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would it be legal...... (1 Viewer)

wikkidpissah

Footballguy
.....to pay a QB on a rookie contract, say 10million bucks extra not to do commercials.

even though i love the Baker Mayfield-lives-at-the-stadium angle, i've since never felt he did anything that wasnt more for his brand than his team, even these bowls of determined awful he's been serving us since the shoulder.

during the Patriots 917-3 game w Jacksonville, they keep going to commercials of the confused child known as Trevor Lawrence playing with his wind machine so we'll eat soup or sumn. cant really tell which has more of his interest, but i really dont want to think of hair & sammiches when i slap down $150 to watch a guy play

forget the racial politics of Colin Kaepernick - i was more concerned that he spent more time after his breakout year making commercials instead of watching film than if he'd even genuflected to Hitler before ballgames.

anyways..............does anybody know how the CBA/cap/etc might deal with a "no-commercial" contract?

 
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Gally

Footballguy
I would guess the NFLPA would have serious issues with a team preventing a player from getting endorsements and doing commercials.  That is a major stream of income for the players (yes I realize you are suggesting the team make up for that by paying them not to do commercials) that isn't related to the team itself.  That diversification would probably be a big talking point if a team ever tried to do this.  

 

ignatiusjreilly

Footballguy
I mean, the entire point of a rookie wage scale is to cap the money players can receive on those contracts. So yeah, I would imagine any kind of side payments -- whether it's not to do commercials, or to mow the owner's lawn, or not to date his daughter -- would violate the CBA.

A related question is whether teams could put a rider in players' contracts forbidding them from doing commercials, the way they can forbid them from, say, riding motorcycles. And there I agree with Gally that the PA would fight them tooth and nail on such provisions. They could try to negotiate it as a provision in the next CBA, but I can't imagine the players ever letting that door crack open.

 

wikkidpissah

Footballguy
but you get my point, right? wouldnt all three have represented their teams better without seeking the commercial spotlight and isnt that a valid consideration?

 

fatness

against the grain
.....to pay a QB on a rookie contract, say 10million bucks extra not to do commercials.
Teams can't.

Private entities can offer them money to do commercials, so private entities can also offer them money to not do commercials. If enough easily-irritated viewers pool their money they could offer it. 

 

Marauder

Footballguy
but you get my point, right? wouldnt all three have represented their teams better without seeking the commercial spotlight and isnt that a valid consideration?
It sure seems that way to me.   I remember seeing the improvement that Lamar Jackson made as a passer between his first and second year and contrasting it to Baker Mayfield's regression.  It seemed obvious that Lamar worked hard on his game in the offseason and Baker did not.   I don't think there's anything the teams can do about it though.

 

Gally

Footballguy
but you get my point, right? wouldnt all three have represented their teams better without seeking the commercial spotlight and isnt that a valid consideration?
I think the teams (and more likely the NFL itself) want the commercials and notoriety as even "bad press is good press" to make the NFL front and center all year long.  

 

wikkidpissah

Footballguy
I think the teams (and more likely the NFL itself) want the commercials and notoriety as even "bad press is good press" to make the NFL front and center all year long.  


that's publicist-think and, therefore, wrong even if right. we switch on for one reason - fine-tuned violence & excellence without serious consequence. the restaging of the battles we've been fighting since the Monolith appeared, the purest alcohol that can be squoze from the human id. and there's an algorithm in Belichick's closet which quantifies public distraction and the fledgling QB, i'm sure

 

Gally

Footballguy
that's publicist-think and, therefore, wrong even if right. we switch on for one reason - fine-tuned violence & excellence without serious consequence. the restaging of the battles we've been fighting since the Monolith appeared, the purest alcohol that can be squoze from the human id. and there's an algorithm in Belichick's closet which quantifies public distraction and the fledgling QB, i'm sure
Right but it is the publicist that drives the ship in a lot of ways.  Plus it's not like these commercials take anything more than a day or two of filming for the player.  There is the ability to do both if you want to put in the effort to improve your craft.  

