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"Go up and get the ball at its highest point"


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I hear coaches and color analysts say this all the time, in reference to what receivers (and DBs) need to do in order to bring down a contested pass, particularly a lob or fade. I am pretty sure I understand what they mean, but it is gibberish.

The "highest point" for a given pass is roughly half-way between the QB and its target, given that ball flight is essentially a parabola. Since it is pretty much physically impossible for a receiver to do this, I can only surmise that they mean something slightly different.

More accurately, they should say "jump as high as you can to catch the ball before the other guy does". Obviously that doesn't sound as cool, not to mention that it is such common sense that it doesn't even require saying.

I realize I am nitpicking, but I just find this statement incredibly stupid and I hear it all the time.

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I hear coaches and color analysts say this all the time, in reference to what receivers (and DBs) need to do in order to bring down a contested pass, particularly a lob or fade. I am pretty sure I understand what they mean, but it is gibberish. The "highest point" for a given pass is roughly half-way between the QB and its target, given that ball flight is essentially a parabola. Since it is pretty much physically impossible for a receiver to do this, I can only surmise that they mean something slightly different. More accurately, they should say "jump as high as you can to catch the ball before the other guy does". Obviously that doesn't sound as cool, not to mention that it is such common sense that it doesn't even require saying. I realize I am nitpicking, but I just find this statement incredibly stupid and I hear it all the time.

You are nitpicking... :hophead: If you watch NFL receivers in general, most still catch the ball with their bodies and not their hands, their pass catching fundementals are pretty pathetic....
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I have never heard anyone say this. I've watched football pretty much every Saturday and Sunday during the season for the last 30 years.

You're ####ting me ?
:goodposting:

He may have been watching, but he certainly wasn't listening. I would guess it is probably said once a game, on average.

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My guess is that if you can pull a copy of the Packer/Raider MNF game where Favre was "playing" for his Dad....you'll hear them say it in reference to Javon Walker at least once that game if not more...

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"Go up and get the ball at its highest point" [you can]

The "you can" is implied. Seriously.

That makes sense, I suppose.

Of course, if that's what is meant, why isn't it said that way?

Because they expect the audience to interpret it the way they do (and even the topic starter said he understands what is meant by it.)

Just as annoucers will say something similar to "the Giants will fly to Dallas for the Monday Night game," when they actually mean "(members of the New York) Giants will fly (on an airplane) to Dallas for the Monday Night game."

I even made the mistake of saying the Giants will fly on on plane, when they will actually fly in a plane.

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"Go up and get the ball at its highest point" [you can]

The "you can" is implied. Seriously.

That makes sense, I suppose.

Of course, if that's what is meant, why isn't it said that way?

I even made the mistake of saying the Giants will fly on on plane, when they will actually fly in a plane.
You're dumb. Where did the bondage picnic guy go? Let's get him back in here.
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Maybe it's an east coast thing.

I live roughly an hour north of you and I hear it all the time. You must be yanking our chains.
Nope. Lots of stupid things said by color commentators bug me, but I seriously don't ever remember hearing anyone say this.
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"Go up and get the ball at its highest point" [you can]

The "you can" is implied. Seriously.

That makes sense, I suppose.

Of course, if that's what is meant, why isn't it said that way?

I even made the mistake of saying the Giants will fly on on plane, when they will actually fly in a plane.
You're dumb. Where did the bondage picnic guy go? Let's get him back in here.
It's on [board] a plane. The board is implied. You're cool. Although I don't get the "on on".
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"Go up and get the ball at its highest point" [you can]

The "you can" is implied. Seriously.

That makes sense, I suppose.

Of course, if that's what is meant, why isn't it said that way?

I even made the mistake of saying the Giants will fly on on plane, when they will actually fly in a plane.
You're dumb. Where did the bondage picnic guy go? Let's get him back in here.
It's on [board] a plane. The board is implied. You're cool. Although I don't get the "on on".
:wub:
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Maybe it's an east coast thing.

