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Massive NFL policy change that nobody is talking about


SSOG

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It's really flying under the radar, not getting much publicity, but the new NFL media policy mandates that all players will be required to speak to reporters at least once a week during the season or be subject to a fine. As a Broncos fan, I'm outraged by what is clearly an attack against our offensive line and their long-standing policy to not speak to the media. Here's hoping that the big boys up front take a stand against this injustice and pay the fines rather than talking.

Come on guys, stick it to the man! :banned:

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I think this is bs. I an not a Broncos fan and not sure whether this is aimed at them or not, but players should have the right not to talk as well as talk if they so choose. As long it is a choice by the player, they should be allowed to do what they choose.

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I think this is bs. I an not a Broncos fan and not sure whether this is aimed at them or not, but players should have the right not to talk as well as talk if they so choose. As long it is a choice by the player, they should be allowed to do what they choose.

I disagree. The NFL should have the right to tell their own employees what to do.
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I think this is bs. I an not a Broncos fan and not sure whether this is aimed at them or not, but players should have the right not to talk as well as talk if they so choose. As long it is a choice by the player, they should be allowed to do what they choose.

They can always get a job in another industry if they don't like the rules.
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I think this is bs. I an not a Broncos fan and not sure whether this is aimed at them or not, but players should have the right not to talk as well as talk if they so choose. As long it is a choice by the player, they should be allowed to do what they choose.

Fans sign their paychecks really, not the owners, the team, or the NFL. Fans like to hear from players, get their autographs etc. Often times fans can't speak to players directly but instead have to deal with the press being the middleman. Since papers sell real well in America I'm figuring fans are OK with this. Fans cough up tons of money for these players to live like kings, the least they could do is chat once a week.
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I think this is bs. I an not a Broncos fan and not sure whether this is aimed at them or not, but players should have the right not to talk as well as talk if they so choose. As long it is a choice by the player, they should be allowed to do what they choose.

I disagree. The NFL should have the right to tell their own employees what to do.
As far as behavior, yes. But not on whether or not they should speak.
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Big deal. Write a script. Everyone repeats it verbatim, sticking it to the man!

Something along the lines of:Emmett Fitz-Hume: Well of course their requests for subsidies was not paraguayan in and of it is as it were the United States government would never have if the president, our president, had not and as far as I know that's the way it will always be. Is that clear? :thumbup:
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Is this really "massive"? Seems like a non-issue. How often do reporters really want to get into indepth reports with offensive linemen anyways? I can't remember many besides a couple post game comments.

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This isn't Russia..........Is this Russia? This isn't Russia.

People have the right to remain silent in this country. It what is called an inalienable right. That means can't be seperated from the citizen.

The NFL is becoming a little too big for their britches IMO by trying to circumvent the Constitution on the basis that they "own" the players.

Players are not property of the NFL. They are not "The Product". They are only employees. And no, you aren't required to speak to the media in any other profession, so why the NFL?

:popcorn: to the NFL.

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I thought this threads was going to be about enforcing illegal blocks and cheap shots.

At least now they will have to show their faces after a game where they destroyed another players knee/career.
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It's really flying under the radar, not getting much publicity, but the new NFL media policy mandates that all players will be required to speak to reporters at least once a week during the season or be subject to a fine. As a Broncos fan, I'm outraged by what is clearly an attack against our offensive line and their long-standing policy to not speak to the media. Here's hoping that the big boys up front take a stand against this injustice and pay the fines rather than talking.Come on guys, stick it to the man! <_<

Go in front of the camera, wait for the question, say no comment and walk off the stage.
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Big deal. Write a script. Everyone repeats it verbatim, sticking it to the man!

Reminds when one of the Phillies got sick of answering the same stupid questions and wrote out 50 or so sports cliches ("I'm just happy to be here." , "We need to give 110 percent.", etc) and hung them in his locker. The reporter would ask him a question and he'd look at the chart and say "Number 42" or whatever.
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This isn't Russia..........Is this Russia? This isn't Russia.People have the right to remain silent in this country. It what is called an inalienable right. That means can't be seperated from the citizen. The NFL is becoming a little too big for their britches IMO by trying to circumvent the Constitution on the basis that they "own" the players.Players are not property of the NFL. They are not "The Product". They are only employees. And no, you aren't required to speak to the media in any other profession, so why the NFL? :own3d: to the NFL.

