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Nice thread and great posts everyone. I'm doing two prime ribs today for the first time. Have a great holiday everyone.

Thanks for bumping this thread. I logged on to search for info, and you saved me from searching.Doing my first rib roast tomorrow.Also serving steamed green beans, creamed spinach with jalapenos, smashed taters.
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Are you all using the Prime Rib cut? About how much does that run a pound?

The cut is actually a rib roast or a standing rib roast, generally. The "Prime" part is usually a bit of a misnomer, as I suspect most rib roasts purchased at grocery stores are actually Choice grade.I am actually smoking a turkey and some sausage tomorrow, since we were in Hawaii for Thanksgiving and had burgers that day.
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sounds good.

fish tacos>

1/2 cup plain yogurt

1/2 cup mayo

1/2 tsp cayenne

1/2 tsp dill

1/2 tsp oregano

1/2 tsp cumin

2 tsp capers

optional 1-2 tsp finely chopped jalapeno or spicy green chili of your choice.

dash salt and pepper

juice of 2 small limes or one big one.

mix well and chill,

use any type of fish you like ( i use Trader Joes breaded cod fillets), once fish is prepared serve with warmed corn tortillas, finely shredded cabbage, diced green onion, sliced olives, shredded cheese and let your guests make their own to their own liking (set up a taco bar basically).

merry christmas.

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GB you guys making good food.

I am doing goose this year, but it is more of a challenge/novelty than anything else.

Prime rib makes my mouth water (espesially with good horseradish).

Turkey makes my mouth dry.

Your guests should be thanking their lucky stars (and blue diamonds).

Cheers and happy holidays!

I used to feel this way. When I was a kid, I always thought turkey was "meh" at best. Turns out my mom was overcooking it.

Also, I have discovered that free range turkeys have lots more flavor than the average Butterball.

I have done a couple of free range turkeys on the BBQ pit/smoker and they have been fantastic.

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GB you guys making good food.

I am doing goose this year, but it is more of a challenge/novelty than anything else.

Prime rib makes my mouth water (espesially with good horseradish).

Turkey makes my mouth dry.

Your guests should be thanking their lucky stars (and blue diamonds).

Cheers and happy holidays!

I used to feel this way. When I was a kid, I always thought turkey was "meh" at best. Turns out my mom was overcooking it.

Also, I have discovered that free range turkeys have lots more flavor than the average Butterball.

I have done a couple of free range turkeys on the BBQ pit/smoker and they have been fantastic.

I'm coming over to your house for Thanksgiving next year and no, I'm not joking.
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GB you guys making good food.

I am doing goose this year, but it is more of a challenge/novelty than anything else.

Prime rib makes my mouth water (espesially with good horseradish).

Turkey makes my mouth dry.

Your guests should be thanking their lucky stars (and blue diamonds).

Cheers and happy holidays!

I used to feel this way. When I was a kid, I always thought turkey was "meh" at best. Turns out my mom was overcooking it.

Also, I have discovered that free range turkeys have lots more flavor than the average Butterball.

I have done a couple of free range turkeys on the BBQ pit/smoker and they have been fantastic.

I'm coming over to your house for Thanksgiving next year and no, I'm not joking.
You know that you would be perfectly welcome. We could even probably find a cranny for you to sleep in.
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GB you guys making good food.

I am doing goose this year, but it is more of a challenge/novelty than anything else.

Prime rib makes my mouth water (espesially with good horseradish).

Turkey makes my mouth dry.

Your guests should be thanking their lucky stars (and blue diamonds).

Cheers and happy holidays!

I used to feel this way. When I was a kid, I always thought turkey was "meh" at best. Turns out my mom was overcooking it.

Also, I have discovered that free range turkeys have lots more flavor than the average Butterball.

I have done a couple of free range turkeys on the BBQ pit/smoker and they have been fantastic.

I'm coming over to your house for Thanksgiving next year and no, I'm not joking.
You know that you would be perfectly welcome. We could even probably find a cranny for you to sleep in.
Well it's an upgrade to the cardboard box I'm sleeping in now.

Alright, 2009 - the year I officially become a ward of the FFA.