I live roughly an hour north of you and I hear it all the time. You must be yanking our chains.
Nope. Lots of stupid things said by color commentators bug me, but I seriously don't ever remember hearing anyone say this.
I've heard it, but it's never bothered me. If someone is going to subject announcers to a junior high physics review, I suspect they're not much fun to watch sports with anyway.
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Maybe it's an east coast thing.

I live roughly an hour north of you and I hear it all the time.

You must be yanking our chains.

Nope. Lots of stupid things said by color commentators bug me, but I seriously don't ever remember hearing anyone say this.
I've heard it, but it's never bothered me.

If someone is going to subject announcers to a junior high physics review, I suspect they're not much fun to watch sports with anyway.

Burn!

Wait, you are talking about me...

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I've heard it and it makes sense to me. I think the missing clause from the sentence that needs to be implied is "which is possible." Therefore, think of the sentence now as "a Wr should catch the ball at the highest point which is possible." Essentially what the announcer is saying is that the WR needs to attack the ball by extending his hands up. He shouldn't wait to make a basket catch to assure getting in on the run and he shouldn't "wait for the ball to come to him" (a common phrase which is the inverse of this phrase). By getting the ball "at its highest point possible" the WR is doing everything legally in his power to make sure the DB doesn't make a play on the ball.

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Maybe it's an east coast thing.

I live roughly an hour north of you and I hear it all the time. You must be yanking our chains.
Nope. Lots of stupid things said by color commentators bug me, but I seriously don't ever remember hearing anyone say this.
Hey, it's possible. I've got a friend who swears that he has never heard Madden say: "Come under control in a zone, run away from man-to-man." :shrug:
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Q: As a defensive back, how can you overcome the size differential against a taller receiver?

BB: The first thing is position. The second thing is timing. It's not always about the tallest guy, but it's timing and however much your effort to elevate and get to get to the highest point

9/27/06

LAUNCH

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Yeah, go up and get it at the highest point means..GO UP AND GET IT AT THE HIGHEST POINT YOU CAN POSSIBLY REACH IT AT.Considering your height/vertical.This isn't that stupid.

Except that they don't say "the highest point", or even "your highest point"; they say "its highest point". I agree with the original poster--this is also one of my pet peeves.
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I've only ever heard it in basketball and golf.

I hear it in volleyball a lot - which makes sense. You shouldn't attempt to spike the ball when it's lower than the net. Spike it at the highest point (possible), and hopefully, spike it in a downward direction.
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I have never heard anyone say this. I've watched football pretty much every Saturday and Sunday during the season for the last 30 years.

Madden says this on almost a weekly basis.
I've heard it many times. It's a meathead's way of trying to sound smart while saying "Go up for the ball, don't wait for it to hit you in the chest or fall into your hands at waist level." Pretty obvious advice.
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I have never heard anyone say this. I've watched football pretty much every Saturday and Sunday during the season for the last 30 years.

Madden says this on almost a weekly basis.
Nice avatar, sir.
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Q: As a defensive back, how can you overcome the size differential against a taller receiver?BB: The first thing is position. The second thing is timing. It's not always about the tallest guy, but it's timing and however much your effort to elevate and get to get to the highest point

Why is bigbottom answering questions about being a DB?
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Yeah, go up and get it at the highest point means..GO UP AND GET IT AT THE HIGHEST POINT YOU CAN POSSIBLY REACH IT AT.Considering your height/vertical.This isn't that stupid.

Except that they don't say "the highest point", or even "your highest point"; they say "its highest point". I agree with the original poster--this is also one of my pet peeves.
:goodposting:Theisman used this exact phrase in the Cardinals/Bears game.
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Yeah, go up and get it at the highest point means..GO UP AND GET IT AT THE HIGHEST POINT YOU CAN POSSIBLY REACH IT AT.Considering your height/vertical.This isn't that stupid.