 

wikkidpissah

Footballguy
Right but it is the publicist that drives the ship in a lot of ways.  Plus it's not like these commercials take anything more than a day or two of filming for the player.  There is the ability to do both if you want to put in the effort to improve your craft.  
oh, i know - it's a publicist's world. that's why we're screwed...

[SIZE=5.25px]as to the distraction of brand-consciousness - that's for the NBA thread[/SIZE]

 

tangfoot

Living Slackmaster
It sure seems that way to me.   I remember seeing the improvement that Lamar Jackson made as a passer between his first and second year and contrasting it to Baker Mayfield's regression.  It seemed obvious that Lamar worked hard on his game in the offseason and Baker did not.   I don't think there's anything the teams can do about it though.
I think the larger issue is that Baker mostly always sucked and Lamar mostly always excelled.

The amount of time spent filming commercials is miniscule and happens outside of time spend practicing or studying. 

 

Dizzy

Footballguy
Baker's commercials are very good... acting chops far exceeding his ability to play QB actually IMO. I'm just old-fashioned this way... don't like seeing a QB with more commercials than he has TD passes, but that's the Browns problem and I'm no fan, so I hope he stays there for the next 10+ years.

This subject came up on the Manning Bros. MNF show. Peyton was denied access to Mac Jones leading up to their coverage of the NEP @ BUF game. He said he knows the patriots PR person well (may have worked together in IND) and it's a matter of team policy to limit their rookie's exposure to the press as they want them focusing on football. Peyton went on to say that IND had the same policy (maybe the same person) and during his rookie season there were limited press interviews, show appearances, etc. and he shot his first commercial during his second year in the league.

Apples and oranges comparing 1998(?) to Baker's time, but interesting comments none the less.

 

CletiusMaximus

Footballguy
but you get my point, right? wouldnt all three have represented their teams better without seeking the commercial spotlight and isnt that a valid consideration?


I don't agree. I think its up to the player, whether they have a drive to work hard and succeed or not. And hard work alone - for most of us - isn't enough. Spending a few days or weeks in the offseason working on endorsements doesn't change that. Even if you could somehow regulate their free time, you can't force them to work hard at football if they're not driven to do it.

Not a comment in any way on Baker Mayfield or any of the others.  I assume as a default position that anyone playing at the NFL level has earned it through hard work, determination and sacrifice, the likes of which most of us can't fathom. 

 

wikkidpissah

Footballguy
I don't agree. I think its up to the player, whether they have a drive to work hard and succeed or not. And hard work alone - for most of us - isn't enough. Spending a few days or weeks in the offseason working on endorsements doesn't change that. Even if you could somehow regulate their free time, you can't force them to work hard at football if they're not driven to do it.

Not a comment in any way on Baker Mayfield or any of the others.  I assume as a default position that anyone playing at the NFL level has earned it through hard work, determination and sacrifice, the likes of which most of us can't fathom. 
agree, EXCEPT when one is attempting to do what only maybe 10 people out of 7 billion can do at any one time - run an NFL offense in a way that makes a difference to one's team's prospects

 

CletiusMaximus

Footballguy
agree, EXCEPT when one is attempting to do what only maybe 10 people out of 7 billion can do at any one time - run an NFL offense in a way that makes a difference to one's team's prospects


The biggest stars are always the biggest brands. Rodgers hosted Jeopardy in addition to his numerous endorsements. Brady runs a multi-million dollar company based on his personal brand. If Broadway Joe can make a pantyhose commercial and still win the Superbowl, I'm not going to fault Mayfield for doing an insurance spot nor blame that for his poor play.

 

Dizzy

Footballguy
No, it's apples to oranges comparing off-season TV spots to in-season access during a playoff run.


Peyton mentioned both... no in-season access or off-season TV spots as a rookie.

Again, just a perception thing. I see Baker CONSTANTLY in commercial spots... and he stinks (as a QB).

 

need2know

Footballguy
I dont think doing commercials has anything to do with baker sucking.   He would have busted regardless.   It was another in a long list of dumb browns picks.

 
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