eta:  all of this is accomplished in about an hour. 

 
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I know you're just kidding. Yea, it's prettymuch all I have unless I want to drive 20 min each way (I don't). But I like it - it's cheap, 5 minutes away, and has enough for me. 

To the larger issue I mentioned in my post, this is kind of the stigma that gyms get. That if you're not dropping barbells, you're not really doing it. I see older guys at PF spending 30 minutes on just the machines, and you know what, great for them. They run circles around their peers in a  "not needing a walker at 70" aspect. Not everyone has to go up up up and have constantly increasing goals.  It's all good. The biggest thing in working out is just doing it in the first place. There are lots of directions to go after you start - your way is just one way. Granted, it may be *the* way if you want to look like your avatar, but a lot of people don't care about that. 
F that macho BS. You’ve got it right. If you’re doing anything, you’re already ahead of most people. I smile inside as I do my single plate/single leg press next to the dude with 7 plates on a side about to shoot his schpincter across the room. No thanks. 

 
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Deadlifts are somewhat optional if you want to program around it.  Layne Norton who does the PHAT/PHUL programs around deadlifts using Romanian Deadlifts and Rackpulls with front squats for reps.  I think a decent argument could be made that deadlifts are a little too taxing to the central nervous system to perform for max, and they are sub optimal from a volume perspective.  

I program around deadlifts about half the year with RDLS and cable pull thrus.  

I would also say that doing traditional deadlifts on leg days is a great way to build up a lot of fatigue and put yourself in a really bad situation for recovery.  Deadlifts should be thought of as a back day movement or a pull movement.  I would say imo, but this is probably backed by enough research now to go with it.
I always did deadlifts as part of the back day as well. Seems to make sense. 

I posed a link that explains it all in the next post, fyi. Couldn't find a way to edit the post on mobile.  neat board. 
You hit the edit button

 
For me it's 100% about the benefits mentally. I started lifting when I was sort of in a dark place around a year and a half ago, and it's basically turned me from moody into good natured. I'd done some running before, but the physical activity and hormone increase turned me around.

Fast forward to this year and I hurt my shoulder being dumb and have had some knee problems from running (and probably being dumb lifting), so I've been sidelined for a couple of months. The other day I sat around basically falling into my old habits as far as being a moody SOB. Shorter days and bad sleep undoubtedly pay a role, but not being able to lift consistently is huge.

After that I started to ease back into it extremely slowly, and I already feel better. I thought I looked good before I started lifting, and lifting certainly made me look better, but it wasn't a game changer. I'd recommend anyone falling into the doldrums or anyone who finds themselves moody or upset for no reason to look into lifting. 

 
I was joking, but Planet Fitness is not a great place to be long term.  They are tough on barbell lifters and really want to push you to do 30 min of cardio and GTFO.  If it's all you have, fine.  
thats kinda why I was asking in the 1st place. I have a ton of these franchise gyms popping up around me but i'm afraid to get locked in to a bad deal and/or find out they suck. I don't see a lot of small private gyms but I'm not really looking either. I'll keep my eyes open. Prob won't go back to crossfit 

 
thats kinda why I was asking in the 1st place. I have a ton of these franchise gyms popping up around me but i'm afraid to get locked in to a bad deal and/or find out they suck. I don't see a lot of small private gyms but I'm not really looking either. I'll keep my eyes open. Prob won't go back to crossfit 
Planet Fitness is a great deal, imo.  Their cheapest plan is something like $10/month with like a $40 annual fee.  That's nothing compared to a lot of other places.

 
Not cautios enough maybe- I did do deadlifts just based on internet videos/instruction. Although never at a weight anywhere near max- it was moderate weight and higher reps. Although it was an exercise I never felt like I got much progress out of. Not sure why.
A trainer once stopped me at the gym and was like "dude you're gonna kill your back."  Apparently my deadlift form was ungood.  I watched some more Youtube vids and continued to do them, and I think it's improved.  I'm not doing tons and tons of weight -- My final set is 6 reps at 250/260lbs.  But I've never felt a strain or hurting myself; it gets my lungs going like crazy, really great workout; and I feel like it has improved my core and overall strength in my back and legs.  So, I'll continue to do deadlifts.  Probably I could go up in weight, and maybe I will start to once I get back into the swing, but one of the limiting factors for me has been my grip -- hands just get tired holding the bar.