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3 lbs of leftovers.:thumbup:

Wow. We had 6 adults and 4 kids, and we consumed 3 lbs of picanha and 7 lbs of prime rib yesterday, plus cheesy potatoes, etc. Good eats.I'll have to post my picanha grilling method sometime. It was much more popular than the prime rib. I should have just made 10 lbs of that.
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3 lbs of leftovers.:thumbdown:

Wow. We had 6 adults and 4 kids, and we consumed 3 lbs of picanha and 7 lbs of prime rib yesterday, plus cheesy potatoes, etc. Good eats.I'll have to post my picanha grilling method sometime. It was much more popular than the prime rib. I should have just made 10 lbs of that.
Seven pound standing rib roast. Six adults -- only two of them are big red meat eaters. It all went perfectly to plan. :thumbup:
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Cooked two different ones. Long story. First one was savory. Thanks to the folks above for some good suggestions. Everyone loved it. The second one, bought yesterday and to account for extra folks coming, wasn't as tasty. It seemed more grainy, if that's applicable. Anyhoo.. good stuff. Wife's cheesy potatoes and a crap load of Xmas cookies, Key lime pie and some cab.

Xmas brunch tomorrow with the aunt's excellent quiche and orange rolls.

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I go by the basic Alton Brown method, no flowerpots or other garden implements in the oven though. Dry rub with kosher salt, fresh ground pepper, and sometimes rosemary and a bit of granulated garlic.

When I go for the final sear I'll use convection at 500 or so. That fan pumps the awe inspiring smell of roasting beef out into the rest of the house. Mmmmmm...

*looks in fridge* But tomorrow/today? A big honking ham from Rolf's Pork Store smokehouse will do nicely. :hophead:

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Did a Prime (not choice) standing roast last night. I also tried Yorkshire pudding with it, and it was AWESOME!...think pancake batter fried in the grease from the roast and covered with gravy.

I did the same thing last year, the key was a hot baking sheet with the juices. The problem I had was the salt I packed around the Prime Rib crusted nice but when I removed it, some got down with the juice so it was a tad salty. The pudding was excellent and easy.
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Made my first prime rib christmas eve. Wasn't planning on it but this thread gave me the urging to do it. 4 of us ate a 5 pounder and it was just the right amount of meat. I put it in for 15 minutes at 450 then lowered to 225 to cook it to an internal 125. I didn't have the kosher salt, but did have some coarse salt which seemed to work out nicely. The only thing that I messed up on was putting garlic in the oven at 450 for that time burned the garlic.

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Did a Prime (not choice) standing roast last night. I also tried Yorkshire pudding with it, and it was AWESOME!...think pancake batter fried in the grease from the roast and covered with gravy.

Oh man...Yorkshire pudding (if done right) is amazing. I mean, sure, you want to go never eat anything but salad again after you eat it, but it's worth it.
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225 in the oven for me.

Take it out at 120 internal temp.

It'll rise to 130 as it rests with "carryover" cooking.

Put it back into 500 oven to get a crust for about 10 minutes.

Take it out and let it rest for 20-30 minutes.

Enjoy.

Thanks Alton Brown. This was one of the first things I saw from him. And it's like a lot of things he does - frivolous sometimes with the clay pot and more trouble than it's worth but underneath a good lesson about cooking / science and how heat waves work.

And bottom line is good food. :)

Made a good horseradish sauce with:

2 cups sour cream.

1/4 cup prepared horseradish

juice of one lemon.

pinch of salt

Nice.

J

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Do you think the browning at the end vs. start makes a big difference? I go old school Joy Of Cooking, which recommends preheating the oven to 550, then turning it down to 350 as soon as the roast goes in. I shoot for about 18 mins per pound (this is boneless). Scrumptious and SO easy.

I'd agree crust at end is not that big a deal. As much as a looks cool thing as much as anything. But still worth doing.J
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Oh, you still get the crust thing this way. I just didn't know if searing at the beginning to seal in juices, blah blah blah, was supposed to make a difference. :kicksrock:

scientifically, the answer is a definitive no. Some french guy that is the dean of food science had a show on foodnetwork they showed him cooking a steak in a 175 degree oven, no browning nothing. Just steak and slow heat until the steak reached the proper medium rare temp. They gave it to the host and he said it was the best tasting juciest steak he ever had. The food scientist guy said the browning of meat is mostly cosmetic, doesnt have anything to do with moisture retention and adds some flavor if anything.

was an interesting show.

the guys name is: Herve This

here's a nice article about him

http://www.csmonitor.com/2004/0218/p11s02-lifo.html

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I had a small eight pounder, bone-in.

Cooked 30 min in a 500 degree oven, pulled it out and put it in a 200 degree oven for about two hours until 120 internal temp. (Use two ovens because it takes quite while to get a 500 degree cooled down to 200).

