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I have a 7 pound 4 bone prime rib. I've never cooked one before and have read confilicting reports on the temp of the meat for medium rare. I've read that anything over 120 degrees is ruining the meat and anything under 130 is rare?? anyone have any experience cooking a prime rib. My family likes theirs a bit more done than I but i figure i can just give them the end pieces.

My original plan is to cook it at 450 degrees for about 15 mins to seer (sp) it then drop it down to 250 degrees for about 20mins for each pound but im not so much interested in how long to cook it as much as the inside temp of the rib. Im thinking about taking it out of the oven when it hits 120 degrees and letting it sit about 20 mins covered up so it should be ready to eat at about 125 degrees.

Is this too rare in your opinion or should i leave it in longer? ugh :hifive:

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https://imgur.com/gallery/Y2whD   beautifully smoked 

Some great work in here gents (though Wilked please tell Edward Scissorhands to stay away from the carving station next year).  Actually think a lot of different methods can work but people are gettin

Almost 7 lb ribeye, smoked for 3 hours at 250

Check out the Good Eats recipe on Food Network. He sears the meat to begin with and then finishes at a low temperature underneath a clay pot. It's really very good.

Medium Rare is right around 129 but you need to remove it from the oven at about 123-124 and let it sit and rise to 129.

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Actually - I was wrong - he crusts at the end.

Remove any plastic wrapping or butcher's paper from the roast. Place the standing rib roast upright onto a half sheet pan fitted with a rack. The rack is essential for drainage. Place dry towels loosely on top of the roast. This will help to draw moisture away from the meat. Place into a refrigerator at approximately 50 to 60 percent humidity and between 34 and 38 degrees F. You can measure both with a refrigerator thermometer. Change the towels daily for 3 days. Place a 16-inch round azalea terra cotta planter into a cold oven. Invert the planter to become a lid over a pizza stone or the bottom of the planter. The oven should be cold to start, to avoid any cracking in the terra cotta pieces. Turn the oven to 250 degrees F. Remove the roast from the refrigerator and rub with canola oil. Remember to rub the bones with oil, as well. Once the roast is completely coated with oil cover the roast with kosher salt, about half a teaspoon per bone. Next, rub with freshly ground pepper to coat the surface. Place the roast over a glass bake-ware dish slightly smaller than the length of the roast. This will catch the drippings needed for the sauce. Finally, place a probe thermometer into the center of the roast and set for 118 degrees. Put the roast and the bake-ware dish onto the pizza stone, cover with the terra cotta pot, and return to the oven. Turn the oven down to 200 degrees F and roast until internal temperature is achieved. Remove the roast and turn oven up to 500 degrees F. Remove the terra cotta lid and recover with heavy-duty foil. Allow the roast to rest until an internal temperature of 130 degrees F. is reached. Place the roast back into the preheated 500 degree F oven for about 10 minutes or until you've achieved your desired crust. Remove and transfer roast to a cutting board. Keep covered with foil until ready to serve. Degrease the juices in the glass pan. Place the pan over low heat and deglaze with 1 cup of water. Add the wine and reduce by half. Roll the sage leaves in between your fingers to release the flavors and aroma. Add to the sauce and cook for 1 minute. Strain and serve on the side.

If I remember from the show, the crusting at the end is so short and the internal cooking has already stopped so it won't cook the medium rare portion any more - just the crust.
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I have a 7 pound 4 bone prime rib. I've never cooked one before and have read confilicting reports on the temp of the meat for medium rare. I've read that anything over 120 degrees is ruining the meat and anything under 130 is rare?? anyone have any experience cooking a prime rib. My family likes theirs a bit more done than I but i figure i can just give them the end pieces.My original plan is to cook it at 450 degrees for about 15 mins to seer (sp) it then drop it down to 250 degrees for about 20mins for each pound but im not so much interested in how long to cook it as much as the inside temp of the rib. Im thinking about taking it out of the oven when it hits 120 degrees and letting it sit about 20 mins covered up so it should be ready to eat at about 125 degrees. Is this too rare in your opinion or should i leave it in longer? ugh :(