In any event, I'm a big believer in squats and deadlifts.  I also never did squats or leg press in my life, but now I'm doing leg press for sets with what is for me a decent amount of weight (400+lbs).  And I've noticed the added muscle in my legs as a result.

Lately the upper body areas I want to focus on are shoulders.  I don't mind doing isolated movements there, because I think it's worth the time spend.  Same thing for triceps, which I've finally gotten noticeable improvement from.  But curls just feel like a total waste of time at this point.  I'm getting that from doing rows, I don't need to isolate them.

 
50 years old. Lift occasionally and I love being in shape. I definitely notice the difference when I'm not lifting ...

especially in my legs. Stairs at work become a chore and my knees ache if I'm out of shape.

 My problem is finding the time.

Do any of you "5 days a week" lifters have jobs?

I wake up at 6am to get ready for work. Get home from work 630-7pm. 

By the time I make dinner and finish eating it's 730-8pm and I'm ready for the couch.

Tried the "getting up early to work out" before work. Set the alarm for 430am. That didn't last long. I was exhausted and felt like crap all day.

Now I get a quick workout in 2 or 3 times a week after work ... if I'm not needed to cut the grass or fix something house or car related that night.

It's enough to keep me in shape anyway.

I'm envious of those that can go to a gym and spend a couple hours a day, every day.  I don't want to rush retirement ... but Work sucks.  :thumbdown:
I work a ton, travel a decent amount, and have three small kids.  I finally put the excuses away a year and a half ago and have gone consistently since then.

I realized that the one and only time during the day that is all mine is before dawn.  So I started setting my alarm at 4:45am.  I'm at the gym when it opens at 5am.  I'm home at 6am.  Gives me a half hour to have some coffee, get through e-mail, whip up breakfast for the kids before they come down.  Then it's off to getting ready for work.  And I love it.  I've been out of commission for a couple of weeks now, and I hate it.  I still get up early without an alarm -- my body is just programmed that way now.  I miss the gym.

The bottom line is I can't go consistently during the work day, because things always come up.  I can't consistently go during lunch.  In the evening I'm home late usually, and in any event, I want to see my wife and kids (and I'm way too tired to feel like going to the gym).  The one and only option I had for getting into a consistent routine is before 6am.  So I finally had to just get disgusted enough with myself to do it.  Best decision I've made in a long time.

Feeling great about it overall, made some nice progress, but I still need to work on my diet. I'm slowly improving my (bad) alcohol intake, and if I could just get my diet to be healthier so I could get from 24% bf down to the 15% ballpark, I'd feel unstoppable.  But cracking the workout problem was a first step in all this.  Eventually I'll solve for the diet stuff.

 
A trainer once stopped me at the gym and was like "dude you're gonna kill your back."  Apparently my deadlift form was ungood.  I watched some more Youtube vids and continued to do them, and I think it's improved.  I'm not doing tons and tons of weight -- My final set is 6 reps at 250/260lbs.  But I've never felt a strain or hurting myself; it gets my lungs going like crazy, really great workout; and I feel like it has improved my core and overall strength in my back and legs.  So, I'll continue to do deadlifts.  Probably I could go up in weight, and maybe I will start to once I get back into the swing, but one of the limiting factors for me has been my grip -- hands just get tired holding the bar.

In any event, I'm a big believer in squats and deadlifts.  I also never did squats or leg press in my life, but now I'm doing leg press for sets with what is for me a decent amount of weight (400+lbs).  And I've noticed the added muscle in my legs as a result.

