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https://imgur.com/gallery/Y2whD   beautifully smoked 

Some great work in here gents (though Wilked please tell Edward Scissorhands to stay away from the carving station next year).  Actually think a lot of different methods can work but people are gettin

Almost 7 lb ribeye, smoked for 3 hours at 250

First one on the Traeger last night.  Roasted garlic, oil, salt, pepper, thyme paste marinade for about 5 hours (would do that for much longer next time), into the oven at 450 for 30 minutes, then onto the Traeger at 325 for about 2 hours (only a 6 lb boneless roast). Took it a little higher than we wanted to at about 140 (got distracted) let it rest for 30 minutes and it was still nice and red in the middle. Exactly 1/4 cup of fat drippings in the roasting pan, made a roux with some flour, added two cups of beef broth and had a nice jus.

Very happy with how it turned out, with a little room for improvement. And got a wireless thermometer for xmas today, so that'll help monitor better going forward  

Enjoy your meals, all!

 

 

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9 pounder, 45 minutes at 500, now one hour left to rest in the oven. The whole house smells like herbs de provence. :) 

Really tempted to check the internal temp in 30 minutes just in case something is off. My parents' oven is as old as the house -- 1959. :mellow: 

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10 hours ago, Galileo said:

Had to cut the beast into two...Before Pic

Well, I managed to screw it up...still ended up good, but slightly overcooked for my taste.  Went 500 degrees for about 30 minutes...turned the oven down to 200.  I am guessing my oven stayed too hot for too long, because only an hour later, my thermometer was telling me it was at 120 deg.  I pulled the meat out, and the temperature initially rose to about 125 while I was working on other things.  Unfortunately, it was "done" an hour ahead of plan and as it sat the temp dropped to 108.  I put it back int the oven to warm up a little before serving, but the temp had only gotten back up to 112 when I pulled it.  I figured some hot jus will warm it up enough.   When I removed the bones, my wife started #####ing that it was way too rare...Back in the oven it went.  The rest of dinner was ready at this point, so we were trying to rush it a little.  Oven was at 400 deg...much too hot for this delicate piece of meat.  Anyway, after about  30-40 min., the temperature climbed back up to around 125, I pulled it again.  You can tell some of the outer edges got too well done at this higher heat.   It was still pretty damn tasty, very good crust, but definitely did not go as I envisioned...

 After Pic

A few slices

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7 minutes ago, Galileo said:

Well, I managed to screw it up...still ended up good, but slightly overcooked for my taste.  Went 500 degrees for about 30 minutes...turned the oven down to 200.  I am guessing my oven stayed too hot for too long, because only an hour later, my thermometer was telling me it was at 120 deg.  I pulled the meat out, and the temperature initially rose to about 125 while I was working on other things.  Unfortunately, it was "done" an hour ahead of plan and as it sat the temp dropped to 108.  I put it back int the oven to warm up a little before serving, but the temp had only gotten back up to 112 when I pulled it.  I figured some hot jus will warm it up enough.   When I removed the bones, my wife started #####ing that it was way too rare...Back in the oven it went.  The rest of dinner was ready at this point, so we were trying to rush it a little.  Oven was at 400 deg...much too hot for this delicate piece of meat.  Anyway, after about  30-40 min., the temperature climbed back up to around 125, I pulled it again.  You can tell some of the outer edges got too well done at this higher heat.   It was still pretty damn tasty, very good crust, but definitely did not go as I envisioned...

 After Pic

A few slices

Still looks solid.  Nice work for having a wife who doesn't want bloody meat.

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12 minutes ago, Galileo said:

Well, I managed to screw it up...still ended up good, but slightly overcooked for my taste.  Went 500 degrees for about 30 minutes...turned the oven down to 200.  I am guessing my oven stayed too hot for too long, because only an hour later, my thermometer was telling me it was at 120 deg.  I pulled the meat out, and the temperature initially rose to about 125 while I was working on other things.  Unfortunately, it was "done" an hour ahead of plan and as it sat the temp dropped to 108.  I put it back int the oven to warm up a little before serving, but the temp had only gotten back up to 112 when I pulled it.  I figured some hot jus will warm it up enough.   When I removed the bones, my wife started #####ing that it was way too rare...Back in the oven it went.  The rest of dinner was ready at this point, so we were trying to rush it a little.  Oven was at 400 deg...much too hot for this delicate piece of meat.  Anyway, after about  30-40 min., the temperature climbed back up to around 125, I pulled it again.  You can tell some of the outer edges got too well done at this higher heat.   It was still pretty damn tasty, very good crust, but definitely did not go as I envisioned...

 After Pic

A few slices

First pic looks solid but second looks a little over.  Still...not bad considering everything and it wasn't cooked through.  I'd be scared as hell for worse with that much meat.