I would expect one of the pro chefs on the board to respond with more official answers, but I figure I can answer from a laymans perspective.Screw turkey/ham and the rest. I cook prime rib for the big occasions, at least 4 a year, including the one I will cook for Christmas. I don't see why people screw with turkey when they are harder work and don't taste as good.I forget what website I got directions from, but I cook mine for 15 minutes at 525 (yes that is hot) and then reduce it to 325 for about 20 minutes per pound. But the key is the internal temp, don't go by time. If you are going to do this much (and you will, because you will find it so easy and better than more traditional meats) buy a thermometer that sits on top of the counter with a probe that goes down into the meat. That way you don't have to keep opening the oven and letting out the heat. Anyway, to your question. Typically rare is 135. I take mine out at 130 and it gets to 135-140, which is a little more done than most restaurants. But, most people don't eat meat that is as bloody as prime rib is in good restaurants. I find I please more of the crowd this way and still have it rare enough for those that like it that way.One more key to success, did you rub it with anything? I find the seasoning that you rub on it takes it from great to highly exceptional. My local meat shop has a mix that is wonderful, but I have purchased prime rib rub in a store before. I highly suggest a rub on seasoning. Edited by bigfishboy
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Beef Roast Cooking Temperatures Rare 120° to 125°F center is bright red, pinkish toward the exterior portion Medium Rare 130° to 135°F center is very pink, slightly brown toward the exterior portion Medium 140° to 145°F center is light pink, outer portion is brown Medium Well 150° to 155°F not pink Well Done 160°F and above steak is uniformly brown throughout

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Beef Roast Cooking Temperatures Rare 120° to 125°F center is bright red, pinkish toward the exterior portion Medium Rare 130° to 135°F center is very pink, slightly brown toward the exterior portion Medium 140° to 145°F center is light pink, outer portion is brown Medium Well 150° to 155°F not pink Well Done 160°F and above steak is uniformly brown throughout

Thank you, I was winging it based on what has worked for me. I knew there were multiple great cooks on here that would clean up any errors on my part.I take it out at 130 and get enough red cuts for me and plenty of more done ones for my wife and girls. Company has never complained either. Edited by bigfishboy
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Now Im even more confused. A lady that i work with told me she did a prime rib and took it out when it hit 130 degrees and it was too done. She said she had ruined it. :(

The Key is she took it out at 130. By the time it stopped cooking it was probably 140 and for a lot of people that's way too done for Prime rib. Edited by Drifter
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Now Im even more confused. A lady that i work with told me she did a prime rib and took it out when it hit 130 degrees and it was too done. She said she had ruined it. :(

"Too Done" is subjective. For me, Medium Rare is "Too Done". Carry over cooking will take that 130 to as high as 140 which is bordering on Medium.
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Actually - I was wrong - he crusts at the end.

Remove any plastic wrapping or butcher's paper from the roast. Place the standing rib roast upright onto a half sheet pan fitted with a rack. The rack is essential for drainage. Place dry towels loosely on top of the roast. This will help to draw moisture away from the meat. Place into a refrigerator at approximately 50 to 60 percent humidity and between 34 and 38 degrees F. You can measure both with a refrigerator thermometer. Change the towels daily for 3 days. Place a 16-inch round azalea terra cotta planter into a cold oven. Invert the planter to become a lid over a pizza stone or the bottom of the planter. The oven should be cold to start, to avoid any cracking in the terra cotta pieces. Turn the oven to 250 degrees F. Remove the roast from the refrigerator and rub with canola oil. Remember to rub the bones with oil, as well. Once the roast is completely coated with oil cover the roast with kosher salt, about half a teaspoon per bone. Next, rub with freshly ground pepper to coat the surface. Place the roast over a glass bake-ware dish slightly smaller than the length of the roast. This will catch the drippings needed for the sauce. Finally, place a probe thermometer into the center of the roast and set for 118 degrees. Put the roast and the bake-ware dish onto the pizza stone, cover with the terra cotta pot, and return to the oven. Turn the oven down to 200 degrees F and roast until internal temperature is achieved. Remove the roast and turn oven up to 500 degrees F. Remove the terra cotta lid and recover with heavy-duty foil. Allow the roast to rest until an internal temperature of 130 degrees F. is reached. Place the roast back into the preheated 500 degree F oven for about 10 minutes or until you've achieved your desired crust. Remove and transfer roast to a cutting board. Keep covered with foil until ready to serve. Degrease the juices in the glass pan. Place the pan over low heat and deglaze with 1 cup of water. Add the wine and reduce by half. Roll the sage leaves in between your fingers to release the flavors and aroma. Add to the sauce and cook for 1 minute. Strain and serve on the side.