Except that they don't say "the highest point", or even "your highest point"; they say "its highest point". I agree with the original poster--this is also one of my pet peeves.
:goodposting:Theisman used this exact phrase in the Cardinals/Bears game.
Who listens to what Theismann is saying? After 10 years of marriage, I have perfected the ability to tune out useless blather.
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Yeah, go up and get it at the highest point means..GO UP AND GET IT AT THE HIGHEST POINT YOU CAN POSSIBLY REACH IT AT.Considering your height/vertical.This isn't that stupid.

Except that they don't say "the highest point", or even "your highest point"; they say "its highest point". I agree with the original poster--this is also one of my pet peeves.
:goodposting:Theisman used this exact phrase in the Cardinals/Bears game.
Who listens to what Theismann is saying? After 10 years of marriage, I have perfected the ability to tune out useless blather.
Right. So far the examples given are Madden and Theisman. This phrase is officially nonsensical.
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I have never heard anyone say this. I've watched football pretty much every Saturday and Sunday during the season for the last 30 years.

Madden says this on almost a weekly basis.
I've heard it many times. It's a meathead's way of trying to sound smart while saying "Go up for the ball, don't wait for it to hit you in the chest or fall into your hands at waist level." Pretty obvious advice.
It's also utter nonsense. Unless the pass is an "alley oop" style high-arcing ball coming almost straight down, there is only one location where it will intersect with the line of your leap. If the ball is coming on an arc where it intersects the air space over your location at a height of 7 feet, it doesn't do you any good to leap higher.
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I have never heard anyone say this. I've watched football pretty much every Saturday and Sunday during the season for the last 30 years.

Madden says this on almost a weekly basis.
I've heard it many times. It's a meathead's way of trying to sound smart while saying "Go up for the ball, don't wait for it to hit you in the chest or fall into your hands at waist level." Pretty obvious advice.
It's also utter nonsense. Unless the pass is an "alley oop" style high-arcing ball coming almost straight down, there is only one location where it will intersect with the line of your leap. If the ball is coming on an arc where it intersects the air space over your location at a height of 7 feet, it doesn't do you any good to leap higher.
While mostly true, there is a range along a ball's trajectory where a receiver could meet some balls. In most examples, the concept being discussed relies on the QB throwing the ball to the highest point possible for a particular receiver to catch it. It really has nothing to do with the receiver, other than he went up to catch the ball.
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Yeah, go up and get it at the highest point means..

GO UP AND GET IT AT THE HIGHEST POINT YOU CAN POSSIBLY REACH IT AT.

Considering your height/vertical.

This isn't that stupid.

Except that they don't say "the highest point", or even "your highest point"; they say "its highest point". I agree with the original poster--this is also one of my pet peeves.
:goodposting:

Theisman used this exact phrase in the Cardinals/Bears game.

Who listens to what Theismann is saying? After 10 years of marriage, I have perfected the ability to tune out useless blather.
Right. So far the examples given are Madden and Theisman. This phrase is officially nonsensical.
Agreed.
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During the replay of a touchdown catch this past Sunday, the color commentator (Madden maybe?) said "that's the definition of catching the ball at it's highest point." ORLY?

The phrase always annoyed me a little bit, but throwing "definition" in there took it to another level. :wall:

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I think what it really means is having the instincts to take the ball out of the air instead of waiting for it to come down to you - see Randy Moss not catching the TD vs. Denver for an example of not getting the ball its highest point.

Highest point = highest point it will be at in the area above the receiver and defender.

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I think what it really means is having the instincts to take the ball out of the air instead of waiting for it to come down to you - see Randy Moss not catching the TD vs. Denver for an example of not getting the ball its highest point.Highest point = highest point it will be at in the area above the receiver and defender.

I just assume that when I'm watching a game involving actual humans who are subject to the laws of gravity, "catchable" is implied.
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