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2 minutes ago, wilked said:

12.5 lb, 5 ribs

Covered in butter/herb mix

500 for 45 mins (amazed my smoke alarm didn't go off - serious smoke being thrown off)

225 for 2 hrs and 250 for 1 hr 

end result - perfect, even if my uncle sucks as a meat carver (I was on kid duty)

https://s30.postimg.org/ypttzfvr5/IMG_1277.jpg

Doesn't he know that shaved prime rib sandwiches are what the leftovers are for!??!

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Sous vide method came out well.  Vacuum sealed 8lb prime rib and cooked at 131 degrees for 8 hours.

Took it out, thermapen registered 130 degrees everywhere.

Dried entire roast with paper towels.  Then put together thyme, rosemary, salt and peppercorn herb rub and coated the meat.  Turned convection oven on at 475 and got a good crust in about 15 minutes.

End result was incredibly delicious.  Made au jous with the drippings, some wine reduced, and beef stock plus some garlic and more rosemary/thyme.  

Whole thing was incredibly delicious and the lack of effort/attention necessary for the sous vide would make me highly recommend it and do it again myself.  Put it in at 7:30am this morning, didn't look at it again until I pulled it out, checked the temp, added herbs and got a crust.  Not bad for boiled meat ;).

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19 minutes ago, adonis said:

Sous vide method came out well.  Vacuum sealed 8lb prime rib and cooked at 131 degrees for 8 hours.

Took it out, thermapen registered 130 degrees everywhere.

Dried entire roast with paper towels.  Then put together thyme, rosemary, salt and peppercorn herb rub and coated the meat.  Turned convection oven on at 475 and got a good crust in about 15 minutes.

End result was incredibly delicious.  Made au jous with the drippings, some wine reduced, and beef stock plus some garlic and more rosemary/thyme.  

Whole thing was incredibly delicious and the lack of effort/attention necessary for the sous vide would make me highly recommend it and do it again myself.  Put it in at 7:30am this morning, didn't look at it again until I pulled it out, checked the temp, added herbs and got a crust.  Not bad for boiled meat ;).

How did you get drippings with only 15 minutes of regular cooking?  Or did you get them from the sous vide?

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Just now, proninja said:

One of the benefits of sous vide is that there's nowhere for the expelled moisture to go so when the food is cooked the drippings are all in the bag. Males for some nice sauce options. 

Ah, that makes sense.  How much do those meat boilers run?

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3 minutes ago, James Daulton said:

How did you get drippings with only 15 minutes of regular cooking?  Or did you get them from the sous vide?

Sous vide.  Even though it's vacuum sealed, as you cook the meat will shrink and the juices will come out (saying this if you haven't done sous vide yet) and accumulate at the bottom of the bag. 

I cut a hole in the corner of the bag before I took the roast out and poured the juices into a bowl for the au jous, then worked on the meat.  I dried it off pretty well, but another benefit of sous vide is that you minimize fluid loss due to higher temperatures by cooking the entire piece at the final temperature, which means more moisture remains in the meat.  So, the meat continued to put off liquid as i was prepping it, but not a big deal.  I'll see if I can get a pic of the roast up here to match others...the crust won't be as dark due to preferences of others eating with me (explains the 131 temp too...if it were just me, i'd have gone 126).

Edited by adonis
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3 minutes ago, proninja said:
4 minutes ago, James Daulton said:

Ah, that makes sense.  How much do those meat boilers run?

150-200 or so. 

This is the one I have.  Second one I've owned by Anova and it's good...but there are plenty of others.  Joule is another one.  And some self-contained ones too (which offer less flexibility).

Edited by adonis
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1 minute ago, James Daulton said:

This method seems pretty ideal for lesser cuts of meat.  What other cuts do you use it for?

It's actually ideal for the best cuts of meat.  It's what tons of famous steakhouses and restaurants use for their best meats, because it's foolproof and you can trust very expensive meat to it and guarantee the right outcome every time.

I love using it for steaks and lamb chops.  I won't really cook steaks on the grill anymore, even though I got that down pretty good.  Simply it's too good quality not to do it this way.  Vacuum seal your steak, cook it at exactly whatever temperature (i mean exactly) you want, and hold it for (reasonably) as long as you want until you're ready to finish it.  Take it out, pat it dry with paper towels, throw kosher salt and ground pepper on it, get a cast-iron skillet searing hot with some oil with a high smoking point (grapeseed/peanut oil) and sear it for about 30 seconds each side and you have a perfectly done steak, with an amazing crust, with virtually no effort or chance of failure.

I don't really do chicken with it because of the texture, but the flavor/moistness is great for being cut up in things like salad.  

It's also interesting to use with vegetables in combination with the vacuum sealing...carrots specifically.  