If I remember from the show, the crusting at the end is so short and the internal cooking has already stopped so it won't cook the medium rare portion any more - just the crust.
I STRONGLY recommend against the aging UNLESS you are absolutely certain your fridge is at the correct humidity and odor free. Frankly, aging beef is best left to professionals. A Rib Roast is damn fine right out of the butcher's case.
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I just found this quote:

For a classically juicy, red, rare piece of meat, remove the roast from the oven when the internal temperature reaches 110. Lovers of ultra-rare, super tender beef that quivers like jelly may pull their ribs at 105. If you are a fan of better done beef, pull at 115. Gods help you if you pull any later than 120, as this is the way to dry, overdone meat.

from:http://members.tripod.com/~BayGourmet/primerib.html.

WOW! I cant imagine pulling it out that soon. I cant imagine pulling it out at 120 even.

I will have to search for other opinions.

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Actually - I was wrong - he crusts at the end.

Remove any plastic wrapping or butcher's paper from the roast. Place the standing rib roast upright onto a half sheet pan fitted with a rack. The rack is essential for drainage. Place dry towels loosely on top of the roast. This will help to draw moisture away from the meat. Place into a refrigerator at approximately 50 to 60 percent humidity and between 34 and 38 degrees F. You can measure both with a refrigerator thermometer. Change the towels daily for 3 days. Place a 16-inch round azalea terra cotta planter into a cold oven. Invert the planter to become a lid over a pizza stone or the bottom of the planter. The oven should be cold to start, to avoid any cracking in the terra cotta pieces. Turn the oven to 250 degrees F. Remove the roast from the refrigerator and rub with canola oil. Remember to rub the bones with oil, as well. Once the roast is completely coated with oil cover the roast with kosher salt, about half a teaspoon per bone. Next, rub with freshly ground pepper to coat the surface. Place the roast over a glass bake-ware dish slightly smaller than the length of the roast. This will catch the drippings needed for the sauce. Finally, place a probe thermometer into the center of the roast and set for 118 degrees. Put the roast and the bake-ware dish onto the pizza stone, cover with the terra cotta pot, and return to the oven. Turn the oven down to 200 degrees F and roast until internal temperature is achieved. Remove the roast and turn oven up to 500 degrees F. Remove the terra cotta lid and recover with heavy-duty foil. Allow the roast to rest until an internal temperature of 130 degrees F. is reached. Place the roast back into the preheated 500 degree F oven for about 10 minutes or until you've achieved your desired crust. Remove and transfer roast to a cutting board. Keep covered with foil until ready to serve. Degrease the juices in the glass pan. Place the pan over low heat and deglaze with 1 cup of water. Add the wine and reduce by half. Roll the sage leaves in between your fingers to release the flavors and aroma. Add to the sauce and cook for 1 minute. Strain and serve on the side.

If I remember from the show, the crusting at the end is so short and the internal cooking has already stopped so it won't cook the medium rare portion any more - just the crust.
I STRONGLY recommend against the aging UNLESS you are absolutely certain your fridge is at the correct humidity and odor free. Frankly, aging beef is best left to professionals. A Rib Roast is damn fine right out of the butcher's case.
I did it last year and it worked out very nicely.
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I think the safe bet is to keep it in until it reaches 125 degrees and hope for the best. I planned on using plain ol Garlic salt and black pepper as my rub. :(

Garlic salt? :no:Kosher salt is the only way to go. Put on some garlic powder if you must but use kosher salt.
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here is another from: http://whatscookingamerica.net/Beef/ClassicPrimeRib.htm

About 1/2 hour before the estimated end of the roasting time, begin checking the internal temperature (use a good instant-read digital meat thermometer). Insert meat thermometer so tip is in thickest part of beef, not resting in fat or touching bone. Cook until rib roast reaches an internal temperature of 120°F. Remove from oven, cover with aluminum foil, and let sit approximately 20 to 30 minutes. NOTE: Remember, the roast will continue to cook as it sets. The temperature will rise to 125 to 130° F internal temperature (medium rare).