Wrapped in film and waited 30 min while internal temp rose to 127.

Pulled off the film , carved off the bones and sliced six perfect slices- rare to med rare, edge to edge.

Served with 50/50 horse radish / sour cream sauce at room temp.

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Actually - I was wrong - he crusts at the end.

Remove any plastic wrapping or butcher's paper from the roast. Place the standing rib roast upright onto a half sheet pan fitted with a rack. The rack is essential for drainage. Place dry towels loosely on top of the roast. This will help to draw moisture away from the meat. Place into a refrigerator at approximately 50 to 60 percent humidity and between 34 and 38 degrees F. You can measure both with a refrigerator thermometer. Change the towels daily for 3 days. Place a 16-inch round azalea terra cotta planter into a cold oven. Invert the planter to become a lid over a pizza stone or the bottom of the planter. The oven should be cold to start, to avoid any cracking in the terra cotta pieces. Turn the oven to 250 degrees F. Remove the roast from the refrigerator and rub with canola oil. Remember to rub the bones with oil, as well. Once the roast is completely coated with oil cover the roast with kosher salt, about half a teaspoon per bone. Next, rub with freshly ground pepper to coat the surface. Place the roast over a glass bake-ware dish slightly smaller than the length of the roast. This will catch the drippings needed for the sauce. Finally, place a probe thermometer into the center of the roast and set for 118 degrees. Put the roast and the bake-ware dish onto the pizza stone, cover with the terra cotta pot, and return to the oven. Turn the oven down to 200 degrees F and roast until internal temperature is achieved. Remove the roast and turn oven up to 500 degrees F. Remove the terra cotta lid and recover with heavy-duty foil. Allow the roast to rest until an internal temperature of 130 degrees F. is reached. Place the roast back into the preheated 500 degree F oven for about 10 minutes or until you've achieved your desired crust. Remove and transfer roast to a cutting board. Keep covered with foil until ready to serve. Degrease the juices in the glass pan. Place the pan over low heat and deglaze with 1 cup of water. Add the wine and reduce by half. Roll the sage leaves in between your fingers to release the flavors and aroma. Add to the sauce and cook for 1 minute. Strain and serve on the side.

If I remember from the show, the crusting at the end is so short and the internal cooking has already stopped so it won't cook the medium rare portion any more - just the crust.
I STRONGLY recommend against the aging UNLESS you are absolutely certain your fridge is at the correct humidity and odor free. Frankly, aging beef is best left to professionals. A Rib Roast is damn fine right out of the butcher's case.
I did it last year and it worked out very nicely.
I called the local chef from the country club and had him age the prime rib for me. In return I traded him a 12 pack of SkullSplitter Ale ( his favorite)
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I tried Tyler Florence's Horseradish and Salt-Crusted Prime Rib off the Food Network site. For the most part is was really good but WAAAAAYYYYY too salty.

If I didn't have vegetables in the pan sopping up all the juices, it probably wouldn't have been that big of a deal. But the veggies turned out almost too salty to eat. Fortunately it wasn't a big thing for the entire family...just a thing for the wife and I. Next time I'd do the same thing but use 1/4 of the salt.

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The best thing anyone can do to ensure their prime rib is cooked to perfection is to use the thermometer that you leave in while you cook it. I think Joe posted about it -- Polder is the one I have and it works great.

Cooked mine to 120 -- let it carry over to about 130.

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  • 11 months later...

Remembered this from last year and plan on cooking one this year..

Some Questions/discussion topics:

** Is a bone in rib-eye about the same cut as prime rib with cost being taken into consideration?

** About how many pounds per person?

** Anyone ever tried the "rock salt" method for cooking this?

** Au Jus?/ Horsey sauce recipes?

** Aging advice?

Getting hungry already.......

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I've been doing rib roasts for Christmas for about 6 years or so now. Like a lot of people have said, I basically use the Alton Brown recipe. I don't age the meat, (although I've done a dry aged prime roast that I paid out the ### for before) and I don't use the Terra Cotta pot. The rest of the recipe works great. Slow cooking til 114. Take it out to rest until carry over heat stops, then 10-15 minutes at 500 to develop the crust. Roast comes out on the low side of medium rare. I can generally get a rarer piece on the very middle. If I had a lot of people who liked meat as rare as I do, I might pull a few degrees earlier.

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Remembered this from last year and plan on cooking one this year..