Lately the upper body areas I want to focus on are shoulders.  I don't mind doing isolated movements there, because I think it's worth the time spend.  Same thing for triceps, which I've finally gotten noticeable improvement from.  But curls just feel like a total waste of time at this point.  I'm getting that from doing rows, I don't need to isolate them.
You can alternate your grip on the deadlift (pronate one & supinate the other). You can also do a hook grip (thumbs under fingers). That would probably help if you’re not doing it now. I use a traditional grip (so far), but my grip is one of my stronger points.

As far as biceps, I agree. I don’t do any direct arm work so I supinate my row (Pendlay version) so the bicep is more involved & it doesn’t take away anything from your back. I can also do more weight that way (which makes sense).

 
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BTW, forgot to mention straps. If you need them, use them, IMO.

You don’t want your grip to be a limiting factor in the deadlift. You can always do some grip work to improve strength.

 
ately the upper body areas I want to focus on are shoulders.  I don't mind doing isolated movements there, because I think it's worth the time spend.  Same thing for triceps, which I've finally gotten noticeable improvement from.  But curls just feel like a total waste of time at this point.  I'm getting that from doing rows, I don't need to isolate them.
I'd probably argue if you feel your biceps doing rows you might be doing them wrong.

The best sort of combo movement for biceps are weighted chins imo.  Gets a lot of the back working and get to hit biceps too.  I used to avoid chins and just do straight pull ups because they are more direct back work.  

I now throw biceps curls in on leg days during rest.  Mostly just to kill time.  It's probably optional, but whatever.  I do think it is more of a pre-hab movement as there is some risk of biceps strain/tear doing some pressing movements.  Same reason I do face pulls.  

 
I'd probably argue if you feel your biceps doing rows you might be doing them wrong.

The best sort of combo movement for biceps are weighted chins imo.  Gets a lot of the back working and get to hit biceps too.  I used to avoid chins and just do straight pull ups because they are more direct back work.  

I now throw biceps curls in on leg days during rest.  Mostly just to kill time.  It's probably optional, but whatever.  I do think it is more of a pre-hab movement as there is some risk of biceps strain/tear doing some pressing movements.  Same reason I do face pulls.  
I supinate my grip on the Pendlay row to get biceps activated.

EMG studies show supinating your grip activates more biceps without taking away from your back (which is why most people can do more weight with a supinated grip). Then again, I don’t do direct arm work.

As far as triceps, bench & overhead press make mine blow up (over time), but everybody is different.

 
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You can alternate your grip on the deadlift (pronate one & supinate the other). You can also do a hook grip (thumbs under fingers). That would probably help if you’re not doing it now. I use a traditional grip (so far), but my grip is one of my stronger points.

As far as biceps, I agree. I don’t do any direct arm work so I supinate my row (Pendlay version) so the bicep is more involved & it doesn’t take away anything from your back. I can also do more weight that way (which makes sense).
Not a fan of this. Even with rotating grip you will develop muscle imbalance at best or tear your bicep at worst.

 
Not a fan of this. Even with rotating grip you will develop muscle imbalance at best or tear your bicep at worst.
I've never tried it so I can't comment too much on it, but you're supposed to switch hands often to keep from having imbalances. I know you can tear your bicep with a traditional grip, as well. 

My point was don't let your grip determine how much you can deadlift. Definitely don't let your grip hinder your deadlift, but as you stated, the potential problems with an over/under grip are something to be aware of.

Hook grip is better, but I hear it can be a ##### getting used to it, LOL. Luckily, my grip has always been really strong (probably from years of wrestling) & I haven't had to go away from a traditional grip yet.

 
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I've always played sports, and I've lifted seriously for probably the last 20 years. I've tried pretty much every program imaginable, and got to a point where I just design my own programs based on what my current goals. I've had my best results with 5x5 linear (AKA Mad Cow) for strength, and Hypertrophy Cluster Training for size, but a combo program like PHUL or Power/Muscle/Burn can be really good too.

unfortunately, a couple years I had to have one of my kidneys removed, and I've never really gotten back to the level I was at pre-surgery. I'm still a dedicated lifter, but I just can't pound the protein intake like I used too. ?

anyway, I love lifting, and I think it's an amazingly beneficial activity for pretty much anyone who has the motivation to dedicate some time & effort to it. 

 

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