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Now Im even more confused. A lady that i work with told me she did a prime rib and took it out when it hit 130 degrees and it was too done. She said she had ruined it. :(

"Too Done" is subjective. For me, Medium Rare is "Too Done". Carry over cooking will take that 130 to as high as 140 which is bordering on Medium.
It is clear to me, after researching a bit, that compared to most, I have been cooking it longer than needed.Because "doneness" is personal preference (and apparently my family likes it more done) you need to use the info provided and tailor it to your needs. If you want it bloody, take it out at 120 or 115. If not take it out later. It is not rocket science and you won't "ruin" it. I accidently cooked one to 140 a couple years back before I got my digital external thermometer. It was brown, and drier than anyone wanted for prime rib, but it still made a heck of a pot roast!I will re-iterate from the poster about the salt. Normal salt won't work well it doesn't make a crust and absorbs into the meat making it salty. One of those websites I posted discussed that.
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:(

I just found this quote:For a classically juicy, red, rare piece of meat, remove the roast from the oven when the internal temperature reaches 110. Lovers of ultra-rare, super tender beef that quivers like jelly may pull their ribs at 105. If you are a fan of better done beef, pull at 115. Gods help you if you pull any later than 120, as this is the way to dry, overdone meat.from:http://members.tripod.com/~BayGourmet/primerib.html.WOW! I cant imagine pulling it out that soon. I cant imagine pulling it out at 120 even.I will have to search for other opinions.

I read that same thing online which brought me here. It seems that medium rare is anywhere between 105 - 130. That cant be right. :loco:
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I think the safe bet is to keep it in until it reaches 125 degrees and hope for the best. I planned on using plain ol Garlic salt and black pepper as my rub. :(

Garlic salt? :no:Kosher salt is the only way to go. Put on some garlic powder if you must but use kosher salt.
Dont know why Garlic Salt would be so bad, i use it on my steaks all the time.
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:(

I just found this quote:For a classically juicy, red, rare piece of meat, remove the roast from the oven when the internal temperature reaches 110. Lovers of ultra-rare, super tender beef that quivers like jelly may pull their ribs at 105. If you are a fan of better done beef, pull at 115. Gods help you if you pull any later than 120, as this is the way to dry, overdone meat.from:http://members.tripod.com/~BayGourmet/primerib.html.WOW! I cant imagine pulling it out that soon. I cant imagine pulling it out at 120 even.I will have to search for other opinions.

I read that same thing online which brought me here. It seems that medium rare is anywhere between 105 - 130. That cant be right. :loco:
If it's below 120 (all done temperature - not take out temperature), it's definitely rare. No one would interpret that as medium rare.
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I think the safe bet is to keep it in until it reaches 125 degrees and hope for the best. I planned on using plain ol Garlic salt and black pepper as my rub. :(

Garlic salt? :no:Kosher salt is the only way to go. Put on some garlic powder if you must but use kosher salt.
Dont know why Garlic Salt would be so bad, i use it on my steaks all the time.
Start using kosher salt (and if you want garlic, garlic powder) and your tastebuds will thank you.Trust me
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Actually - I was wrong - he crusts at the end.

Remove any plastic wrapping or butcher's paper from the roast. Place the standing rib roast upright onto a half sheet pan fitted with a rack. The rack is essential for drainage. Place dry towels loosely on top of the roast. This will help to draw moisture away from the meat. Place into a refrigerator at approximately 50 to 60 percent humidity and between 34 and 38 degrees F. You can measure both with a refrigerator thermometer. Change the towels daily for 3 days. Place a 16-inch round azalea terra cotta planter into a cold oven. Invert the planter to become a lid over a pizza stone or the bottom of the planter. The oven should be cold to start, to avoid any cracking in the terra cotta pieces. Turn the oven to 250 degrees F. Remove the roast from the refrigerator and rub with canola oil. Remember to rub the bones with oil, as well. Once the roast is completely coated with oil cover the roast with kosher salt, about half a teaspoon per bone. Next, rub with freshly ground pepper to coat the surface. Place the roast over a glass bake-ware dish slightly smaller than the length of the roast. This will catch the drippings needed for the sauce. Finally, place a probe thermometer into the center of the roast and set for 118 degrees. Put the roast and the bake-ware dish onto the pizza stone, cover with the terra cotta pot, and return to the oven. Turn the oven down to 200 degrees F and roast until internal temperature is achieved. Remove the roast and turn oven up to 500 degrees F. Remove the terra cotta lid and recover with heavy-duty foil. Allow the roast to rest until an internal temperature of 130 degrees F. is reached. Place the roast back into the preheated 500 degree F oven for about 10 minutes or until you've achieved your desired crust. Remove and transfer roast to a cutting board. Keep covered with foil until ready to serve. Degrease the juices in the glass pan. Place the pan over low heat and deglaze with 1 cup of water. Add the wine and reduce by half. Roll the sage leaves in between your fingers to release the flavors and aroma. Add to the sauce and cook for 1 minute. Strain and serve on the side.