Yet another example of someone not understanding the Constitution. The NFL is not revoking anyone's rights. If a player chooses not to speak to the press, it's not like the NFL is going to shoot them.I have the right to free press, but you can bet your *** that if I send an e-mail to my entire company declaring what a ****hole it is that I'll be sans job by Monday.
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This isn't Russia..........Is this Russia? This isn't Russia.People have the right to remain silent in this country. It what is called an inalienable right. That means can't be seperated from the citizen. The NFL is becoming a little too big for their britches IMO by trying to circumvent the Constitution on the basis that they "own" the players.Players are not property of the NFL. They are not "The Product". They are only employees. And no, you aren't required to speak to the media in any other profession, so why the NFL? :own3d: to the NFL.

Dude. This isn't an investigation, its a way for the fans to see their players talk. Is it really that hard on them? Besides, if your employer asked you to give an interview or have a friendly chat with the media, would you say "THIS ISN'T RUSSIA!!!" I don't think so.
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Sterling Sharpe spoke to the media once and they were so shocked they didn't ask many questions.

If the player calls the media to their driveway once a week does that count?

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I just think that it means the team has to make them available. THe team cannot say certain players are not permitted to speak to the media.

Whether the players talk or answer questions is up to them.

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Players are not property of the NFL. They are not "The Product". They are only employees. And no, you aren't required to speak to the media in any other profession, so why the NFL?

The players are free to find another profession at any time they wish. Companies can require their workers to do certain tasks. This is one of them.
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Players are not property of the NFL. They are not "The Product". They are only employees. And no, you aren't required to speak to the media in any other profession, so why the NFL?

The players are free to find another profession at any time they wish. Companies can require their workers to do certain tasks. This is one of them.
I don't necessarily agree with this. They were hired to play football. That's like me being hired to do computer programming, and then tell me that one day each week I need to clean the toilets.Sure they can find another profession. Sure they can be fired. Or, sure they can sit there and answer "No comment" for a full hour each week.
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Players are not property of the NFL. They are not "The Product". They are only employees. And no, you aren't required to speak to the media in any other profession, so why the NFL?

"In any other profession"? What other profession has 80,000 people showing up to watch you work each week, and millions more watching on television? That TV revenue, in particular, is by far the single most important contributor to player salaries, which are humongously above what workers in other professions make. Your indignation seems misplaced, though I agree that compulsory communication with the media probably won't be all that effective. Now I'll be right back. We're having our rookie draft in my fantasy lawyer league.
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Big deal. Write a script. Everyone repeats it verbatim, sticking it to the man!

I agree with this. I don't know how the league could enforce such a rule anyway.Reporter: So tell me, how do you feel about your upcoming opponent?Tom Nalen: Well you know....last week, I put fertalizer down on my lawn. I use Scotts. What kind do you use?
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Big deal. Write a script. Everyone repeats it verbatim, sticking it to the man!

I agree with this. I don't know how the league could enforce such a rule anyway.

Reporter: So tell me, how do you feel about your upcoming opponent?

Tom Nalen: Well you know....last week, I put fertalizer down on my lawn. I use Scotts. What kind do you use? ;)Hi Roger, your rule sucks.

Fixed.

[/Jim McMahon]

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Has no one seen the movie caddyshack!? :shrug:

;) I actually read that line of your post in Ty Webb's voice. The classics never die!"This is a hybrid. This is a cross, ah, of Bluegrass, Kentucky Bluegrass, Featherbed Bent, and Northern California Sensemilia. The amazing stuff about this is, that you can play 36 holes on it in the afternoon, take it home and just get stoned to the bejeezus-belt that night on this stuff. "
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Players are not property of the NFL. They are not "The Product". They are only employees. And no, you aren't required to speak to the media in any other profession, so why the NFL?

The players are free to find another profession at any time they wish. Companies can require their workers to do certain tasks. This is one of them.
I don't necessarily agree with this. They were hired to play football. That's like me being hired to do computer programming, and then tell me that one day each week I need to clean the toilets.
And the indignation is like a computer programmer being upset because the boss wants him to be nice to the customers. Now, being nice to the customers doesn't affect your job as a computer programmer, but it's good business.having a code of conduct, for example, doesn't affect on the field play, but it's a good idea.The media is the liason between the players and the fans. I don't care personally if the players talk to the media or not, but from the standpoint of the NFL, it makes good business sense. This is about what's best for the league, the greater good. Access to the players, and putting a personality to these guys, is a good thing.
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I think this is bs. I an not a Broncos fan and not sure whether this is aimed at them or not, but players should have the right not to talk as well as talk if they so choose. As long it is a choice by the player, they should be allowed to do what they choose.