Some Questions/discussion topics:

** Is a bone in rib-eye about the same cut as prime rib with cost being taken into consideration?

** About how many pounds per person?

** Anyone ever tried the "rock salt" method for cooking this?

** Au Jus?/ Horsey sauce recipes?

** Aging advice?

Getting hungry already.......

1. Yes, it is more economical to have a butcher cut the bones out as you are paying by the pound, this is a 7 bone roast I did for Thanksgiving with the bones removed.

http://public.fotki.com/Meglamaniac/new-smoker/dsc03746.html

2. Not pounds per person, a 10-12 oz cut is good for most people, here is the 16 lbs roast from Thanksgiving cut up

http://public.fotki.com/Meglamaniac/new-smoker/dsc03759.html

I varied the thickness of the cut for several pieces as we had kids, small adults, large males eating and I got @ 18 sclices out of it.

3. I have not tried this

4. I did not Au Jus for this, a simple but good recipe can be found here

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/guy-fie...cipe/index.html

This will also show you how you can dry age you roast at home

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Remembered this from last year and plan on cooking one this year..

Some Questions/discussion topics:

** Is a bone in rib-eye about the same cut as prime rib with cost being taken into consideration?

** About how many pounds per person?

** Anyone ever tried the "rock salt" method for cooking this?

** Au Jus?/ Horsey sauce recipes?

** Aging advice?

Getting hungry already.......

1. Yes, it is more economical to have a butcher cut the bones out as you are paying by the pound, this is a 7 bone roast I did for Thanksgiving with the bones removed.

http://public.fotki.com/Meglamaniac/new-smoker/dsc03746.html

2. Not pounds per person, a 10-12 oz cut is good for most people, here is the 16 lbs roast from Thanksgiving cut up

http://public.fotki.com/Meglamaniac/new-smoker/dsc03759.html

I varied the thickness of the cut for several pieces as we had kids, small adults, large males eating and I got @ 18 sclices out of it.

3. I have not tried this

4. I did not Au Jus for this, a simple but good recipe can be found here

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/guy-fie...cipe/index.html

This will also show you how you can dry age you roast at home

Thanks Megla.

I've never done a prime rib like that without the bones in. Not sure if it's wives tales but I always hear the old timers talk about how they like to cook stuff slowly with the bone. The "magic" stuff happens like when you make home made stock from the bones. I dunno. Could you tell any difference at all?

And was this on your smoker? I forget, what do you cook on and how did you do this one?

J

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Remembered this from last year and plan on cooking one this year..

Some Questions/discussion topics:

** Is a bone in rib-eye about the same cut as prime rib with cost being taken into consideration?

** About how many pounds per person?

** Anyone ever tried the "rock salt" method for cooking this?

** Au Jus?/ Horsey sauce recipes?

** Aging advice?

Getting hungry already.......

1. Yes, it is more economical to have a butcher cut the bones out as you are paying by the pound, this is a 7 bone roast I did for Thanksgiving with the bones removed.

http://public.fotki.com/Meglamaniac/new-smoker/dsc03746.html

2. Not pounds per person, a 10-12 oz cut is good for most people, here is the 16 lbs roast from Thanksgiving cut up

http://public.fotki.com/Meglamaniac/new-smoker/dsc03759.html

I varied the thickness of the cut for several pieces as we had kids, small adults, large males eating and I got @ 18 sclices out of it.

3. I have not tried this

4. I did not Au Jus for this, a simple but good recipe can be found here

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/guy-fie...cipe/index.html

This will also show you how you can dry age you roast at home

Thanks Megla.

I've never done a prime rib like that without the bones in. Not sure if it's wives tales but I always hear the old timers talk about how they like to cook stuff slowly with the bone. The "magic" stuff happens like when you make home made stock from the bones. I dunno. Could you tell any difference at all?

And was this on your smoker? I forget, what do you cook on and how did you do this one?

J

I honestly could not tell the difference from this and any of the many bone in rib roasts I have done, it was wonderful.

This was done on the new trailer smoker that my dad got me, I have several others as well, both verticle and horizontal.

I followed this recipe for the roast

http://www.wiviott.com/morefun.html

only I did not use my WSM, I used the horizontal with Pecan logs, cooked at 250 for @ 3.5 hours to 120, let stand for 30 minuted tented and then sliced and served.

Edited by Megla
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Remembered this from last year and plan on cooking one this year..