If I remember from the show, the crusting at the end is so short and the internal cooking has already stopped so it won't cook the medium rare portion any more - just the crust.
I do mine exactly this way with the exception of the terra cotta pot which I found to be more for wow factor than anything. If your oven is clean, it gets the heat waves bouncing around just fine. Nothing against it, just seemed frivolous.I cooked two last year this exact way Alton Brown describes (less the terra cotta pot) and they were both as good as I've ever had in restaurants. :thumbup:Key is using a remote probe thermometer like a polder where you can keep a constant eye on the temp without having to open the oven.J
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I think the safe bet is to keep it in until it reaches 125 degrees and hope for the best. I planned on using plain ol Garlic salt and black pepper as my rub. :(

Garlic salt? :no:Kosher salt is the only way to go. Put on some garlic powder if you must but use kosher salt.
Dont know why Garlic Salt would be so bad, i use it on my steaks all the time.
Start using kosher salt (and if you want garlic, garlic powder) and your tastebuds will thank you.Trust me
Good enough, Ill have Mrs Tag get me some Kosher salt instead. Would adding some black pepper be wise on this or just the salt?
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I think the safe bet is to keep it in until it reaches 125 degrees and hope for the best. I planned on using plain ol Garlic salt and black pepper as my rub. :(

Garlic salt? :no:Kosher salt is the only way to go. Put on some garlic powder if you must but use kosher salt.
Dont know why Garlic Salt would be so bad, i use it on my steaks all the time.
Start using kosher salt (and if you want garlic, garlic powder) and your tastebuds will thank you.Trust me
Good enough, Ill have Mrs Tag get me some Kosher salt instead. Would adding some black pepper be wise on this or just the salt?
Up to you. I like to use it (you are using a grinder for fresh pepper, not the powdered stuff, right?)
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I do mine exactly this way with the exception of the terra cotta pot which I found to be more for wow factor than anything. If your oven is clean, it gets the heat waves bouncing around just fine. Nothing against it, just seemed frivolous.I cooked two last year this exact way Alton Brown describes (less the terra cotta pot) and they were both as good as I've ever had in restaurants. :thumbup:Key is using a remote probe thermometer like a polder where you can keep a constant eye on the temp without having to open the oven.J

I have a small electric roaster oven that I use, so no terra cotta pot for me either.
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Im doing a prime rib this year for the first time, but Ive cooked hundreds of em in the past when I was a cook at a hotel.

Ill rub with worcestershire, tobasco, minced garlic, then coat with kosher salt, thyme, majoram, oregano, cracked black pepper. In the oven at about 250-260 until temp is about 120. Then let er sit in a warming oven till its time to eat.

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Im doing a prime rib this year for the first time, but Ive cooked hundreds of em in the past when I was a cook at a hotel.Ill rub with worcestershire, tobasco, minced garlic, then coat with kosher salt, thyme, majoram, oregano, cracked black pepper. In the oven at about 250-260 until temp is about 120. Then let er sit in a warming oven till its time to eat.

What time do we show up?
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Make a paste of minced garlic (five cloves), horseradish (1/2 cup), kosher salt (1/4 cup) and cracked pepper (1/4 cup).

Rub the paste really well into the roast.

Cook at 325 for twenty minutes per pound

Remove from oven when it reaches 120

Let stand for twenty minutes before carving.

This RULES!