I disagree. The NFL should have the right to tell their own employees what to do.
:confused:
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Both teams played hard.

Both teams played hard.

Both teams played hard......

It's a stupid rule. Why force people who don't want to talk to do so? You end up with embarrassing situations, and eventually fines and discord because guess what - those guys you're forcing to talk when they don't want to are probably going to say things you don't want them to say. Then again there's no such thing as bad press right?

Also LOL at the people spouting off about how the NFL can tell these guys to do whatever they want because they pull down a paycheck. Hillarious.

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This isn't Russia..........Is this Russia? This isn't Russia.People have the right to remain silent in this country. It what is called an inalienable right. That means can't be seperated from the citizen. The NFL is becoming a little too big for their britches IMO by trying to circumvent the Constitution on the basis that they "own" the players.Players are not property of the NFL. They are not "The Product". They are only employees. And no, you aren't required to speak to the media in any other profession, so why the NFL? :thanks: to the NFL.

What a horrible argument!The right to remain silent is as pertains to self-incrimination. As contracted employees, the NFL has every right to ask (REQUIRE) that their employees make themselves available to media interviews on a regular basis. Not only do they have the right, but since the NFL is in essence a business of entertainment, it makes more then a little bit of sense!
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This is going to blow up in the NFL's face. Do they not realize that they have more than their fair share of shady people playing the game? Do you really want those guys out talking to the media on a weekly basis? Would you want a Chris Henry talking to the media on a weekly basis? No. Because you know what he's up to off the field and you do not want attention drawn to that, but this will invariably do just that.

And, you know what the press is going to make the loudest noise about, not how good a game some guy had, but how stupid some guys comments were about something non-game related. It will simply increase the amount of distractions to the game itself.

Imagine if Pac-Man was giving weekly interviews. Questions about what he's up to off the field will come up and he's probably stupid enough to answer them truthfully, which would not be good.

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Players are not property of the NFL. They are not "The Product". They are only employees. And no, you aren't required to speak to the media in any other profession, so why the NFL?

The players are free to find another profession at any time they wish. Companies can require their workers to do certain tasks. This is one of them.
I don't necessarily agree with this. They were hired to play football. That's like me being hired to do computer programming, and then tell me that one day each week I need to clean the toilets.Sure they can find another profession. Sure they can be fired. Or, sure they can sit there and answer "No comment" for a full hour each week.
There is no law that stops them from doing this. They can probably just get someone to do it for a cheaper salary than you.
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This is going to blow up in the NFL's face. Do they not realize that they have more than their fair share of shady people playing the game? Do you really want those guys out talking to the media on a weekly basis? Would you want a Chris Henry talking to the media on a weekly basis? No. Because you know what he's up to off the field and you do not want attention drawn to that, but this will invariably do just that.And, you know what the press is going to make the loudest noise about, not how good a game some guy had, but how stupid some guys comments were about something non-game related. It will simply increase the amount of distractions to the game itself.Imagine if Pac-Man was giving weekly interviews. Questions about what he's up to off the field will come up and he's probably stupid enough to answer them truthfully, which would not be good.

The NFL can feign indignation all it wants in these circumstances, but these types bring in attention, and that is all that matters.
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If the Broncos OL didn't play dirty they wouldn't worry about speaking to the media.