Some Questions/discussion topics:

** Is a bone in rib-eye about the same cut as prime rib with cost being taken into consideration?

** About how many pounds per person?

** Anyone ever tried the "rock salt" method for cooking this?

** Au Jus?/ Horsey sauce recipes?

** Aging advice?

Getting hungry already.......

1. Yes, it is more economical to have a butcher cut the bones out as you are paying by the pound, this is a 7 bone roast I did for Thanksgiving with the bones removed.

http://public.fotki.com/Meglamaniac/new-smoker/dsc03746.html

2. Not pounds per person, a 10-12 oz cut is good for most people, here is the 16 lbs roast from Thanksgiving cut up

http://public.fotki.com/Meglamaniac/new-smoker/dsc03759.html

I varied the thickness of the cut for several pieces as we had kids, small adults, large males eating and I got @ 18 sclices out of it.

3. I have not tried this

4. I did not Au Jus for this, a simple but good recipe can be found here

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/guy-fie...cipe/index.html

This will also show you how you can dry age you roast at home

Thanks Megla.

I've never done a prime rib like that without the bones in. Not sure if it's wives tales but I always hear the old timers talk about how they like to cook stuff slowly with the bone. The "magic" stuff happens like when you make home made stock from the bones. I dunno. Could you tell any difference at all?

And was this on your smoker? I forget, what do you cook on and how did you do this one?

J

I honestly could not tell the difference from this and any of the many bone in rib roasts I have done, it was wonderful.

This was done on the new trailer smoker that my dad got me, I have several others as well, both verticle and horizontal.

I followed this recipe for the roast

http://www.wiviott.com/morefun.html

only I did not use my WSM, I used the horizontal with Pecan logs, cooked at 250 for @ 3.5 hours to 120, let stand for 30 minuted tented and then sliced and served.

Cool. Tell me about the new smoker.

J

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GB you guys making good food.

I am doing goose this year, but it is more of a challenge/novelty than anything else.

Prime rib makes my mouth water (espesially with good horseradish).

Turkey makes my mouth dry.

Your guests should be thanking their lucky stars (and blue diamonds).

Cheers and happy holidays!

I used to feel this way. When I was a kid, I always thought turkey was "meh" at best. Turns out my mom was overcooking it.

Also, I have discovered that free range turkeys have lots more flavor than the average Butterball.

I have done a couple of free range turkeys on the BBQ pit/smoker and they have been fantastic.

I'm coming over to your house for Thanksgiving next year and no, I'm not joking.
You know that you would be perfectly welcome. We could even probably find a cranny for you to sleep in.
GM,

How was it?

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My father works for a textile company so they have several mills in the AL, GA area where he lives.

My niece was getting married in Dec. (wedding called off) and he wanted me to cook for the rehersal and reception so he commisioned some of the guys to build me a trailer smoker as a way of saying thanks.

I did know about any of it when I got there for Thanksgiving so it was a bit of a suprise. We deciede to break it in over the holiday with some butts, wings, hams turkeys and the rib roast ( he wanted something different for the Saturday football games)

The trailer is @ 15 feet long, all the lighting is already wired and ready for pulling. The cooking chamber is @ 7 ft with three cooking grates. There are two smoke stacks, heat sheilding plates in the chamber (pics to come at Christmas) below the bottom grate. All the grates pull out so it could easily do a whole hog up to 150 lbs. The chamber is stainles steel, not sure about the thinkness. The door has clambs to prevent heat loss and there are thermoeters at the center of the chamber and the far left (away from fire box). There is a cage for wood at the from of the chamber currently filled with White Oak and Pecan logs. There is storage under the cooking chamber. The fire box is 2 ft by 2 ft by 2 ft of cast iron, very thick. The top of the fire box is a grill, with a removeable heat sheild that can also be lowered if you want to put coals in it. There is a thermometer there as well. There is a baffle between the firebox and chamber that can be adjusted up or down 6 levels from all the way open to completlely closed.

I will get many more pictures of it at Christmas, I was very limited in what I could at Thanksgving because of the weather (rain) and that is when I will bring it home.

Saturday the 20th we will be doing 6 hams and 6 turkeys for some local needy families so that should really give me a good idea of how it will handle large loads.

It prefeormed very well at Thanskgiving, once I was able play with it a bit I had no problems getting it to stabalize at the desired temp and to my suprise it recovered very quickly after the chamber or fire box was opened.

Best of all this rig cost less than 600 bucks because all the materials san the trailer where at the shop as scrap.

Link to the few pictures I have

http://public.fotki.com/Meglamaniac/new-smoker/

Edited by Megla
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