:yes::yes::yes::yes::yes::yes::yes:

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I always cook boneless rib roasts at Christmas. I take care to find one that has a fairly uniform shape and then just go by time. Thermometer, shermometer. I take the meat out of the fridge and season it, letting it sit til it's close to room temp. Preheat the oven to 500, then turn down the temp when I put the roast in. Cook about 18 minutes per pound. Voila. Nice, dark crusty outside, juicy and tender inside. :drool:

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I always cook boneless rib roasts at Christmas. I take care to find one that has a fairly uniform shape and then just go by time. Thermometer, shermometer. I take the meat out of the fridge and season it, letting it sit til it's close to room temp. Preheat the oven to 500, then turn down the temp when I put the roast in. Cook about 18 minutes per pound. Voila. Nice, dark crusty outside, juicy and tender inside. :drool:

If you're not using a thermometer you're shooting in the dark. Cooking by time is absolutely the worst idea when cooking large items (Turkeys, roasts, etc)
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I always cook boneless rib roasts at Christmas. I take care to find one that has a fairly uniform shape and then just go by time. Thermometer, shermometer. I take the meat out of the fridge and season it, letting it sit til it's close to room temp. Preheat the oven to 500, then turn down the temp when I put the roast in. Cook about 18 minutes per pound. Voila. Nice, dark crusty outside, juicy and tender inside. :drool:

If you're not using a thermometer you're shooting in the dark. Cooking by time is absolutely the worst idea when cooking large items (Turkeys, roasts, etc)
I suppose, but I've never had one turn out badly in years. I think all these thermometer gadgets are just to convince guys that cooking is cool. ;)
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Make a paste of minced garlic (five cloves), horseradish (1/2 cup), kosher salt (1/4 cup) and cracked pepper (1/4 cup).Rub the paste really well into the roast.Cook at 325 for twenty minutes per poundRemove from oven when it reaches 120Let stand for twenty minutes before carving.This RULES! :shrug::excited::pickle::pickle::pickle::pickle::unsure:

This sounds like money! I just had one (couldn't resist the sales on Choice primers at the beginning of the week). Anyway, just used Kosher salt, cracked pepper and a little Lindberg Snider's Porterhouse Roast Seasoning (best on earth). Also put a few cloves of garlic in lower part of fat cap. I didn't use thermometer - did 20 minutes per pound at 325, let stand for 20 minutes and it was absolute perfection. Note: My brother is a chef and recommends cooking prime rib at a much lower temperature, like even 225, for a longer time.
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Here's the one I am going to try.

From Paula Deen.

Foolproof Standing Rib Roast Recipe courtesy Paula Deen

1 (5-pound) standing rib roast

1 tablespoon House Seasoning, recipe follows

Allow roast to stand at room temperature for at least 1 hour.

Preheat the oven to 375 degree F. Rub roast with House Seasoning; place roast on a rack in the pan with the rib side down and the fatty side up. Roast for 1 hour. Turn off oven. Leave roast in oven but do not open oven door for 3 hours. About 30 to 40 minutes before serving time, turn oven to 375 degrees F and reheat the roast. Important: Do not remove roast or re-open the oven door from time roast is put in until ready to serve.

House Seasoning:

1 cup salt

1/4 cup black pepper

1/4 cup garlic powder

She guarantees medium rare every time.

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  • 11 months later...

I'm grilling a 7 lb prime rib tomorrow night, and I'm a first timer. Lots of good advice in this thread, but it's been a year. Does anyone have any tips, suggestions, etc to add?

You should note that I'll be cooking it on my Holland Grill, which will run at a constant temperature between 350-400 under the current weather conditions. I have no control over the heat, and the meat will not be exposed to a direct flame at any time, so I'll be cooking completely based on the internal temperature of the meat. I have a Polder thermometer, so I'll be able to monitor the internal temperature constantly.

Do I need to do anything to prepare the meat, such as make any cuts around the bones, etc?

I like the simplicity of covering it in kosher salt (and nothing else) prior to putting it on the grill, so I'll be doing that.

How long is this going to take?

ANY help you can give me would be appreciated.

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I'm grilling a 7 lb prime rib tomorrow night, and I'm a first timer. Lots of good advice in this thread, but it's been a year. Does anyone have any tips, suggestions, etc to add?