Denver's OLine doesn't play any dirtier than any offensive lineman, defensive lineman, linebacker, safety, or Cornerback in the entire league.Denver's OLine uses a tactic that causes the other player to worry about getting hurt in the future. When a WR runs a crossing pattern, and the safety or LB levels him, what do you think that is? That's a tactic that causes the other player to worry about getting hurt in the future. And when a DE intentionally levels a QB (John Teerlink, the DLine coach for Indy, teaches his players to run THROUGH the QB and use his body to cushion their fall), that's a tactic that causes the other player to worry about getting hurt in the future. And what about the fact that every coach in the entire NFL teaches his defensive players that the first thing they should do on an INT return is look for the QB and level him, because it's essentially a free hit? That's not even a tactic to cause the other player to WORRY about getting injured (because INTs are not a reliable event), that's flat-out a tactic designed to injure the other player. Is every defensive player in the entire NFL dirty, too?I'm not even going to argue that every OLine in the entire NFL cut blocks. Every single one. Not as frequently as the Broncos, but apparently it's okay if you do it only 20% of the time instead of 60% of the time, right? I mean, how frequently are you allowed to do it before it becomes a dirty tactic? I'm also not even going to bring up the point that Denver's offensive line actually winds up injuring a lower percentage of opposing DLinemen than the league average.In order to be a dirty player, in my mind, you have to actually TRY TO INJURE the other player- not try to make them worry about it, but actually go out of your way to cause an injury. In that respect, the last (and only) dirty OL to play under Shanahan was Dan Neil, and he's already left town.If you disagree, JohnnyU, tell me what percentage of the time it is acceptable to cut block? I mean, obviously you don't think cut blocking is wrong, or else you'd realize your beloved Colts OLine is as dirty as the hated Broncos. Is it wrong if you do it more than 5% of the time? 10%? 20%? How many times are you allowed to block a man low before it becomes dirty? Inquiring minds want to know.If you want to complain about dirty units, why not talk about the Colts D-Line, for my money the dirtiest unit in the league. Or is it only dirty if it doesn't happen on your beloved team?
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If I was a player who didn't want to speak to the media I'd just respond to every question by saying how much I love tacos.

"So the Eagles have been playing lights out as of late. How are you planning for their passing attack and more specifically Reggie Brown?"

"I love tacos."

"Excuse me?"

"I love tacos."

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If I was a player who didn't want to speak to the media I'd just respond to every question by saying how much I love tacos."So the Eagles have been playing lights out as of late. How are you planning for their passing attack and more specifically Reggie Brown?""I love tacos.""Excuse me?""I love tacos."

Ninjas, Chuck Norris and hippos are also excellent subject matter here.
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If the Broncos OL didn't play dirty they wouldn't worry about speaking to the media.

Denver's OLine doesn't play any dirtier than any offensive lineman, defensive lineman, linebacker, safety, or Cornerback in the entire league.Denver's OLine uses a tactic that causes the other player to worry about getting hurt in the future. When a WR runs a crossing pattern, and the safety or LB levels him, what do you think that is? That's a tactic that causes the other player to worry about getting hurt in the future. And when a DE intentionally levels a QB (John Teerlink, the DLine coach for Indy, teaches his players to run THROUGH the QB and use his body to cushion their fall), that's a tactic that causes the other player to worry about getting hurt in the future. And what about the fact that every coach in the entire NFL teaches his defensive players that the first thing they should do on an INT return is look for the QB and level him, because it's essentially a free hit? That's not even a tactic to cause the other player to WORRY about getting injured (because INTs are not a reliable event), that's flat-out a tactic designed to injure the other player. Is every defensive player in the entire NFL dirty, too?I'm not even going to argue that every OLine in the entire NFL cut blocks. Every single one. Not as frequently as the Broncos, but apparently it's okay if you do it only 20% of the time instead of 60% of the time, right? I mean, how frequently are you allowed to do it before it becomes a dirty tactic? I'm also not even going to bring up the point that Denver's offensive line actually winds up injuring a lower percentage of opposing DLinemen than the league average.In order to be a dirty player, in my mind, you have to actually TRY TO INJURE the other player- not try to make them worry about it, but actually go out of your way to cause an injury. In that respect, the last (and only) dirty OL to play under Shanahan was Dan Neil, and he's already left town.If you disagree, JohnnyU, tell me what percentage of the time it is acceptable to cut block? I mean, obviously you don't think cut blocking is wrong, or else you'd realize your beloved Colts OLine is as dirty as the hated Broncos. Is it wrong if you do it more than 5% of the time? 10%? 20%? How many times are you allowed to block a man low before it becomes dirty? Inquiring minds want to know.If you want to complain about dirty units, why not talk about the Colts D-Line, for my money the dirtiest unit in the league. Or is it only dirty if it doesn't happen on your beloved team?
:X The BS that people throw on Denver's line when everybody else does it is incredible. Remember when Cowher made a comment about it, so next week Shanny showed a video for about 30 minutes with nothing but Steelers o-lineman doing the same damn thing. That shut his ### up.
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