Another really nice thing about it is that you can cook steaks to a variety of temperatures.  Someone wants medium well - you heat the water to that temp, cook that one steak, then when it's done, drop the temp down to, let's say rare for the other sane people, and you can leave the "medium well" done steak in because it's already been cooked at the higher temp, just drop the other steaks in and cook them, and you can have them all done at the same time, none cold.  

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Some great work in here gents (though Wilked please tell Edward Scissorhands to stay away from the carving station next year).  Actually think a lot of different methods can work but people are getting too hung up on the x minutes per pound thing.  It's done when it's done, and you work out plating based on when you pull and allowing for an appropriate rest.  Pulled this one from the Traeger at 135.  Tasty.  For me a thermometer is a must for a prime rib or a turkey.  Need to be precise with the temp.

Whole

Plated

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28 minutes ago, Judge Smails said:

Some great work in here gents (though Wilked please tell Edward Scissorhands to stay away from the carving station next year).  Actually think a lot of different methods can work but people are getting too hung up on the x minutes per pound thing.  It's done when it's done, and you work out plating based on when you pull and allowing for an appropriate rest.  Pulled this one from the Traeger at 135.  Tasty.  For me a thermometer is a must for a prime rib or a turkey.  Need to be precise with the temp.

Whole

Plated

 

Beautiful cap on that cut piece shown.  IMO ...THE best part of the cow.

One of these days I want to take the cap off an entire rib roast and then do a roll ...stuff it with something rich and wonderful.  Cut into pinwheels of deliciousness.  

Smidge over 125 degrees.

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47 minutes ago, Binky The Doormat said:

Beautiful cap on that cut piece shown.  IMO ...THE best part of the cow.

One of these days I want to take the cap off an entire rib roast and then do a roll ...stuff it with something rich and wonderful.  Cut into pinwheels of deliciousness.  

Smidge over 125 degrees.

Thx.  Costco does the Prime Caps for you...

Prime Rib Eye Caps

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I cooked a 20 lb. prime rib for my in-laws yesterday.  They bought the Costco seasoned one with the garlic cloves between the roast and bones.  I added a flour and rosemary crust and seared it at 500 before dropping to 325.  My thermometer failed so I had to go on time.  In spite of this, it came out somewhere between medium rare and medium on the ends.  I would have preferred a bit rarer but Mrs Eephus folks bought it and they like things more cooked.

Brought home a couple of slices and the leftover au jus and enjoyed French dip sandwiches for lunch  :thumbup:

 

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Did what amounts to the perfect method and used a live fire to do the final sear on the 16#er we got.  

I thought it was solid, but somehow seemed a little bit dense and the texture wasn't silky.  

My BIL was in charge this year and I can't talk him into salting the thing well in advance and this made some of the inner pieces pretty bland as they were  and probably lost some texture elements. He's also pretty scared of salt as it is so it was light to begin with both on the amount and the time it had salt on it.  

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3 minutes ago, xulf said:
54 minutes ago, Binky The Doormat said:

Are any of you prime rib roast guys doing yorkshire pudding?  

Fantastically delicious.  

 

Is this a euphemism for getting the wife wet?  If so YES :excited:

 

Not unless Yorkshire is her maiden name.

No, it's prime rib juice dripping infused french toast with a slightly crisped outside.  

Yorkshire Pudding

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On 12/21/2016 at 6:40 PM, Judge Smails said:

Alright, just tried making it and it is indeed good.  However, I wanted to try it to see if it would replace the corn side dish we make and I think I'll be going back.  Thus, I figured I'd try and give back and let you guys try it and see what you think.  Even simpler to make and I think you'll find it's a little different than what you might eat elsewhere.

 

Ingredients:

1 can of corn (~15oz)
1/2 cup of Italian style bread crumbs (I use this from Progresso)
1/2 cup of grated cheese (I use this from Sam's club....amazing cheese)  You can do it with Parmesan cheese as well)
2 tablespoons of butter
Salt and/or garlic powder to taste (I don't add salt because the cheese I use is already salty)

In a pan, melt the butter, add the corn, bread crumbs, and cheese and mix together.  Heat until better is melted and everything is combined.

 

That's it.  Takes only a couple minutes to make and it's always a hit as a side dish anytime we serve it. 
 

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  • 11 months later...
On 12/24/2016 at 10:32 AM, James Daulton said:

The perfect method was a bust for my main cut of meat.  It was still almost raw inside.  Luckily I had a secondary NY strip roast in at the same time that was smaller and that cooked nicely.  Perhaps my oven isn't as insulated or whatever as it should be.  In the future I'll run a meat thermometer no matter which method I use.  The rest of the meal was on point except for the grave.  Was watching the today show earlier in the week and the chick cooking said to throw a splash of sherry vinegar into the gravy to cut the fat a bit.  The damn vinegar was so overpowering I had difficulty masking it.  

The star of the meal was @Judge Smails creamed corn. 

Can you post the creamed corn recipe. I can’t find it and the judge hasn’t posted in some time. 

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