You should note that I'll be cooking it on my Holland Grill, which will run at a constant temperature between 350-400 under the current weather conditions. I have no control over the heat, and the meat will not be exposed to a direct flame at any time, so I'll be cooking completely based on the internal temperature of the meat. I have a Polder thermometer, so I'll be able to monitor the internal temperature constantly.

Do I need to do anything to prepare the meat, such as make any cuts around the bones, etc?

I like the simplicity of covering it in kosher salt (and nothing else) prior to putting it on the grill, so I'll be doing that.

How long is this going to take?

ANY help you can give me would be appreciated.

This link contains many good tricks, timings, etc.. be sure to read the comments as well
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Just as we polished off the picanha, I put the prime rib on the grill. It should be ready to eat in about 2 hours from now. If it's even HALF as good as the picanha, I could die tonight and my life would be complete.

Started the prime rib with 20 minutes in the oven at 450. The grill is running at about 375 as expected. Pulling it off at 120 internal seems a little rare to me, so I'm shooting for 125-130 and will tent it under foil for 20-30 minutes before carving.

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I think the safe bet is to keep it in until it reaches 125 degrees and hope for the best. I planned on using plain ol Garlic salt and black pepper as my rub. :(

Garlic salt? :no:Kosher salt is the only way to go. Put on some garlic powder if you must but use kosher salt.
Dont know why Garlic Salt would be so bad, i use it on my steaks all the time.
Start using kosher salt (and if you want garlic, garlic powder) and your tastebuds will thank you.Trust me
:yes: This is how I do mine.
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Kosher Salt, Freash Ground Pepper, and Fresh Rosemary cook to 120 internal temp and enjoy. :thumbdown:

(also, garlic on red meat overpowers the flavor....Garlic is a no no :mellow: )

And, i could eat garlic every day, i just perfer to keep it off the good cuts of meat.

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I have a 7 pound 4 bone prime rib. I've never cooked one before and have read confilicting reports on the temp of the meat for medium rare. I've read that anything over 120 degrees is ruining the meat and anything under 130 is rare?? anyone have any experience cooking a prime rib. My family likes theirs a bit more done than I but i figure i can just give them the end pieces.My original plan is to cook it at 450 degrees for about 15 mins to seer (sp) it then drop it down to 250 degrees for about 20mins for each pound but im not so much interested in how long to cook it as much as the inside temp of the rib. Im thinking about taking it out of the oven when it hits 120 degrees and letting it sit about 20 mins covered up so it should be ready to eat at about 125 degrees. Is this too rare in your opinion or should i leave it in longer? ugh :nerd:

:nerd::thanks:
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Just as we polished off the picanha, I put the prime rib on the grill. It should be ready to eat in about 2 hours from now. If it's even HALF as good as the picanha, I could die tonight and my life would be complete.Started the prime rib with 20 minutes in the oven at 450. The grill is running at about 375 as expected. Pulling it off at 120 internal seems a little rare to me, so I'm shooting for 125-130 and will tent it under foil for 20-30 minutes before carving.

It was very good. I didn't pull it off the grill until it hit an internal temp of 130 degrees, and it was up to about 142 after resting for 15 minutes. Next time, I'll pull it off at 120, because it was just a little more done than I would have liked.Also, it wasn't as flavorful as I would have liked. I need to find a way to get a little more flavor into the meat, because kosher salt on the fat cap didn't quite cut it.
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Make a paste of minced garlic (five cloves), horseradish (1/2 cup), kosher salt (1/4 cup) and cracked pepper (1/4 cup).Rub the paste really well into the roast.Cook at 325 for twenty minutes per poundRemove from oven when it reaches 120Let stand for twenty minutes before carving.This RULES! :goodposting::lmao::lmao::lmao::mellow::shark::yes:

This sounds like money! I just had one (couldn't resist the sales on Choice primers at the beginning of the week). Anyway, just used Kosher salt, cracked pepper and a little Lindberg Snider's Porterhouse Roast Seasoning (best on earth). Also put a few cloves of garlic in lower part of fat cap. I didn't use thermometer - did 20 minutes per pound at 325, let stand for 20 minutes and it was absolute perfection. Note: My brother is a chef and recommends cooking prime rib at a much lower temperature, like even 225, for a longer time.
Are you going to get the desirable crust from cooking it at such a low temperature?
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